35 Burst results for "Sally"

"sally" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

04:26 min | 3 weeks ago

"sally" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"Of the FBI. She was held in custody for a year. During which time, the FBI and the military government under Douglas MacArthur conducted an investigation, interviewing hundreds of people, including the POWs that worked on her show. They also dug up hundreds of documents to see if she had committed any crimes. After a year she was released after the FBI and U.S. counterintelligence service, found no evidence of wrongdoing. However, this wasn't the end of her problems. Back in the U.S., the public led by newspaper columnist Walter Winchell, campaigned to have her tried for treason. In 1948, she was re arrested in Japan and returned to the U.S. to stand trial. And here I need to move the story from Japan to Germany. Because they too had their own version of Tokyo rose, known as axis Sally. Unlike Tokyo rose, which was a name given to many different people, there were not as many access sallies, and in particular, it was a very specific person. Mildred gillars. Gillers was born in 1900 in Maine. She was a vagabond for most of her life, moving around trying to make a go of it as an actor or a model. She eventually left the United States in 1929 to live in Paris for 6 months. In 1933, she left the United States again, going to Algeria to work for a dressmaker, and then landed in Dresden Germany to study music and teach English. In 1940, she got a job with German state radio as an announcer. In 1941, the United States advised all Americans to leave Germany. But by that time she was engaged to a German national who wouldn't marry her if she returned to the U.S.. When war broke out in late 1941, she couldn't go back if she wanted to. In 1941, Gilles was recruited into hosting a show called home sweet home, which had popular music and spent a lot of time telling soldiers how their sweethearts back home were being unfaithful to them. Her.

FBI U.S. counterintelligence servi United States axis Sally Douglas MacArthur military government Walter Winchell POWs Mildred gillars Gillers Tokyo Japan Germany Maine Algeria Dresden Paris Gilles
Biden's Latest Nominee Saule Omarova Removed Karl Marx Thesis off Resume

Mark Levin

01:56 min | Last month

Biden's Latest Nominee Saule Omarova Removed Karl Marx Thesis off Resume

"Just to show you How unbelievable this administration is What a fraud Joe Biden is and was to get elected president of the United States From our Friends at post millennial Biden nominee removes thesis on Karl Marx from her resume Removes her thesis from Karl Marx on her resume I talked about this woman before She's a Marxist She's a flat out Marxist On Tuesday Biden's nominee to head the office of the control of the currency Sally amar ova removed her thesis on Karl Marx from her resume According to the Washington free Beacon Amaro listed a paper titled Karl Marx's economic analysis in the theory of revolution in the capital on her resume as recently as 2017 Senator pat toomey the ranking member of the Senate banking housing and urban affairs committee demanded she hand over a copy of that thesis in a letter written on Tuesday He said the committee needs to fully assess the fitness of individuals to serve in Senate confirmed executive and independent agency positions She reportedly wrote that thesis while attending Moscow state university at pointed her out two weeks ago on a VI Lenin personal academic scholarship on a Lenin personal academic scholarship But the curriculum vide the CV viewed by the Senate committee on banking housing and urban affairs did not list that paper To me demanded that she hand over the original Russia language thesis in an English version if it exists to the committee of October 13 Remember the Democrats run the committee

Karl Marx Biden Sally Amar Ova Senator Pat Toomey Senate Banking Housing And Urb Joe Biden Amaro United States Vi Lenin Washington Moscow State University Senate Committee On Banking Ho Senate Russia
Tracking Clinton Campaign Lawyer Michael Sussmann Since the Nunes Report

Mark Levin

01:57 min | 2 months ago

Tracking Clinton Campaign Lawyer Michael Sussmann Since the Nunes Report

"So everything I did based on the house Intel drop was chrono chronological order as it was presented And it starts here From the Nunes memo both the DOJ and the FBI petitioned the fisa court to begin to surveil a Trump campaign adviser we later learned was Carter page On October 21st 2016 just two and a half weeks before the election The application had to be certified by the FBI's director or deputy director The attorney general Deputy Attorney General or assistant attorney general to the NSA The initial warrant on Carter page was issued and renewed three times Every 90 days which took you through the rest of the campaign Through the election the president elect period in the early months of the Trump presidency FBI director James Comey signed three of those fisa court warrants Comey sign three deputy FBI director Andrew mccabe signed one Deputy Attorney General's Sally Yates Dana bonetta and rod Rosenstein they signed one Christopher Steele was an FBI source He was initially paid first payment a $160,000 by the DNC and the Clinton campaign to create the dossier via Perkins coy and fusion GPS Okay so this is now the place where sussman fits in Everywhere we have the law firm Perkins coy We now know that was sussman

FBI Carter DOJ James Comey Intel Comey Andrew Mccabe NSA Sally Yates Dana Bonetta Rod Rosenstein Christopher Steele DNC Clinton Sussman Perkins
Food Prices Go Up Globally

The Indicator from Planet Money

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

Food Prices Go Up Globally

"Today we're looking at food prices so sally. I'm not sure if you're feeling a bit a sticker shock at the supermarket aisle or pain at the grocery counter. I mean i live in brooklyn we go to the deli but have you seen the price of bagels lately. Not getting any cheaper this month. Consumer price index came out today and it is five point three percent and that means that. Us prices of role in august with five point three percent higher than they were this time last year and food prices. They are growing at a pretty steady clip at three percent per year. But the little bit of food price increases that we're seeing in the. Us is small compared to what's happening globally according to the un's food and agriculture organization wholesale prices for food like we sugar mate. They're up thirty three percent from a year

Sally Brooklyn United States UN
"sally" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:45 min | 2 months ago

"sally" Discussed on The Book Review

"I guess and yeah. I mean it's sort of a classic sally rini novel in that way. It's all about the relationships in the will they won't they of at all. I think it's clear you're a fan but you did have some criticism of this novel in particular in your review. Tell us about that. Yes i am. Avowed rooney tune at all salad. Rini fans and i did enjoy novel but i did feel a little. You know there are these moments in the novel where alice who's sort of the spokesperson for the writer. She she says writing a novel today as so vulgar like yeah. It seems like a waste but isn't but also isn't important to make art enta- like had relationships aren't human relationships important to an felt a little bit like a dodge view like it felt a little bit like the novel had raised all of these interesting questions about the function of art in an age of systemic collapse in climate change and threats against democracy but instead of really really dwelling in the material reality of those fashions if dodges faints is like but relationships are important because after all we're all human and i you know as a reader i was like yes. That's true but it feels like you're not really answering the questions. You're raising not that a novel knee do that but you know i wanted a little more of a satisfactory engagement at least with the terms of the debate and also sally is so good at dialogue that sometimes it felt like the cleverness was being used to get her out of a jam in a sense to dodge the real thorny questions of class power that are raised by the knowledge. And so yeah. I was a little underwhelmed by the novel's dodging us regarding the moral of its project but as a sally rooney fan you love the dialogue on you. Love the relationships. You've love the great pros in the the great settings and the apartment decoration that's described as a reader left having enjoyed myself but not entirely satisfied..

sally rini Rini alice sally sally rooney
"sally" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:10 min | 2 months ago

"sally" Discussed on The Book Review

"In that sally renew the person professes to be a marxist which to some mind smacks of the nineteen as opposed to the twenty first century. And there's a lot of debate about whether that marxist philosophy is conveyed in her novels and if so is it conveyed enough or not enough. What are her politics. And how do they become apparent or not in her work. She is said the her her stories in her novels. Don't really begin with characters. They began with relationships and that strikes music deeply. Marxist thing i mean. I don't know if it's because marxist ideology or if it's just how she sees the world but i do think of marxism is being study of interconnectedness and social relations. In that way. I think that her novels are kind of marxist and that they are exploring power dynamics and the ways that society is under girded by these differentials of power and dialectics and her characters are marxist. I mean there's this really great conversation in beautiful world. Where are you where i lean gets into a fight about whether or not working class is the identity group that can be inherited. Or if it's just a class status thing that you can have it at one point in your life regardless of your station of birth and like these. Young people are like arguing about the nature of what is a working class person in. What does that word even. What does that phrase even mean in. Today's world anyone who's like gone to grad school. Milan years recognize that. Very particular argument among once-socialist friends. And so i mean. I do think that she is alive to all of contradictions and the strangeness of trying to live in an ethical marxist way in a grossly capitalistic society and so i think that her characters in her novels. Try to explore marxism but in the sort of jess general way. She's not writing like those horrible muckraking novels from the early twentieth century. Like she's not writing. One of those novels..

sally Milan jess
Surfer Fatally Bitten by Shark off Australia's East Coast

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 3 months ago

Surfer Fatally Bitten by Shark off Australia's East Coast

"The staff has been killed by a chunk of the eastern coast of Australia as many Nichols went to beaches to celebrate father's day the attack took place of Sally in emerald beach is around three hundred and thirty miles north of Sydney witness our nam strong said people had cleared out from the C. immediately after the attack ran down to see what was happening sore man without and lots of blood and lots of people in a sentence by sentence in paramedics gave the man CPR but his injuries was so severe he could not be revived Armstrong believes that will change the point that the area at least for now trying to fabricate a bit for a little while in a day that's for sure we've never had an incident he that I've heard all fine Karen Thomas

Emerald Beach Nichols Sally Australia Sydney Armstrong Karen Thomas
Using The Keto-Alkaline Approach for Menopausal Women with Dr. Anna Cabeca

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

02:38 min | 3 months ago

Using The Keto-Alkaline Approach for Menopausal Women with Dr. Anna Cabeca

"Are the keys to mastering hormones. Now well i definitely say it's all about getting into that balance getting that peaceful state and always say there are three major hormones. We have to control right as gynecologist. I wanna say. it's progesterone estrogen testosterone. But it's really not to be honest. Insulin cortisol and then my absolutely favorite most powerful mormon in our body oxytocin. So it's those three that i teach now working with women as they're going through this midlife weight gain. I want to tell you this. I mean this is what i would tell. My patients kito Genyk guides don't work for women in this change of why they just don't work and i'll tell you what the reason is. I tell you go crazy. So what i found in my clinical practice understanding the research from decades ago looking at ketogenic diets thinking okay. You know sally you. You're forty five. You're gaining this way. Let's go and this buried carbohydrate restricted program and you know of course after we've done detox program. Let's go through this carbohydrate restricted program and this is the ketogenic this will help you burn fat and lose weight for sure. But you know when i would try to do and i'm like okay. Yeah no. I don't like myself this way. I'm getting irritable on edge of not appease. What's going on and my patients would say the same thing. So i said i call the keita crazy so as i as i hit this stage thinking okay well. What's the missing link here for women especially to avoid these symptoms and to empower their body into a fat-burning state which feels can feel really great. How do we create that balance. So that brought in the missing piece that we all know his functional medicine. Docs that's really key. When we detox people. We want them on an alkaline diet and i started checking i started having myself check my family friends etc. Check their urine. Okay they completely get an acidic urine. Ph let's not good long term. We need a good balance. We need to be alkaline. And acidic and our european and i help what you -ation so i started getting clients and myself alkaline. Burst and then going to kyoto says so starting eating more healthy greens carbohydrate bump talking about europe. And i know you know that. But i think that's where the literature gets really confusing like alkalinity. Doesn't matter it absolutely does. Our blood ph is gonna stay stable and we're going to rob our bones muscles etcetera in order to keep up ph stable but urinary will give us a good indication of what woods passing through our kidneys on a regular basis. What's our inflammatory know. What's going on from that cellular

Kito Genyk Sally Kyoto Europe
Taliban Crush Opposition Across Afghanistan, as Chaos Builds at Airport

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:05 min | 3 months ago

Taliban Crush Opposition Across Afghanistan, as Chaos Builds at Airport

"Let's sally. Takeover of afghanistan has post more questions than it has on stirred the insurgency groups. Promise that the country would no longer be a violent basil filtering hollow. As at least three people were short and killed at a protest in jalalabad. Senior taliban leaders also say afghanistan under their watch will not be a democracy. Mas will be ruled by sharia law will earlier. Today monaco's georgina godwin spoke to helene o'donnell a columnist for foreign policy magazine who witnessed to the changes in the country firsthand. She and tour photographer. Who recently left kabul for the netherlands. Let seventy seven. I was in herat the west and a couple of weeks ago. And i was there to cover what seemed to be at the taliban is sold it was actually taliban incursion into The western city of herat. It's very big important. Wealthy part of the country. I spent time on the front lines with a called ishmael. Khan who since given oak And he was working at the time with his militia alongside Soldiers on the national security directed afghanistan's who do how do we know a former perhaps secret service. And i watched them really losing and i thought i tried to get out up to two days. My plan had been forty eight hours. I was there for five days. Because the taliban taking the road to the airport the airport was causing. It was very difficult. And i decided dan event as was watching the reality of herat full. That tyrod was a big step towards kabul and that it was time to make arrangements to leave an i. I can't tell you how lucky. I was in my tiny because via flight that i took out We've my friend and colleague westwood hosseini the pulitzer prize winning photographer from afghanistan. Who i've been working with for a decade It was the last commercial flight wheels up on sunday morning.

Taliban Afghanistan Georgina Godwin Helene O'donnell Foreign Policy Magazine Herat Jalalabad Kabul Monaco The Netherlands Tyrod Khan Westwood Hosseini DAN Pulitzer Prize
The Shameful Legacy of Indigenous Residential Schools

Scrolls & Leaves

01:34 min | 3 months ago

The Shameful Legacy of Indigenous Residential Schools

"Sally went to the mohawk institute residential school in brantford canada. And here's one incident that she remembers. We were at the marshall one week. It's were full the bugs and we had all our hair cut off. We were made baldi's we were really bold and That was a very good feeling to have so like sally sad. Her hair was shaved off and that was just the beginning of years of abuse that the school throw us in this dark room and tell us the rats were going to get us. But i didn't know. Then why i was being thrown in there and i used to wonder what did i do and i would cry. We cried and cried for hours in there. Not knowing who were in there and take us out. And when. I did get to learn a little bit of english. I knew then they were throwing us in there because we wouldn't speak english. Oh my god. It's awful yeah. It is still awful. It's just one example. Of what what. She endured there her interviews from a two thousand nine documentary called unseen tears. And that's by filmmaker ron douglas. So sally and hundreds of thousands of indigenous children in america and canada or sent to boarding schools just like mush hole and they were beginning to speak their language where traditional clothing practice their religion and a lot of times agency their families for years so it was a legacy of hardship and abuse. That was literally meant to wipe out their

Mohawk Institute Residential S Baldi Brantford Sally Marshall Canada Ron Douglas America
"sally" Discussed on Inquisikids Daily

Inquisikids Daily

05:16 min | 4 months ago

"sally" Discussed on Inquisikids Daily

"Hi i'm luke and welcome to the inquisitors podcast. Do you like new things. Have you ever wanted to be the first person to do something exciting and daring. Today we are going to learn about someone who would have answered yes to those questions. Sally ride was the first american woman to travel to space. that is undoubtedly exciting and daring. Sally ride was born on may twenty six. Nineteen fifty one in encino california. Her mom was a voluntary counselor for a prison ministry and her dad was a professor of political science. She had one sister. Sally was a great student and she enjoyed math and science. She started playing tennis when she was ten and was one of the best players in the united states after she graduated from high school. Sally attended swarthmore college in pennsylvania and was a tennis team member there during her second year there. Sally decided not to pursue a career in tennis. But to enroll at stanford university sally graduated from stanford in nineteen seventy three with not one but two degrees one was an english and the other in physics but she did not stop learning. She continued on at stanford and earned a masters degree in science and a phd in physics. She was now. Dr sally ride. Her focus was astrophysics. It was no surprise that in nineteen seventy seven when nasa was looking for astronauts and would be considering women for the first time sally applied nasa was only accepting twenty five people. Sally was among those people along with five other women. It was now. Nineteen seventy eight and sally moved to houston texas to begin her training at the johnson. Space center here she learned how to parachute scuba dive tread water and heavy spacesuit and how to live in the weightless conditions of space. Sally also learn how to control the space shuttle that would eventually carry her and her fellow astronauts into space. Sally also earned her pilot's license. She completed her training in nineteen seventy nine and began her work as a space shuttle mission specialist as a mission specialist. Sally was on the ground control team for the astronauts on the second and third space shuttle trips. Sally was the first woman to do this job. She was also involved in developing the robotic arm used to deploy satellites on the space shuttle several years past finally on june. Eighteenth nineteen eighty-three. The moment sally had been training for arrived. She was suited up with four other astronauts and ready to blast off aboard the space shuttle challenger. She would not only be the youngest person to travel the space but would be the first american woman to go to space joining to russian women who had gone before her. Her mission lasted six days during her time and space sally conducted many experiments and was involved in the deployment of two communications satellites. Sally said it was the most fun she had ever had. Sally was able to go to space again. The next year it was the thirteenth shuttle mission and she was once again aboard the challenger. This time there were six others with her including catherine sullivan. Who became the first woman to walk in space. During the mission the largest crew ever other shuttle. This mission lasted eight days. Sally spent her time making scientific. Observations of earth and researching refueling techniques for future shuttles. She was scheduled to take third shuttle trip. But after the explosion of the challenger in nineteen eighty six nasa suspended shuttle missions for the next two years instead she served as a member of the presidential commission that investigated the tragedy. She would also serve on the commission that investigated the second shuttle explosion in two thousand three. Sally ended her career at nasa in nineteen eighty seven. She went on to become a physics professor in nineteen eighty nine at the university of california. Sally used her knowledge and experience to help young girls advance in the fields of science mathematics and technology. She even wrote seven children's books about her time in space. Dr sally ride is a member of both the national women's hall of fame and the astronaut hall of fame. Two elementary schools are named in her honor. She is the only person to have served on the investigative committees for both shuttle accidents after battling cancer for almost a year and a half. Sally passed away at sixty one in two thousand thirteen. President obama awarded sally. The presidential medal of freedom. Dr sally ride was indeed a pioneer. Not just for women. But for all americans.

Sally sally Sally ride stanford university tennis Dr sally ride nasa Space center swarthmore college encino luke catherine sullivan pennsylvania california united states houston johnson texas presidential commission
Why Relationships Fail With Abby Medcalf

LifePix Relationships With ST

01:50 min | 4 months ago

Why Relationships Fail With Abby Medcalf

"Do you think is the real reason relationships fail so 'cause i really talk about this a lot. I you know i've been. I've been working with couples all these years like thirty five years now. 'cause i'm old and i have to say so. Everyone comes in usually the same thing. We don't communicate with. They say over and over again. We're not communicating. We need help communicating. It's here and really. The communication is failing because of a different problem which is competition and we compete with our partners. All the time and this isn't really just in love relationships but that's what we'll talk about right now it is. We compete all the time you know. It's your turn to put away the dishes. I took sally the baseball on monday. So you have to take jack piano on friday. You spent money on this thing. So i get to spend money on that thing. We divide all the time. We do this sort of thing and what happens. Is we end up on opposite sides from our partners because right we're in competition for resources in the relationship money time all those things in that jealousy that happens i see it all the time and it's not even just a couples who have children it's all over Were i think with kids. It's more about time and with couples with our kids. It's more about money But sometimes it's time kill and there's this a subtle. Will you out with your friends all weekend. You know when is my time you know. There's this jealousy. There's this not liking when the other person is doing. Well actually not liking. When someone's doing while i had belie is that if you really love percent then you want the best for the other person you do but if you think it means loss for you you don't so if you're going to be lost for you just because i say it shouldn't

Jack Piano Sally Baseball
"sally" Discussed on Dear Dyslexic Podcast

Dear Dyslexic Podcast

02:30 min | 4 months ago

"sally" Discussed on Dear Dyslexic Podcast

"Has anyone <Speech_Male> done that. We do <Speech_Male> and stop that. Compensation <Speech_Male> and advances <Silence> will then. <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Female> great compensation salt <Speech_Female> with stop talking <Speech_Male> to the latest in <Speech_Male> your leadership <Speech_Male> team about <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> i guess you wanna find <Speech_Male> out what's happening in how <Speech_Male> it place and <Speech_Male> dumped. Do people <Silence> feel comfortable <SpeakerChange> talking <Speech_Female> about. <Speech_Female> And i think <Speech_Female> that's a great <Speech_Female> way to <Speech_Music_Female> finish the podcast <Speech_Female> particularly <Speech_Music_Female> as <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> we've <Speech_Female> gone through <Speech_Female> There's never <SpeakerChange> been <Speech_Female> a more opportunistic <Speech_Female> time <Speech_Female> to be asking this <Speech_Female> questions <Speech_Female> because everyone's <Speech_Female> needed support <Speech_Female> in. How <Silence> in transitioning <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> hurry <Speech_Female> out. Just <Speech_Music_Female> the whole change <Speech_Music_Female> security <Speech_Female> across the world. <Speech_Female> I think he no. <Speech_Female> It's actually really exciting. <Speech_Female> Time to be curious <Speech_Female> into the asking <Speech_Female> those questions of <Speech_Female> oil staff. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> I <Silence> am royal teams. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Look at the success <Speech_Male> stories. The <Speech_Male> so many positive <Speech_Male> stories that have come out of <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> what place sitting <Speech_Male> around remote <Speech_Female> teams and <Speech_Female> booting <Speech_Female> empathy and so <Speech_Female> both and is also <Speech_Female> pain stories around <Speech_Male> the challenges. <Speech_Male> Lots of stories <Speech_Male> around the challenges <Speech_Male> always glosses. <Speech_Male> It's just <Speech_Male> that the fact <Speech_Male> that we talk about <Speech_Male> the challenge is <Speech_Male> also positive <Speech_Male> the fact <Speech_Male> that people can <Speech_Male> share all <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> zoom of <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> know <Speech_Female> challenging. <Speech_Male> The blur between <Speech_Male> where can harm and <Speech_Male> so forth. These <Speech_Male> conversations <Speech_Male> are <Speech_Male> about <Speech_Female> differences <Speech_Male> and flexibility <Speech_Male> and inclusion <Speech_Female> and affected <Speech_Male> people. Do things differently. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> that's the sign <Speech_Male> compensation when it <Speech_Male> comes to <Speech_Male> a diversity <Silence> it's just about having <Speech_Male> a winless <Speech_Male> of <Silence> differences <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> with thank you so much <Speech_Music_Female> for coming on the show. Today <Speech_Female> i've lent to launch. <Speech_Female> It lays me <Speech_Female> thinking about <Speech_Female> how it <Speech_Female> can continue to rise <Speech_Female> awareness in the space <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> It's been wonderful <Speech_Female> in your <Speech_Female> suggestions <Speech_Female> at <Speech_Female> a really valuable in africa. <Speech_Female> That allison is <Speech_Female> as much as the <Speech_Music_Female> as i have. So <Speech_Female> thank you so much for coming <Speech_Female> on the show. Sally <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> take <Speech_Female> care <Speech_Female> to find <Speech_Female> out more about <SpeakerChange> sally <Speech_Female> and all the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> work she's doing hit <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to. Dd slick <Speech_Female> dot com or checkout <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> linked in profile. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Did you know <Speech_Female> we now have a new <Speech_Female> live q. And <Speech_Female> a series called question. <Speech_Female> This <Speech_Female> d <Speech_Female> created <Speech_Female> during curve <Speech_Female> to help out community <Speech_Female> feel more connected. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Each month i <Speech_Female> interview a fellow dyslexic <Speech_Female> about all <Speech_Female> things dyslexia <Speech_Female> unlock. The <Speech_Female> question do series <Speech_Female> is running <Speech_Female> through facebook live. <Speech_Female> I really <Speech_Female> hope you can come along <Speech_Female> and

allison Sally africa facebook
"sally" Discussed on Raising Christian Kids

Raising Christian Kids

02:35 min | 4 months ago

"sally" Discussed on Raising Christian Kids

"It's not hard. It june one other mom and you pray. Pray in your house. You pray in another woman's house if you're on a christian school you can proud christian school. It's not hard. It's so simple that knee who never brought up our before it be part of it perfect so we will have the links on how they can sign up in the show notes and we will have to remind our listeners to start praying with your children when they're very very young. It's just so important yes yes might might kizer the similar my best prayer partners when they were young the youngest i think was one in my oldest. My kids were ten years apart from the oldest to the youngest at four children and from eleven to one they would come up the my bed. All four of them and we would do the four steps of prayer one day. We prayed for one child in the schools the next day and under child in our relatives they learned to pray the footsteps of prayer in as shared with you earlier. Three of my four kids are heavily involved in their prayer and their churches in there. Witnessing guy bring revival within their churches so it's incredible but teach them because his world teachers don't fear. I mean fear paralyzed you. Fear sets a stress. Hormone that just paralyzes you yet. Praise and thanksgiving if you teach them that that sends dopamine and that is that that that wide open mind receive all that god wants to end and through their lives but a comes through prayer. It takes away the fear of the bully when they're in school and their little in the bullies are picking on them or saying something mean if they can just stop from moment and say a prayer right away you know. Teach them how to pray to god to let that peace that surpasses all understanding. Bill them in calm them. Thank you sally. For being on the show and i hope the moms who are listening and even the dads is there an organization for dads to or is it just moms. It's so funny because you'll have a lot of dads and they can use our tools. It's all free on there. The rare sheets. Anything in the naked can join with men and prayed with men. it's a very intimate moment and time. So those moms come together and they were out there heart so yes is definitely a mom's so moms go and check out her organization by going to the show notes on the episode on my website and again thank you for being on the show. Sally yes you for what you're doing. I love your ministry. Thank you for what you're doing. Empowering and clipping guarantee to raise their kids unto christ. Oh guy has a great plan for next generation. Yes he does. And just god bless you for all you're doing for moms and for the little children in for our country and we're all working together to.

kizer sally Bill Sally
"sally" Discussed on Raising Christian Kids

Raising Christian Kids

04:07 min | 4 months ago

"sally" Discussed on Raising Christian Kids

"Jesus so let's dig deep and raise strong christian kids. Hello and welcome back to racing christian kids. I'm so happy to have sally burke on the show today now. Sally burke became the director of field ministry at mom's in prayer international headquarters overseeing ministry expansion worldwide but today in her role as president her vision remains unchanged that more children schools imams.

sally burke Sally burke field ministry mom's in prayer international
"sally" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

05:24 min | 4 months ago

"sally" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"New book new yorkers the first guest believe it or not is sally davies herself and we're also joined by photographer. Writer and fellow. Be an hr jill waterman. Welcome to sally a gel. Sally davies is a new york city photography if they ever was won her images of the site in east village just uis gotham and her work is appropriately in the permanent collection of museum of the city of new york and the new york city. Nine eleven memorial museum. Our archive was recently acquired by nyu and is now part of the downtown collection of fales. Library sally's photographs have been featured in the new york. Times and the new opposed among others and exhibited at bernard uchi meisel gallery in two thousand fourteen salary. See the citation from the city of new york for ongoing commitment to photographing the lory side and like all grey chronicles of new acceding. She's canadian wouldn't you know it. They go chill. Waterman has joined us on the podcast past years and has recently published insightful interview with sally which wigan referenced. Today jill is a photographer in editor and writer. And she's worked for photo district news and dna explorer and she's the author of the two thousand six book night and low light photography gills photo series. The new year's eve project has documented new year's celebrations around the globe for the past thirty seven years. You know jill. I think you would have gotten it right by now but okay. We'll have to talk a little bit again. Welcome to both of you to the show. Thank you great to have you rate the beer sally. This is a really really neat neat book. That captures a certain spirit. The new city mood of what got a photographer. More known for wandering the streets neighborhoods into the various homes in apartments of the city. And like what. What's the magic word for getting into people's apartments in this new york city. 'cause i've tried going over to strangers..

Sally davies jill waterman sally Nine eleven memorial museum bernard uchi meisel gallery new york city new york east village nyu jill Waterman wigan
Gausman, Casali Power Giants to Sweep of Nationals

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 5 months ago

Gausman, Casali Power Giants to Sweep of Nationals

"Kevin Gosselin worked six plus innings of one run ball and Kirkus Sally hit a three run homers the giants top the nationals three to one for a three game sweep Gaza struck out nine and held Washington to four hits as he lowered his ERA to one point seven three second only to Mets ace Jacob deGrom among all big league hurlers Sally went deep off Eric fading in the second inning while filling in for all star catcher buster Posey San Francisco heads into the all star break with the best record in the majors at fifty seven and thirty two quite a surprise for a team that wasn't expected to contend in the NL west I'm Dave very

Kevin Gosselin Kirkus Sally Jacob Degrom Giants Gaza Mets Washington Buster Posey Sally Eric San Francisco Dave
The Fight For Abortion Rights In The Dominican Republic

Latino USA

02:12 min | 5 months ago

The Fight For Abortion Rights In The Dominican Republic

"The dominican republic has one of the harshest anti-abortion laws in the americas. Abortion isn't allowed. Under any circumstances only five other countries in the continent have such harsh restrictions on ending a pregnancy legally. That's haiti on dudas. Nicaragua jamaica and el salvador today. I'm joined by amanda. She's a dominican journalist and our former digital media at her here at let the usa. She's gonna tell us more about what's happening in her home country where she's based right now and what's going on in the fight for women's reproductive rights on the island. Hey amanda welcome to let him. Usa alumnia thank you for having me today. So amanda you've been following the protests that have been happening in the dominican republic since march and that's when women's rights activist set up an encampment in the capital in santo. Domingo more recently there was a national march where a lot of people in the protests. Were chanting something pretty particular. They were saying less. Today's cows silas which can basically be translated into the three grounds or the three circumstances. So that's a less three scou- sally's i mean it's like it's it doesn't roll right off of your tongue. I'm trying to think of ever used the word. Gauss silas anywhere in my life in spanish. And i'm like. I don't think i've ever used that word. So kisses to the last three days. Cow sally's yes. So the silence. Which was a word that i've personally gotten very used to saying because i've been in the middle of these protests They're basically three circumstances under which women would be allowed to have an abortion and these are considered sort of the basic circumstances right. So it's when there has been a case of rape or incest when the fetus non non-viable and when the health of the woman is at risk

Amanda Dudas Dominican Republic USA El Salvador Americas Nicaragua Jamaica Haiti Gauss Silas Domingo Santo Cow Sally Silas Sally
A Mob Boss Starts a Movement

HISTORY This Week

02:26 min | 5 months ago

A Mob Boss Starts a Movement

"June twenty eighth nineteen seventy one f. I'm sally helm. It's hot and humid in new york. City a festive. Summer morning at columbus circle on the southwestern corner of central part vendors are hawking sandwiches angela lotto and cold orange sodas to the gathering crowd forty foot plastic banners in red green and white flutter beneath the statue of christopher columbus. In fact the colors of the italian american flag are everywhere on penance on hats on buttons. That read kissed me. I'm italian the rally will begin at noon. It's the second annual unity day celebration sponsored by the italian american civil rights league. There are concerned with fighting. Discrimination against italian americans and combating stereotypes. They say not. All italian americans are mafiosos for most of us. The godfather isn't real life and the thousands of people at this rally are here to make their voices heard as hard-working law abiding citizens discrimination against italian. Americans is a real problem and has long roots in the united states. but it's nevertheless ironic that the head of the italian american civil rights league. The guy who really is the league is a reputed mob boss himself. Joe colombo colombo. Is there at the rally on this summer morning. Reading his supporters taking photos with politicians people call out to him as he weaves through the crowd. Joe hydro at around eleven forty five. Am colombo approaches the podium to speak and then three shots ring out from the press area near the stage. There's a moment of eerie silence and then chaos colombo has been shot in the head. He's alive but in critical shape. His horn rimmed glasses. Lie a few feet from his body near a growing pool of blood

Italian American Civil Rights Sally Helm Columbus Angela Joe Colombo Colombo New York Joe Hydro United States
"sally" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

04:36 min | 5 months ago

"sally" Discussed on Short Wave

"Buddies her high school. Everybody that we could think of. And then i started thinking like okay. So we're gonna have this big event that i'm going to organize. And who am i to i mean. Many of the people know where a couple but most of them don't yeah and so i went back upstairs and sat on sally's little hospital bed and just said you know what you know who. Who am i going to be in the world. And she kind of thought about it for a second and she was just lying down. You know her hair completely shaved but looking at horrible i might add. They're for little crewcut and she said you decide whatever you decide. We'll be just fine. You know you decide and you know that. Put me in shock. You know so. I kinda ran downstairs and sally sister bear was staying with us and one of our good friends and i just. I said you believe what sally just told me. And you know what should i do. I don't know what to do. I want to protect sally. I want to protect nasa. I you know and both bear and karen said. Tell the truth that that's who you are. That's who sally is and basically wrote an obituary about sally. And so on. So i made it clear she and i were a couple for twenty seven years and you know then. I'm being left behind. Her mother was being left behind bear nieces and nephews and so on and that just took off you when she passed away because most people didn't know she was ill very few people in general knew that she was gay so it was really sally telling me to do what i thought was best and then my friends helping me realize that i needed to be true to myself and it changed my life and i wish sally could experience that though so after sally passed away you know you had kind of come out as a couple in her own bed. There were a few big public recognitions of your relationship. Sally didn't just break the stratospheric glass ceiling. President obama decided that sally should receive the presidential medal of freedom and that you should accept it. Tam o shaughnessy accepting on behalf of her life partner. Dr sally k ride doesn't give much more than that. What was that experience like. First of all. I love president and for him to be brave enough. I think and just do the right thing. Sally's mother could have received the award. Her sister her former husband. You know whatever and he selected me. It was an amazing experience. But i do wish i. Just gosh i wish sally had been around to see all this stuff and to experience kind of our authentic selves. As billie jean would say you know and i love that phrase. Actually you know be be who you are. Don't cover it up. ok tam. I really really appreciate your time.

twenty seven years Sally both karen one sally k sally First President couple bear obama billie jean nasa Tam o shaughnessy Dr
Greg Abbott Vetoes Part of Budget That Funds Legislature After Democrat Walkout

Under the Hood with Cambridge Auto

00:18 sec | 5 months ago

Greg Abbott Vetoes Part of Budget That Funds Legislature After Democrat Walkout

"Following through on his threat. Governor Abbott is vetoing the portion of the state budget that pays for legislature salaries, the walkout by state Democrats in the final hours of the May session. Killed the election Integrity bill as well as the bail reform bill to priorities The governor had highlighted. I'm Sally

Governor Abbott Legislature Sally
Biden Tax Proposal Means Your Beneficiaries Will Have to Pay Taxes, Too

Mark Levin

01:58 min | 5 months ago

Biden Tax Proposal Means Your Beneficiaries Will Have to Pay Taxes, Too

"And maybe you've drawn up a will. And you say, you know what? I'm going to leave my home. My kids. When I die, That's what most people do, don't they? Leave it to Freddie. Mohammed Sally, Whatever. And so in the federal tax code, they have a way of Evaluating these things. Take a look at this. So how do they tax this? How do they taxing? Well, if you don't meet a certain threshold, they don't tax it at all. But Joe Biden wants to hugely reduce that threshold. And Joe Biden wants As a as an example a real property that's valued at over a million dollars at the time of your death. To use the value at the time of your death as the basis for the property. For which a capital gains would be paid, But he wants the capital gains to be the same as the regular income tax. So what is he doing here? He's massively increasing the tax rate. So there is no distinction between capital games and personal income tax. He's massively increasing. The value of the property. So you'll be taxed on the higher value of the basis of the property. What does all this mean? Oh, So convoluted. Means that most of you who are in the middle class who are not millionaires when you pass away And your property is passed on to your kids or whomever. They're going to have a massive tax bill.

Mohammed Sally Joe Biden Freddie
Marxists Have Control of the Media and Education; It's Time to Challenge Them

Mark Levin

01:35 min | 5 months ago

Marxists Have Control of the Media and Education; It's Time to Challenge Them

"I think you can look at two things before we run out of time. The media and education These are two the key areas They have devoured them. They've controlled them for a very long time. Now they're completely out of the closet. In many ways that's helpful so we can deal with it. You will not see a difference between the vast majority, overwhelming majority of media platforms and outlets, the Democrat Party And the Democrat Party and these offshoots of Marxism. That's a fact. We're going to have to explain it. We're going to have to get it. I'm going to be all over TV and radio explaining on different stations and so forth. That we have to call it what it is. We have to explain what it's doing. We have to have the courage to do that. We have to talk to our neighbors and our friends and so forth and their concrete things we're going to have to do and we can do it without changing our lives in any significant way. And I'm sure that many ideas out there like the one I heard last night about body cams for teachers. I just did it slightly, even though people may disagree with me, which is okay. Let's put cameras in the classroom. Let's find out what's going on in our classrooms, the government schools, they know the administrators know what's going on the school boards know what what's going on? The principles know what's going on the assistant to the assistant principals know what's going on the teachers. Unions know what goings on the teachers. Now we have to hear from little Johnny Little Sally, if we're lucky now. We pay for every damn thing in these institutions. We want to know what's going on. And I thought that was a great idea. But we have other great ideas, too.

Democrat Party Johnny Little Sally
Baseball Reference Adds Negro League Data in Record Books

Chicago's Afternoon News

01:03 min | 5 months ago

Baseball Reference Adds Negro League Data in Record Books

"Is a big day today for baseball statisticians and to help us explain all that is Larry Lester. He is the chair of the Negro Leagues Committee for the Society. American baseball research. And Larry This is personally got to be a pretty big day for you. Oh, yes, It's a confirmation for all the 50, plus years of work up mining data from newspapers and compelling it and president into a database and producing results has never been seen before. And so this is the day that the records from the Negro Leagues are being incorporated into Major league baseball records, right so The numbers for the most part are merged. Uh, that is correct. The Negro League players now have major league status, with the emphasis on major And has status available. So I'm happy that this is Sally come to fruition and hopefully, uh, some on unheralded players. We'll get some more

Larry Lester Negro Leagues Committee For Th Baseball Negro League Larry Major League Sally
When DNA Research Doesn't Benefit All of Us

The Pulse

01:30 min | 6 months ago

When DNA Research Doesn't Benefit All of Us

"When pulse reporters journal. A heavy has a question about her family history. She knows exactly where to turn her. Mother and some of that history is on display in their house. In fact at the entry of our home we you come in. Our home is all the ancestors on the wall. That's my mom octavia mcbride. She got her knack for sleuthing when she was a news reporter in the late eighties and every time i had an assignment for school that involve family history. Choose the person i went to. Yeah i was excited. Because i felt like i was passing the baton to you because i was always sort of liked the person collecting the pictures and the stories. So i i get great strength and pride from knowing my family stories sharing them and passing them along to my own children and my nieces and nephews and sojourner does your mom do her research with paper records or how does she go about it. Yeah it's been a mix of paper records and story. She's heard over the years from relatives so for example. My mom was able to piece together. The story of her grandmother della mae. She had my mother. Sally by a white man and of course nineteen thirty one those types of relationships and the children that came from them. You know they were legal. So the white family who was pretty prominent place. My mother and the home of a sort of fair skinned family where my mother would would not stick out

Octavia Mcbride Della Mae Sally
US COVID Vaccine Rollout Begins for Children Ages 12 to 15

The World Today with Sally Sara

00:18 sec | 7 months ago

US COVID Vaccine Rollout Begins for Children Ages 12 to 15

"States has become the first country to begin a mess. Covert 19 vaccination program for Children aged 12 to 15 and younger Children may soon be getting their shots, too, with clinical trials checking if the vaccine is effective for Children as young as five

A highlight from S6 E10 - Real Conversations on Mental Health (w/ Special Guest: Patricia Perkins)

Courage to Fight Again

34:47 min | 7 months ago

A highlight from S6 E10 - Real Conversations on Mental Health (w/ Special Guest: Patricia Perkins)

"May is mental health awareness month. And i felt it only right to release an episode focusing on the topic of mental health. Now if you've listened to the podcast for any length of time you've no doubt heard me talk about my own struggles with ptsd depression and mon experiences. Not all that uncommon in the veteran community. What you don't often hear though is from the veteran's spouse and on today's episode. I get to sit down with my wife patricia. As she shares the story of her own emotional journey with mental health diagnoses medications. Hospital stays and a whole lot more. This is the we serve now. What podcast where. I do my best to answer the questions. Veterans and their families are already asking so you can make your post military life your best life by way of introduction my name is aaron perkins i am a us army combat veteran daddy to amazing kiddos. Host of this podcast. If you hadn't guessed. And i am joined today by my beautiful bride patricia. Welcome to the show thank you. I'm so glad to be here excited to talk about a subject that i'm passionate about. Yeah absolutely absolutely well. Great to have you here. I'm i'm incredibly happy that you agreed to be on the show. Usually it is me saying. Hey i'm going to be recording tonight. So if you you and the kids can kind of keep it down a little bit and but really really grateful that you here today. So today was one of many days where you're going through this. I don't know call procedure or treatment treatment. Okay so so. Obviously i went with you. Today is able to accompany you to that treatment and it specifically four depression right and so start with today. Let's start with today in a kind of what happened today. And what the treatment is. And let's start there. Sure okay so. The treatment is called. Tm s it means trans cranial magnetic stimulation menendez Treatment that oddly. Enough stimulates your brain. It's post what is supposed to do is to help the neurotransmitters talk to each other better and it is usually reserved for someone who's tried a few different types of medication for depression but it also helps with like anxiety. Ocd and sometimes even physical pain. Okay so so so. This is not a it. Sounds like it's a noninvasive. It's not a surgery type of thing so basically the way they explain it. It's like electromagnetic therapy. Where like in the old days where they would maybe cut. Open your head and maybe electric your brain things like that but this obviously they're not doing that. You can sit down in this chair. It's kind of like the big dentist chair. They strap you all in and they put this big magnet next to your head in a certain spot at a certain level. It's already been determined by your doctor and it made me last twenty minutes. And then you're you're on your way okay. So is that it's not obviously. I know this right before listeners. This is not like a one time thing. This is one of how many treatments you have to get. Okay so today was off my fourth treatment and i think if i did the math right i have at least thirty three more to go. So it's over a nine week period and because of where we live. I have to drive basically an hour and a half to get there. And then i'm there for fifteen to twenty minutes in the drive an hour and a half and and yeah i i definitely know that. That part in itself is frustrating. The drive so let's go back a little bit now so you're having this it might not be invasive but stewart pretty extreme treatment of kind of remapping your brain right yes. It's it's had some side effects already some some anger some tiredness Brain fog lightheadedness. The way the only way. I can explain it. It's like there's a big garden with a huge gate and there's all these locks and each treatment seems to slowly work open a new lock and then hopefully by the end all the locks will be open and king come open and i can be free of depression anxiety. I don't know if that's going to happen. I have faith that it can happen so hopefully it does happen. You me both you both so so take us back a little bit. How did you get to this point. You know obviously you. Have you know some sort of depression or anxiety or whatever take us back to diagnoses and that sort of thing so i i got diagnosed probably sixteen years ago like actual clinical diagnosis of major depressive disorder and house have severe anxiety. I have d. c. Ptsd so what is so ptsd. I know what is cd. Basically childhood post traumatic stress disorder. And then i have. Ocd okay so so ptsd. Veteran community intimately familiar with cps d c p s de. It is then the so. How did that come about. I mean this this is like you know really getting into the nitty gritty of it a little bit but i had parent you know. I had parents that. They weren't believers not that that makes you any less of a good parent but they were involved with things that they shouldn't have been involved with and they didn't have a good relationship with one another so that meant a very rocky relationship with their children and so without getting into too much and making people uncomfortable. This is a really bad childhood really bad and even in my teenage years there was some other stuff that was really bad. So just you know things that people don't really think about as being post traumatic stress disorder. I've heard other people say. How can you even have that. You weren't a soldier. Well that's not reserved for soldiers or servicemen period. Post traumatic stress can happen after a car accident after your home gets broken into after a traumatic. Any traumatic experience you can. Pdf st right right so so with depression. You were diagnosed. She said sixteen years ago crack and so did the anxiety diagnosis. Come along with that or out of that will work. It was shortly after. I think they at i thought maybe it was just really bad depression and they realized that it was both mint so they started treatment to different treatments who different medications and over the years between the two just the depression and anxiety. I know i've had over sixteen or seventeen medications and sixteen or seventeen. I didn't know there were that many others time for i mean i know. There's a lot of medications out there right. But most i know i i'm gonna go out on a limb here and say most people when they're struggling with anxiety depression or even if they do have a legitimate diagnosis of anxiety. Depression or both. It's okay let me go get this. Let me go try it. You know and then if that doesn't work maybe they go try something else but sixteen or seventeen that that just sounds like an extreme number is sensitive to medications and so what may work for a lot of people. Just doesn't seem to work for me. Or i ended up being allergic to it but i will say that i did. This test called a g. e. n. e. s. t. and it's a dna test and that's something that you're psychiatrists can do for you. There is a cost involved but it will tell you which medications and you know. They're all different classes. Work for your dna type so you have a red section and you should stay away from those. You have a yellow section. That may help. And then you have. A green section is more likely to help with your dna type so that can help a lot of people. Stay away from having to try sixteen or seventeen different medications. Sure sure that that's a really good point. And obviously you. You didn't take that 'til later. Right actually took it last year. Yeah so the break i. I wish i could have taken ten years ago. But i don't think even knew about it and that's another thing i would say. Is you know educate yourself. Don't wait on your doctors to find all the resolutions for you. Like feel free to look and research and bring it up to your doctor. you know. it's a good point. So medication is just one side of the depression anxiety. Ptsd just one side of it before the medication happens. There's something that either. Your doctors realize your families realize or you personally realize something different in me. Something is not working as it's supposed to or it's manifesting in in a certain way and i know that when it comes to ptsd specifically it manifests itself in a lot of different ways. They can manifest itself in anger in inability to focus and chronic pain. In a guilt it can manifest itself in different ways. So let's focus on the. Let's say let's. Let's go with depression right the major depressive disorder. How did that or does that manifest itself in your life. The first time. I realized that i might have an issue with. Depression was actually. I had a really bad episode. After i had caitlin so caitlyn's daughter. Sorry caitlyn's her daughter. Yeah she's fourteen now. After i had her. I was sitting just watching tv. And she was sitting there beside me and her little old bouncy seat. And i actually started having these really dark feelings kind of like oppression and actually that coincided with an anxiety attack as well and actually got rushed to the hospital because they thought i was having a pulmonary. Embolism so they thought that. I had blood clots. I was about to die. You know there was but it was a mixture of depressive episode and anxiety attack which i had never felt before and that really scared me and the doctors were able to put me on medication to help with that. It did not stop it but it did help. Sure sure so what what happens next. You know you're you're on this medication. It's helping look what happens. Is there a point at which you realize. That medication isn't working or isn't working as well as it should. Yeah most doctors will tell you you know. Give it two or three weeks to really get in your system if you don't see any changes or if you see getting worse than you're to want to let us know so that we can adjust or change that medication and over the years. That has happened so often. That i i got to this place and i'll say that it's okay to do this if you need to. Own your closet by yourself and cry for a little while. 'cause you're just overwhelmed and nothing seems to be working and you want so badly to be quote unquote normal. Go have cry. Go eat ice cream or chocolate or something. I don't even care. It's okay to do those things. But i got to this place where i was like. None of this is working. I need something completely different. And i think that's when. I did the insight site testing because most of the medications that i had been put on. Were in my red list more in the list that was for your dna. These are not going to work for you. Oh wow so going through this process and the truth is i didn't even realize this at the time we've been married for fifteen plus years and i knew that kept having different medications tried and you like oh. This is not working but we had no idea why. It's not working until this test. You didn't says hey this might actually work for you Yeah that's that stuff okay. So what about the anxiety piece you know. It started with an executive attack How does that manifest itself or did it manifest itself in your life. So i have an odd anxiety like i have panic. Attacks panic attacks but generally speaking. I'm just anxious and it's like my anxiety and my ocd. Like to just hold hands and frolic through my brain and so what. I'm feeling extremely anxious. I have to clean everything so it's kind of like since i can't control my emotions i can't control what's going on in the world. My brain has to find something that can control and the cleanliness in my house. I can control thankfully because you and the kids are pretty neat people. But i have to do have to be able to do something. Control something to calm down. If i don't do that ended up in the closet crying eating chocolate well like you said. That's okay if you have to do. It's not not not every day but so talked about the depression. Talk about the anxiety. Ptsd how does that manifest itself in your life on a day-to-day basis weekly basis. How how often what does it feel like said the. Ptsd is like a whole different monster. That lives somewhere inside of my person. And the worst episodes i have with. Ptsd is when my children especially caitlyn our daughter when she reaches those age those ages where you've espn we. We had talked about this a little bit today. As we're preparing for the podcast but it was as a recall kind of like the same ages or proxy ages where something traumatic happened in your own childhood right so so then. My brain is like imagine that happening to kaitlin. Imagine that having to our son. Christopher and then it's like this overwhelming like it's not a mama bear feeling is a mama dragon. And it's like i will. I will died to protect but at the same time. It's then there's this the the little girl in me is like. How could my mom have let that happen. How could my dad have let that happen. Where was the the parental. where were they. Why did these things even happened. That i have this trauma but we're all human doing the best. We can now. That i'm older i can. I can look at my pass without being completely angry with my parents because they were just doing their best as well. Sure sure so. We're won't take a break real quick but coming up after the break and now you have a few things that you want to share with our listeners. More as encouragement and continuing the story obviously but also practical steps. Stay with us. Many americans today don't realize the stress and anxiety. They feel is likely because of their finances. According to bankrate.com more than six out of ten people couldn't cover a one thousand dollar emergency seven out of ten. Don't budget regularly. An eight out of ten are living paycheck to paycheck to these describe you. Are you ready to live like others. Can't too many make the mistake of budgeting their lifestyle instead of budgeting their basic needs. I my friend. Marco over at mc business lab has a simple process to automate the basic things. You need to live and then never looking at one of those bills again. Head over to live like others can't dot com to get on the wait list for his own line course to learn this automation skill. That will significantly reduce your stress anxiety. And if you think one on one attention could be the way for you. You can also schedule your free consultation with marco once again that's live like others can't dot com get on the path to your dream life today. Alright so here we are back. Second half of the show here with my wife patricia talking about mental health. And it's okay. She's looking at me right now. She's like oh just made a noise like it's okay. Well we'll cleared up. It's fine and so so anyway so here talking to my wife patricia about mental health and about her own challenges and struggles with it. And so obviously there's no one in your corner so to speak. I mean there's the stigma associated with it but there's also no one kind of coaching. You through this of like okay. Well if this isn't working here's what you do right not currently. I've had counselors in the past. You know and they've we've tried to work through things. I have been the hospital couple of times. And i think there's a lot of people who mean well but it doesn't mean it's going to work for you and so i feel it's important that people understand that if you do have a mental illness. It's okay to research an advocate for yourself. You don't have to wait on a doctor or counselor or someone who you feel like is more intelligent or just because they have letters after their name that they know you better than you do feel free. No not feel free. Please speak for yourself. that's huge. That is so huge. And i think that advocating for yourself is such a critical element of getting the help you need. Because when i think of veterans who are struggling right. You know whether whether it's a physical health or mental health concern. They know themselves like better than anyone else knows them and so when they go to the doctor when i as a veteran go to the doctor i have an obligation to myself right to be as honest and as really a as direct as i can like look. This is the problem. This is how. I'm feeling. I'm here for you to help me fix it right. But then there's the stigma especially in the military community. Where if something isn't working right in your brain you're not working right. Oh absolutely that is the stigma is is really and i think the worst thing about mental health diagnoses today at least in america. If not all over the world it absolutely needs to be normalized that your your brain is an oregon and just like your heart and all your heart muscle but you could knees your liver. If any of those things were failing if they weren't working like they were supposed to have so many people around you. Hey what can i do for you. What can i do for your family. Could i get my blood tested to see if i could be donor. How in the world could make your life better but you hear someone is in a three month depressive episode and they can't even get out of bed. I don't see people lining up with casseroles. I don't know. I don't see that happening. You know if you have to leave an event because you had an anxiety attack there's whispers. There's not help this is strong. It is so strong. And there's a you know within the military there is a fear and i will say rightly so that if you say hey i have this particular mental condition it can potentially impact your career and in the civilian world because well as a mom i if another mom i don't know maybe somebody's going to hear this and maybe they don't want their kids hanging out but as a mom you think. Oh can this person actually take care of my kid. While i'm away or is everything issue going to be too overwhelmed. Is she going to have some kind of attack. That i don okay. If you know somebody like that. Just educate yourself right and know that that person wouldn't take on that responsibility if they didn't feel they could handle it. Yeah absolutely and you know. That's a critical point to is. There is so much misinformation out there about mental health. And you know here's the thing. Hollywood doesn't help and i'm not going to rant. I'm not. I'm not trying to say like oh. Don't make movies about people with mental conditions. You know but there is this you know. The joker movie that just came out with a joaquin phoenix. That's joker yeah. Okay so you know. He obviously has a mental health problem. It looks like severe depression and he turns out to be this mass murderer. Right and so people associate edison. He's bipolar but go ahead. Fair enough fair enough so people associate those mental health conditions with something so extreme that they saw on a screen or read an article. now there are extreme cases. it's true. I mean you can't just say that that. No one is that bad off but there are people that bad off that they're not usually the people who look like they're doing okay. There those the people who are really struggling there are more signs right than than you just meeting them. Like if i just walked up to you and said hi. My name's patricia. Perkin tie you doing. You would never think i had five mental disorders right. You know someone. who's that far gone. You know they're going to be showing signs. Oh yeah absolutely for sure for sure and you know the thing is when it comes to mental health when it comes to you know having a a severe enough level of mental health challenges concerns whatever. You wanna call them. If you don't have an official diagnosis right there are so many. I guess levels is probably the best way to put it of of severity. Because you know like saying. Hey i'm feeling depressed for a couple of weeks is a far cry from major depressive disorder right okay. Yeah may i believe probably should have been a little more research but it would be depressed for at least six months before. It is a clinical diagnosis. And so there's going to be events someone dies. A friend moves away. You have to switch jobs then you could go through a you know a few days or a week of feeling depressed. That's normal. yeah exactly. That's the normal depression. That's not the go quick. It'll medication so you can feel better. That's right it's just a normal life happens and you get down and i've even had people say to me. Well you know you have a lot of stuff. You're very blessed. You have a nice home. You have a great husband. Smart kids you you you have you have you have you have. That has nothing to do. With what my brain is doing. I have the intelligence to know that. I a blessed person a blessed individual but that does not mean that my brain is going to let me enjoy all the time. Yeah that's so true. That is so true. And so i just saw an article earlier today from cnbc said fifty one percent of young americans are struggling with mental health. Fifty one percent. I can believe and i think a lot of that if i can just put in. My personal opinion is social media. I'm sure you constantly see people who are throwing up. There highlight reels on instagram. And some of them still on facebook and then those who are throwing out things on twitter but there you're not getting their whole life you don't read what's actually going on. I mean if people looked at my facebook they would see highlights. Because i want to show the good. I don't want to show the days. I don't wanna get out bed. Showed the days where. I'm like begrudgingly. Driving my kids to school because i have to. I'm an adult to do these things. You don't see those things and especially the generation under us. They're so obsessed with social media that they think that's real life. I mean i have a good life. But it's not insta worthy like everything. I do isn't gonna be popping up on instagram. Because it's not real life right. That's just advertising then like you said it's just highlights right. Yeah and so. I want to go back to the stigma piece for just a minute. Because that's a piece that i'm really passionate about and you know in the military you know being healthy being fit to fight. That's part of the job if you're broken your broken leg unit can't use you to go to war right. You have to get that leg fixed. I if you're broken mentally your unit may not be able to use you to go to war because like there's something wrong with you and like the. The thing is with the stigma. It's okay in you know outside of the military that things that your body or your brain is not working like it's supposed to and i've heard so many veterans so min- countless veterans really be rating their brothers and sisters in arms when they talk about having. Ptsd like your combat. Experience was different than mine. Therefore you don't have ptsd or you can't be depressed or you can't be anxious like you're just whining because you want to get paid from the va. You want the va to take care of you. That's ridiculous it. It really is our veterans out there who just looking for that that extra little bit of money out a month sure. There are but by and large the majority of veterans who who are having the courage to stand up and say. Hey i got something wrong in my brain. It's not working like supposed to. They should be applauded and say you know what that is. Surreal courage that you having right now to go and say i need help. Yes it takes a ton of courage and just in time out of being a military spouse and then my time out of it and interacting with veterans and even people who are still currently serving. They they have these but they don't even know how to say it out loud. They will become an alcoholic. But there's nothing wrong with me. I had no problem with war. Or when they get out of the military you know they get hooked on drugs. Oh in the military didn't affect me very much. I'll have i don't have any. Ptsd that that crazy stuff you know or all of a sudden. They're wife isn't good enough. Their kids aren't good enough and they want to be away from them at all times. They don't want that interaction but they say they're fine because they're afraid to say i might be broken inside and might need some help. So instead of having the courage to say that they are literally ruining their lives in other ways right what alcohol would drugs with breaking up their homes with neglecting their responsibilities. That's may there's so much i want to. I want to fix it right. I want to fix the stigma. Problem wanted but there is no easy way to do it. But i think what we're doing right here is having the conversation for the world to hear that. Look it's not just veterans. It's not just veteran spouses. It's according to that article. Fifty one percent of young americans who are struggling with some sort of mental health condition right regardless of what title you go by better in active duty man woman boy girl. Mental health is no respecter of persons. I'm sorry mental illness right. No you're right and mental health needs. You know it doesn't matter who you are. What are what color you are just like any like. I said any other body part in any other thing. That may need attention. Don't be afraid to give it that attention. Don't be afraid to speak up and speak out. Don't let the stigma hold down. Yeah for sure so from our conversation today. I know we're running up on time. So we're gonna wind this down and you know. Obviously you and. I have talked about this a lot and me in the future. I'm sure we will get you back on the show and talk and talk about about this and how fixing your life especially how the team s treatment is grain because he you know. I'm not afraid to talk about right. My inner demons especially can help somebody else. I feel like i feel like god puts us through situation so that we can help other people and if we can't take the bad and turn it around and help someone than what's it for and i have to have faith that it's it's to help others. Sure sure so. We have alluded to these three big takeaways right like the big takeaways from this episode. We've alluded to them throughout the episode. We've talked about them. We've even said them but remind us remind listeners. What those big three takeaways are from listening to this. I would say the first one is to advocate for yourself like i said. Don't be to research. Don't be afraid to figure out what might work for you. Ask for the jewish site testing. Ask for even if you've been on medication for a long time talking about the s you know there are other ways to go about it than just constantly saying in that cycle of pill after pill after pill with no results there. There is light at the end of the tunnel. So don't be afraid to say. Hey i think this might help me. What do you think. Don't wait on them. The second one i would say is. Don't let the stigma prevent you from seeking help Let's there is nothing wrong with you. If you have mental illness nothing like innately wrong review. You are just a person who is struggling and number three. I would say no that you are not alone like you were saying that article fifty one percent of young americans. This isn't even us. The older americans during these are young americans who were struggling. You're not alone. find group. fine fine started group. It right to you know. Don't don't stay alone either. When you isolate yourself things. Things often get worse so definitely seek out others who may have similar problems going on that you can talk through to to have some sort of accountability with and accountability is huge. It is huge and those are the three big ones. But i wanted to add one more. And it's something that i've done personally and it has to do with what i was talking about with social media and it's so funny because our pastors just said at this sunday delete block. You do not have to look at sally. Suzy sampson's and wish it was yours. Delete her blocking her. If if watching her highlight reel is taking your joy. Delete her if mr man who has it all together all the money all the muscles and the most beautiful wife you've ever seen if that stealing your joy delete him bought him because you need to focus on you and yours is so good. That is so so good so patricia. It is been an amazing conversation with you. I wanna thank you personally. Thank you for your courage to come on the show and talk about not just health in general but your own mental health your own struggles with the diagnoses. You know you've had hospital stays as a result had so many things going your life and so thank you so much for talking about this important topic with us you know. We all have a lot of questions but the most important question you can ask yourself is. This have accepted the forgiveness of sins. That only comes through faith in jesus christ and before we go one thing. Patricia wanted me to point out was earlier. she referenced. cpt. St and she called it childhood. Ptsd it is actually complex. Ptsd would she informed me of later in complex. Ptsd is brought about from long term trauma that might be physical emotional sexual abuse own going childhood neglect things like that. It could even be a prisoner of war type of situation that brings about complex. Ptsd so just clarification. There that that was what she was referencing in the second. Half of the episode. You may have heard probably did hear a lot of clicking in the background while that clicking was my burien husky running around on a hardwood floor and unfortunately we can't edit that out he just kind of made a cameo appearance on the podcast so that dog is the way i deal with my ptsd and depression having a pet. It just helps a lot so anyway. Thank you so much for listening. It has been a joy sharing our hearts with you today. Be sure to check us out on social media. We at facebook at courage to fight again. Instagram also occurred to fight again and twitter at courage again and check us out on our website at courage to fight again dot com a whole lot. More resources there well until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

Depression Traumatic Stress Disorder Patricia Ptsd Depressive Disorder Anxiety Attack Ptsd Depression Aaron Perkins Depression Anxiety Caitlyn Anxiety Depression Anxiety Us Army Caitlin Stewart Kaitlin
"sally" Discussed on G&Q Review

G&Q Review

03:30 min | 10 months ago

"sally" Discussed on G&Q Review

"I don't think who knows. Maybe as time goes by seven point six seven point. That means i think it's a seven point five or below. Yeah i think so. I just can't think. I can't imagine myself ever watching this film again. It's an age thing that's got more life. Experience be beat down by levy. Yeah i need to get to a low point. I'm like fuck dude. I feel just like harry. Who came on and said this. One one star one star when harry met. Sally trolls probably anybody. That's like forever single or something probably just goes through every love movie. And it's like if i can't have loved and are these movies can have ten but this is like a movie that kinda show of whatever for them. It works out for the troll or the sad person. That's like real real life. You don't get any girl in the end. You fill out to be like harry and sally were relatively attractive people. Yeah yeah exactly yeah. Well i'm going over. I said on my reasons throughout this broadcast. I enjoyed it. I can see myself washington again. Good length I see why it's it's the romcom to beat. Because i liked it. A lot is the first time washington right i. I'm watching okay. But it's like the rat light. We looked like a romcom list in this was on every lis- tenants theorem and so is pretty woman. I think that was on a lot of lists all right. When harry met sally nineteen eighty-nine dot forgot the data. What they call an ellipse alessi's next week grant. We are rolling the dice. A little ara. Angie which when you check ice the good advice oh the good is nice back to good. Yeah we're going to pick a number one through to fifty pick from the top two fifty that we've been talking about one harry just so you guys i have. Records is not on the top. Two fifty The cutoff ranges. What around eight point. Seven six so Number of votes. Yeah so i'm gonna roll of the dice in whatever number we get. We're gonna pull from our sites chiku review dot com slash. I'm db dash top dash to fifty Stu it ray ban. It said it one sixty that you said one day. I'm one okay winding nemo signing..

fifty One next week harry ten sally seven point six one star Seven six five chiku first time Angie Two fifty fifty pick Sally two fifty single washington
"sally" Discussed on Relationships & Revenue

Relationships & Revenue

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"sally" Discussed on Relationships & Revenue

"I know i'm feeling something different. This is what it is this. I think this is why. I'm feeling it. And the real growth here. Men comes through. What do i do with this now. That is huge. So when sally was talking before about when you get to the point where you may need to go to somebody and talk to them about something. You're feeling something has to do with your relationship. It is gonna feel messy and awkward and weird several times. it's gonna feel that way is just. It's not going to become normal and natural to you unless you do it. Multiple times is just. It's going take a while. it's like any new skill. Set is just if you can remember back how old you are too when you first learned to ride a bike if you did. I realize there's some people who didn't but most people learned how to ride a bike when they were kids. When you first did it you fell down a lot. You're supposed to in you know the parents who lead the training wheels all all the time. You are not helping those kids leaving the training. You are not so. Let's take your emotional training wheels off now and let's try and help you get to the point where you can become emotionally healthy. And so that when you're dealing with stuff you don't do the thing that most men do. Is we take those feelings. That are uncomfortable and awkward and we cramming down inside and we push we hold them down as long as we can. But as sally alluded to earlier they find a way out and the longer you hold him down the worst they come out. They explode volcanoes. And it's just horrible for everyone who's around war so let's not do that especially this time of year especially during the holidays so that leads me into talking about this time of year. Sally it is just if if twenty twenty and the way that things have gone down throughout the entire world had not happened. What would be some good ways to approach the holidays from a mental health perspective. It's a great question and it's an important thing to consider in a lot of us just kind of blindly or you know kind of in numb fashion. Just go to okay here. It is going to be in the have an expectation..

sally Sally
"sally" Discussed on Relationships & Revenue

Relationships & Revenue

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"sally" Discussed on Relationships & Revenue

"Ulan so happy. You decided to join us today. And i have a special guest. Her name is sally livingston's. Sally how are you today. Great john thanks for having me on excited to talk with you. That's great. I'm so happy to have you here today now. Everyone you need to understand. Today's episode is our mental health. Show very very excited about that. And i say show. That may sound like we're only going to do one show on this. That is not the case. This is the beginning show and also is to kind of us work. Through this time of year it can be very challenging during the holidays because this episode is gonna be coming out during the month of december and twenty twenty and so i just wanted to bring someone on. Who knows much more about that than i do to be able to help all of you and me be able to not only survive this time but to come out better on the back end of it so sally. I want to tell a little bit more about you and so just that you know listeners. Sally is a licensed ridge and family therapist. She's a speaker she's a coach. she's an author. She told you in the intro. She wrote a book called. Get over it for those of you. Who are watching the video. This is the book of it. My handy dandy little handwrite here. Fantastic book by the way. Excuse me it says get over it. Four steps to breaking free from the stuck cycle and she's gonna tell us about that and a little bit all right in besides all of that she has a couple of other titles that i think she probably holds most dear and wife and mom grandmom. Oh and grandmom see. I didn't know that part all right. Good to know three titles. Now all right so sally now everybody knows just a little bit more about you folks. Just you know. Sally's been in practice for a little while. You can't tell by looking at her but she has been in practice for a little bit so she's been doing it for a while she's not just out there just kind of saying stuff fresh out of school. She knows what she's talking about. She got real world experience so now that we know where you are. Sally take us back. How did you kind of get your start into what you do. What led you to where you are now and even what prompted you to write the book. Great yes i. From mining florida kind of born and raised in just was doing the thing you do. You go to school. go to high school. You go to college so i found myself at baylor university which All you know pretty much everybody in my family went to said you can go anywhere and i'll pay for baylor. That's where i ended up but happily so it was a great experience and i was majoring did major in their kind of experienced Disappointment Because it was not exactly what i thought it would be. It was a little bit more research based it. Was you know at in the lab and the deprivation scales and etcetera etcetera. And i was the person who fed all the rats and gave them all the water. Messed up everybody's you know experiments. Because i just had to tender of heart even for rat. Yeah i left baylor and came home to miami kind of not knowing what i was gonna do because it felt like okay..

Sally sally livingston Ulan sally john baylor university baylor florida miami
"sally" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

07:14 min | 1 year ago

"sally" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Originally this had been announced under the title. Molly yes when did that change and why it changed partly feedback from distributors here in the US Because Street? Who said do you realize molly is the name of a street drugs that everybody is? GonNa think this film is about drugs and I kind of resisted dot feedback for awhile but also some other feedback. I got was that it didn't give enough of a clue really about what the film was going to be about. It didn't help people into it. It was a female name. And as you know man at the center of it but then fought for me. Her right to her name. Molly is important. Because although we're in his head she's the one who's holding it together emotionally on the fact that at the end of the story. He suddenly remembers hunt name and says it is an incredibly moving of the stories so there was good reason to call me but there was also very good reason to not call it molly and so finally decided on this title. That would at least give people clue that when we're seeing we'll be on the lives of the guy had these are the roads not taken. These are the life you didn't live. I saw an interview with you. Where once said ideas are to a penny? Yeah how do you know when the idea is the one you wanNA pursue when I'm still passionate about after euro two it has to withstand the test of time because you have to live with for a long time so it can't be something you're GonNa get bored with or or wish that you'd never taken on in the first place so it's like that if I'm still really intrigued by occupying I think one of the things that I've learned from talking with. So many filmmakers over the years is that every film you make ends up affecting you in some way. What's your takeaway having completed this project? Having completed this project is. I'm really looking forward to doing comedy next on my four D. written it so I think it's good to deal with subjects that have sadness or loss lisa part of life but will so there are other ways of dealing with this subject. I didn't feel it's Don's right from one subject to the next one way of telling the story to the next. I never want to repeat myself. I'm not interested. I feel I've had the experience not moving onto something else where there's something else new to learn here and not very much at the beginning of its life. Its trajectory in the world on. So I don't yet know how who's GonNa welcome it how it's going to be received. You never do. No I was just talking to a Spanish speaking journalists somebody from one of the Latin American countries and I was very interested to know how it was for him. And how it might be received by the Latino Latina community and it was very gratifying to hear the him. It was a great relief to hear some Spanish spoken a length. Not just like Papa my mouth or whatever and the Spanish speaking characters were not made or chauffeur's they were very complicated. Rounded human beings have been interesting and difficult transition. But it's very early days. I I'm finding out whether someone is GonNa loud in people's hearts and minds who's going to want it who's GonNa find themselves it who's going to recognize it. I don't know yet but has the process of telling this story changed you in any way. Yeah film I feel like I go into a universe. Somehow University of my own making in I start with a blank page and then it ends up. Kinda world on the film these people in it and inhabiting it doing things and speaking in it you know. I can't blame anyone myself for what exists up there on the screen. But I think I became through making it even more interested in whether cinemas a medium movies on on not like a doorway into the mind on minds of so mysterious. If you could put a recording device inside your mind and listen to watch sports in there it would be much more complicated than this film. You know the way off saw stance. From Associati from one thing to the next day memories the imagination the thoughts the visions Minds our new universes of such complexity and since the very beginning of making films. I've kind of wondered if we could have a Mak- film that function like the mind in a way so it's part philosophical part practical question but that's punishable. I was attempting to do this one. So you said you kind of move from style to style that you've tested one boundary and you're looking for the next. What drives you from style to style. Well it's interesting. You should ask that because I actually never think of it as a style really. It's like I think. Of what form does this story need or idea need in order to be told so? It's a consequence of things much deeper in the idea or in the story and then I try and find the necessary form for that so I don't think of it as something adding on to the top of the subject matter so just being how you know many things over. His style is kind of interesting if you like but rather as something that is it must be told this way on the has ended on with it looking palms if I'm exploring different genre and different ways of telling things rather than having one signature thing signature way of making films but for that reason because I'm trying to find out how must be told. What shape does this? Some need comes out of that. Feeling of necessity. And when you're developing that how does a movie tell you how it should be told? I suddenly meditates on it and I think I work out. You know I try this try that I tried to think that the first thought is not always best. You know what would be. Another way of. Doing this would be doing that. I look a lot of stuff. I look at photographs and look at other movies. I listen to music and I gradually find it. I I always loved the matter of the scope to look a block of stone and sees what form is waiting inside that block to be found and I experience making a film a little bit like that. It's like I'm finding something I'm not necessarily inventing it but I'm finding something that was hidden and that to be found. Thank you so much to our guest. Today Sally Potter Who's written and directed the roads not taken and also to our producer for joining us. Jenny thank you so much for calling in Sally Syndrome. Nice talking with you. Thank you very much. Hollywood unscripted is created by. Kurt comb media and presented in cooperation with the Malibu Film Society. This episode was hosted by Scott to law CO hosted by Jenny. Curtis with guest. Sally Potter produced and edited by Jenny. Curtis sound engineering by Michael Kennedy. The score for the roads not taken featured as the music. This episode was composed by Sally Potter and provided courtesy of Sony Music. Entertainment the executive producer of Hollywood scripted. A Stuart Halperin the Hollywood unscripted theme song by Celeste. And Eric Dick Please. Rate Review and subscribe to this podcast for more conversations with top industry professionals discussing the entertainment. You Love Creek. How media.

Sally Potter Molly Jenny Hollywood US Curtis Sony Music Latino Latina community Love Creek University of my Stuart Halperin Don Malibu Film Society Papa Eric Dick executive producer Sally Syndrome Mak Kurt
"sally" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

Hollywood Unscripted

10:42 min | 1 year ago

"sally" Discussed on Hollywood Unscripted

"Welcome to Hollywood unscripted. I'm your host. Got To law of the Malibu Film Society. Joining me today in the studio is our producer. Jenny Curtis Hi Jenny. And this is our final episode of the season. Our guest today is Sally Potter. Who has written and directed the roads? Not Taken starring. Javier Bardem L. Fanning along with Salma Hayek and Laura Linney welcome. Thank you very much indeed. Over the past several years we've had a steadily increasing number of films that have been dealing with dementia and I know you've had some personal experience with it. But what was the new territory? What was the difference that you wanted to get across with your story? I wanted to explore really the mystery of the mind. The sale is not necessarily only a really difficult and tough tragedy. Although there's often great difficulty involved but the fact that we don't really know what goes on in the mind when somebody seems to disappear. I ASK MYSELF THE QUESTION. Or maybe they're going somewhere really interesting. Not gave if you'd like a doorway into thinking differently about the mind about lives not adverts not taken us the title That somebody might be slipping in and out of different kind of a win. Says even of power lives the lives. They could've lived existing at the very least somewhere within the mind so it was using it not so dementia is not like the sum total of the stories. Not just about somebody with dementia but rather somebody in a state of mind in relationship with in this case of Dourson taking care of him and we're exploring that state of mind also through her is to know that you did. Dedicate this to your late brother. Nick and that he severed from frontal lobe dementia. Yes from a young onset dementia. He was very young when he got something. The symptoms took him over quite. He passed on within two years. As I understand it you were very involved in his care. Yes I was. So how did that inform the story that you wanted to tell me? It was accompanying him. If you like has his kind of witness and keg it there were other people carrying for him to but but being responsible for his car and going with him opened my eyes to many many things first of all how badly somebody in that condition is often treated as if they're becoming less than human song and I found that I became incredibly protective of ten. And also the people say as more and more hard to communicate with somebody in this state. Well I found. It was not the if I went into. Let's say his speech patterns and treated them like poetry and wrapped with him and stay in these fractured language. Other people couldn't understand that we could understand each other perfectly well also that we laughed alert through the you know sometimes humiliating experience. He was having. I tried to turn them into a joke into a kind of human comedy rather than human tragedy so I learned a great deal. Of course I was deeply deeply saddened by his loss and booze grieving and so on but I wanted to find a way of telling a story that might by transposing it and transforming it into something else might first of all be useful for other people who've been through similar experiences. Carrozza whatever semi off different questions about the mind the mysteries of the mind uncertainty from all the neurologist. I talk to all the specialist so that period I gradually realized there is still a great deal to learn about this and many other mental states and a great deal more respect owed to the people who are living with this illness but I didn't want to a portrait of him so the character portrayed in his from heavy. It couldn't be more different. Touch Lee is very different. The story is held by a father daughter relationship siblings so it went through many processes of transformation. But that's where it sprung from. The father daughter relationship is obviously the core of this film and the character portrayed by Al. The daughter is so incredibly sympathetic to what her father is going through to the point of sacrificing everything else about her life. It seems. Well it's left open at the end. Exactly what she is prepared to sacrifice. And what isn't but what we see is that she's split. We see the consequences that so many women face in their lives whether that's mothers caring for their children. How can they also have a life a guilt free life following their own trajectory and she is a doors trying to do the right and loving thing for her father's the guy she loves? She loves her father and Heart is kind of a King Fan and for his suffering but she also loved her and work on. She wants to do that for the very end. We see a signal that she's trying to do both she's trying to do both wants to an intends to do both. Did you start creating the story while you were caring for your brother know afterwards while I was coming from I was actually making another film so I know exactly what it's like when you're working and answering the phone and rushing out of the late at night is early in the morning to deal with crisis or something? I know not speeches like at first time but no when I was in the middle of it was kind of overwhelming so it was only later when I started to do all right. Just do which is transformed some of the biggest expenses they fought in the life and starts work with it and see what you can do it. Put it back out into the world in a way that will make sense others but at the time no. I couldn't now separate from the making of the movie. There is the business side. Was this a hard sell to either investors or to the actors that you approached it was very hard sell to investors not such a hard sell to the two because they could see in it the potential to explore an incredible range of profound human experience really even in the smaller parts like Salma. Hayek you know it's small but every good actor knows there's no such thing as a small part and for her. It was really interesting to play a Mexican woman that she recognizes as a total human being and not stereotype and so on so no. The actors were very enthusiastic and eager. Hardworking and intent I think for investors. It was difficult to see how this might work. Because it's quite a complicated structure to run. These kind of power lives into weaving through the mind of this but also because the subject of dementia or mental illness is kind of taboo. You know there have been some films. Yes but it's still a difficult area that people don't we want to look at and this was coming out in such a different way. It's not really the main focus of the thing. It's not dementia. The main focus of this loud. The many faces of love adores for her father. An ex wife. I somebody who she still loves. But it's no longer responsible for and so on and so forth so yeah I think it wasn't self-sided but there were enough. People who were finance who passionately committed to it from the very beginning core finances and then others came in late and talk to us a little bit more about the casting. Yeah but you want to know was how they are. Your first choice. Who WERE OTHERS CONSIDERED FOR? This role did consider others now conveniently forgotten once. I've ended up with somebody. How could I even thought if anybody else on that? It's often like that. Sometimes it takes bit of trial and error and kind of figuring out and initially I was thinking of somebody English speaking and it took a while for me. It was like a Eureka moment when I thought no this will be much more interesting. If it's a Latino person who's not only looking at life through the filter of this illness but looking at it through the filter of another language so in a way the issue of translation between the mental state and how people understand the more communication difficulties the feeling of a border line if you like a physical border between Mexican America and the United States but the border inside the mind between one state and another one thing became a metaphor for another. And I've thought many of the performance is that have you done in particular how he was in in your research foam beautiful which I think is an extraordinary film. How in it so I approached him with the script on T. was IGA take it on with some trepidation that he was eager to take it on. Vr BARDEM and Selma Hayek. They know each other in real life. Did that affect their casting or the way they interacted onset. She's very very close friends with penelope. Who Dare is hard to? But they made a decision early on while they were on such a while we earn Russell and working together the they would create a kind of professional distant as if they didn't know each other outside. But I think there was joking and sense of humor and kind of the rough and tumble of the fact that they do already know each other. That probably be helped shelley the ease with which they worked together and because SAMA is Mexican and she's playing Mexican and he's playing Mexican. He was looking to her for example to make sure his accent was correct and that everything he did aside was authentic to her as a Mexican individual. That was very helpful for me to so yea they worked off each other very well and in a very short space of time you know. We shot all of those things together in three days but we prepared for months beforehand and those people who like to prepare. Of course ELLE FANNING. You had worked with on. Ginger and Rosa eight years ago and she is outstanding performer. An outstanding professional young twenty one year old now Thirteen I I work with her and she brings a dedication and infuse the ousman lightness to to a role and is able to imagine herself into the shoes of others experiences. She's not hot directly herself. She somehow manages to empathize with and imagine in an incredible sunset way. And she's Joyce who was used as an extraordinary form. Did you have in mind when you're creating the character? When I was writing the script I was deliberately not allowing myself to imagine any particular actors in the row but rather let the characters themselves come to life under my pants so to speak to find out who they were. Now that's partly. Because if you get fixated on a particular actor. Will you know writing? And it doesn't work out for one reason or another show delaying or you know whatever you disappointed whereas if you allow the character to come to life and then start to think well who could play. This might take this car during the different direction. That can be very enlivening and now what I usually do. Once I've got somebody committed to the pot in principle I then what with them find out how it fits retailer it slightly to fit them more precisely to sit in that qualities. Whatever and so to the point where then I really content much? Anybody else.

Salma Hayek Sally Potter Javier Bardem L. Fanning frontal lobe dementia Jenny Curtis Malibu Film Society Hollywood producer Laura Linney Dourson ELLE FANNING United States Nick Lee Joyce Heart Vr BARDEM Russell shelley T.
"sally" Discussed on Beautiful You

Beautiful You

06:47 min | 2 years ago

"sally" Discussed on Beautiful You

"Way that I remembered my time with when my husband was alive and I began and to appreciate what we had had rather than continually regret what I wasn't going to have. And then when it came to the aging side side of it I noticed that by being grateful for being alive by it flowed onto being grateful for being another day older for having another birthday and I really. That's when my major healing started take place when I really started to embrace being grateful like at a at a real coal level. I've always been a pretty grateful. But what I would classify a grateful person but this was just sort of taking it to a whole `nother level and and so then I started reading researching it because I noticed what is tau good. It was for my healing and When I started to research research and I found out how it can change just physiologically? It was just became a natural progression for it to be part of the aging process. Because you know we have so much much one way when we're in a middle years and beyond we have so much to offer. We have so many experiences we have suffered in many different ways. Ace we have learned many different lessons and these are so valuable and should be appreciated and and you know all cultures such that we just tend to spend too much time looking in the mirror and worrying about the next facial. Line as knives knives instead of you know really tuning into what we what what is actually part of our makeup Rica and that's really where it started and that's that's where aging gratefully has just developed from and it's You know I just if every retired I do anything anymore research pickup. Because it's it's the ageism thing is quite a big it is quite a big topic these days I'm really excited. I'm actually really excited to bring this element into you into people's focus. Well it's a conversation absolutely needs to be had isn't it because as you say that's population I should is an aging population in strategic chalets. So gene gratefully is a book that urology it is. It's it's a book on writing. It is also a platform and I. I'm authoring Mentorship and Coaching Life Coaching. Because and I really my passion is for women in their midlife because you know we we actually in a major transition on midlife. We have children if if we if we have children that usually Of An age where they are moving out. So we've got empty nesting on one side if our parents still alive and we've got aging parents on the other hand and we're in the middle taking care of everybody and at the same time nine. We've got this major shift happening For for ourselves because Arosa shifting you know we We asked we will always be mothers but that role will shift. Is Our children. Get older we we we Only sometimes forget because women on sort of naturally nurturing we and we do have a tendency to take care of everybody else's oxygen masks. I we do that. We can't forget you know and loose designs of who we are and our passions and those sorts of things and I honestly believe that in our middle years we can make conscious and intentional choices about so how are older life is going to be by what we decide to do here. Now in our middle years just you know on a daily basis just this little things. It doesn't even. I'm not talking about great. Big will changing things that just so that our lives for this for this next season are as good as they can possibly be. And that we we live fully and with vitality and I mean that is such such a legacy to leave for the future for future generations coming behind us to look at look at us as female population Russian that is just really embracing living and loving aging. Because we've got so much to do so much more time to do it. Look how beautiful that what you learn in your journey of your arm. I saw after after Russell's passing. That Um um you lived the power of gratitude and now that you're bringing this into a stage in and place in life that that is actually very exciting to hear because I to hear things that I feel like I go to push back on sometimes because I don't want to walk away with that negatively either I the Mayan thinking and my conception of aging so aging gratefully Our put in the description box of links that we can share the people to connect with you. Sally Cross thank you and if payroll loosening today thinking that's what I need then reach out to sally because She has something very powerful to bring intensive ZIP unexperienced and how if gratitude can carry you through the journey that you've experienced to being a woman that you today then it's definitely going to be very empowering thing for you and obviously share as as you age Very exciting exciting thing selling win is fresh style happened for you when when this fresh is just such the wrong word in his situation but is new. Start in your life. What would you say is one of.

Sally Cross Arosa Russell
"sally" Discussed on Z104

Z104

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"sally" Discussed on Z104

"In these Sally and Hawkgirl summer on Z. one oh four. which is. golf is a must. they should get it. she. so let's say. the game he's. he put in all the. don't you want me would maybe yes. the status. to give those to that take. she is the most. there should. some of. how to be got a lot of D.. will he be happen. what we say is how close are we talking about the great. I don't know. he made a you know to see a lot of. they could be coming you way put me in a brand but that's the you plan to make. and we really with this. give us about that did I get that and then I did not. the most. then when I'm done with. I want to. that makes. begin to go down on a brown no we don't. the status. thank you love to take the time. five. they should get a. some of. he looks easy one oh four planes he will know.

Sally
"sally" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"sally" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"You're listening to a special edition of the globalist in association with UBS. Hello and welcome to a special edition of the globalist. I'm Ben Ryland over the festive season, we're looking back at some of the best interviews we did here on call twenty four in twenty eighteen the big interview brought you the fascinating stories of some of the most influential people from the worlds of arts and culture business politics and design today, we listen back to the also winning actress Sally field the minute. I walked on stayed something. Struck me electricity, a bell rang, and the self-imposed fog that I had been living in just cleared, and I could hear myself, and I was alive for this moment for the second. I was free and weightless I spent my life chasing, the firefly's on the edges of my is. That was Sally field. The double Oscar winning actress and the fog she was escaping descended following sexual abuse. By a stepfather jock Mahoney when she was a child she lost herself in acting career began as a teenager playing the all American lead in gidget. She went on to star in the flying nun, and then made her first film the way west with Kirk Douglas in nineteen sixty seven a host of television movies, followed before she joined her then boyfriend, but Reynolds in the box office hit smokey and the bandit Reynolds was another controlling man in her life. As was the film director, Bob Raffelson's. She was forced to kiss before being cast by him in stay hungry. She won her first Askar for the title role of Numa Ray in nineteen eighty and she's appeared in amongst others. Steel magnolias, MRs Doubtfire and Forrest Gump winning another best actress Academy Award for places in the heart in one thousand nine hundred five she was given an outstanding lead. Actress EMMY for television show. Brothers and sisters and most recently was nominated for best actress in Lincoln in two thousand and twelve she's written a memoir in pieces. I'm Georgina Godwin, and I sat down with her in the big interview. Sally. We're here in London. And you've been hit promoting your book, which is an extraordinary book. It's about this amazing life full of experience, but also Chuma to degree a wonderfully brave book, but it also charts your acting career, and I wondered if you'd always known that you were going to act well by the time, you know, you're thinking about what are you going to be when you grow up kind of thought, I think it was always an actor..

Sally field Numa Ray Georgina Godwin UBS jock Mahoney Reynolds MRs Doubtfire Bob Raffelson Ben Ryland Kirk Douglas EMMY Oscar director Academy Award London Lincoln Forrest Gump