18 Burst results for "Sally Jenkins"

"sally jenkins" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

05:27 min | 4 months ago

"sally jenkins" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"An Orioles batting practice one day and cal ripken comes is running the basis and he comes around and I'm kinda standing. You know there with a with a pat and and I chatted with him a little bit during batting practice in he he's he's running the laps around the basis and he comes running by any just says to me learning anything. You know and I thought what at your you know I mean I know he's he's one of the great. Nice guys in the game but. That was like kind of just a typical of thing that that tells you what What athletes thought of Women's sports but that's what I'm talking about those. This is the stuff that I don't think can be underestimated I don't mean to accentuate the negative I'm just telling you that it. It had to be tougher than you're letting on because CAL ripken is viewed as a pillar of grace at the time cal ripken was viewed as a superhero athlete and that is sort of the attitude you're running in two on the high end of baseball star who represents everything good about. Sports, masculinity? You know the fact of the matter is that he was courteous and helpful. That's the most important thing right? I got what I needed out of him that day he didn't refuse to talk to me like some people did but you know there were some guys who wouldn't talk to anybody Eddie Murray wouldn't talk to any member of the press much less me. You know So again, what mattered was you got what you needed. To get to work I mean that's all I was really focused on and the more you stayed on that track and focused on that the better you did to be honest look you know. It's it's a you knew you were going into you're going to be a woman in a man's business, but I was a woman in a man's household I grew up with two brothers and a dad who was a sports writer. So I mean it it just didn't feel that bad to be honest and probably some of the little asides and insults I should have been more offended by You know maybe I should have taken more exception to cal ripken saying that but I was young and and I did have a lot to to learn you know also so just shrugged it off you know and went about my business. How did it come to be that you were doing a books with Lance Armstong? We got put together by agents and lawyers you know it was a it was a one of the it was a business deal really that said I really came to like him I I. Enjoy The hell out of Lance I still do and I've never judged as harshly as other people. Do you know my problem with Lance Armstrong is not everybody else's problem my only problem with them I wish he'd come to me. when I asked him if he had something, he needed to tell the world about doping and he said no and had he. had. He done what I wished. He done, which was to say, okay, I, have an issue and I need to try to explain to people why I made the decisions I made I think he would have had a much different experience. You know I, think I could have helped him and I think people would view them as Andy Pettitte instead of the worst cheap on the face of the earth. That's interesting. So hold on a second..

cal ripken Lance Armstong Lance Armstrong Andy Pettitte Orioles Eddie Murray baseball writer
"sally jenkins" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

02:23 min | 5 months ago

"sally jenkins" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Look like uselessly. Defense, though we do how weird that would be on a day like today, we only planned for it to be one segment. It's not our fault magazine just popped up in my screen and I got very exciting to keep them in the waiting. Room. He put his arms. He folded his forearms in front of him both of them were cinderblocks and soon as he right? Okay. Because he remains every bit as enormous as he was when he was throwing again full kegs of beer over wall forty feet high. He joined US surprise me. Chat and the next thing you know I'm looking at the top of Action Bronson's vehicle because he can't get the technology right? So again, Magnus Magnusson is going to join us again tomorrow and we'll ask him whether he's an Iceland. Aware he is. Because I those world's strongest man competitions to me were transporting in the same way that they were to. Action Bronson rivals like Oh my God I don't know what it's like to be strong. That's amazing to see these people who are so strong and why do they feel the need? To carry a seven ton rock. From over here to that bus, this world, I'm checking vague they started lifting like items. He would find around a national park as opposed to actual weights that way the same just a lot more impressive when you lift a car than you lift the weight of the car. I love that accent Brian's and apparently set up his own world's strongest man course in his yard or wherever that just to his scale with weights he can lift. Right. So it's not like a boulder like these guys these guys come up and hug a boulder and then carry it for for six blocks. It's not quite the same. Honestly I WANNA listen back to that south each session with him because he got down into it how much he obsessed over this he revealed steroid use in that south each session because he idolized magnus it's so weird that we were the play met. And and poorly though not. So wait really this is the place that they would meet poorly. I'm can you explain to me? I would like with the last twenty seconds of this show a deep dive introspection on why you felt the need to go mvp M, and then just sort of liberty. Why Magnus probably nickname I figure short it up for everyone mvm sounded like a you know it place the be. Finish it off with beauty..

Magnus Magnusson Bronson Brian US mvp
Zion Williamson's injury in Duke vs. North Carolina raises questions about amateurism, his future and more

Channel 33

03:59 min | 2 years ago

Zion Williamson's injury in Duke vs. North Carolina raises questions about amateurism, his future and more

"Zion. Williamson mentioned a minute ago future. Number one pick in the NBA draft hurts us nearly three seconds away. Much-hyped game between Duke and North Carolina. Here's my take on this. I am I am with the anti amateurism brigade, but I sort of feel we've reached a stalemate on this in the sense that nothing is changing in the meat in the near term. And so that, you know, you have something like this come along he hurts himself. It's obviously terrible. The news is on the front page in the New York Times. I got a press release from the Washington Post that Sally Jenkins had written a column about this is this is in the press release zone. This is note that the amateurism system. Is no longer gonna work, and I just feel like I don't feel anybody's doing anything wrong. But I feel it's one of those weird journalistic situations where morally, you know, a moat. Let's call it. A vast majority of sports writers have have pointed out a moral wrong that is taking place, but no action is happening to write the moral wrong. So we are all looking for examples to then reposed, essentially or rewrite the columns we've now been writing for a couple years. Yeah. I think that's right. I mean, I think that it's it's worth noticing that there has been some evolution on the issue. Right. I mean, we're not that far away from. You know, sports writers in sports casters being just totally caught off guard, and you know, engaging in various forms of pro clutching when when football players assigned to sit out bowl games, you know, just one fully optional game in the nine after this happened. I the morning after this happens. Ari I popped on ESPN in the morning expecting to see wall to wall, you know, second micro-second breakdowns of the shoes exploding office zion's feet. And and instead just saw the every single show was talking. I mean, the argument shows I I take in as well. But as well as the more laid back get up environs or just consumed with discussing whether or not Zion should ever play for Duke again. Which was I thought both really interesting like I said in terms of the sort of Lucien of that portion of the argument, but also a little bit just bewildering because like you know to react to a football player. Affirmatively deciding to sit out a game is one thing. But to sort of speculate completely baselessly about whether or not a player showed her will preemptively in his college career halfway through. Just seems like I don't know. Is it seemed like I mean like like so much else. Just sort of like arguing for sport. You know? I mean, I don't I don't really know. I don't and I don't think that. I mean, I think like going to what you said about the stalemate. I'm not sure there was much disagreement. I think that a lot of people, you know, a lot of people would talk in one direction really strongly, and then come back and just be you know, it's like he should do as best as families. You do the best. You know, he's he's gotta style, you know. And then. Between sports writers in the NCAA. I think yeah. Exactly not between, you know. Mass killer minutes, Steven A and to talk about you know, whether or not things are changing. I mean, be the NBA did use this opportunity. It seems you know, deliberately to kind to try it out there their statement that they're going to try to eliminate the the age limit, you know, in the next collective bargaining agreement ripe. So and that is that is interesting, and that is a kind of progress it something it is it is. And I think I mean, it's you know, I think that it's Zion. Specifically is an interesting case. But then that the broader conversation immediately goes to, you know, the broader conversation of paying players, which you know, is just the most kind of depressing hopeless, or, you know, online argument that we see these days not just online. Yeah. I mean, I think you're right. I I don't know that anybody's convincing anyone of anything especially because I mean, I don't I don't mean.

Zion Duke NBA Football Zion. Williamson North Carolina Espn New York Times Sally Jenkins Washington Post Ncaa Lucien Steven A Three Seconds
"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Anytime someone lifts the lid on the Ferrari, you know, you really wanna stare down into the engine and say, okay, well, how did that work? You know what really drove, you know, Serena Williams. I, I've Serena did a autobiography back in two thousand nine, but she was just becoming a great player in two thousand nine. And now she's an important player and as that's a big difference in, so I would be really interested in talking to her over the next couple of years as she winds down. Do you think. Every great player. It's an interesting distinction. Do think every great player longs to be an important player? Yes, absolutely. So some of them are more suited for than others. Chris Evert was a great player, became an important player in a very, very subtle way through the sheer unbroken grace of her conduct and her sort of ethic on the court became translated into a larger ethic. I think people found her and incredibly ethical champion and me. She gave back point once in a grand slam final when the chair per missed the call, she didn't want it. She gave it back to the opponent. She said, no, the ball was out that sort of thing. Whereas Billie Jean King and Martina Navratilova were important politically important. You know, Chris Evert wasn't political, but she was important in other ways. So they, you know, they all long for importance. They long to believe that what they're doing matters and is meaningful for something more than than ego. Everyone else. Yes. And it is important just sometimes not in the ways that they think my met note. I can say, you have already achieved importance. You're. Good greatness, but importance. The show. Thank you. So as I said, at the top of the show today's a very special day for me, it's a special anniversary. It's the one year to the day anniversary of my starting this podcast. And so you know, after I got fired as being with attorney wasn't sure what I would do. Next, I want to write this book and I wanted to continue having a voice on issues that I care about communicate with the public. Try my hand at something completely new in my brother gave me the opportunity to do it through his company, and we gave it a shot and a year ago to the day, I walked into an office with Leon Panetta, former secretary of defense and CIA director to see if we can have a conversation that anybody would want to listen to. And a year later, I can say, thank you to all of you for tuning in for staying tuned for paying attention. It's been an amazing twelve months. The podcast to me is not about educating other folks alone and explaining what. Going on in the world. It's also for me to understand and learn and grow and educate myself. The two things about this that have been the most gratifying have been won the opportunity to meet and talk to at some length. The most thoughtful interesting, caring intelligent people that you can find in basically any field having come on the show, the talk about what's going on in America because I think there's been no time as critical as now to try to make sense of what's going on. And the best moments that I've had on the podcast have been when I have learned along with you in. There are a lot of times when I'm asking against a question that I haven't thought of an advance. I just listened to what they're saying, and hopefully I'm asking the question that popped into your head when someone is talking about Muller or someone is talking about criminal Justice or someone is talking about how we deal with foreign policy or Russian intervention in the election..

Chris Evert Martina Navratilova Serena Williams Billie Jean King Leon Panetta America Muller attorney CIA secretary director twelve months one year
"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Basketball players. If they take a free para sneakers or a meal there called criminals. Why is that. In the law. We spend a lot of time revising laws, understanding that our standards change from Aera. In some ways, I am concerned with the degree to which we make athletes live in other epochs while we own Vaughn. So in other words, an NC double a player. The terms of his scholarship are exactly the same as they were in nineteen sixty. Meanwhile NCWA revenue TV revenue alone has gone from five hundred fifty million dollars a year to a billion. It's almost becoming an equal Justice under the law situation in the NC double a. because we really creating a separate class of citizens last thing because your your career spans all sorts of amazing interviews, and I hope in presume that you will eventually get capital to talk to you. But you were, I believe the last person less journalists to interview to Paterno who was the head coach, head football coach at Penn State? And you know, opinions vary. About him and what he did or did not know my opinions vary about him, but I don't want, you know, we don't have time to go through that horrible series of events. Can abusive took place at Penn State? The question is though, how did it feel to interview him when he was basically on his last breath, he was dying of cancer. He was not well. And just describe what that was like given the complexity of that person? Well, it was it was profoundly difficult and rending because you know, he was surrounded by his family. He was also flanked by lawyers. It was in some ways awkward. Why do you think you agreed to do it? Because I think he was fighting for his legacy, his posthumous legacy, and I think he felt that he had a chance with me to get some nuances and subtleties across which I think we're legitimate explanations of his behavior. You know, I, I think he had some mixed motives. You know, I think I think it was justifying him some things to himself too. I mean, it was part of his was calculated strategy in part of it, I think was he was talking to himself as much as to me. Do you worry about that you have to be worried about people who are trying to burnish their legacy and engage in? Sure. Self aggrandizing publicity. I tried to do that and you did the whole start shirt. So I clearly sucked at that. You know, my dad is a sports writer, so I grew up in the knee and he's he's a great sports writer and of a certain type. And he spent a lot of time a bursting, the pretensions of a lot of the people that he covered. He's an my Dan Jenkins was known as a really has always been known as a very truthful. Sports writer who quoted athletes talking the way. They really talk saying the things they really say and not writing children's literature, which is what a lot of sports writing can devolve into. If you're not really careful, you know fables, right? And I like I like talk like, you know what? You know what? I really love talking to athletes most is when they're older and right on the cusp of retirement because they want to be understood athletes who've spent years in in basic silence holding the media at bay. They hit like thirty eight thirty nine forty years old, and they start wanting to kind of talk to somebody and they want someone to understand the sacrifice or the inner driver that pushed him to do these extrordinary things. That's when they're at their most interesting of the easiest Mark in the world for for someone really a good interviewer is a great legendary athlete, turning forty. Final question then who is the athlete, who is still playing today in any sport that you would like to interview in there on the cusp of retirement, what's fun is to find someone who hasn't been fully cracked open yet someone who's been very reserved for a long, long time and then to try to get them to tell you a little bit about what they do would Tiger Woods be interesting in the way you've described to interview if he was going to be forthcoming on the cusp of tyrant. Sure..

Dan Jenkins Basketball NC Tiger Woods head football coach Vaughn Paterno thirty eight thirty nine forty five hundred fifty million dol
"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Again, I don't think you can underestimate the degree to which politicians wanted the NFL commits all sorts of transgressions and and they get let off the hook and a lot of ways by law enforcement by regulatory agencies by city governments by the federal government. It's it's very interesting. We support that league in ways that we don't support any other American business. And so I do think it's going to stick around. But as I say, it's a workplace hazard, it's one hundred percent injury rate in that league. So you had a professional relationship with another legendary athlete named Lance Armstrong. My friend, Lance homes to your friend, Lance Armstrong wrote two books with him. He didn't read any of the words while you're at the mall. I wouldn't say that. All right. You work the good ones that he say that football has become the liturgy of empire. I don't think that was not say, okay, I don't want to relitigate his doping and everything else. But now you you once wrote after you came to understand and believe that he'd engage in this conduct and adoped to use the parlance, which is a bad term by the way it is. I'm gonna use that term for next. I don't wanna get into a debate about what dirty. I, but he did a thing that got him in trouble. And then you wrote a piece saying, you know, you're trying to find your anger toward Lance Armstrong and he can't find it. I've never found my indignation against Barry Bonds or Marian Jones, or I mean, I just don't have it. I mean, if I'm a moral, then I'm immoral on that subject, but I don't have it. I've never had it long before I met Lance. I didn't have it against Mary Joe, but is it because of the nature of that transgression or because you know, you don't put them on a pedestal, and you look at them for what they have done, either in fighting against cancer or an achieving something in sports that known as a retrieved before. And so if they have this other thing that they were doing. That doesn't bother me. So what doesn't bother me about it is that I feel like we have as a society done a profoundly bad job of working through the philosophy of medicine, doping performance enhancement. We have again as a language person, we've done an incredibly poor job of defining what performance enhancement is why it's wrong. There was a study in two thousand sixteen from some Dutch scientists who gave EPO to some cyclists riding up mount von to which is a stage in the tour de France. They took a bunch of highly trained cyclists and they give half of them EPO and they gave half of them a placebo. And the riders on the EP, oh road actually slower. We actually don't know there's very scientists shoddy EPO APO is throw Poyton which is a medicine that they give cancer patients to help build their red blood cells back athletes have used it to build a red blood cells in competition. So we, first of all, we've done a really poor. Job of defining these substances. And the easiest thing for everyone to do is demonize will blame ask you this because I come from new law and order background in their rules, and with respect to some things you can say, well, the rules are not clear, and there is no intention -ality, but are you saying maybe not saying this there was back to all the people you mentioned like Barry Bonds, Lance Armstrong, Marion Jones, with respect to any of them. Did they know there was a rule sure ended. They knowingly violates so so. So why can't we be upset with them for that? We can. Okay, but you're not. I mean, I think we can be upset with them upset with them to the level of making them pariahs of society. Millions of dollars and singing the federal government on them, the quality of proportionality. What I'm saying is that I don't have the heart to judge an athlete who has won skill in one skill only is an incredibly ephemeral creature and is using something to recover from an injury or to get back on the bike to ride up another ALP on another day in a three week, bike race through terrain, that car transmissions have a hard time getting up. It's just never made sense to me personally to sort of judge those people as you know, the worst members of our society. I, it just doesn't is part of the problem that we put these people on pedestals and so we can incredibly disappointed with Allison sometimes too. And we've you them as heroes..

Lance Armstrong Barry Bonds NFL cancer Mary Joe Allison football Marian Jones Marion Jones one hundred percent three week
"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"It's not about the anthem and you're like, well, then why are you doing it during the anthem? I mean you the problem here is but he's not protesting the flag people get very upset about when they hear the description of this as protesting the flag. How do you resolve that linguistic issue to me, the player's movement again, which I applaud and in which I defend, but as a as a language person, I think that they, they muddled the message. Initially, I knew what Tommie Smith and John Carlos wanted from the nineteen sixty eight Olympics. I knew what Mohammed Ali one. And when you refer them who won medals raise black gloved fists on the metal gave up. There actually ended up surrendering their medals. They had a very clear written agenda a set of social Justice issues that they had very clearly stated had very clearly thought out. Mohammad-Ali again, had a very clear set of beliefs in an agenda, Billie. Jean King always knew exactly what she was fighting for. I feel like Colin Kaepernick I personally feel like he has lacked the sort of diamond cutters clarity that some of those other activists had in terms of reaching people come up. You fixed sure. The too late. I think it could be fixed. The message can be fixed. But you know, when's the last time you heard calling cabernet, talk Yellowstone. I mean, I, it's been what a couple years he might sound like, Jared, Kushner. I have no idea. That's the thing I haven't heard calling Kabir Nick. I really had league Nike told him not to talk. That's interesting point. I, I really don't know because no one can reach. I mean, it's not a criticism. It's more expressing a certain curiosity about his method. There's a murkiness here. That is interesting to me. So how does a house this diffused or resolved, or is it going to be continuing issue so long as some people think there's something that's wrong in society and were protesting. We're going to have these two camps that are very polarized into the future. Well, so Colin Kaepernick has collusion case against the NFL, so we'll we'll have a legal resolution to whether or not he was in fact blacklisted or blackballed from the league that will be in a critical outcome in and turning point. You know, at some point, I do think that capper Nick is going to have to be something more than a cipher that people are projecting onto. He lacks the hard edges of that other great athlete activists have had to me. Okay. Okay, good. The do you think that football will exist in its current form given documented cases of concussions and other deterioration of people physically after playing the game for awhile? Do you think that football will exist in anything like its current form and fifty years? I do because I think the American public has decided in eight hundred different ways that it wants it, whether it's giving huge tax breaks to billionaire owners and devoting huge amounts of city budgets to their stadiums through are not going to get rid of you. You're out at once. I actually think what's going to happen is they're going to have to do because I do think that injury and particularly the concussion and neurological issue in football is the black lung. They have a black lung problem. And so I think what's going to happen is what happened to the coal industry in this country where they're going to have to establish a fund a, a large ongoing fund and the price of doing business as an NFL owner is going to be to contribute to the lifelong medical care of your employees, but it will be football will continue because you put it. I could just quote. You back to yourself over and over again. You think he wants wrote football has become the liturgy of empire? Yes, that sounds very grand. Well, it's true. I don't think those are my words. I think I was quoting. Oh yes, you're quoting someone, it sounds like you. It's a great phrase, I, I mean, I've quoted it because I believe it. You know, I look football is about taking. It's about moving other bodies out of the way to take territory right. It's very American to is boxing boxing exist. I mean, boxing doesn't exist in some. It's boxing's already been. It exists, but on a much smaller scale than it did when I was a kid, the NFL has a staying power..

football Colin Kaepernick Kabir Nick NFL boxing Tommie Smith Mohammed Ali Jean King Nike Olympics cabernet John Carlos Billie Jared Kushner fifty years
"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"I think for one of the super bowl's basically sent a memo that said, you know, I want everybody standing on the sidelines with their helmet under their arm standing at attention that that's fairly brief. As soon as every game becomes televised. They didn't want the audience watching the national anthem before NFL games. They wanted them watching commercials. I mean, the anthem wasn't even televised particularly it's only when the NFL mix a deal with the Pentagon to start using the NFL as a marketing vehicle for the US military that you start getting this, the anthem izing of the NFL do we do too much of that at big. Games too. I asked rocky Bleier. Rocky Bleier was a great Super Bowl champion for the Pittsburgh Steelers who had actually used the one of the few NFL players who did not get out of the draft, the Vietnam draft. He ended up going to Vietnam as an infantryman got shot and blown up had shrapnel in in his legs, almost income back in play football, worked his way back in wins a couple of Super Bowls with the Pittsburgh Steelers, and I asked him not too long ago. I was doing a interview with him and I said, you know, why do you think people feel so strongly about this whole anthem thing in stadiums anyway, and he said, I don't know guilt, right? If you talk to servicemen if you talk to football players who've served those guys like a rocky Bleier is a little uncomfortable with the fact that if you look in any football stadium on Sunday, maybe one percent of the people in that stadium have any relation to the armed services. Maybe. I mean, that's what it is in this country today. Right? The people who serve our comprise about the come from about one percent of our population as opposed to Vietnam when during the draft. I mean significantly hired American families had personal relationships to servicemen during the Vietnam era, and we don't anymore. And that's a fact. And so that's a weird neurosis to me. You know, what is this thing that we're doing as an audience that we are so captivated by this issue with the flag and service? If you look at NFL players, I've studied the NFL player population for their relationship. The league is loaded with guys whose parents served who have brothers or sisters serving some of them married women who've served. I mean, they actually probably have a stronger relationship to the military personally, average person certainly than you were made right. You know, you use this other phrase to describe what's going on and the pressure to behave in a certain way, not. Behave in a certain way as enforced patriotism. Is that what you think it is? Involuntary. Patriotism is not patriotism. It's North Korea, you know, it's simple, right? Involuntary. Patriotism is contradiction in terms. And do you think it some heightened because the president gets involved? Certainly, of course, you look presidents have gotten involved with football since teddy Roosevelt shore. You know, Woodrow Wilson Woodrow Wilson's wife at one point said it's a good thing that you know Princeton won the football game because I don't think Woodrow could've taken losing a football game and an election. Right, right. Interesting to me how much of this, but just beneath the service just beneath the surface is about economics. Yes, in about profit. And now we have the issue of Nike. So this whole time, people thought Colin Kaepernick, you know, sacrificing line, I think he has in there was a controversy because Nike has his new ad campaign, and a lot of people begin burning Nike shoes on saying, we're going to boycott and then it turns out sales. Like thirty one percents. Yeah. So this is about business or is this about patriotism? Well, they're, they're intertwined when it comes to the American way. Yeah, but you know, it's funny because you know, as I've always, I've always thought calling Kabir next message was incredibly muddled. You know, I applaud him for social activism. I applaud him for giving a lot of money to 'cause he believes in, you know, part of this to me stemmed from an imprecision of language. You know, the NFL players who are still wanting to kneel on the sidelines. They get infuriated when they say it's not about patriotism..

NFL rocky Bleier football Vietnam Woodrow Wilson Woodrow Wilson Pittsburgh Steelers Kabir Nike president Colin Kaepernick US Pentagon North Korea teddy Roosevelt Princeton one percent
"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"And you have said that in part, it's because people view that as a denial of American exceptionalism of American exceptionalism. What does that mean? Well, it's interesting because the NFL on Sundays has become a form of civil religion. You can find a whole lot more people in this country at football games on Sunday. Then in church and the NFL has quite actively sought to wrap themselves in the flag. And also there's a certain amount of wrapping themselves in a religious, like fervor and based on a defense to religion, or is that about money. Well, it's both. I mean, it's it's not pure artifice, but they did set out to wrap themselves in the flag during the nineteen sixties. Pete Rozelle even said, you know, they, they basically were going to turn themselves into, you know, this sort of patriotic institution in the middle of the Vietnam war. What was really pretty craven about the whole thing was that NFL owners were protecting their players in their financial investments in their players by helping them stay out of the draft. They were funneling them into national guard units, local national guard units. If you went to Green Bay Wisconsin, and you're a young man trying to get into your national guard unit as opposed to getting shipped out to Vietnam. You couldn't get in because it was full of Green Bay Packers. Same thing in Dallas. Okay. The Dallas Cowboys filled up all the national guard unit. So in fact, that came a bit of a scandal. Life magazine did an expose on it is the NFL has had this coming for quite a long time. Why? Why the NFL as opposed to nearly. Baseball or the NBA was it just was it just a particular decision they made by any sport. They've been more aggressive in marketing themselves. That way, you know, football is a war without death game look early or not always without debt, in fact, particularly in the Victorian era. So I mean, I've written entire book about this subject called the real all Americans. The birth of American football follows closely on the closing of the frontier and the end of the the Indian wars. I mean, basically college football is essentially founded about six months after little Bighorn. The frontier is closed. The transcontinental railroad is finished, and there's really nothing else left to conquer. The wilderness has conquered right, and there's this fear in Victorian America that American men are becoming feminized. And over civilized there was a fear and we had it today by the way, governs a lot of how we look philosophically at sports. There is this neurosis American neurosis this fear that the human body is. Being outstripped by our technology. And when that happens, we get a little funny about our sports in this country. So this controversy about the kneeling during the anthem with interesting about that in part is I feel like a lot of people assume that it's always been that whether the players come on the field during the anthem players only started coming up on the field during the national anthem in two thousand nine thousand nine ten years ago. So there was a moment in the sixties where Pete Rozelle..

NFL Pete Rozelle football Dallas Cowboys Green Bay Packers Green Bay Wisconsin Vietnam Dallas Life magazine Victorian America Baseball NBA two thousand nine thousand nin six months
"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Once you describe the scene? Well, essentially, you've got both players destroy. Brought an interiors. The the crowd is live loser. The loser, and the winner are both crying. The crowd is booing the boozer raining down on the court is waiting for your chance to speak because first Serena speaks and and I only has her her visor right? Which he pushes down and she's wiping tears away. Even though she has just done the most extraordinary thing of her entire life of her entire career, maybe the most extraordinary thing she will ever do and the moments ruined for her. The the moment is ruined for because of the intensity, the intensity of the anger and the emotion in the arena from the crowd, you know, no one wanted to see it in that way. Look, that moment is so complex in so loaded because Osaka is sick because she didn't want to win a match that way. She didn't want anything given to her. She wanted to beat Serena Williams in the US Open final Serena. Williams is sick. It what's been taken away from her. But I think also probably I presume fairly sick and that she's helped ruined this moment for this great new young player. The crowd is. For both players and furious at the chair umpire for having created the situation in the first place we tennis is a fairly undemonstrative is a very hushed sport. So that level of noise and emotion was was pretty extraordinary. But then what happens Lund Serena Williams puts her arm around Niamey Asaka leans over and says, I'm very proud of you. They're not doing you. And then she also tells the crowd, no more booing. This is her moment. You know, let's make this the best moment we can for her and no official, and no announcer was going to get a grip on that crowd. Serena Williams at that moment is the only person who can do it, and she knows that. And I think took responsibility for herself in that moment and did exactly the right thing. My last question to you on this match. What was the angry reaction to your article? Do people who are upset with your view? What was because it really it hits a nerve. You know, I think the match it self hit a nerve people resp-. Sponde- in intensely emotional ways to sporting events, trigger events, sports events because people when you root for somebody part of what you're rooting for, you want to be right. Okay. You don't want to be wrong about them. So the stakes get a little high rooting for for sports figures or sports teams. There have been a million psychological studies that show that people take the successes and failures of their sports teams or sports figures as very personal successes and failures. It's about your judgment, right? But the second part of it is, you know, Serena Williams provokes real discussion. She has set out actively sought the platform to provoke discussion about gender and race, and it makes people uncomfortable. It makes them defensive and it makes them resentful sometimes. Is it appropriate for her to do that? Or is it individual person? It's up to each individual person. It's not inappropriate. You know, Billie Jean King chose to do it. Arthur Ashe chose to do it. LeBron James has made a whole different range of social activist choices than Michael Jordan. Did you know some. Elites doing some athletes don't and it's not income. You know, I asked Billie Jean King that question, once I said our athletes supposed to be activists, do they have a responsibility? And she said, no, it's choice. She said, I wanted it. I wanted to be that. But I, I would never impose that on an athlete who didn't feel comfortable with it. So that's a great segue to talk about football and kneeling during the anthem then con cabinet and you've written about this and a preliminary question which you address is, why does it make people so crazy? The issue of somebody protesting a particular way, and you have said with respect, I think to the to the con- capper Nick controversy and his decision to protest, not the anthem, not the flag, but police brutality and inequality in various sectors of of the country..

Lund Serena Williams Billie Jean King boozer Osaka tennis Arthur Ashe US LeBron James Niamey Asaka Sponde Nick Michael Jordan football
"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"In fact, the Charon per tried to penalize him Agassi called for the tournament supervisor of the tournament supervisor came out in overturned the chair umpire and basically let Agassi play on in the match. He was the biggest star in the men's game, but you know what everyone does. It is not an honorable defense certainly not and is a little bit of, you know what people refer to as what aboutism. Loathe and isn't this a little bit of that? No, here's why. Because if you look statistically at the number of times any player, male or female has been penalized an entire game. You mean that huge penalty that huge penalty. Serena Williams. Got yeah. Once in thirty five hundred matches one other time in thirty five hundred tennis matches. You can't find a tip people to have tried to analyse statistically whether women get penalized like this more than men. The fact is nobody gets penalized the way she did. Nobody. So you know what that suggests to me is there was a clear bias on the part of this chair umpire. It was an unprecedented penalty. Do you think the Trump should continue to be in the game? You know, I, I do. I don't think drove pretty hard. No. I'm saying I think he did committed a real disservice and I think he led his bias, get the best of him on the court. Now, what sort of bias it is it could have been purely personal. I happen to think it was. It was biased towards women behaving that way on a court because he's presided over other matches where he didn't penalize Ruffin a doll for a full game. And Rafa Nadal came after him. Verbally said, you'll never Ruffin adult told him at the French Open. You'll never sit in the chair and another one of my matches, which is almost verbatim. One of the things Serena Williams said to him in the US open final. So then the match and and it's chaos and everyone's upset when they come out for the ceremony..

Serena Williams Agassi Trump supervisor Ruffin Rafa Nadal French Open tennis
"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"What's your demeanor during this time? Because then we'll talk about this because it's interesting when standard angry between men and women. Argumentative strident would use the word emotional, certainly. But you also haven't used controlled controlled and that makes a difference. I mean, she was very careful for instance not to use foul language not to use threatening language. You know, she'd been in the situation before in two thousand nine when she was younger player with a lot less self command. And she had behaved really brutally in a brutally ugly fashion. And I think has worked pretty hard to get a grip on that sort of behaviour on the court. But again, technically he was within his rights to call it. I don't think he was within his right to call her what he calls her for it. He calls her for verbal abuse, which first of all is an incredibly vague term. Anyway, you know, it's in the rule, it's there is a rule against verbal abuse. It seems to me problems with these rules. Yeah, it's a timeout, an pretty archaic rulebook anyway, verbal abuse. I mean, I didn't hear anything abusive in what she was saying. I mean, I just didn't I to this. I don't want to be an objective standard of abuse, like if he felt a Bucur part of what you wrote is that the chair decided to make it about himself. Look, I've seen them yes to where a defense lawyer is making an argument. And for some reason, the judge thinks you know, many judges would not find it, offensive. Particular judges may be sensitive about it, finds it offensive and begins to rule against one side, which I think is unfair. But. It is within the discretion of that judge. So was incumbent on the judge. In this case, the chair up to control himself or knowing the stakes and being the professional athlete, maybe the best in the sport that we've ever seen up to her to control herself. I think nobody. Likes it when a judge of any sort in search themselves into a situation where things appear to be working themselves out no member of the audience and no competitor wants the final score to be determined by the guy in the striped shirt or the person in the blazer sitting in a chair, ten feet above the action on the court, and this court with a presidential election or a judge in a Paul manafort's trial k. people were a little uncomfortable with the way the Virginia judge kept inserting himself right. That's a great analogy running. So when you feel that someone is tilting the floor, particularly when a judge is tilting the floor that Sharon participated the court. Okay. So it's difficult now to know whether Naomi Osaka was going to beat Serena Williams in two straight sets and when the US open championship because this judge dropped a game and appoint on her side of the court. This is one of the great philosophical debates in sports. You know, do you call the foul in the final second of NCWA championship game or the NBA final? Do you call holding on the last play of the Super Bowl or interference? Do you let them play and potentially commit physical violations out there? Or if it's on the fence, in the case of a clear and serious violation in any sport or in in the real world outside of sports, you call it. What you're saying is I think there's more of a debate about whether or not in a in a close situa-. D. become a deciding factor, right? D- become the deciding factor. And so a lot of times audiences get very frustrated or sports writers, or you know, whomever, particularly competitors get very frustrated when referee chair umpire call something that could be called it at any stage of the game. I again, you go back to common violations that early in the game are not decisive factors, but in the final thirty seconds, obviously create an unequal situation. Jim Komi sending the letter. So, I mean, we're going to talk by the way all the parallels between Serena Williams sentencing and everything is going on, so so here's what here's what it looked like to me. So what happens when Carlos Ramos calls that third code conduct violation and slaps an entire game penalty on her? Basically six. The third strike on her, you know, says three strikes you're out basically game set match over. I'm taking the entire US open away from you..

US Serena Williams Jim Komi Paul manafort Bucur NBA Carlos Ramos Naomi Osaka Virginia Sharon thirty seconds ten feet
"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Do you agree with that? I do agree with that. And Billie Jean King said that very thing. It's part of the problem with the way the rule is written is that the player absorbs the penalty for something that the coach is doing that Serena Williams in the middle of a grand slam. Final has no control over the people in her box, right. Okay. So the first thing happens, yes or them. The second thing happens. What's that? So the second thing happens and he has to call this. She breaks her racket cut and dried no real discretion there. Although, you know, some again, Charon parts have an enormous amount of latitude. There's some chair empires who might have issued a warning rather than what they call a code conduct violation. So she breaks her racket. That's two strikes essentially what we're working up to his third strike and the significant to the third strike is the significance of the third strike is that it's a mandatory deduction of a full game. So when she breaks her rack. It's the second violation. He deduct a point because he's already called her for coaching. It's a second strike against her and therefore it deduct the point. And so now she's had a point taken from her in a critical game in a critical stage of the match. Now, Serena Williams has come back. She's a notorious, slow starter. She's come back from a set down in more grand slam finals than we could probably count on four hands. This is part of what she does. She feels herself competitively with a certain amount of competitive anger. And so now what he's done is he's walked up to the edge of a cliff. And it's the third call, arguably Serena, walked herself up a little bit. She coach did the thing. I don't condone her conduct across the board and I don't think anybody does, and I don't think she defends reconduct across the board. It's the third call that Carlos Ramos makes that is really where he had the most latitude and the most discretion. Any makes the strangest call of the match. And it happens to be the one call that in my mind, an empire earn official or a sentencing judge, or prosecutor really doesn't make this is what takes the entire match situation from a normal skirmish between athlete and chair, umpire or athlete and referee and tips it over into truly unprecedented ugliest situation I've ever seen in a grand slam tournament, and I've covered a number of which is what so Serena Williams does. What Serena Williams is arguing with him. There's no audible obscenity, which is a rule. There is no threat back in two thousand and nine. She threatens aligns woman and says, I should shove this ball down your throat. I wrote it in two thousand nine. I should have been suspended for that. So you think that merely calling because I think she called him a thief, right? She said you stole a point for slow point and I think Kalma thief. Yeah, you're if you split there was there was no profanity there's no profanity and there was no suggestion of having them swallow a piece of sports equipment. Exactly. She's arguing in a in a fairly controlled for at least from my point of view, watching at home with the rest of the TV audience. You where you could hear every word, the people in the arena couldn't hear actually what was going down on the court, but at home watching television, you actually could hear every word she was saying and what?.

Serena Williams Billie Jean King Carlos Ramos reconduct prosecutor official four hands
"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"And once again, maybe in the future I'll be interesting, but today you're the interesting one. Let's let's talk about that match. So it was the US open. It was the final and it was Serena Williams who's one many times in many different venues and she's playing the relatively unknown. Naomi Asaka. And before we get to happen in the match, I want to talk about the writing of this piece that you put together. What made you write that piece so immediately and so quickly? Were you hot about it? Interesting. I thought it was. It was unique and unprecedented in my personal experience to see a grand slam final end the way that it did. So that's news and and I called the office immediately and said, you know, I think I have to. Don't you? And they were like, well, we'd love it if you would. So I started typing took about ninety minutes probably what's up the stage. So Serena Williams is in the final with me Asaka Trina Williams, get beaten pretty badly in the first set. Right? Six down six two. And now it's the second set and there were a series of calls made by the chair up Carlos Rama's three in particular. The resulted in a fairly harsh penalty against Serena tells what those were. So it begins when he calls her for coaching, which is a pretty ticky tacky. Technical call to make coaching is a subject in tennis that has been debated for a long long time. It's something that is called disproportionately against women. Actually men don't get called for it nearly as much what's the violation. So the rules are fairly incoherent actually in women's tennis, you can. You can. You can be coached at certain stages of the match, but not at others. The rules are different in men's tennis in a grand slam final. The rule is basically no coaching in a grand slam final, but it's a scrambled egg policy. Basically, to start with her coach did try to signal something from the box. She claims first of all that they don't have preset signals and therefore even had she seen what he was doing. She would not have understood what he meant by it, but it's but it's technically true because he's mid, yes. He said he was engaging incurring. So the first violation is coaching. You about that in the reason Mexicans question is, you know, we spent a lot of time on the show and I have in my life talking about what's fair in the courtroom. What's fair in politics and with a rule should be followed and with discretion is of the person who's going to bring about the penalty. So it's a rule, it is. It was admitted that the rule was broken and we'll get in a moment to whether or not it was selectively enforced cracked, but any unfairness in calling that infraction. So discretion is the keyword here, the chair empire has a lot of latitude. He, for instance, could have warned her. He could have leaned down from the chair and said, hey, your guys trying to signal you tell him to knock it off, right? I mean, that's one option we had. He's a known stickler he called it a Alan Dershowitz on television talking about this one of those rare occasions. He wasn't defending the legal strategy of Donald Trump, and he said, no concepts that with me a little bit that the unfairness of the calling of coaching was similar in the law. If you. Penalty on a client for an infraction by the lawyer, correct. And it was the coach who was engaging in the bad conduct and a harm should not have been visited on the player..

Serena Williams Alan Dershowitz Carlos Rama tennis Naomi Asaka US Donald Trump Trina Williams ninety minutes
"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Thank you so much for being on the show. Thanks for having me. So this is a little bit different. You're the first person from the world of sports sports writer to be on the show, but I want to mention to the audience that you and I have met before. And the first time we met was in my office when I was used attorney and you were the one asking the questions, but it was in March of two thousand fifteen. And you wrote in the Washington Post, you know, a fairly thorough. I thought pretty fair profile of me as the US attorney and you wrote the following. And so I think you're pros is excellent, very good mastery of the language. So you describe me like this. The most powerful prosecutor in the country, the US attorney for the southern district of New York occupies a four square chamber flooded with relentless government, ceiling light, which makes his charcoal suit all the darker and his white shirt. So stiff, it could pour itself a glass of water all the whiter. Okay. So how the hell does a shirt ports up. A glass of what could you explain the metaphor? Because I've been trying to understand like I get it. It sounds cool, but that doesn't make any sense. I felt like your shirt could have stood up on its own in walks across the room. So why don't you tell you how stiff as much today? Very relaxed. The minute I walked in, I told you, I said, you've lost ten years. Yeah, being a prosecutor, very rock and roll. Right. Well, let's rock and roll then. So the other thing that I wanted to mention that I want to blame you for is, you know, we became friendly after meeting and I had some thoughts of it writing a book, and you've written a number of books and courage me to do it. And so I did so wanna say, it will never forgive you. That's right. Because writing is is breaking rocks with a shovel. Really, it's difficult. So first of all, congratulations. Well, it's not published. I'm not done editing it. But as I told you when we first brought this up, I'll read that book. I mean, or hope. That's why I'm counting on if all the guests of the show read the book that's like it's like forty bucks, so it's pretty good. It's more than zero in you. You're right about a lot of things have to sports is sports inherently easier to interest people in because the nature of it is is interesting, I think so it's a highly emotional volatile subject for people as the Serena Williams match demonstrated. I mean, that's probably one of the best read things I've ever written at any level book or magazine or newspaper a couple million people read that peace time real time. Yeah. So, yeah, it's easier to immediately engage people on something that are already feeling pretty hot about the engines already running pretty hot in the first. Why was a sports columnist assigned to write a profile of the US attorney because it was my idea. First of all, it was, you know, I, I write a lot of things outside of sports. I, I've written political profiles over the years for the Washington Post. So it wasn't because of my perceived tremendous athleticism. It was because of your thought. I live in New York for one, even though I worked for the Washington Post. So you're in your you were at the time and remain a very intriguing figure nice with the remain. I saw that you edited yourself in real time you were? It was it was. It was a very definitive past tense usage. I saw it and then you add the parenthetical look, look, I don't care. It's fine. It's, but I want you to know that. I totally caught it very nimbly. Yes, athletic. All right..

Washington Post US attorney prosecutor New York attorney sports columnist Serena Williams writer ten years
"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Now, at the end of the day, they may not be any full certainty as to what is true and what is not. And so the question arises, you know, how is the Senator supposed to make his or her decision on how to vote, you know, what's the standard that has to be met with respect to the. Allegation, you know, when a remind people something, it's not a court of law. This is not a trial about whether or not the crime of attempted rape was committed in is not subject to a beyond reasonable doubt standard that we have under the constitution in this country. People already have some reasons that they want to support brick cabinet, no matter what other people have reasons why they don't want to support per cabinet because they think that he's not right for the court because they think he's been misleading about a number of other issues during his hearings as Ron cleaned, pointed out when he was here a short time ago. And so for them, the question is not do you believe absolutely. One hundred percent that the allegations are true, it's whether or not they think that the additional allegation is credible enough that it gives them further doubt. And I think it's okay to have this standard. Senator is entitled to vote his or her own conscience on the issue. So we'll see what happens. Next question comes from Rennick four who writes, really enjoy the podcast. What if anything, have you gleaned from the recent Manafort plea deal? I feel like the news is getting tighter around this corrupt administration. Well, I don't know if it's getting tighter around the administration. It's certainly getting tighter around Paul Manafort and everyone else who comes within the crosshairs of the Muller investigation. It seems to me the time after time after time with your Michael Flynn or George popadopoulos or Paul Manafort that your best option is to surrender quickly. And Paul Manafort is an object lesson in, I think not particularly good lawyering, not particularly good strategy. If at the end of the day, he was going to give it up and cooperate and give the prosecution formation the best time to have done that would have been to been remorseful at the beginning and plead at the beginning and give up the information at the beginning, and it seemed like the it was trying to game things out and he got convicted at trial, which shows the public that. Neutral jury that even had on it. People who were supporters of the president, found proof beyond a reasonable doubt to convict him on a number of counts. Another trial pending an in between those two trials decided to cooperate and plead guilty. So the prosecutors have the best trophy you could possibly have in a case, you have both a conviction in an open proceeding with conviction by a jury, and you also have an admission of guilt in the form of a plea by the defendant. That's a very rare thing, and now they have information that can use against other folks. So my sense is the Manafort is providing substantial assistance because otherwise the prosecutors would not have accepted as cooperation after having in their pocket, a guilty conviction, a number of counts, and so you can expect charges against other people. I'm not saying who they might be because I don't know, but you can expect that they would have only agreed to accept its cooperation if there are other people against whom they can bring charges up the food chain released lateral Tim in the funny thing is. Answering your questions. If we've been taping this podcast just a few days ago on Saturday, we probably would have spent all our time talking about Paul Manafort, but news moves at the speed of light. And within days we're talking about the cavenaugh confirmation and maybe next week they'll be something else, but keep your eye on the ball and remember that these cases are going to keep coming that the idea that Donald Trump's lawyers suggested last year that the Muller investigation will be wrapped up imminently our before thanksgiving or before the end of two thousand seventeen was nonsense is nonsense. There's a lot still yet to come..

Paul Manafort Senator Muller Donald Trump rape Ron Rennick president Michael Flynn Tim George popadopoulos One hundred percent
"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"She's had to move away from her home all of which he predicted an all of which came true. And so when someone is trying to in the interim before trying to persuade someone to put their name to an allegation, I think it's appropriate fair and honorable that she kept the identity secret and when and otherwise leaked out will. Then that's when the rubber meets the road. And that's when the vote got postponed as I think it should have. And a hearing was set as this recording. It sounds like she's not coming on Monday, although she is not as far as I've seen definitively ruled it out and the basis that she and her lawyer have given is that they would like before they come forward. And before she goes under oath to testify, they would like the FBI. To conduct its own investigation. So what senators are asking for based on one side is the FBI take a look at the allegations interview the appropriate people for purposes of determining whether or not it's true that bears on the fitness of this person to be on the supreme court. For them to do that. It's my understanding that the president has to direct them to do so and the president, oddly Donald Trump has. It will. The FBI doesn't do that, and it seems a little nutty to me because since when does Donald Trump let the FBI direct matters as opposed to the other way round. So it seems as soon today where an impasse that Dr fort will not come testify unless there's I some, you know, investigation done by the FBI. So some facts are brought to bear. Now, remember at should be obvious to everyone. This is not one of those things that's unprecedented is not without any precedent. There is a precedent. It was a Nieta hill making sexual misconduct allegations against then nominee Clarence Thomas back in nineteen Ninety-one. And back then before the metoo movement before they were greater numbers of women in the Senate and will would hope before there was greater sensitivity to and acknowledge of the rights of women in the belief, people should. Have in credible accusations being made. Even back then what happened was Clarence Thomas testified before the Senate Judiciary committee. And then these allegations came out after that just like we have here with Dr Ford and Joe Biden who was a chair of the judiciary committee, reopened the hearings. And there was another hearing like we're talking about for this Monday, but in between the allegations being made by a hill and the second hearing at which both Anita hill the person making the allegations and the nominee testified, guess what happened? There was an investigation. Guess who did it? It was the FBI the FBI most professional law enforcement organization that I know and I worked with him very closely for a lot of years, and I feel that they're being politicized again. I think everyone whatever side you're on, whatever you think of the ideology cabin Cabnol- the allegations of the serious one. It has credibility attached to it even if you don't fully by it and that everyone should want to get to the truth. There's no reason why senators from both sides of the aisle and the American public shouldn't become satisfied that the fullest inquiry possible has been made..

FBI Donald Trump Senate Judiciary committee Clarence Thomas Anita hill Senate president Dr fort supreme court Joe Biden Dr Ford
"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"sally jenkins" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Slash Preet, betterment, outsmart average. So obviously the big news this week and an issue in which I've gotten an unbelievable number of questions is the red cavenaugh nomination to the supreme court. So about a week ago, we were recording. He seemed to be sailing towards a a vote in the judiciary committee this week that would have been basically party line which would have gotten him out of committee in revolt in the entire Senate in relatively short order that has been up ended as you all know and at the time of this recording at about noon on Wednesday, September nineteenth, the vote for tomorrow has been postponed because there has been a serious allegation made by woman named Dr Christine Blasi Ford, who is a psychologist in California who claims as you've all seen that a number of years ago, thirty five or thirty six. Some odd years ago when she was fifteen and Brookhaven was seventeen. They're both at a party in a suburb in Maryland, and he attempted to. Raipur and in the room during the time of the attempted attack was a friend of his named Mark judge for his part Brad Kavanagh denies completely that he ever engaged in such conduct in highschool ever after that and was never at a party like that. So the question is, who's telling the truth and whether or not you believe one party or the other, what should happen. So the first issue was procedural, right? What what happens next? Because Republicans control the Senate, the only way for the vote to have been postponed. A derailed in some way is if fellow Republican senators stood up and said they wanted more process and said that they wanted to have more investigation and to did Jeff flake who's been on the show. And this member of the judiciary committee made clear that he wanted to hear from the person who made the allegations and also perhaps Br Cavanaugh and another Senator who's not in the committee, but is an important vote for the Republican caucus and the cabinet nomination is Republican, moderate, Susan. Collins from Maine. So once those two, but particularly flake made clear on Sunday that they wanted to hear more. They shouldn't proceed. Chuck rashly, basically had no choice, but to postpone the vote and then set for Monday this coming Monday, an open hearing to which I believe they have invited both Dr. Ford who makes the allegations and also Brad Kavanagh. It's interesting that I've seen a lot of senators get up in the well including Mitch McConnell and others, and the thing that they have been complaining about and they have been upset about is not the content of the allegation. So much as the timing of when Dianne Feinstein came forward with it. And when the identity of the alleged victim came out in the press and the Washington Post and why find humorous if it weren't so serious is that it doesn't make any sense at all. The allegations seems to be the Dan Feinstein had this letter and knew about the allegations of attempted rape, begins Brett Kavanagh and saved it for tactical. Seasons until after the regular hearings took place and we were on the cusp of vote in the judiciary committee should that she could derail the nomination in derail the confirmation that make any sense to me as everyone knows in his Dianne Feinstein has made clear. She was trying to do right by Dr Ford who reluctantly had come forward who didn't want her name to be used. And if you really wanted to do damage to the confirmation Abrek Cavanaugh and you really wanted to have the the maximum possibility of destroying the confirmation of that man and you had the information about the alleged attempted rape that time to have brought it forward. If that was your goal was during the hearings when everyone was paying attention, not after their over on the off chance thought that perhaps there will be a delay in the vote because as we see now that almost didn't happen, there still may not be much of a delay. The vote could happen as soon as Wednesday, whether or not there's a hearing on Monday. So I think there's a lot of bad faith on. Top of everything else in these allegations against Dianne Feinstein. I think it's a delicate difficult sensitive thing when someone comes forward, knowing how people are treated these days when they make allegations like this, we've seen it all too often, the metoo movement that you come forward you life is offended. She's gotten death threats..

judiciary committee Dr Christine Blasi Ford Dianne Feinstein Senator Brad Kavanagh Jeff flake Abrek Cavanaugh Senate Dan Feinstein supreme court Raipur Maryland Brett Kavanagh rape Washington Post Brookhaven Mitch McConnell Mark judge Collins Chuck