17 Burst results for "Sally Davies"

"sally davies" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

04:22 min | Last month

"sally davies" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"They were all like little. Railroads were small apartments and they each. Dj's apartment was sort of identical just wall to wall records like a person who didn't understand. Dj's might say they were hoarders word. It was just as wife went on. The furniture. got chalked. 'cause they needed another wall for records and nobody who's out of these rent-controlled apartments which was part of the thing of the book. And i you know. I hope the reader kinda gets are and it's why we're still here if we didn't have those kinds of apartments we wouldn't be here anymore yet. There's there are some some Portrait in sort of newer cleaner spaces. And i wondered do those spaces resonate as much with you or did it become more about the person in those sort of clean contemporary spaces. I was grateful for every different kind of space. When i got in it. You know because this is a book about new yorkers and it can't just be all people like me or you you we had to show..

"sally davies" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

04:21 min | Last month

"sally davies" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"Is that any good or is it not good so yes. I guess to answer your question. I've always take that free. Space is very important. I mean i see it in in in these conversations that we have with other artists and photographers. And i mean even thinking about his own podcast sometimes just having no is on you a little bit of freedom to do. What you want is the way interesting. Things are absolutely a must start to have an agenda. You know as soon as you're showing and people are judging your work in starts to starts to get in there from accused you. Are you familiar. I'm sure you're familiar with but do you know the work of saul later and allieu. We i mean thinking about painting as well as the east village in his work and cars for that matter to yeah interesting. Beautiful beautiful things by him. I'm one of my regrets. And i don't have many but then i never introduce myself to him and got to know before he passed away right. Did you bump into on the street i mean. Would you recognize them if you did okay. Yeah 'cause i imagine you guys you guys probably walk same blocks a few times they can pick no or is your cool I actually have a question about one particular variety of few photos. And and if you don't mind ellen again. Jill jump in anytime..

allieu saul Jill jump ellen
"sally davies" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

04:25 min | Last month

"sally davies" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"I know i personally have started purchasing certain books. The good books not just regular readers but more are kind of books. Because the fact that i suddenly had time to really appreciate him so i have about about four or five books in the past year that i probably wouldn't have purchased otherwise i don't know my book Did very well. Nobody was more surprised than me. It sold out in like three or four days. Yeah i only two hundred copies. That's predictable here. Bought the other two allen is supposed to be selling them in a profit and what was the run. The first round was three thousand very small. Now we just did another run of six thousand. Congratulations for sale in august and hopefully as retail starts to hopefully get wound up again for the holiday seasons while sal. That's great yeah. I mean i i get the idea that you know you wanted as simple as possible. The gear the setup simple and i totally understand this idea of not setting up lights and how that can mess with people but but what about like. How long did you stay there. But what we your conversations like. I mean did you try to. Do you engage people or was it really like you. Don't get out and and and did you direct people at all nap shoes. I i did a little tap dance. My first off lightened up the atmosphere looking around for ten minutes. I left okay. Then there was also the dog which is a great little conversation starter. Yes my dog comes with me everywhere and she sat there in inner bag. You know waited. Now i would say the most i i was anywhere was maybe a half an hour. And the quickest was probably five minutes. Well the thing is is that. I was in touch these people with emails because i they had to fill out the qa and we had to go back and forth. I get that all figured out..

allen
"sally davies" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

04:43 min | Last month

"sally davies" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"And i always said when somebody else pays for it really good point to everybody self publishing now in that can be thirty. Forty thousand dollars you know. I don't try this hong kind of thing i i. It's not in my snack bracket so. I was really grateful to be able to do that even though you know because cove in it got a little bit. But it got out there nobody's marsh than And real quickly. You mentioned that you didn't want to put any of your opinion in there. And you wanted the randomness of this Do you feel that street. Photography does put your opinion in it. I mean to some people kind of random so you differential well not to belabor this point but i don't really think of myself as a street photographer in the classic sense you know when a grand and those people you know. I'm an art. I'm an artist seminar. I'm a painter You know our photographer looking for a photo. So i go around looking for stuff that i think is what i'm trying to say which is very different from the book which is like. I didn't want to say anything. I just want to shoot you at home in whatever you wanted to wear with all your stuff a story speak for itself something. I'm kind of curious about that again. You your most your photographs. Autism point have been outdoors in the streets called street photography or not and i'm referring to the moral as environmental portraits. Which is exactly what you're doing indoors as well. They really person in their environment in some manner had shooting approach change going from outdoors where there's all sorts of variables to indoors.

Autism
"sally davies" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

05:24 min | Last month

"sally davies" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"New book new yorkers the first guest believe it or not is sally davies herself and we're also joined by photographer. Writer and fellow. Be an hr jill waterman. Welcome to sally a gel. Sally davies is a new york city photography if they ever was won her images of the site in east village just uis gotham and her work is appropriately in the permanent collection of museum of the city of new york and the new york city. Nine eleven memorial museum. Our archive was recently acquired by nyu and is now part of the downtown collection of fales. Library sally's photographs have been featured in the new york. Times and the new opposed among others and exhibited at bernard uchi meisel gallery in two thousand fourteen salary. See the citation from the city of new york for ongoing commitment to photographing the lory side and like all grey chronicles of new acceding. She's canadian wouldn't you know it. They go chill. Waterman has joined us on the podcast past years and has recently published insightful interview with sally which wigan referenced. Today jill is a photographer in editor and writer. And she's worked for photo district news and dna explorer and she's the author of the two thousand six book night and low light photography gills photo series. The new year's eve project has documented new year's celebrations around the globe for the past thirty seven years. You know jill. I think you would have gotten it right by now but okay. We'll have to talk a little bit again. Welcome to both of you to the show. Thank you great to have you rate the beer sally. This is a really really neat neat book. That captures a certain spirit. The new city mood of what got a photographer. More known for wandering the streets neighborhoods into the various homes in apartments of the city. And like what. What's the magic word for getting into people's apartments in this new york city. 'cause i've tried going over to strangers..

Sally davies jill waterman sally Nine eleven memorial museum bernard uchi meisel gallery new york city new york east village nyu jill Waterman wigan
"sally davies" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

06:29 min | 6 months ago

"sally davies" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"Can't have it all on your own or you really ask so. You need pajamas. Who recognize women have rights to careers support you and then you have to get on it and you have to believe that you'll the equal of olas other men. Whatever they think will say. I think that the way we structure things needs to be we on society parents to raise the next generation. So wasting structured copy for the nineteen fifties where the mongo's out knows the money and the woman stays home all the time we need to rethink and restructure alexandra. Newton says i lead science at a primary school in london. How can i talk goals and children from disadvantaged backgrounds to boost interest confidence. How did the panel know. That science was for you How did you know. Science was fi angela. Well i was quite lucky that I grew up in a really galateri and family. My dad was an engineer. And i never had any sense that there was anything that i couldn't do the toys that they were or anything like that. I think one of the most important things we can do is give children all the same toys and a wide range of toys. And because these you know depending on what you play with really does exercise the parts your brain and the skills that you need to develop stew you need to do. I loved mcconaughey when i was growing up. I absolutely was obsessed with it. Whether that's why became an engineer or not. i don't know. But certainly as i grew older started tinkering with things fixing things I do all the diy at home. now instantly. because i i know how to announce vic stuff and that's because my mom and dad taught me and simple things like that. We need to kind of have big role models all big inspirational stories just as simple as getting goals to do the same things that boys doing is off the coast jamming boys adult but giving both to both both houses and doctors equally important and we need more maleness as well. How did you know that you want to do such a scienc- degree is not saying. Well i think it was probably remind mom because my mom was just not like other people's mountains she wasn't you know i i boy nineteen fifteen and at school i can remember lots of girls sort of talking about mom's doing by Things that have where it was. My mum was never like that. I remember one day going into schools. Eight or nine and we were talking about what it what we were talking about yesterday when you have taken some of the single. My mom is to address with making mallock Away with about if you had a gun during the second world war. John which you shoot hitler and they were kind of my mom about stuff mama's Just wasn't mummy ish. Save at the time obselete leash. She really got to do a couple of quick questions now. Just so we get more people's questions asked philip cat neck says how have women's bodies often without consent advanced medicine. Well i think ghulam boat is adults med. Some food the learning of individuals by working with patients and a actually women's bodies of melted multiples into much as men. The things i find very irritate isn't most clinical trials have more men and women and they usually don't have pregnant women They say for safety but you know when now having to do the vaccine trials again in pregnant women they usually have old people either so women need to be more. They're excellent answer. Somebody else tau to feel confident returning to the profession after break in practice due to paternity leave or the circumstances. How do you feel confident coming back in as anybody here had a baby or taking a break for other reasons than going back in. I haven't i think the says too. Failing coat Is pretending your confidence. Yes i'm glad when i was when i was sitting that guessing not sitting signing guessing. Some of the most appalling hatching that you could ever believe from these repulsive drunken men. Some nights i would just look at them like i could not give less of a toss and once you stop doing that. They actually genuinely believe new. Can't once they believe that you've one and i think that's half the battle if you don't worry about it you don't look nervous. You don't look subservient acts that you don't and then eventually you won't be and also don't feel guilt of women who go back to work after having kids feel guilty about their kids with someone else but we have to remember that right through human history. Children have not just been raised by mothers if been raised by communities and it's good for children tablets eighties and in fact that was the last night got for my mother-in-law because she did a lot of babysitting for me when i went back to work and she never. She was a doctor herself. Should just retired and she never let me feel guilty about going to work hooton. it takes well. She probably need that. The only reason she was still alive was to take care of the grandchildren. Very reason the that she'd been allowed postmenopausal she understood the purpose. Thank you so very much for joining us angela. Say thank you very much for joining us. Same sally aa throughout twenty twenty one. The science museum group is hosting a series of climate talks panel discussions q. Days and events connecting you with leaders experts activists and campaigners as they discuss how to tackle the problems facing communities due to climate change. Choose to you. By which i mean you enjoy living appliances for more information and how to book brooklyn the science museum's websites and Now it only feels safe. Thank you so much for coming to the guilty feminists. A science museum livestream. Thank you so much to the science museum for. Having us everyone is. What's so hard behind the scenes to make this happen. I want you.

london yesterday John Newton alexandra nine nineteen fifteen hitler Eight second world war both eighties one twenty twenty one single last night brooklyn mcconaughey both houses nineteen fifties
"sally davies" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

08:28 min | 6 months ago

"sally davies" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"What have you and chris of cv. You have to still like his about though. I mean dr either but someone offered me one of those honorary doctorates and make people. Call me doctor all the time. They should be called doctor. So i guessed is a second guessed the uk special envoy on antimicrobial resistance monster trinity college cambridge and former chief medical officer for england in the twenty twenty years on his she became the second woman and the fourth outside the royal family to be appointed dame grand across the order of the bath. Gb for services to public health and research she has also been awarded more than thirty honorary doctorate degrees. So she's i'm thirty. I dream of the date. Please welcome dame sally davies. Sally thank you for joining us. I'm c. glittering. I would say yes. It's quite good. Look back at it. But i didn't set out to do that. It just kind of how i believe that. I'm not saying he didn't set out to do it. But i'm saying it didn't just happen. There's a lot of hard work there. you may not have set out to have a pink fashion. The queen bops. Yeah you really tell a lot of work you haven't you didn't fall out of bed onto it either so we are talking to you today about women in medicine and angelie. Your first book seems like a great place to start inferior. How science women wrong. Can you tell us a little bit about what's in that. Well i had just given birth to my son and it might not is an engineering so used to write about engineering and physical sciences. But when i went back to work. And i'm sure lots of people can empathize with this. Had to take what i could get and editor set me. Can you to story on the menopause. Which was something. I knew nothing about. You know either academically or through personal experience but had to say yes. Because i needed the work and Just coincidentally at that time. A paper had been published in canada by three mile scientists hog arguing the reason that evolution reason that women experienced the menopause might be because right through our evolutionary history so right throughout human history from the beginning men did not find older women attractive enough to have sex with him. No man of any age and This was wig because There was accounta- theory. In fact the prevailing towns theory that says the reason that women live so long into the insert all years which is more accurate way of thinking about menopause because most animals around the world die around the same time that they stability facility and this grandmother hypothesis states that the reason that women experience menopause long is because just so useful to the kids and the grandkids to help. Keep them alive and a lot of women who worked on this theory now. I had been trained up in a system that said that science is objective. It's rational that whatever ideas we have about the world Through empirical observation and understand. Then why men and women were coming up with theories about the same thing and of course there is there is you know we're we're affected by not just what we taught what we about the world so what we wanted to be true and that's where inferior came off. It's really an investigation into how scientists think about women's minds and bodies and why they think about us that way and all the mistakes that i've made through history and how those mistakes are slowly encrypted. And what did you discover about menopause. Do we know why. But i tell eleven i why because when we talking about why we all the way we all what is human nature and history will never know unless we get a time machine and go back and in and see it for ourselves which will never happen. But the grandmother hypothesis is the one with the most data and Rational behind it. And certainly if you look at the data we can see through studies and observations around the world that the presence of grandmother does increase the lifespan of and grandchildren so there is an evolutionary mechanism. At least there is a possibility that that could be true. So that's the one on sticking with rather than the. I am honestly disappointed. That the only reason i'm going to live beyond menopause to care for children. I want it to be more feminist than that. I wanted to be because women are meant to come together and take leadership one day. Take over the world i want. I want to be more than not enough hanged. Anything's possible. Okay yeah evolutionary biology an evolutionary theory. You can come up a chevy. We like he can look on that. If you like in the case through history that women have been looked at a certain way. Haven't they example at roman times women's private bits for cold hugh denda which means things to be ashamed of and also if we hysterical that men's our way was off wondering rounds out both a Wind could get on the shelves who get something. East villa denied. But i'm so i think from that. You know women have always been severely innocent. Weigh-in might never thought that in some ways maybe the cool part of sciences objective but scientists. Very much guided by who you are on what the sort of i love this word and people find annoying but what Paradigm is in terms of how people view particular scientific theories so it's never totally objective. Is it would be. Scientists tend that they are imagine that they are not least because it makes them feel authoritive and more important than every shaw sally. You went from being a doctor to being in public health. So a role like chris witty. How was that how. How does it go for being a doctor to somebody who has to comment on the health and the health practices and guided a whole nation's health. Well it is quite scary all the way through actually because so many different things come. A strength is in being able to interrogate people literature. Angela and i share. That will look at the literature and two assimilated to a view and the differences. You'll going from an individual in front of you and so the balance shifts because you'll think about populations but everyone wants to help and we're all born with brain. Some of i say you learn about it. People give advice then you come to a conclusion for me. The biggest journey worlds to learn about the health impacts of deprivation. I knew from my work. In brenta was a doctor working on sickle cells. About how difficult it was. But i hadn't understood the broad aside deprivations impact on health. And if you look now the fact that we're having one of the worst outcomes in terms of deaths per population from kovin eighties related to deprivation. Am i i got there but it took me a euro two to learn that understand it. So you've got to look at the sort of societal factors. That might make up a health crisis. What do you think is one of the greatest global health now. We've had this global health challenge. I acutely aware we all want species all trying to put borders and keep these people out. You know prioritize also whatever. We're one species. The virus doesn't care. What our flag football team. We support whether or not. We're trying to put up borders to keep refugees out the viruses the virus and it sees us all as human beings. What's one of the greatest global health challenges. The future i think it is he work as a globe. And how are we fair to old parts of it and that plays out through kobe. Not safe to the rest of the world is vaccinated but.

Angela Sally twenty twenty years today thirty fourth canada first book second woman one species three mile second chris hugh denda both one dame eleven sally davies monster trinity college cambri
"sally davies" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

12:34 min | 1 year ago

"sally davies" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"My guest today is dying Sally Davies. Who until October last year was the chief medical officer for England the my senior government advisor on health matters? She was the first and only woman to ever hold this raw. She's also a member of the World Health Organization Executive Board and now serves as master of Trinity College at the University. Kind Bridge Sally. Until recent weeks many people would not have thought much about the chief medical officer. Now we find ourselves hanging off their every word and I met a way we are in the world. Can you describe the role of the chief medical officer what it was like to hold that job? Well it was an incredible honor and to bear flagbearer. I think as a woman actually does put more pressure on. You definitely meant that. I was called the Chief. Nanny of the nation which was sexist. But what we have to do is think hard about the public's health and most of the time for me in Britain that was not about the NHL services. It was more about the preventive health health improvement and health protection and so of course lamentin agencies came onto that I was the one that with the backup of scientists had to advise government. When we have the NAVA joke poisonings in two thousand nine ten. I was not there for the first wave of the flu. Pandemic I was actually running research the chest but I was there for the third wave when we had even more deaths and drank back from holidays by ministers for a bowler in West Africa to talk about what needed doing where we responding effectively and to talk to the public. Some people call the roll. The nation's doctor so it's complex because it moves around and I'm a hematologist specialist in sickle. So and then. I became a researcher so I have a broad background but I'm rather pleased that my successor is an infectious disease specialist so he has called the president horrors of covert and he is expert. And can you imagine what the Chief Medical Officer in the U. K? Or INDEED OTHER CHIEF. Medical officers around the world are going through now. Can you give us an insight into what would it be like well? It's very pressured because what you're trying to do is stay on top of the signs on one side. What should we be doing the services on what's going on and the limitations because no one is prepared for something as bad as this and then the crushes which come from ministers because they clearly want sorting out and they want to show they're in control the media which again is pushing and raking over every little thing and the public demands? Put that beside your own desire to get it right and to save lives and it's a very pressured role you refer them to people not saying something like this coming. Did you ever imagine that the world would be where we are today? Well we did a lot of practice. As did you in Australia of pandemic planning but it was always a flu. So that tastes in respiratory born virus and we thought that would standards in good stead. I think it's shown that we didn't practice everything we didn't think through the testing well enough and the other things. We clearly didn't have ready but would anyone have ready. It's a question of how much clamming can you do and we did a lot and we some really good planning song quite proud of what we did but then how fleet of foot can you be when it happens and how anticipate can you be as you watch it develop and what's giving you hope at the moment on one thing that certainly in world war odd claims the scientific and medical communities coming together and focusing on the research and vaccine other things that are going to make a profound difference at all of that. What escaping you spirits up? Well the first thing is of coal some actual nature that we historically have epidemics and pandemics and survival of the fittest as nations and society. We come through. Interestingly here. I am sat in Trinity College and the where the plagues in the mid sixty and hundreds. Which aren't she because we close down as we have done now. Pasta spy but newt of gravity fame is famed for having. Actually it's not quite correct story having discovered gravity during one of the plagues. I think the way people are coming together whether it's about the sun some working together on treatments vaccinations whether it's in the service stories of heroism of nurses doctors on the front line but also the volunteering the support from people in the community for the vulnerable taking medicines. Taking food and everything. So it's how society is coming together and working together whether it's on Sundance or to support others. Isn't that wonderful? The way it's happening and I am loving the means and the little videos and everything on facetime what SAF and zoom I mean are now doing masses of things by zoom. We were cooking supper with our daughter on zoo last night. She was cooking hers in the House. And we were cooking up unfortunately onsumer. You can't lane in enticed they can't particularly better. I'm GonNa take you back now to your ties when you grew up and when you first start to think that you might want to be doctor because I'm sure one of the things that struck people as we've watched the coverage of the pandemic is had. Jane ended idiots most of the experts most of the politicians or their podiums breed. I telling us what's going to happen next all men so as a girl growing up. What made you decide you so I wanna be a doctor. Well actually. I'm an auditory because I didn't know what to do. I got to the age of sixty nine had quite decent exam results. I was better at biology. Had I remember my mother saying you? Good biology you quite like people that you do mince father who was a medic. No one else in the family so I talked to him and it seemed a good idea so I went off to do it and actually after the first couple of years and it's on record I found it quite brutalizing. I think in the way that the doctor's now will find it. The people were. We had Russian health system particularly at that time in the mid seventies where I can remember. Oh young woman. For instance. Not being allowed renal dialysis because there was a choice between patients. And she didn't win. Am I thought this was so unfair? And how many things were handled. I was so brutalized I actually gave up for four years and then giving up discovered I had of the -cation and I think what our young doctors are going through. The moment that was on the front line is very similar. Not Enough ventilators. Who Do you choose seeing? People die in circumstances where you can't hold their hand and their families can't be there I think they're experiencing some of that brutalizing and harrowing things that I saw in the early and mid seventies and I fear many of them will say after it's over. I can't do this. I hope like me I went off. Married diplomat went Madrid as a diplomat's wife. I wasn't the good diplomat's wife but I realized I wanted to do meant and then came back really energize and I hope that if they do give up then come back energized when they've found themselves again. Do you think we'd be a bit better now at supporting the main to help us. And we'RE OBEYING OF AIR FRONTLINE. Doctors Enosis as they go through something like this. Would they be more understanding? About how spirit crushing making. Those choices are literally between. Who lives in dollars? I think we're more understanding but talking to on younger daughter WHO's a first year doctrine. The front line they are so stretched so rushed that the extra services aren't available so it is a question of kindness in a team and supporting the team. I had that too. It wasn't enough for me. I would rather a gentle soul that stage. I don't know I think we're going to have to do an awful lot of catching up later on and when you look back on those days I mean. Brutalizing is a very strong word. Was that really perspective about the system. Did you think that they was agenda? Element and win offered in your life that if I said to yourself. Jay is something different that happens because I'm a woman. Oh the walls gendered element was in medical school. I think thirteen women at the year of one hundred ten. I mean looking back very inappropriate thing so when we did surface anatomy I was made to stand on a stool while they drew on my legs where the muscles were. I mean you know and I thought that was normal at that stage but you wouldn't allow that now getting back to starting on the walls. The word very few women. The nurses were not used to women. Doctors remember the system. I I would saying well. You think I'm here to ally was no. I don't and she said you're here to make mighty and it was actually quite difficult environment and I was definitely Baltimore. The pecking order. But I came from a fairly sparky academic background and my father who was a theologian taught me that. I should ask and challenge. In order to get the right answer I mean at the age of six challenging bishops. How do you know God exists and things so? Perhaps I was better prepared. The many women would be in that. I was prepared to challenge and push back but it wasn't easy. Am I do think it was a agenda sexist environment and can you give us an example of one moment of pushing back of challenging? Do Love the image of you as a sixty road. You know it Sunday lunch challenging bishop but in the context of Medical Education or medical practice. Well I mean just silly things like I remember. I did something on one of my early wall drown. Something consultant said. Miss Davis I said in front of the patient and the whole team. I appreciate you think have got this wrong and I'm really sorry but I know that when you're happy with me you call me Sally when you content you call me. Dr Davis Miss Davis not acceptable. And he said Oh. I didn't realize I did that. Said you into the men interesting. It didn't again. Oh so go to resort. Yes I wouldn't be invited to everything because the boys were going for a beer sitcoms. I can't stand beer and I didn't like pubs because of the smoking them so I didn't mind in one sentence but on the other side. We all know that a lot of medical networking used to take place in the pub over a beer so I was being excluded though I think the funniest was my hematologist professor who I was very fumbled. But he would do this long ward round on one morning of the week and at a certain point he would walk into the gents and continued discussing the patients and my friend and I she she and I would stand outside. Arms crossed thinking. What are they saying about patients? We're looking off. And I got so fed up I took to propping. Open the door with my foot and continuing the conversation with the professor while he was in the Jen's that stopped it..

Chief Medical Officer Sally Davies flu Trinity College World Health Organization Exec NHL professor England Dr Davis Miss Davis Britain Australia advisor Miss Davis West Africa researcher Brutalizing Jane president
"sally davies" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

09:17 min | 1 year ago

"sally davies" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"Poor are prone to health inequalities. They are more likely to have a bad outcome both in getting the disease in having morbidity and a bigger death rate see you have to have the safety net of the NHS to support them. And what we're now seeing coming out of the states. The African Americans getting the disease more often than than dying at much. Higher rates is tragic and we need to support our people so we don't get those dreadful outcomes. I think the lack of national unity and sons based advice visibly is making it very difficult. Some states and clearly politics is coming in much more. You can an analysis which suggests that the red states will slower coming in with restrictions and look downs than the blue states. I don't know enough about it but I am glad we have an innate absolutely and I think people at this time are all looking for some hope and some ways of getting through. So if you've got a crystal ball that tells us when we'll be out of this we would love to hear your prediction but in the meantime what are you enjoying doing. I've been reliably informed the brig making and jam production happening at your place. Is that right jam? Making and shut me. Yes I've discovered a website called Marquee and they've given a reduction because of covert where you can get the Royal Shakespeare Company. All pro plays so. I'm watching lots of things that I missed and I wish before. I've got the exercise bike to look forward to but a bubble. I'm trying to structure my day so that I am leading a normal day and to talk to our daughters and our family through facetime and zoom and Google. Hang out as much as possible so that actually we're much more contact than we ever were before and that's right with the pressures of being locked down and for our daughter on the front line in the hospital and do you think will come out of this wiser. I'm hoping that we come out of it with a new attitude. Too Flexible working. You know one of the things. We've talked about for a long time. Which would help women's careers and to close many of the gender gaps that there are around work would be for virtual and flexible work to be more embraced. And we're all having a big listen. Had to get that done so I'm hoping we take some of that with us. What are you hyping? Tyke hat of this. Well I hope we do. I think we will. I hope that we will come out recognizing how important health services are. I mean. We shouldn't have people pleading for resources for every day. Care and then we get this on top of it. I hope we come out of it. Kinda to our neighbors tonight. Believe we probably will with much more social cohesion but I also hope we come out of it with not just the digital at home but the digital across our health service. Because that's what I know about if you look at how health services a changing because we can't do face to face and people have pressured. That is the talk of change we've needed for ages and we've given it a big step up. I don't want to lose that and the other area. That's fascinating is. We're managing to aggregate data in the interests of getting better outcomes from coverted where before ridiculously heavy governance and box. Ticking of a little brains was getting in the way. I hope we can keep that. Because actually patients will benefit. The public will benefit and also shown in one of my cmo annual reports. If you keep people healthy than the economy does better. So we can continue this partial unlocking. It's not a full on locking of the aggregating data it will change our lives since like some great things to come out of it now. I'm going to move to act concluding questions. We always ask guests a set of questions and we always start with the fact to respond to so your fact is. According to an analysis of one hundred four countries conducted by the World Health Organization. Roughly seventy percent of the global healthcare workforce is made up of women currently of course there at the front line. Saving patient's lives given half feminist. This workforce is windy. Think we will properly recognize and pie. The contribution of healthcare workers a good question. I think what's important is to look at each group and make sure all the women are getting equity within their groups because on an average we have a lot more women in the lower paid areas. But you're not going to pull them up to the medical levels. The evidence on women is in medicine is on average they are in certain groupings that are lower paid. Is that because women. Is it for other reasons. We need to sort through that and move forward. I think when you take. The biggest feminist workforce nursing one of the things that were as Ms. Why do we see a small number of men coming in but proportionally many more men in the managerial and leadership roles? What can we do to help those women who could do it but I haven't recognized? It comes through because then. I think pay will begin. Sort its way through but those already work on arguing to our government in this country that nurses need to be better paid and I hope the care workers and other people will have a better deal going forwards. I'm in. It must be very difficult as a woman. Be A care worker on zero walls contract particularly if you've got children or other responsibilities at home. I if violence all putting bread on the table and yet doing these other things. We need fair. A society can't come out of covert. Maybe we can rely too far from the embers of covert. I hope so. What's the worst misogyny.

NHS Google World Health Organization Tyke Royal Shakespeare Company
"sally davies" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

13:44 min | 1 year ago

"sally davies" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"I mean the fact that you didn't put yourself forward for the role of chief medical officer that you waited for someone to ask you the fact that your initial reaction was to be taken aback rather than be fantastic bat and the fact that you didn't take a challenge intellectual challenge of debate as an undermining of your ladyship pathology. How gendered do you see that? I mean at the Global Institute for Women's leadership we look at a lot of research about these things and to us in those sorts of things does saying the agenda dynamic based on the research but it had to use it. If you had been you know Bob instead of instead of Sally. Would you had your cat sit on the chief medical officer post ten years earlier? Would you put yourself forward? Would you say on just going to blitz this? I'm going to the base Savo? Would you feigned more offhand or dismissive? If people put account of you two you can guide so you and I know the research that a lot of women are waiting for a tap on the shoulder little princess. This wasn't about that my response was why would I want to do it because actually I had the world's best job I was running one and a quarter billion pounds worth of health research. I loved it and I wasn't sure I actually wanted to do the job. So that's quite different from how it's too much for me and so I had to think myself into. So do I want it? What is it and what what would I do with it? And then to watch other people circle and think about it actually in the end. I went to the Permanent Secretary of the department. Said I've been thinking about this and I have decided to apply because my present role repulsed. The CMO am. I don't respect any of the men who you are too short list. Says I will apply. I will keep the research portfolio. And if you don't appoint me that's fine but I will not report to the new. Cmo I will report directly to you so actually I played it quite. Powerfully was not a that I was waiting to be tapped. I thought through what could I do with it and I thought through who else would get it and how I wanted it and four women who are listening to this podcast and who are now shaking their head going. I could never do something like that. What would you say to them? Was there a little voice in the back of your head? Sighing war. Sally. Don't be so push shield and not gonna like you if you push like that because a lot of women have that voice in the back of their heads. Yes I think over the years. I've come through that so don't let me pretend that this is how I've I've always been quite challenging as talking about me as a young doctor. I've also had my fair share of worries and the Impostor Syndrome but I've learned I believe in the Peter Principle which is that a lot of people ended up appointed to the job born above the warm where they function best as managed everything. I've done so my question to myself is. When does the Peter Principle play out? Can I do the next level and the way you find out? It's by doing it and I probably can. So that's where I come to this fantastic now during your time as chief medical officer. Of course you'd have ended up with the one with the KHURANA virus. But you did during your tenure have to deal with the case response to the atoll rap break in West Africa and you said back then. You were very proud of the volunteers. The doctors the nurses the lab staff the government officials who went out and put themselves at risk to do an amazing job. Can you just talk us through what it was like to be at that time in such a responsible position when a ball breakout and as we know they season incredibly deadly disease. I mean we've all spent a lot of time talking about death rights from nineteen but a baller is truly Deadly disease absolutely well-treated. You might get thirty to forty percent deaths but always an outbreak sit. It starts much higher until you've built the right facilities and got the local staff knowing how to treat the patients and it's scary because it's not that easy to catch. She can't catch it with spiritually wise like covert any bodily secretions and a lot of the early cases always spread through funerals and everything. Which means that. You're getting the heart of a community. How do you conduct your rights? The social fabric of those communities scary because it was going up exponentially. The number of doctors it died in Sierra Leone was horrendous. It's decimated their Health Service. Azziz covert in some countries like Italy and Spain and we are having doctors and this is dying here with co two so the questions were to understand the disease and luckily we had a lot of good Santus. Explain that to me. Understanding how best treated the present chief medical officer. My Success Chris Witty was actually the chief scientific advisor it defeat our aid agency so he and I worked in tandem with him thinking about Sierra Leone. The me thinking about the impact on Britain. And then you get to the clash between science and public pressure. One example was that the son says that to do entry. Screening based on high temperatures is not cost effective so we go to our emergency meetings chaired by the Prime Minister that called Cobra because it stands for Cabinet Office briefing rooms and say cost effective and the prime minister says. But I want to do it. Ashley. I then was able to tease out that the reason he wanted to was. He wanted to show the country and his electrode that he had done everything possible to protect them. I could see the advantage of catching people coming in from west Africa and saying these of the symptoms if they develop ring this number Public Health England. And this is what you do so that we were giving them something. I said. Well if you feel you need to do it to show. You're doing everything. The reason advantage. Are you prepared to pay the bill? And he said yes. I said fine. I have no problem with doing it. Interestingly this time on covert the scientists said it wasn't cost effective and our prime minister. Said all right. We wouldn't do it. I actually think that was the right decision here because so much everywhere that you either walk down and stop aeroplanes and traffic. Or you don't follow but you can't do it through entry screening and we know that now because of all these eysenck dramatic carriers but just teasing out what does say what needs doing. What politicians want an in the moment taking the decisions and flexing round that is quite tough and then talking to the nation about it doing all the media? I still remember after one broadcast my sister saying you look really grumpy and said I was trying to look serious. And she's because counts and she said well look jumpy and I think that was when they really started that and I'll go guidelines of course a lot of the press calling me. The chief nanny which is totally gendered was and that was quite difficult. You know usually I just ignored it or laughed about it. Though the walls of famous type where on the Today programme which is of course are very famous news programme on radio. Four every morning one of the interviewers Nick Robinson instead of waiting till the end of an interview then saying and chief nanny or something said some call you chief. Nanan so angry that he started like that turned around and said. I think you'll being gendered. I think that's unacceptable. I won't have it. There was a whole twitter storm in support of me and he was writing me. A note sexist. I would say you did it without thinking and it was my back against the wall. I challenge my fight back. I mean half frustrating was that I mean they are chief medical officer an incredibly serious job talking about issues that really matter will abol or end up in the United Kingdom deadly disease what is alcohol usage or the misuse of alcohol costing in terms of people's held some lives and people are critiquing like that. I mean how have frustrating is it. Well I did goals Kim Woody. Call a male. Cmo The chief. Man I said I would watch wants I retired. I have not yet seen in cool male successor chief. Nanny and I'm waiting for it because that would then mean it wasn't gendered and do you think fool women in the Medical Profession Women Hamada spa to a public role like that that saying that kind of treatment it puts them off. Or they just shrug and say well. I guess they'll be a bit of that but the job still worth. Do you have a sense of that? I think it does put women off. Because how do you learn to cope with it and you know I have learnt? I've been very well. Trained MEDIA WISE BY THE DEPARTMENT DOT COM staff of fabulous. And they would really everything I did. I was prepared as if it was a five hour exam. What are the elephant traps? How will I sound? How will it come over? And I've learned terrific amount. Thanks to that but if you haven't been through that so that you know okay. I can do this in any way. I am a fighter. It's quite worrying. Are they going to say things like that to me? What will I do? How will I say it so I think it does put off some of the ones who would turn out to be very good with some training and so we need to do more training and in an age like this watching as you get to do now than being in the middle of it so that having that sense of distance which can give you an ability to see it all I mean what do you think are some of the big problems in dealing with a pandemic like this and so much main? The scientific problems though feel free to speak about them. But I've got more on my mind this balance that you've talked about between political decision making in the expert advice and also the communications when people at home for countless hours they can scroll every tweet watch every facebook post and clearly end up with a lot of John King formation as well as hopefully get themselves onto some credible sources including more chief medical officers and other scientific experts. I so it is difficult. Unite both knew this. There's a desire for news. All ministers led by the Prime Minister. Doing five. Pm Conference News Conference every day and actually people around the country logging. In what's fascinating to me is you can see that. Some ministers a lousy at it talking down to us the public or bossy others are too nervous clearly not leaders and it really is sorting them out the door couple. I'm happy they're in their roles but others you think Ooh but the scientists my successor. The chief scientific advisor or deputies are there and being home and giving the advice so the communication is there. I think the media so far doing in Britain a very good job of being supportive but questioning a bit of challenge but most of them are taking the line of look. We can do the looking back later on. This is where we are. How are you GONNA go forwards and recognizing the needs the sense? We have a wonderful institution called the sounds media center. Run Your folks whether you know it but she finds experts to talk to journalists all the time about different things and she's been running conferences for the journalists with expert so that they get the background so when stories come up they know what's going on and when a story comes up she'll find them an expert to quote comment so I think we're getting very responsible reporting in general on looking all across the globe. Of course I looked to the states. Get a lot of interesting things and I really can't not take you up on that how you see the US in comparison with the UK or any other nations response. Well I'm glad we have an nature. I think he's my big. Take home message that care and testing. It's free appoint access because we know that poor people whether they are black and minority ethnic just our own or toxins..

medical officer Prime Minister Sally Sierra Leone scientific advisor Britain Bob Global Institute for Women West Africa Chris Witty Permanent Secretary twitter US Medical Profession Women Hamad Italy UK Ashley Nanny facebook
"sally davies" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

14:35 min | 1 year ago

"sally davies" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"My guest today is dying Sally Davies. Who until October last year was the chief medical officer for England the my senior government advisor on health matters? She was the first and only woman to ever hold this raw. She's also a member of the World Health Organization Executive Board and now serves as master of Trinity College at the University. Kind Bridge Sally. Until recent weeks many people would not have thought much about the chief medical officer. Now we find ourselves hanging off their every word and I met a way we are in the world. Can you describe the role of the chief medical officer what it was like to hold that job? Well it was an incredible honor and to bear flagbearer. I think as a woman actually does put more pressure on. You definitely meant that. I was called the Chief. Nanny of the nation which was sexist. But what we have to do is think hard about the public's health and most of the time for me in Britain that was not about the NHL services. It was more about the preventive health health improvement and health protection. And so of course. Lamentin is came onto that. I was the one that with the backup of scientists had to advise government. When we have the NAVA joke poisonings in two thousand nine ten. I was not there for the first wave of the flu. Pandemic I was actually running research the chest but I was there for the third wave when we had even more deaths and drank back from holidays by ministers for a bowler in West Africa to talk about what needed doing where we responding effectively and to talk to the public. Some people call the roll. The nation's doctor so it's complex because it moves around and I'm a hematologist a specialist in sickle. So and then. I became a researcher so I have a broad background but I'm rather pleased that my successor is an infectious disease specialist so he has called the president horrors of covert and he is expert. And can you imagine what the Chief Medical Officer in the U. K? Or INDEED OTHER CHIEF. Medical officers around the world are going through now. Can you give us an insight into what would it be like well? It's very pressured because what you're trying to do is stay on top of the signs on one side. What should we be doing the services on what's going on and the limitations because no one is prepared for something as bad as this and then the pressures which come from ministers because they clearly want sorting out and they want to show they're in control the media which again is pushing and raking over every little thing and the public demands? Put that beside your own desire to get it right and to save lives and it's a very pressured role you refer them to people not saying something like this coming. Did you ever imagine that the world would be where we are today? Well we did a lot of practice. As did you in Australia of pandemic planning but it was always a flu. So that tastes in respiratory born virus and we thought that would standards in good stead. I think it's shown that we didn't practice everything we didn't think through the testing well enough and the other things. We clearly didn't have ready but would anyone have ready. It's a question of how much clamming can you do and we did a lot and we some really good planning song quite proud of what we did but then how fleet of foot can you be when it happens and how anticipate can you be as you watch it develop and what's giving you hope at the moment on one thing that certainly in world war odd claims the scientific and medical communities coming together and focusing on the research and vaccine other things that are going to make a profound difference at all of that. What scaping you spirits up? Well the first thing is of coal some actual nature that we historically have epidemics and pandemics and survival of the fittest as nations and society. We come through. Interestingly here. I am sat in Trinity College and the where the plagues in the mid sixty and hundreds. Which aren't she because we close down as we have done now. Pasta spy but newt of gravity fame is famed for having. Actually it's not quite correct story having discovered gravity during one of the plagues. I think the way people are coming together whether it's about the sun some working together on treatments vaccinations whether it's in the service stories of heroism of nurses doctors on the front line but also the volunteering the support from people in the community for the vulnerable taking medicines. Taking food and everything. So it's how society is coming together and working together whether it's on Sundance or to support others. Isn't that wonderful? The way it's happening and I am loving the means and the little videos and everything on facetime what SAF and zoom I mean are now doing masses of things by zoom. We were cooking supper with our daughter on zoo last night. She was cooking hers in the House. And we were cooking up unfortunately onsumer. You can't lane in enticed they can't particularly better. I'm GonNa take you back now to your ties when you grew up and when you first start to think that you might want to be doctor because I'm sure one of the things that struck people as we've watched the coverage of the pandemic is had. Jane ended idiots most of the experts most of the politicians or their podiums breed. I telling us what's going to happen next all men so as a girl growing up. What made you decide you so I wanna be a doctor. Well actually. I'm an auditory because I didn't know what to do. I got to the age of sixty nine had quite decent exam results. I was better biology. Have I remember my mother saying you? Good biology you quite like people that you do mince father who was a medic. No one else in the family so I talked to him and it seemed a good idea so I went off to do it and actually after the first couple of years and it's on record I found it quite brutalizing. I think in the way that the doctor's now will find it. The people were. We had Russian health system particularly at that time in the mid seventies where I can remember. Oh young woman. For instance. Not being allowed renal dialysis because there was a choice between patients. And she didn't win. Am I thought this was so unfair? And how many things were handled. I was so brutalized I actually gave up for four years and then giving up discovered I had of the -cation and I think what our young doctors are going through. The moment on the front line is very similar. Not Enough ventilators. Who Do you choose seeing? People die in circumstances where you can't hold their hand and their families can't be there I think they're experiencing some of that brutalizing and harrowing things that I saw in the early and mid seventies and I fear many of them will say after it's over. I can't do this. I hope like me I went off. Married diplomat went Madrid as a diplomat's wife. I wasn't the good diplomat's wife but I realized I wanted to do meant and then came back really energize and I hope that if they do give up then come back energized. When they've found themselves again. Do you think we'd be a bit better now at supporting the main to health and well being of air frontline doctors enosis as they go through something like this would they be more understanding about how spirit crushing making. Those choices are literally between who lives in dollars. I think we're more understanding but talking to our younger daughter WHO's a first year doctrine. The front line they are so stretched so rushed that the extra services aren't available so it is a question of kindness in a team and supporting the team. I had that too. It wasn't enough for me. I would rather a gentle soul that stage. I don't know I think we're going to have to do an awful lot of catching up later on and when you look back on those days I mean. Brutalizing is a very strong word. Was that really perspective about the system. Did you think that they was agenda? Element and win offered in your life that if I said to yourself. Jay is something different that happens because I'm a woman. Oh the walls gendered element the was in medical school. I think thirteen women at the year of one hundred ten. I mean looking back very inappropriate thing so when we did surface anatomy I was made to stand on a stool while they drew on my legs where the muscles were. I mean you know and I thought that was normal that stage but you wouldn't allow that now getting back to starting on the walls. The word very few women. The nurses were not used to women. Doctors remember the system. My first ward saying well. You think I'm here to ally was no. I don't and she said you're here to make mighty and it was actually quite difficult environment and I was definitely Baltimore. The pecking order. But I came from a fairly sparky academic background and my father who was a theologian taught me that. I should ask and challenge. In order to get the right answer I mean at the age of six challenging bishops. How do you know God exists and things so? Perhaps I was better prepared. The many women would be in that. I was prepared to challenge and push back but it wasn't easy. Am I do think it was a agenda sexist environment and can you give us an example of one moment of pushing back of challenging? Do Love the image of you as a sixty road. You know at Sunday lunch challenging bishop but in the context of Medical Education or medical practice. Well I mean just silly things like I remember. I did something on one of my early wall drown. Something consultant said. Miss Davis I said in front of the patient and the whole team. I appreciate you think have got this wrong and I'm really sorry but I know that when you're happy with me you call me Sally when you content you call me. Dr Davis Miss Davis not acceptable. And he said Oh. I didn't realize I did that. Said you into the men interesting. It didn't again. Oh so go to resort. Yes I wouldn't be invited to everything because the boys were going for a beer sitcoms. I can't stand beer and I didn't like pubs because of the smoking them so I didn't mind in one sentence but on the other side. We all know that a lot of medical networking used to take place in the pub over a beer so I was being excluded though I think the funniest was my hematologist professor who I was very fumbled. But he would do this long ward round on one morning of the week and at a certain point he would walk into the gents and continued discussing the patients and my friend Anais. She she and I would stand outside. Arms crossed thinking. What are they saying about patients? We're looking off. And I got so fed up I took to propping. Open the door with my foot and continuing the conversation with the professor while he was in the Jen's that stopped it. That's a fantastic. He meach to now. You've said about being a woman that you think your gender means that you bring anything special to the role for example role as chief medical officer beyond the willingness to take a more collaborative approach and perhaps a relative lack of a guy. What did you mean by that? A lot of men who achieve these great offices set out to I mean I do meet young. Men Are not met a young woman. Actually who say to me? I want to be a chief. Medical officer said well. Perhaps you should not only enjoy the journey but recognize that. It's an issue of timing. Who else is around? And you may not make. But they're invested in the office. I wasn't it was only about a year before the post came up when my predecessor said to me sally you'd be a good. Cmo Why didn't you apply? When I go in about a year. And I said why would I want it? We had this very funny discussion. So it wasn't. I was invested in the office or had an EGO. In fact I don't my father and mother as I said. We're academics and they brought me up to believe that you should have a really good debate. Does matter of it's an argument but the debate. Get to the best answer. So I brought this very academic research background in and in fact what my team said was I would get to a conclusion quite quickly. But if they had a better argument I would shift and I was always debating thinking aloud and everything and that isn't an ego driven way of doing it so it was a different style. It was very I set out to make evidence my U. S. P. and to be collaborative and debating and then if a decision needed taking I would take it. So that was kind of different approach. Much more academic approach and just unpacking some of that..

Chief Medical Officer Medical officer Sally Davies flu Trinity College professor World Health Organization Exec NHL Lamentin England Britain Australia Miss Davis advisor West Africa Dr Davis Miss Davis researcher Brutalizing
"sally davies" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"sally davies" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"Dear listeners I hope you.

"sally davies" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

11:06 min | 2 years ago

"sally davies" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Hernandez and accused him of having ties as to drug traffickers the Honduran president's brother Tony Anandas is on trial in New York City on accusations of trafficking tons of cocaine through Honduras bound for the United States he's also accused of having personally accepted a million dollar bribe meant for president or Anandas from the notorious Mexican drug lord known as Chapo back in the United States the FBI has carried out thousands of unconstitutional warrantless searches of the national security agencies ask Computer Archives including the protected personal data of US citizens and residents that's according to a ruling last October by the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act court that was declassified this week in the partially redacted ruling Judge James Bowes Berg deter amend the FBI failed to meet minimum legal standards to protect people's Fourth Amendment Rights to privacy on one day alone in December a two thousand seventeen the FBI illegally queried the NSA's database nearly seven thousand times using people's social already numbers the United States has blacklisted twenty-eight Chinese companies government offices and security bureaus over their alleged role in China's mass imprisonment of Muslim leaguers and other minority groups and the far western region of Xinjiang the US Commerce Department said quote these and cities have been implicated in human rights violations and abuses and the implementation of China's campaign of repression mass arbitrary detention and ED technology surveillance unquote the move comes days before trade talks between the US and China and extinction the only in protests are continuing around the globe with nonviolent actions demanding urgent action on the climate crisis this morning protesters is blocked roads leading to London City Airport and held a sit in protest inside the terminal disrupting flights in central London hundreds of mothers with babies blocked traffic and Hilda nursing on Wednesday this is protesters Sally Davies what planet are they going to have go to democracy now dot org and those are some of the headlines this is democracy now democracy now dot Org the Warren Peace report I'm Amy Goodman and I mean she welcome to our listeners and viewers around the country and around the world Turkey has launched an aerial and ground assault on northern Syria targeting Kurdish controlled-areas the offensive began Wednesday just days after president trump ordered US troops to fall back from their positions on the Turkish Syrian border the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reports at least sixteen Kurds have been killed so far turkeys claiming the death toll is far higher some of the heaviest fighting getting has been in the Syrian town of Taleb Yod Turkish jets and artillery have reportedly hit at least eighty one targets east of the Euphrates River the trump administration has faced widespread criticism from both Republican and Democratic lawmakers for abandoning the stateless Kurds who'd help the US fight Isis Turkey is claiming the assault is needed to establish a quote safe zone in northern Syria where Turkey could relocate Syrian refugees who fled over the past eight years of fighting but the Kurds see the offensive as part of a decades long attack by Turkey to crush their attempts at greater autonomy fears also knowing that the Turkish assault could lead to the mass release of Isis fighters of until now the Kurds have been responsible for holding over ten thousand Isis fighters and their families in detention while president trump has claimed Turkey will take control of the makeshift jails there's growing concern many former Isis fighters we'll be able to escape during the Turkish assault at least one Kurdish prison has already been shelled the New York Times reporting the US military has moved as many as seven rural dozen Islamic state prisoners to more secure locations this includes two British members of Isis who are accused of beheading Western hostages including the journalist James Foley and Steven Satloff the Turkey assault is facing international condemnation the UN Security Council was expected to meet later today. The European Union has worn Turkeys hostilities would quote further undermined the stability of the whole region earlier today Turkish president rip type aired one has threatened to send millions of Syrian refugees to Europe if Turkey's assault is Chris sized a European Union. Pull yourself together I say it again if you try to label this operation as an Asian it's very simple we will open the gates and send three point six million refugees your way on Wednesday president trump described Turkeys assault as Adia but defended his decision to shift US troops away from the Syrian Turkish border here in New York protesters demonstrated on Wednesday in front of the offices of D Democrat Senator Chuck Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand in New York City demanding the US defend the Kurdish autonomous region known as Rhodesia this is them governor and assistant professor of sociology and Anthropology at Cuny the City University of New York Kurds have lost. Thousands tens of thousands of lives their homes their lands their agricultural production so all their livelihood in order to defeat is is so that the European and US citizens are comfortable in their homes and now they're once again paying with their lives for having protected our lives we're starting right now with two guests and London were joined by L. F. Sara Khan Kurdish women's movement activists she's an anthropologist at the London School of Economics in Brussels Belgium we're joined by air to rule Kirk Cha the honorary chair of the pro-kurdish People's Democratic Party known as the HD he he's a former member of parliament and Turkey we welcome you both to democracy how else Sarah come let's begin with you let's start at the beginning what we understand what you understand is happening on the ground now you have this conversation last son today between president trump and the Turkish precedent aired one and apparently trump tells him the US will pull oops back in northern Syria and aired one makes very clear he's going to attack this area with Turkish troops explain what has happened since I mean just to give it some context an this is not a new Development Air Dole has been trying to push for this for many months if not years and finally somehow through quite a mysterious cliff conversation trump agreed withdraw the few US soldiers that were position there and just to make clear that the US army the US trump himself the Syrian democratic says and Turkey were well aware that these troops still remained posted there essentially to act as human shields to stop a Turkish invasion now what we saw today was the beginning of this invasion the long promised invasion by Turkish President add-on and as many people have said as a consensus all around the world and with public opinion is the consequences of this are can be grave and will be great it's not only that it's a it's essentially threatening a Kurdish genocide it will it's not even just a possibility it will create and caused a resurgence of Isis it will add to the the national refugee crisis but also equally as importantly it will crush the democratic ecological women's liberationist experiment that has been happy Ming there as well as the Kurds fighting against isis but left the situation is quite extraordinary a US NATO ally Turkey is relentlessly attacking with us made arms and ammunition a US ally the SDF the Syrian democratic forces those who were also trained and armed by the US now what do you understand is happening today in these last two days what do we know about casualties both civilian a Kurdish civilian casualties as well as a casualties among the SDF though it's because the situation is unfolding so quickly it's quite difficult to get any precise figures at this moment but official figures that we've had in the last in the last twenty four hours the is that there's over ten civilians that have been killed says at least fifteen injured civilians and also CNN reporter Clerks Award was going through part of the region yesterday and reported quite horrific scenes of civilians killed but left on the left on the street because people can't get to them because the shelling is so intense and in terms of the SDF again they we don't we don't know the exact figures we know this clashes with as six coordinated attacks in six all areas of northern Syria and the Turkish army with its ally Jihadi forces don't seem to want to stop by any means I wanted to bring Aero Kirk into the conversation and get your response to what president trump is now just saying curtis forces have fought alongside the US against Isis for nearly half a decade Nearly eleven thousand fighters dead on Wednesday trump critic this is eight house during an event in the Roosevelt Room now the Kurds are fighting for the land just so you understand that fighting for the land and somebody wrote in a very very powerful today they didn't help us in the Second World War they didn't help us with Normandy as an example they mention names of different battles and he also Ed The Washington Post is reporting the US military has no plans.

US assault president European Union trump City University of New York Ku Turkey Hernandez New York City New York Senator Chuck Schumer Rhodesia Europe Kirsten Gillibrand Adia assistant professor of sociolo Turkeys twenty four hours million dollar eight years
"sally davies" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

09:02 min | 2 years ago

"sally davies" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"On Twitter, finally at Hewlett tiresias. Right now, continuing the conversation started last hour about a recommendation. From chief medical UK chief medical officer Dame. Sally davies. She's issuing formal guidelines. Urging parents to limit their children's social media use to two hours a day. Now, I happen to agree with the guideline two hours. A day is plenty of time for a child to be exposed to social media or the open internet in general. I'm not talking about when they're doing something that's productive. When they're researching something, no, I'm talking about unstructured, especially social media focused internet time. Two hours is plenty for any kid, frankly for anybody. But my my concern is that we start with a government issuing guidelines, and that eventually turns into a government. Writing laws. That I happen to disagree that I happen to agree with this guideline that I happen to in my own household adhere to something similar to that. Doesn't make any difference. I don't want the government telling me how to raise my kids, and there's a guy. This is Europe. Okay. You look at what's going on in the Pacific Asian nations and the way that the Chinese and the Japanese are handling social media and government control of those things, especially the Chinese and. You're getting off into some kind of crazy totalitarian nightmare where it's being used by the government to actually make things harder for the population. Four hundred fifty eight fifty eight the number do you? Let your kids you social media. Do you agree with restricting that? Does the government guideline change your mind one way or the other is this the slippery slope? It appears to be four nine hundred fifty eight fifty eight Samson is next on KM J. Good afternoon, sir. How you doing today? This is the thing we got a one hundred percent. There's no way the government should be in. They're trying to dictate or set up guidelines and how you can raise your own kid know, what you'd have them do in your own house. But I tell you what parents have got to get get here. And I think I think it's the thing. Also, it's a perfect business opportunity. I don't find my. So mike. I don't mind him being on the internet. Want to be if you're in my house and they're under under eighteen in there. My child I'd say that. The businesses should come up with phones that Kim. They can enter you can control. That's why. Tool set some guidelines with a kid it. It doesn't make sense to have the government is really stupid meniscus linear. The solution. We get that the public can do that can solve this problem. Sampson. I agree with you there. There's a private sector solution. There's a money making opportunity here for for some smart programmer. Yeah. And there are situations where a kid does need a phone, and we see it all the time in the news and stuff when the kid gets kidnapped or or he's lost somewhere. If he has a phone that allow you to track that phone, then you build the fine pm easier. Yeah. That's a very good use of phone. Also, you know, I think that the private sector ought to come up with a phone that if achieved has that he's under eighteen in your house, and you don't want him to be the point sites and stuff if he has it whatever she goes on to you can see it on your phone. So you can monitor it all the time. And he knows you're monitoring or she or she knows your mom, and those sorts of things that can solve this problem without getting the government involved. That's just plain stupid to get the government involved. The parents have distance role they should take back control. And and and have these things I mean technology is coming along so fast. Now, we gotta get to the point where we can use it effectively without destroying our society. You might say. There are ways to do this stuff Simpson. You're absolutely right there. There is a solution out there right for the picking for for some clever coder or for some service provider who wants to attract that audience, there's a great money making opportunity here and by virtue of I think being very profitable and opportunity to improve safety for our kids because my daughter hop on recipes dot com, where is she gets some of these recipes that she works off of no problem. My daughter's spending a little bit of time goofing around browsing Pinterest on on any given day as long as the contents family friendly. No problem. My kid being out on the open internet accessible to other people and able to access any content. She so desires that I got a problem with because she is a good kid. She's a smart kid. She's still a kid. And I don't see unfettered access being the way to go my worry. And the reason that I think you're seeing this guideline being issued across the pond is that this free market solution seems very very obvious. And the programming could be it could be difficult. It could be challenging. But I'll programming is all good programming is. If there was a market for this wouldn't this product already exist. Why aren't parents looking for this? Why aren't parents encouraging this by going to the developers that have something close to what they need and pushing for it to get modified and expanded and improved to be truly useful. That's what bothers me. We could have this solution already. And I don't think anybody's looking for Samson. Great call dude, always good to hear from you got to keep moving four hundred fifty eight fifty eight the number here in town. We're going to talk to Bill next. Welcome to KM J Bill. Bill. Are you there, sir? Okay. Bills phone cut out. That's all right bills comment was that parental controls should be used on any internet use for kids. And then that goes with what I I was just saying, yes, they should. Content. Filtering is an imperfect art the the complexity of successfully programming something that will absolutely positively definitely filter one hundred percent of undesirable content. I don't think it's possible. For two reasons one it's actually really really complicated to teach an algorithm how to see a picture accurately. Shot from the top lot. Hey, foam art, could definitely be mistaken as a human body part. By a machine. Likewise for somebody like my daughter who would just go go to that website. Because there's something there. I'm not supposed to see there's something that it's not appropriate for me to see. Again. I go to my son at ten or eleven he was fighting. He was worried about any of this stuff. By sixteen seventeen years old. My son had figured out how to bypass basic security on our home network. And I am look I I I'm not hacker, man. I'm I'm no IT genius. But I'm pretty competent when it comes to setting up a network and filtering out undesirable stuff and my sixteen year old figured out. How to get around that? And I assure you. Most of the folks that I know who are my age, and my parents age would not have figured out how to get around that. But he he figured out how to circumvent that security and programming this stuff, it is an uncertain art. But I think that there's money it. I think that there's potential in it, and I don't understand why market pressure has it generated a more robust. A more robust set of products already. And again, my fear is that we have a bunch of parents who aren't paying attention don't.

Sally davies UK Twitter Hewlett tiresias Europe Bill medical officer Samson Sampson Kim mike programmer Pinterest Simpson one hundred percent two hours sixteen seventeen years
"sally davies" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

07:12 min | 2 years ago

"sally davies" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"If here's picked up at the car for kids touchdown challenge. This is a fundraising effort through valley children's hospital, which has at least in part supported the construction of just a gorgeous new satellite office in north Modesto. The link-up on Twitter at Philip Terresa. It's kind of a long league you can find it through the valley children's hospital website. Kind of a cool way to raise a few bucks. And support a guy who loves valley children's. Now, I watched Elizabeth Warren's announcement her her kickoff rally to the official Elizabeth Warren for president twenty twenty campaign. Most of it's what you expected. She lays out her platform. I think that Warren has actually I think Warren has actually started to drift towards the center, at least at least based on the platform that she's putting out on the website and the comments that she made today. Drifting slowly towards the center. I think she's got strangle her production. Supervisor. Fire him something there was throughout the entire event. Now, look if you don't like Elizabeth Warren, I get it. Believe me, I get it. But I think that it's I think that it's worth my time to understand where these people are coming from what their positions are going to be friends, close enemies, closer all that. There was a woman who either had to have been standing directly underneath Senator Warren or directly underneath one of the one of the microphones that they had over the crowd. This lady would not stop screaming and carrying on the crowd will get excited, and they'll pick up on a particular phrase the little bit of a champ one of those. This woman went on well past the crowd at the end of every sentence to the point where I was actually watching Elizabeth Warren getting annoyed with it. I think that the Senator could hear this woman, maybe as well as we could. And look, I I do not believe that this country is going to elect Pocahontas president. Actually, I don't think that Elizabeth Warren is going to make it through the primary. I do not believe that she'll be the democratic nominee for president twenty twenty. But it is a significant thing. To have this person. Make the announcement that they're going to run for president. It is something that will be maybe a minor footnote in the greater history of the United States, but a footnote nonetheless, and that video is going to be an essential part of explaining this woman's candidacy. And there is going to be some wigged out. Knucklehead screeching and yelling in the background through the whole thing. And I think it captures perfectly the problem with the platform. So if you do go back to research what Warren had to say find a transcript you're going to be way less annoyed. If you just read warrants comments will not way less a little less annoyed. So we talked about this a little bit on the Christie annual show earlier this week, and I kind of wanted to get your take on it at four nine hundred fifty eight fifty eight or eight hundred seven seven six fifty eight fifty eight. Chief medical officer Dame. Sally Davies is offering formal guidelines. The government is urging parents to limit their children's social media used to two hours at a time. Now Davies is specifically pointing to the death of a fourteen year old girl, Molly Russell, but his talking about suicide rates and incidents of self harm in general as the cause for this push to limit screen time. First of all. Yeah. Two hours a day on the internet is enough for any sane person. Now, I'm not talking about a more and more when we work what we we've got to go to a web portal. I'm not talking about that. I'm talking about the time that we spend just eilly cruising the internet checking social media randomly, browsing flipping through news or fake news. As it would as it would be. I think two hours is enough. God knows it would be for me. For kids. It's definitely enough. I've got an eleven year old daughter. Smart kid, very active. Nice little circle of friends. She's into athletics. She's into drama. She's into music. I mean, she's she's all over the board. Great kid. Very balanced. Very smart. And my wife, and I decided months ago. To program her phone to restrict your screen time. And she can't access anything. But. Our contacts after bedtime. Between like eight PM and six AM all she can do is call me, my wife or nine one one. And during the day, she she gets a maximum of two hours to goof around on the phone. Now, she's she's not on social media. At least not in the sense that most of us think of it being Facebook and Twitter and Instagram her her love affair online is with I kid you not baking shows and Pinterest. But my wife, and I came to this decision based upon the personality and the behavior in the performance of the individual. The fact that my households routine falls into step with recommendation from you case chief medical officer. Doesn't mean that. That's what works for you. Or for your kids? Should there be an automatic restriction on kids screen time? Do you restrict your kids screen time? Have you figured out how to do it? Or is it a an Ottoman iphone? They're not bothering me bothering anybody else..

Elizabeth Warren president Twitter medical officer Sally Davies Philip Terresa Modesto United States Senator Supervisor Pocahontas official Christie Molly Russell Facebook Instagram Pinterest
"sally davies" Discussed on Le Show

Le Show

02:11 min | 4 years ago

"sally davies" Discussed on Le Show

"Louisiana i'm harry share welcome you to this edition of the shoah now news from outside the bubble farming organisations in great britain have set new targets to reduce the use of antibiotics and raising animals for food in an effort to cut the widespread overuse that has been blamed a significant factor increasing resistance among humans this from the guardian the chief medical officer for england dame sally davies has repeatedly said the rapidly increasing resistance antibiotics and the rise of resisted superbugs is one of the greatest threats to human health could make even routine operations life threatening not long from now task force has been set up a among organisations leading the british pig dairy and poultry farming sectors attempting bring down the number of antibiotics commonly used with the assistance of vets and farmers the government the british government had sales of antibiotics to treat animals in that country had fallen by 27 percent in last couple years at also a drop of 83 percent in sales of coal list in an antibiotic of last resort that is critical for human health w h oh says at that drugs should be reserved for human use almost never used in animals are we know unless over here somebody may now that somebody is not meet the department for environment food and rural affairs doesn't gather statistics on antibiotics youth on farms accept recorded volume total sales in the uk vets are not required to report their prescribing practices the drop in sales concerns antibiotics purchased from vets in the uk an investigation by the guardian a couple of years ago found that strong antibiotics though were easily available for purchase unrecorded through the internet limited progress but probably not enough.

Louisiana britain medical officer england british government uk sally davies 27 percent 83 percent
"sally davies" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"sally davies" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Now he is in a film festival in south korea at the moments and oliver stone was asked yesterday about the harvey weinstein situation he said at that time that he believed demand shouldn't be condemned by vigilante system however overnight allwise change oliver stone was to be working with harvey weinstein on his first ever tv show the first ever oliver stone tv show guantanamo about the guantanamo bay prison and he is no said the explains been travelling th the last few days wasn't aware of all the accusations against harvey weinstein and is no decided to recuse himself from guantanamo the tv series and will not work on its he was going to be to writing a to our pilots he won't work on its as long as the weinstein companies involved to a big change of use in the last twelve hours from all over stoned the film director colin patterson now are we heading for a world where common antibiotics don't work anymore and previously treatable illnesses become deadly well possibly that's according to the world health organization which has warned of a post antibiotic era and kotra urgent action to change the way we use antibiotics to that end experts and health professionals from around the world are at a conference in berlin including the uk's chief medical officer professor tame sally davies the uk's involved in a new projects together all the available data on drug resistance around the world james menendez asked her first to outline the scale of the problem antibiotic resistance is already killing paint coal we know conservative estimate for european twenty five thousand deaths a year simla in the states but a figure i often use that of india where we know that about sixty thousand newborn babies die drugresistant infections every year.

south korea oliver stone harvey weinstein guantanamo bay prison colin patterson uk professor india guantanamo weinstein director berlin medical officer sally davies james menendez twelve hours