20 Burst results for "Salk Institute"

Scientists search for ways to lock more carbon in the soil

Climate Connections

01:17 min | 6 months ago

Scientists search for ways to lock more carbon in the soil

"Plants absorb carbon dioxide as they grow and store it in their roots stems and leaves but when plans decompose much of that carbon returns to the atmosphere joanne. Corey is a plant biologist and geneticist at the salk institute for biological studies. Her team is working to develop new plant varieties. That can lock more carbon in the soil long term. She says these new plants need to have more and deeper roots. In order to bury the carbon down deep where there are fewer microorganisms that can decompose the plant and made all the company go back up in the atmosphere correy says the ideal plants will also have high concentrations of a molecule called subaru which is found in cork it holds a lot of carbon and breaks down very slowly. The project is in its early stages right now trying to understand what those traits really mean in terms of jeans with that information. Researchers can selectively breed those traits or engineer them into widely grown plants such as corn and wheat. These owners of crop plants. Because you really need a lot of land you do. This corey hopes that in ten years. These climate-friendly crops will be growing in farm fields around the globe. Climate connections is produced by the center for environmental communication

Salk Institute For Biological Correy Joanne Corey Cork Center For Environmental Commu
Sequential Comparisons Could Mean Better Witness Identifications

60-Second Science

02:41 min | 11 months ago

Sequential Comparisons Could Mean Better Witness Identifications

"In two thousand, six, a twenty, six, year, old California man named your riot courtney was sentenced to life in prison for kidnapping and rape despite having an alibi for the time the crimes were committed to witnesses. They saw lineup the police station and they both identified the same person and he was convicted entirely based on those two eyewitness Accounts Salk Institute for Biological Studies neuroscientist. Tom. Albright he says years later the California Innocence Project looked into the case and it turns out that the DNA that was found at the crime scene was not the DNA of Courtney after eight years behind bars courtney was set free, but his case is not unique now. Of cases in which individuals have been exonerated based on post conviction DNA analysis most of these innocent people were sent to prison because witnesses miss identified them somebody. Out of a lineup and that information was taken seriously by the police in the jury believed it why witnesses sometimes get it so wrong Albright explains that our memory for visual events is notoriously flawed. Somebody tells us that they saw something we figure it must be true. They saw with their own eyes lineups. Witnesses photos of six faces, five of innocent people and one of the suspect the eye witnesses simply asked to identify any person that they remember from the crime scene but only having them pick their top choice doesn't account for how well the witness remembers that face. This issue can result in errors. Albright's team thinks there's a better way by tapping into the strength of the witness's memory in an experiment they had volunteers watch a clip of a grisly crime scene from an obscure Hollywood movie. The next day these studies subject witnesses viewed a six person lineup that show just to faces at a time think of an eye test better. Now or now. So on each hair witness will vote for one or the other the faces which one looks more similar to the person you remember from the crime scene, we've been tabulate that vote and the face that has the largest number of votes is the winner compared to traditional lineup techniques. The two faces at a time method lead to a less biased and more accurate identification of the fictional perpetrator people are far better at making relative judgments than they are making absolute judgements. The study is in the journal Nature Communications the researchers think their approach to lineups has the potential to reduce wrongful convictions resulting in more justice for

Albright Courtney Salk Institute For Biological Kidnapping California Innocence Project TOM Nature Communications Rape Hollywood
How Does Jet Lag Work?

BrainStuff

05:34 min | 1 year ago

How Does Jet Lag Work?

"GonNa talk about jet lag. I grew up flying back and forth between America and Singapore. So I wanNA share what I know about jetlag with you. First of all jet lag occurs when you travel between two or more time zones via air travel and the thing is it disrupts your circadian rhythm. Your body's natural cycle and you're sleeping patterns now. The Circadian Rhythm dictated by the daily appearance of the Sun. So light and darkness. Influence our bodies. But when this is disrupted it's official name is D- synchronous symptoms include insomnia fatigue loss of concentration irritability depression and even gastro intestinal ills but look jet lag or decent. Kronos is prevalent a nineteen ninety. Eight study found that ninety four percent of Americans get it and forty five percent reported that their symptoms were severe. So what causes jetlag? Well there is a whole field that exists to study how life is affected by time it's called chronobiology and here is what it's taught us. I late triggers a reaction in a special I pigment this activates response in the neurons of your brains hypothetical. Mus The twenty thousand nerve cells located. They're they're called the Super Cosmetic nucleus or S. C. N. for short are what starts your body's daily processes and also the lack of light causes other developments in your body. Circadian Rhythm tells you when to sleep and went awake and it regulates your body temperature blood pressure digestion urine production and hormone secretion so for example when it's time to sleep the SEM releases Melatonin and that encourages you to go to sleep when you cross into multiple timezones though your body has trouble resetting quickly and this is worse when you fly east. This is called phase advance. Flying West is called phase delay. This is because our circadian clock is actually closer to twenty five hours. Going East would require going to bed earlier. A study showed it takes four days to adjust to a twelve hour phase delay. In comparison. It takes more than eight days to adjust to a twelve hour phase advance and also jetlag is worse when you have to awaken when your body is still at its minimum temperature. There is also research from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. The indicates jet LAG is connected to your L. H. x. One gene and this gene regulates neural development and Circadian Rhythm. And Sleep. Okay. So we've got what causes it. What are the symptoms? How do you know if you've got jetlag? Well it's time to talk to Dr Christian beyond the insomnia fatigue loss of concentration irritability depression and even gastro intestinal ills. There's even more symptoms. It can aggravate menstrual discomfort or contribute to the development of heart disease and diabetes jetlag also releases stress hormones. Which make you anxious and grumpy? It drives up your blood pressure. It sends inflammation stimulating chemicals here arteries it also disrupts your appetite regulating hormones. It disrupts the release of Melatonin which we mentioned earlier. Not only does this affect sleep but it can also protect you from cancer in finally research on animals shows that there's other symptoms as well. A twenty ten study at the University of California found that when subject to jetlag the brains of hamsters created neurons? At half their normal rate they showed memory and learning deficits. And a two thousand. Six study at the University of Virginia. Found that younger mice rebounded from jet lag but making older mice undergo the equivalent of a Washington to Paris flight. Every week would actually increase their death rate yet. That's how big it is well for mice at least so we've got what causes jetlag and we have it's symptoms. You're wondering Dr Christian where the remedies. How do I fix this? You've probably heard of some of the common remedies like operating on your new time zone before you fly there or wearing yourself out before exercising by exercising in two thousand nine researchers recommend the following regimen to beat jetlag. I you readjust your rhythm before the trip by using a light box that simulates daylight now depending on whether you're flying phase advance phase. Delay us the light box either. In the morning or the evening to stimulate your circadian rhythm another suggestion from the same researchers was to take a Melatonin supplement by changing when you take the doses in relation to going to sleep. You can alter your circadian rhythms the CDC actually recommends exercise to a balanced diet. And lots of rest in the weeks before you fly. They also recommend avoiding alcohol and Caffeine as well as drinking water. Finally they recommend wearing loose comfortable clothing. While you're flying and moving around the cabin this can help avoid thrombosis or blood clots so do not take sleep medication. So you can sleep it off in your seat. In mobilization for long periods can actually raise your risk for thrombosis and this can actually lead to a stroke. So there you have it. The causes symptoms and remedies for jetlag.

America Melatonin Dr Christian Singapore Salk Institute For Biological Insomnia Official Cancer Caffeine University Of California University Of Virginia Washington CDC Paris
"salk institute" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

Making Sense with Sam Harris

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"salk institute" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

"So yeah. So you were reminded me we met at one of those beyond belief conferences at the Salk institute back in in two thousand six or so, yeah, I think it was more like two thousand nine it was quite a while ago. And it was was very it was very interesting. I think I was writing a book at that time with Scott, Lillian fouled on the promise and peril of neuroscience in the in the public square. So so that was very that was a very important meeting for me, actually, a learned about a lot of people's work there, and I was familiar. You're is. But I heard your your talk. And I remember I spoke on since I'm a clinician, I'm a psychiatrist. So I try to stick with clinical matters and see most things through that lens. You know, how how how brain science how junk science all very frac through through clinical land. So I spoke about post traumatic stress disorder, and and how it is both house both the product of of a brain in mind. In other words, you know mechanism which is brain function. But and meaning and that in my field, I think we we've tended to be a little reductionist about it and see it largely through the lens of of anxiety of of a fear response that hasn't extinguished after the stresser is gone away. Which just to me, the essence of continuing fear, and that's very highly legitimate. And of course, one of the best therapies is exposure therapy. Which which touches on that mechanism. But there is so much more to post traumatic stress disorder in terms of in terms of what what keeps it alive for people. And that that often has to do with the meaning so so that was my I wanna talk about that of their many intersect issues here with addiction and the opioid epidemic and PTSD. And so I want to dive into all that. But, but I more generally, how do you view your work as a psychiatrist because you're you're sort of at the nexus of clinical work on these various fronts, but also you comment on the politicization of science and medicine, and you you you have been the this kind of a to some degree a culture war component to what you've been doing to. How do you summarize the your approach to psychiatry at the very much? There's a cultural component. In fact, I. Wrote a book back in two thousand one called PC MD hell political correctness is corrupting medicine. And and then I collaborated with Christina of summers in two thousand five on a book called one nation under therapy. And both of those folks have very a very thick thread of politicized science or even junk medicine, and in fact, in a way so much of it comes down to the critiques often came down to explanatory reductionism, and and as addiction psychiatrists that's my main field, and I do work. I do work part time in a methadone clinic. I've done that for about twenty years and this year, I'm I'm actually spending the year in a small town in Ohio trying to understand the I even call it an addiction epidemic at this point not just an opioid epidemic and in a small town compared to to an urban area. And there are lots of interesting differences. We can talk about but the overarching, I guess. Almost everything I've I've written has to do with some sort of a perversion of of the data or some sort of questionable interpretation. And so I just give you an example, take take for example, post traumatic stress disorder since I brought that up and a reductionist approach anonymous, not an incorrect one. But just one explanatory level would be at the level of the amazed at the level of neuroscience. And and it's I'm not saying it's illegitimate at all. It's it's it's very real. It's very true. But it's just one level and when you reduce things to win level we do that in addiction as well. Now, the dominant view of addiction is that it's a brain disease and anytime you reduce things to one level..

Lillian Salk institute PTSD Scott methadone Christina Ohio twenty years
"salk institute" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

The Wellness Mama Podcast

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"salk institute" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

"I don't have all the did on in front of me, but I'm sure we can find some some studies in Posta links shuts awesome. Yeah, have makes her include those. Are they're reliable ways that you guys have seen in a decent amount of data now with everybody tracking their sleep? Are there ways that are. Reliable to like basically increase from sleep, were increased deep sleep that seemed to work across all segments of the population or is that more of a personalized thing? I definitely think there's some personalized things that end up happening. But yeah, we definitely have some data, we think, and frankly, were trying to share gonna start showing a lot of this data on our social and on our blog going forward about things we do find. I would say one of the most important things is actually consistency of sleep time. Like what time you go to bed every night and wake time what time you wake up and you first get exposed to light that tend to actually impact the quality of our sleep quite a bit, not just the duration. I think it actually gets back to the principles of circadian rhythms. So just about actually a year ago, finally, noble prize was awarded in this, but our body actually operates and our mind around something called our circadian clock. So it's actually, you know, sort of what governs with hormones or released when. You know when you should fall asleep when you should wake up and turns out that this actually impacts most cells in our body. So anything that sort of helps set a consistent time helps keep that clock in check. So just falling asleep at the same time. And we actually are starting to give recommendations for people win that optimal time is for them because everyone has different time for that. So we're starting to give that information at the app. I think one of the other consistent things we find, frankly, is meal timing and alcohol. So oftentimes actually we eat pretty close. Now today's society really close to bedtime from everything we've seen. That's probably not healthy for us. Actually, there was a fascinating work being done by such Ponda out of the Salk institute. And I think one of the things that they found actually is your glucose response to certain types of food will vary upon the time of day. And basically what they showed is that after sundown, our body resp-. Bonds to sugar, like much much worse. And and part of that is actually thought that are paying Chris, which helps regulate that, you know our insulin and are you know, assuming basically helping control control glucose levels in her body basically starts shutdown once melatonin is released in the body. So I would say, meal timing from what we're seeing in our did on what we're finding research has a huge, huge impact. We generally commend you shouldn't go to bed to full or to hungry in reality. This ends up meaning people should probably finished in her three hours. And I think from some of our data, we've seen four hours helps quite a bit. I notice a recent study done in intermittent fasting and the timing of the window. And what they found is a cohort that actually finish our meals before five and doing much better and sort of all metabolic function than a cohort that ended up finishing their meals at nine. So I think we're gonna find more and more research going back to sort of what our grandparents used to stay of. Eating eating early and going to bed early helps quite a bit. The other one is alcohol. I think timing of alcohol and what types of alcohol we know has a big impact. So I think we have found data people react differently to different types of spirits and beverages. So that's pretty interesting. And then outside of that, I would say it's getting enough light exposure were in a society today where we don't get the amount of light that we used to. So most time, you know, if you think sort of back restoring historically, we were not. We didn't have lightbulbs, we were sort of waking and going to bed with sawn and getting that light exposure the morning actually helps jump start that circadian clock again and set schedule every day. So in today's society, when you're sort of.

Posta Salk institute melatonin Chris three hours four hours
"salk institute" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

The Healthy Moms Podcast

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"salk institute" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

"I don't have all the did on in front of me, but I'm sure we can find some some studies in Posta links shuts awesome. Yeah, have makes her include those. Are they're reliable ways that you guys have seen in a decent amount of data now with everybody tracking their sleep? Are there ways that are. Reliable to like basically increase from sleep, were increased deep sleep that seemed to work across all segments of the population or is that more of a personalized thing? I definitely think there's some personalized things that end up happening. But yeah, we definitely have some data, we think, and frankly, were trying to share gonna start showing a lot of this data on our social and on our blog going forward about things we do find. I would say one of the most important things is actually consistency of sleep time. Like what time you go to bed every night and wake time what time you wake up and you first get exposed to light that tend to actually impact the quality of our sleep quite a bit, not just the duration. I think it actually gets back to the principles of circadian rhythms. So just about actually a year ago, finally, noble prize was awarded in this, but our body actually operates and our mind around something called our circadian clock. So it's actually, you know, sort of what governs with hormones or released when. You know when you should fall asleep when you should wake up and turns out that this actually impacts most cells in our body. So anything that sort of helps set a consistent time helps keep that clock in check. So just falling asleep at the same time. And we actually are starting to give recommendations for people win that optimal time is for them because everyone has different time for that. So we're starting to give that information at the app. I think one of the other consistent things we find, frankly, is meal timing and alcohol. So oftentimes actually we eat pretty close. Now today's society really close to bedtime from everything we've seen. That's probably not healthy for us. Actually, there was a fascinating work being done by such Ponda out of the Salk institute. And I think one of the things that they found actually is your glucose response to certain types of food will vary upon the time of day. And basically what they showed is that after sundown, our body resp-. Bonds to sugar, like much much worse. And and part of that is actually thought that are paying Chris, which helps regulate that, you know our insulin and are you know, assuming basically helping control control glucose levels in her body basically starts shutdown once melatonin is released in the body. So I would say, meal timing from what we're seeing in our did on what we're finding research has a huge, huge impact. We generally commend you shouldn't go to bed to full or to hungry in reality. This ends up meaning people should probably finished in her three hours. And I think from some of our data, we've seen four hours helps quite a bit. I notice a recent study done in intermittent fasting and the timing of the window. And what they found is a cohort that actually finish our meals before five and doing much better and sort of all metabolic function than a cohort that ended up finishing their meals at nine. So I think we're gonna find more and more research going back to sort of what our grandparents used to stay of. Eating eating early and going to bed early helps quite a bit. The other one is alcohol. I think timing of alcohol and what types of alcohol we know has a big impact. So I think we have found data people react differently to different types of spirits and beverages. So that's pretty interesting. And then outside of that, I would say it's getting enough light exposure were in a society today where we don't get the amount of light that we used to. So most time, you know, if you think sort of back restoring historically, we were not. We didn't have lightbulbs, we were sort of waking and going to bed with sawn and getting that light exposure the morning actually helps jump start that circadian clock again and set schedule every day. So in today's society, when you're sort of.

Posta Salk institute melatonin Chris three hours four hours
"salk institute" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

02:59 min | 3 years ago

"salk institute" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"You know, when all is said and done, I don't think people have fundamentally changed over the last ten thousand plus years of evolution. I mean, we've changed in some ways and there's different ever legionary pressures that were reacting to, and you see that, for example, I'm asking you and Ashkenazi. Jews have gone through very strong bottlenecks, which is why as a group, we have higher incidence of different genetic diseases that we. Disinherited. And so you know, there is constant pressure in pollution happening in humanity, but when all of a sudden Don our basic drivers or the same, I'm rule off both at sequoia capital. Has this great saying that every product that you can think of is fundamentally driven by one of the seven deadly sins in terms of successful products, and so which send us at line against in that may imply how you think about the product area? And so I think organizations are similar in that there's always room for innovation in. I can mention one or two nations that have happened over the last decade, for example. But when all said and done, people want to have direction. They wanna know what they should be building. They won't coordination. Some people are gonna inherently act Baddeley's. You need, you need processes to deal with that in fundamentally to have the most impact you're going to need to coordinate. It's sort of like if you were making dinner with a couple of friends, you'd probably want to figure out who's bringing the salad and who's cooking the main course and who's bringing the desert. Otherwise, you end up with desserts. And so anytime you just get rid of any organization or hierarchy you end up. With potentially a lot of sweets, but maybe not a lot of anything else. And so I do think the hypocrisy is and all the various, you know, the valves, style approach. All these things I think are actually pretty flawed in terms of their purchase in ten to not work. The flip of it is every once in a while, an organization or company will have such strong product market fed that it doesn't seem to matter that they kind of had a really stupid idea around org structure or a terrible person, org structure. And so they succeed despite themselves, and then they're held up as an example of, oh, look, there's another way to do it. And so I actually think I know the insides of a handful of these companies, not all of them. And I think some companies could have been ten times more successful if they'd actually organize properly, but they didn't. And then they're, they're held up as an example of this alternative to perch works well, another area that that I know you're interested in. I'm sure it's at least in part as a result of your beauty in biology is I guess, health and longevity, I would love to hear about your background. The thinking background there. Or why you're interested, what areas specifically you're most focused on? Is it selfish? Is it as an investment thesis? I'm also fascinated by this topic, so would love to hear your opinion. So my background for it as I worked at the Salk institute, many years ago, gene delivery into the brain. And then later I worked on this pathway in Seattle against called the dour pathway or the death pathway, which basically integrates signals across insulin aging and cancer and mammals. And so if you knock out one of these genes and these little worms, the live to three times longer as healthy adults, this crash out at the end, and there's two or three other lines of evidence..

sequoia capital Salk institute Baddeley Seattle
"salk institute" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"salk institute" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Of living two hundred they're gonna live two thousand well we haven't had the time to see if that's going to work or pan out just yet but there are other approaches other ways besides manipulation of that single chain to expand lights span and in terms of wanting to live a long and healthy life the one thing that i would suggest to the audience is and this is in a single word exercise and i was not only exercise physically but exercise your brain your intellect your interest as well my staying physically active you actually prolong your life and you also have enhanced vitality and some of the audience may be aware of some of the other news that has come about in the world of aging related to telomeres for those who have not heard telomeres telomeres are the ends of the chromosomes they act like the capital of a shoelace to keep the shoelace from unraveling the capless at the end of the chromosome keep the dna of the chromosome the nucleic acids materials that transmit the genetic information to the next generation into the next cell as a devise and maintains a slight span it keeps it intact and elizabeth blackburn who happens to be the new president at the salk institute developed and has become a nobel laureate because of a work with telomeres and they found that the length of the telomeres is directly related to the life span in fact it's a biological marker which is available now and you can tell what your biological age is by measuring telomere length and what's called telomerase activity and so you know we've had a lot of discussions here on telomeres in lengthening of telomeres but i was fascinated i went to the buck institute and not too far from me you guys watch the worm research being done and the issue of how to lengthen the telomeres one of the things that you just mentioned you said exercise we have simple ideas good nutrition which we're gonna talk about with you on our next segment exercise which you already mentioned a cognitive health and fitness which we also think is part of aging at simple things like keeping good relationships and nothing isolated these are still all of the things that help us live longer simple but scientists telling us that it's real we should be back don't you.

president salk institute buck institute elizabeth blackburn
"salk institute" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"salk institute" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Let's get back to the show or a keira could grow my own brain in a jar now you might not be able to but the appropriate tool salk institute published an article where rusty gage and his colleague what a great name by the way rusty gage just a rusty gage nothing to see here where he and his colleagues were working with brain organized caesar not new but they do carry with them i think some new ethical questions and what they did is they took these brain organs and they transplanted them into human brain so i'm sorry into mouse brains human brain organs transplanted them into mouse brains let's break all this down real quick an organ is different from a network an organ is different from a brain and organized is not a brain in a jar it's not a fully functional brain it's basically a tiny little blob of brain that does have lots of cells but those cells are sort of connected to each other but disconnected from anything else so there's different levels that we can study neuronal activity right we can look at things in vivo inside of the living organism the the living human being the living animal it's quite hard to look at in vivo research in a human being however unless we're just looking at like brain waves for example using eeg or if we're using fm awry technology c t technology and there were really only looking at like big structural things it's very hard to see what's happening at the cellular level in a human being because that would be way too invasive so we have all these different ways that we can do an animal's little windows you can use to look into brains patch clamping things where you can like you can like suck onto an individual cell and look at its electrical activity there's ways to look at the chemistry all that good stuff and then now there's really cool things that are called organized so it's.

keira salk institute rusty gage
"salk institute" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"salk institute" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"The the salk institute campus with jonas salk once and i said to him how do you know how did you discover the vaccine the polio vaccine and he said well i work with my dreams it was an accident too wasn't it yeah well what do you say well no not exactly he said i worked with my dreams and you know you think about coca and the benzine ring the dream of the snake following itself you think of descartes who has three dreams in rome in sixteen nineteen transform his understanding and and cause him to gain insights that become a whole new form of geometry their endless stories like this and when you talk to saint teresa of avila you know she talks about she says it's fascinating you know given that she's a roman catholic nun she says forget about all the rituals forget about the prese go inside sit and listen and open yourself to this hidden part of yourself bombs says i hear the music when i'm in this meditative state i hear the music and i just write it down mozart same thing over and over when you look at the relationship between creativity spiritual piffling and nonlocal consciousness experiences you see is the same thing it's all about opening to this aspect of the cell that is not limited by space time and not restricted to cockatoo physical conscious conscience once you realize how to use it what does it do for you oh well does all sorts of things i mean just take meditation you know you go up to pubmed and do a google on meditation i mean you know the national institutes of health the national medical library go anybody can do it it's free just go up and do a google on meditation or do a search it's not really a google search the database in their over several thousand papers we know that meditation improves your health it makes you sleep better it improves your sex life it raises your i q you can actually alter your da.

polio vaccine descartes rome avila salk institute jonas salk google
"salk institute" Discussed on Dumb People Town

Dumb People Town

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"salk institute" Discussed on Dumb People Town

"From the phone company by the way when louis kahn the architect who did the salk institute among many other and beautiful buildings in bangladesh when he died there was maybe three sentences we're talking about electrical tape that he's still had this is in what publication i wanna tell you we're going we're going over twenty minutes he enjoyed many many things among those were hunting fishing golfing snorkeling did you see that one come see that one coming abba no the world did you see that cody dancing queen music cath hiking turkey run every wedding he got drunk and told them to play some god damn out put it on to me i don't care if there's enjoyed chopping wood shooting guns bed bath and beyond those think back toback starlight mints cold beer free beer the history channel ccr i'm with you there channel and ccr have never been separated i was always right nets war movies discussing who makes the best pizza the chicago white sox old buicks and above all his family those things are the most four illinois things i've ever she said yeah all the best pizza chicago white sox all buicks bam you're like doing lyrics from aseren gettys bears boss the l all spos a renowned distributor of popsicles and ice cream sandwiches to his grandchildren good on you man he also turned on programs such as finished and for for his grand youngins usually when they were actually there which means he dug it on his own so there was sometimes with that firm is making.

salk institute bangladesh louis kahn chicago illinois twenty minutes
"salk institute" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"salk institute" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"The difference here is you're saying well here's what i see in the lab why don't we try it in humans because it's probably not harmful and let's see what happens even if we don't know everything and the willingness to take action from a research perspective while acknowledging that there's a lot more to learn is highly unusual why are you like that but like how did you get to be a risk taking academic in that way because it's very unusual in theory special and it's is the type of thing the changes the world so what made you this way so there are two things one is i went to another good community says his two children cleats recess institute always use right next door hughley undoing money be as d a daily the member held a professor jeff kelley who is also a kind of semiprofessional risk of dr once again made this example is a low minority scott driver and doing this on disrupted you're driving you have to be ninety type of since you of that you can overtake the next guard before you hit the gas to its mettle and the stories very different in science if you want to be really successful scientist who will leave a lasting legacy you have to be fight bush and sue of that you have a chance before you give it to thrive and that kind of stared with me and then the second thing is when i came to salk institute when i look out said join us sock um this guy who devil up the invented the polio vaccine and he took a he'll chance and if you look at polio we have on cure polio but we have prevented it to the extent that we have all must eat alexander lebed so prevents them has a hughes heels power that we have onto level that state so that's why when i started insecurity under them realized bagged ed breeds in cycles and is eating bad on and all this stuff have hughes impact one limit this on that i find is i can do all this.

jeff kelley scientist bush polio vaccine polio hughes professor scott salk institute
"salk institute" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"salk institute" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"In the meantime bulletproof radio stations high performance you're listening to bulletproof radi with dave asprey today's interview is with one of the leading researchers in the world looking at circadian biology which is how your body responds to night in dark cycles when you listen all the way through the end you're going to learn so many different things you can do to improve the way your body functions that don't have a lot to do with exercise or a new things you might expect the just tons of really get information from one of the guys doing the in the trenches work with some powerful stories filling it end so you'll enjoy this one dis go back to the day is that fifty years ago scientists were first able to create synthetic dna fifty years ago they produced a type of viral dna called fi x one seven four which is an extremely simple molecule with only five or six genes but that laid the foundation for the synthesis of more complex dna including behold genome and even semisynthetic organisms and who would have thought fifty years ago things do change quickly but this was before i was born this is a huge achievement since the structure of the dna molecule was discovered only a few years before they did this in nineteen fifty three and that was discovered by none other than france's creek today's guest is a friend of mine as satchin panda who has perhaps the coolest name of any research scientists that i've come across as you might have guests he grew up in india but he's a professor at the regulatory biology lab at the salk institute and i had a chance to spend several hours with him in his team last year at looking ats might okon drill cells in rat retinas and just getting like deke is to our i've ever had of cool research going on and in such an is considered one of the top fifty influential scientists in the book called brain trust is discoveries among the top ten breakthroughs of the year.

dave asprey france india professor salk institute deke fifty years
"salk institute" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"salk institute" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"A a bedrock of advances in science now because it has only about a thousand cells and scientists know with entire genome sequence they know what every cell does in the warmest transparent so they can see everything as a ages they have found that by manipulating one single gene one gene we're able to extend the life span of the warm tenfold and it just so happens humans have the identical gene we have that same machine and it is possible to manipulate them in humans and there are some people on the planet already or happing to take a prescription drug which works on that gene and they're hoping that a set of living to a hunter they're going to live to a thousand well we haven't had the time to see if that's going to work worker pan out just yet but there are other approaches other ways besides manipulation of that single gene to expand life span and in terms of wanting to live a long and healthy life the one thing that i would suggest to the audience is and this is in a single word exercise and i was the at us not only exercise physically but exercise your blame here intellect your interest as well by think physically active you actually prolonged your life and you also have enhanced vitality and some of the audience may be aware of some of the other news that has come about in the world of aging related to telomeres for those who have not heard of telomeres telomeres are the ends of chromosomes they act like the cap with of a shoelace to keep the shoelace from unraveling the countless was the end of the chromosome keep the dna of the chromosome the nucleic acids and materials they transmit the genetic information to the next generation and to the next cell as a devise and maintains its lifespan it keeps intact and he's lewis the blackburn who happens to be the new president at the salk institute uh developed and it's become a nobel laureate because of her work with telomeres and they have found that the.

president salk institute lewis
"salk institute" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"salk institute" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Have found that by manipulating one single gene one gene we're able to extend the life span of the warm ten fold and it just so happens humans have the identical gene we have that same machine and it is possible to manipulate that in humans and there are some people on the planet already gore happing to take a prescription drug which works on that gene and they're hoping that a set of living to a hunter they're gonna live to a thousand well we haven't had the time to see if that's going to work worker pan out just yet but there are other approaches other ways besides manipulation of that single gene to expand life span and in terms of wanting to live a long and healthy life the one thing that i would suggest to the audience is and this is in a single word exercise and i was the at us not only exercise physically but exercise your brain your intellect your interest as well by he physically active you actually prolong your life and you also have enhanced vitality and some of the audience may be aware of some of the other news that has come about in the world of aging related to telomeres for those who have not heard of telomeres telomeres are the ends of chromosomes they act like the conflict of a shoelace to keep the shoelace from unraveling the conflict at the end of the chromosome keep the dna of the chromosome the nucleic acids and materials they transmit the genetic information to the next generation and to the next cell as the devise and maintains that lifespan it keep it intact and he's lewis the blackburn who happens to be the new president at the salk institute uh developed and s become a nobel laureates because of her work with telomeres and they have found that the length of telomeres is directly related to the life span in fact it's a biological marker which is available now and you can tell what your biological age is by measuring telomere length and it was called to lama race activity and we had discussions here on telomeres and glinting economy is but i was passed the buck institute and not too far from you guys watched the worm uh research being done and the issue of have to lengthened the telomere uh one of the things that you just mentioned you had exercise we have.

president salk institute buck institute lewis
"salk institute" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"salk institute" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Of these things help to fulfil that environment and that ability for you to feel wonderful the environment cure at it it's right you're you're touching on all the census in that uh what's interesting what you're doing in your practice and in your personal journey here is your connecting the science behind it because we talked about this for years i've written in my first booked their dole secrets designed when my things was the quantum design element the unseen that you can feel that with a welldesigned room wealth fought designed room comes together daresay certain ambiance an energy that it is it'll elite exuded from that space that makes you feel something exactly right if the affect of space that actually attracted people to the whole concept of functionally to begin with several years ago and i think people were looking for a magic bullet yummy give me the reason why i feel that in the space is it certain elements is it the in the young of it is it the balance is but it's all does things lord and it's our ability to look at these different disciplines and say how can we connected to today's scientific abilities to be able to say that there is this institute at the salk institute that studies neuroscience for architects believe at herat brilliant it is brilliance because people have been doing it so much in commercial design in healthcare design corporations have been doing it forever but that's for marketing marketing branding growth in healthcare it's a patient recovery rates ally does natural lighting help a patient to recover quicker know there are actual reasons for it.

salk institute herat
"salk institute" Discussed on Weekly Infusion

Weekly Infusion

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"salk institute" Discussed on Weekly Infusion

"While kim's team weekly infusion wave dr tree pinski on dealt to brace shed that we came fugen addresses medically related topics it's in than i unto tanning and everything he wants in all about health and medicine now map presents the varying wonderful to change dealt to bring that welcome everybody to another episode of the infusion of course i am add that bruce's out he still scandinavia at so it's just i the get the profound pleasure of interviewing dr vis robber schander he is the director of the centre on the brain of cognition he's also distinguished professor with the psychology department neuroscience is program all the uc california the universe california's san diego he is also address professor of biology at the salk institute if you'd i if i may introduce you to dr robert shadrach shame on you up sorry for you because uh you should know who he is if you feel like any of you have in exposure neurosciences you should know dot drop shadra his lectures are all over the internet and i recommend each and every one but nothing will surpass today's interview said i drop shot a thank you for joining me thank you dr gr i'm delighted to be here thanks for awhile after the beer yes we would try to do if quite some time we'll talk a little bit about how we did actually meet in percentage a sick of it i want people to get us people that have been art after would work to understand the material uh that you put forth let tell tell brain the properties what's your most known known for which is the issue of phantom limb pain can you give us just a couple of minutes on that so they understand that that story or question how complaints constructs what image is fascinating cruise your eyes yesterday when he parts navigating miscreant armed him sense of cell within your rights division biz and confirms expense and they're all of his be taking granted a axiomatic foundations it's more if this.

kim scandinavia director california professor salk institute distinguished professor san diego dr robert shadrach
"salk institute" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

02:10 min | 4 years ago

"salk institute" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Being shot out into space being frozen what have you this revived even targets would not survive these cataclysms because at the end of the day the still need water and if you boil off all the water tartu grades don't have anything to drink okay dave what else is on the site this week we'll our we've got a story about a robot that accident like a plant orbit like a fungus it's got a tentacled of we even in out of things the coveted go along with that also a story about the vast amount of plastic we are producing nauseous now but how much we will be producing over the next thirty years and the numbers are staggering finally resigns insider we've got a story about why some scientists heat the nih is new definition of a clinical trial also the latest on the controversy surrounding two female scientist suing the prestigious salk institute in california so we should check on all these stories on the site thanks dave thanks sarah david graham is the editor for online daily news site antiaircraft this episode is brought to you by the weather channel when severe weather hits a forecast on your phone just dozen cut it you need to know what to do how to stay safe and what to expect next you need the weather channel the nation's most trusted source for severe weather coverage they go beyond maps in apps with weather experts on the front lines of the storm the weather channel i'm meteorologist make sure you understand the why behind the weather and what steps you need to take you've never seen weather like this the weather channel is exploring our atmosphere like never before they're leading the way with the use of realtime augmented reality allowing you to see us inside a hurricane or the potential threats of a storm surge understanding our atmosphere is the best way to prepare for severe weather every season every storm every time you watch trust the weather channel.

dave nih scientist salk institute california sarah david graham editor tartu augmented reality thirty years
"salk institute" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:56 min | 4 years ago

"salk institute" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Just have to come let's let the chips fall where they fall i should know that that phrase because i live in las vegas of very interesting i'm going to be thinking about this all day i hope it doesn't affect i i shall because my show is usually topnotch and the last thing i need is to be distracted aren't well let's talk about what we're going to talk about today so we have some scientists at the california eddie at cal for your research institute the salk institute that are suing for discrimination so even scientists are seen lack of pay denied opportunity for promotion we're going to talk about that was going to talk about how working more than fifty five hours a week raises your risk of developing serious heart problems by forty percent are you kidding me nobody has forty our week jobs unless of course they work for the government i mean the rest of us right we get into work in about six seven the believe at six seven neither as easily over fifty five hours a week so we're at risk for heart disease we are cranberries cranberries are again in the news for venus superfood egotism cranberries in without kinda cringing tomatoes they say to me is may help prevent skin cancer member joe it's better tomatoes and how like pena specially cooked tomatoes can do a lot in terms of preventing heart disease and cancer work cetera well now the funny that me this can possibly help skin cancer we also got some interesting scoop of these k pair lee with these there's some very interesting meeting trivia that i need to tell you that fairly vis have some very shall we say colorful actions that happened during sex so we're going to talk about that we have the mountain of god volcano this is kind freaking me out it's in tanzania and were being told that a massive eruption of this mounted is imminent and it could wipe out peace sites in human history the volcano was known as the old join your len guy and they say this could be the next the volcano that we see in our lifetimes don't go read ak47 seven delic have you ever wanted to learn the vase it's a spanish greetings asking how someone has julie body parts and if you read the healthcare profession have you ever wanted to learn that acl spanish to the degree we.

las vegas salk institute pena tanzania california cal julie fifty five hours forty percent
"salk institute" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

02:11 min | 4 years ago

"salk institute" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"So once wednesday found the alacid gene people just started racing to research what's going on and then on more recently there was a team at the salk institute that found a girl with williams syndrome who had an atypical deletion she was missing all of the williams genes but one and she had normal social interaction she wasn't overly friendly she could carry on a conversation in kind of a more nonchalant way without kind of smothering people with affection and so that gene that she had is called g t f two i and it helps control the release of oxytocin said that help them conduct zero ina will this one gene seems to have a lot of implications for that sociable williams personality has so far swimming to me about there was a dream but somehow got selected for in the general population that dampened our social interactions them you know that must have been somehow it afflicted for adoptive i suppose at i guess the question bed is you know what is it as as you call it pathological friendliness what is pathological about their behaviour because the one thing that i do remember is all all though the young woman was extremely friendly it was hard for her to make friends right well and it really the the technology part of it is probably less hurtful now then it would have been when we were still kind of evolving and living in tribes many years ago so originally i guess in like the early days of humanity we lived in these tribes of maybe forty to sixty members and those people tended to have some kind of you know genetic relationship to each other and if you encountered another tribe with people who looked different from you it was in your best interest to run and hide or else be ready to fight those people because the biggest danger facing early humans was other humans.

salk institute oxytocin williams