22 Burst results for "Salk Institute"

"salk institute" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

02:22 min | 2 weeks ago

"salk institute" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Or as a good job, Jay, I always like to reward people who go out on a limb and are not afraid to give an answer that departs from the crew. What's my reward? Your reward is that you won this week. That's what you want. There you go. Wow. All right, Evan, give us a quote. If I want to know how we learn and remember and represent the world, I will go to psychology and neuroscience. If I want to know where values come from, I will go to evolutionary biology and neuroscience and psychology just as Aristotle and Hume would have were they alive. Patricia churchland, she's a professor. She's a professor, emeritus of philosophy at the University of California, San Diego, and an adjunct professor at the salk institute. Very nice homage to Aristotle and Hugh, I think. Yeah, but it's interesting though, if you look at the sentence though, she doesn't say that she would go to philosophy. Yeah, I was expecting to hear that come out. And that's kind of, I mean, when you're talking about where values come from, that's pretty much philosophy. I mean, I think it's informed by neuroscience and psychology, but interesting to hear a philosophy professor kind of make that point out, you know? Right, but is it where they come from? Or is that where we go to explore them? Yeah. You know? It's like, I think the idea there that, well, it depends on your philosophies. But our philosophy is natural. Are they constructed? Are they whatever? It's like the process, not the content. They're exploring how we come to those places. But they're not finding their values in philosophy. But was she saying that? She wants to understand them. She would go to these disciplines to understand them. And I would have just grass is always greener. Yeah, I would have just thrown philosophy into the list. I'm sure massive YouTube would do that also, but maybe it's because Aristotle and Hume were philosophers. Yeah, I think she's saying that the classic philosophers would have studied neuroscience and psychology. I will agree with that. I do think that if that's the point, I would agree. Maybe she's assuming philosophy. Right. Yeah, maybe. If you stated. This is why all of our degrees are PhDs. We're all studying philosophy that release that's how they view it. Applied philosophy. All right, well, thank you all for joining me this week. You got it, Steve. Thanks. Thank you. Yes. Until next week, this is your skeptics guide

Aristotle Patricia churchland salk institute Hume Evan Jay University of California Hugh San Diego YouTube Steve
"salk institute" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:21 min | 7 months ago

"salk institute" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Baby come on baby let's go around and round and round W and GM radio I'm Ronald James and it is the giant 5 yes and that was Scotty's request Holy gully Colin time Happy to do that Put your hands in your pocket Sorry so 888-876-5593 We got another hour to spend together if it's on your mind It'll be on mine I was just reading an article about a problem I didn't even know it exists Oh by the way I found the video The video that Sean from sandwich was talking about Now it turns out that that girl's video was actually a staged However I'm glad that Sean brought it up because there have been two instances this year alone at a ski resort in Romania that weren't staged Yeah two different guys both of them chased down the mountain by a grizzly Now in the first one in January the guy was smart after a while he dropped his backpack and that just caused the bear to get more interested in that The second time the guy was just plum lucky because the Bay Area after a while when the distance kept growing more the bear just scampered off into the Woods and lost interest So that was the end of that But yes apparently there's an issue at this ski resort in Romania and I'd say two and two months that would cause me to change my plans All right so 888-876-5593 is 88 88 Rally And that takes us to James and Mount Vernon What's up James Hey good evening You talking about these wild critters and stuff reminds me of Sigmund and Roy you know all those animals they kept in the house and stuff you know Well and obviously it was it came to a very bad ending with an animal they thought they knew very well Yeah Yeah Yeah no I think the kitten is about size I was keeping the house but right And you know for cats that's probably good because I've always say that cats if they were large enough they would eat you Now the nice things about house cats is they're not large enough and they know it But when you start when you start deciding that something along the lion size no no the lion is eventually going to do what the lion is bred to do He will eat you Alicia Yeah well what I wanted to call out is you were talking some medical stuff about this gig arts and stuff Yeah A few days ago I heard on a radio California in San Diego I don't know if it's a salk institute or saving institute They're doing experiments on what they call turning back the clock in the cells of mice And I'll take myself as the equivalent of 30 years 40 years old And here and there are actually turning back the clock in every rejuvenating scan in fur and stuff is becoming like new ones Their memories improving or eyesight improving Energy and stuff I thought that was interesting what researchers are doing It's fascinating And what they're doing is they're injecting molecules into the mice and of course glad it's mice because of all their skin and hair may look wonderful now I want to see exactly what the side effects will be There's going to be a lot of trials before they decide they're going to put this in a human to say the least But yes silver rejuvenation therapy And it is interesting because the human body is so complex Well any living body is really that you start to wonder about the law of unintended consequence on something like this Yeah Well I know they always say yourselves regenerate every 90 to a 120 days So I don't know what's happening to my body but it doesn't seem to be rejuvenating Well some do but aging is about over the years the cells no longer are able to make an exact copy And that's what leads to it And so for a long time the Holy Grail has been how to do that But as I say there are so many issues that the idea was actually patented I'd say about 15 years ago there was a Nobel Prize given out to a guy in Japan in Japan for this And so they've been working on it on it since then but I don't know if we'll live long enough It is the salk institute by the way And I don't know if we'll live long enough to see it And the other thing is I just wonder if you could live longer would you want to live longer Yeah yeah that's a philosophical answer question Right there's no way The other thing is most of these experiments are on young mice I'd be curious to see what happens when you're already dealing with cells that are no longer exactly replicating You know because most people who are young they're not going to try this out If someone who's middle aged or beyond saying well you know maybe I'll give this a try But by then your sales are cells are already in an interesting shape so to speak So I would think that it probably wouldn't be as much of a slam dunk and then of course you've got various cells and various throughout your body that don't all react the same way But it's fascinating and I'm glad it's mice and not people Yeah yeah I was going to ask you you know big John Hamilton Yeah He could play one of his songs What do you want to hear Oh I mean you pick it Okay Yeah no absolutely I will look for something Okay I'm glad you're called Thank you Thank you Good deal So I find that stuff fascinating but I also find that stuff to be very very much like a Stephen King novel Yeah Pet cemetery comes to mind right away And so maybe find some big John Hamilton He would in Florida and he did some duets with Doris Allen and I think them changes they did I look for that I might actually have that here And we've got plenty of plenty of time to talk to you And if all else fails I'll just read the tabloids I was in the middle of that Britney Spears story don't you know But oh.

Ronald James James Hey Romania Sean salk institute or saving insti Scotty Sigmund Colin Mount Vernon GM Bay Area salk institute Roy Alicia James San Diego Japan California John Hamilton Doris Allen
"salk institute" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

05:56 min | 7 months ago

"salk institute" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"Helping those sirtuins to clean up your DNA damage. All at one time. So these are some of the things that there's things you can do right now, like being a man, but those are the things that are coming in the next 12 to 36 months that are truly life-changing. That's one of them excites us. Well, I look forward to seeing that data and it's interesting. I've had sort of mixed feelings with my excitement. I've been holding my excitement back a little bit. I had David David on the podcast a couple of years back and we talked about a lot of this research and there was some evidence that taking either an amend or nicotine ribonucleotide ribonucleoside. And can increase NAD levels in humans in the blood. But there was a study, I think it was the rabbit Webber wits lab published that this was an animal that even really, really high doses of both of these precursors, NAD precursors, both NR and NMN were unable to raise any D levels in other tissues outside of the liver. So muscle brain, for example, there was no change. And there's a lot of mechanisms involved in that, but like, you know, I'm wondering if some of the effects you were talking about also may be indirect. From raising it in the blood, perhaps maybe that's very possible, but they just got the blood back two weeks ago, including what's in the muscles. And again, I can't reveal because I'm not at liberty to do that, but what I can tell you is they're very excited about what they've seen. It's greater response than they had hoped for. Awesome. Super cool. In addition, in addition to the sirtuins, which are one very important and interesting piece to the aging puzzle, I know that you are aware of some of the technology and research that have come out of Juan Carlos belmonte's lab at the salk institute.

David David Juan Carlos belmonte salk institute
Who Is (the Now Infamous) Dr. Robert Malone?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

03:02 min | 8 months ago

Who Is (the Now Infamous) Dr. Robert Malone?

"First. Doctor Malone, welcome to the Salem radio network. Thank you very much, mister gorka and thank you for the opportunity to speak to you and to your audience today. Well, I could spend the next hour just rattling off your curriculum vitae and your various qualifications in the scientific world for those who didn't see your hours long interview with Joe who haven't seen all the interviews you've given with my friend and my former colleague Steve Bannon. Would you mind would you indulge us for a second for those across the country for whom you are a new name just to give us a prey see of your background and your relationship, for example, to the mRNA vaccines that are so in the news currently? Well, for your audience, I have been vetted and have secret clearance with Department of Defense. I've won over $8 billion or managed them for in government grants and contracts. I typically work very closely with the Department of Defense defense threat reduction agency. Kim biodefense group and have for decades, I have been a vaccine developer and innovator for well over 30 years as when I was a graduate student, I had a series of discoveries that led to 9 issued U.S. patents and numerous international patents that include all of the core technology for what we call RNA and DNA vaccines, including the first proof of concept reduction to practice using an RNA vaccine in a mouse model to produce immune responses against the envelope glycoprotein of aids. So an aids vaccine candidate my first major contract was with as a newly minted MD intern at UC Davis was with the Department of the Navy for development of an aids vaccine. I am trained at northwestern university for my NDI hold a license in the state of Maryland. I'm trained in my graduate studies at the salk institute and UC San Diego undergraduate biochemistry UC Davis multiple research fellowships at UC Davis in the department of pathology was an academic for well over a decade reaching associate professor level at the uniformed services university of the health sciences. So that's the DoD medical school. In D.C., I have been involved in way too many outbreaks intimately. I spearheaded for DoD for quite a while. The development of their Ebola vaccine candidate, which eventually I brought murk in. It was licensed to American. It's now the licensed Ebola vaccine. I've worked on flu vaccines. I've worked on literally all the biodefense vaccines used to work under contract directly for DoD at dying port vaccine company.

Doctor Malone Salem Radio Network Mister Gorka Steve Bannon Department Of Defense Defense Kim Biodefense Aids Department Of The Navy For Dev Northwestern University For My Department Of Defense Salk Institute JOE Uc San Diego Undergraduate Bio Department Of Pathology Uc Davis Dod Medical School U.S. Uniformed Services University
"salk institute" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

08:04 min | 10 months ago

"salk institute" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Mostly cloudy skies 66° in the city look for showers to move in overnight and stick with us through the weekend overnight lows will be in the upper 50s 69 your forecast high for Saturday From NPR news this is all things considered I'm Adi Cornish And I'm Mary Louise Kelly When people feel pain they tend to breathe faster When they take an opioid to kill that pain their breathing slows down now scientists think they know how pain and respiration are connected in the brain And piers John Hamilton reports that the discovery could eventually lead to safer pain drugs Some Han has been studying the link between pain and breathing in his lab at the salk institute in San Diego But he got a real world demonstration recently while taking a shower I forgot to change the temperature and the cold water just suddenly came out and covered my entire body and then I just I was breathing really fast A typical reaction to what Han calls aversive sensory information And he thinks he knows the cause Hans lab has identified a brain circuit in mice that appears to link the emotional experience of pain to breathing rhythm Hans as the circuit involves two populations of brain cells both found in the same small area of the brain stem One population regular pain and the other population regulate greeting and that's the reason why pain and breeding are interacting each other They're linked together If that's also true in people it would help explain the mysterious connection between breathing and emotion which has puzzled scientists for centuries And the finding which appears in the journal neuron could also have practical applications That's because both groups of brain cells the ones for breathing in the ones for pain respond to opioids Hunt says this is why an overdose can be fatal The reason why people die is just opioid suppress the breeding One of the scientists who helped show how opioids kill is doctor Kevin yackle the University of California San Francisco Yako says until now most research has focused on either the brain cells involved in pain or the ones involved in breathing The connection between the two is still something that's very new You know perhaps studies like this are some of the first examples of this Yakko says understanding the connection could lead to a new type of opioid one that spares the brain cells that keep us alive Maybe the molecular mechanism by which opioids silence those neurons is different than the molecular mechanism that's used by opioids to cause analgesia or pain relief The echo says the new study also could point the way toward better drugs to revive a person who has overdosed The only way right now to reverse all these effects is to give somebody an opioid receptor antagonist like naloxone Also known as Narcan The drug restores normal breathing but it can also induce withdrawal symptoms which may lead to more drug taking and another overdose Yakult says a drug that only restored breathing would be a better option And he says making opioid safer should be a priority in a country where overdoses kill more than 100 people a day Opioids are the best analgesics and so finding some way to maintain their capacity as an analgesic yet get rid of these negative side effects I think is a really important goal Though it's one that is still years away John Hamilton NPR news Pinatas those colorful swinging figures hanging at birthday parties shouldn't be dismissed as kids stuff especially at this time of year NPR's Alejandra Marcus hanse reports that in Mexico and in Mexican American communities pinatas are essential to celebrating Christmas First you need to know that pinatas for Christmas are constructed months ahead of the holiday season And they are key for Posadas Those are parties fueled by music and food and kits breaking the others Translates to ends in English Families and friends dropping on each other to symbolize Mary and Joseph's journey to Bethlehem seeking shelter ahead of justices birth The festivities ran from the 60th to the 24th of December Father westerly is the director of the museum of popular art in Mexico City He says well there's no documentation about the origin of pinatas oral history gives some idea Instead of being at the female particular genome what is said is that pinatas have an eastern origin basically Chinese They use the mud pot where they would put seeds and it was broken in the best moment of sewing to have good luck in the harvest That still exists that idea Cris cross the globe Marco Polo brought it to Europe where the Catholic Church adopted it and when Spanish missionaries arrived in Mexico the U.S. vignettes in services ahead of Christmas Around the same time that the Aztecs in Mexico celebrated one of their guts So it's a tradition that from the 16th of December when the Posadas started until practically Christmas people used pinatas to deck the Posadas and have fun The shape of this traditional pinata is significant It's basically a 7 point star and each point cone represents one of the deadly saints Pride envy lust gluttony anger greed and sloth And the act of breaking the pinata It's to break with the deadly sins to be able to receive Jesus in a more purified state And the way that a pinata is broken blindfolded symbolizes faith in Christ Then bester Lee says all the candies and toys that come out once it's broken reflect generosity Later on the protocol of the Posadas and Christmas seasons started to break And pinata started being used like a normal thing They made their way into birthday celebrations bachelor parties and even jokes Festival even remembers a time when a friend was getting divorced and Because this is you don't know that he has been He had a very good relationship with his ex-wife so they made a party to get divorced and the way to break the compromise of marriage was breaking an opinion As popularities spread and demand grew the artists who create pinatas found themselves in a bind My name is ya Sanya prieto I'm a third generation pinata maker from Los Angeles California Prieta Owens pinata design studio She uses a variety of materials in her pineapple like cardboard tisha paper paints and homemade glue and even wood for bigger installations Hopping at us average a price of a $125 starting at $50 And she says a challenge in today's pinata make in business is the name of the game is make things as fast as you can because we're not getting paid very much for anything that we're making So produce produce produce produce produce Because the purpose of Apigee is to destroy it the artistry is not appreciated And she wants to change this The vineyard offers not just something to look at but it offers an experience and it's transitory but everything is Just because it has a shorter lifespan doesn't mean it's less valuable She wants people to not just enjoy the pineapple but also remember that it serves as the centerpiece of a celebration A gathering of family food and fun And PR.

NPR news Adi Cornish Mary Louise Kelly John Hamilton salk institute Han Kevin yackle University of California San F Yakko Alejandra Marcus hanse NPR Father westerly museum of popular art Mexico San Diego Hunt bester Lee Bethlehem Mexico City Marco Polo
Who Is Dr. Robert Malone, Inventor of mRNA Vaccines?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:58 min | 11 months ago

Who Is Dr. Robert Malone, Inventor of mRNA Vaccines?

"And he is the president of the international alliance of physicians and scientists, doctor Malone, welcome to the Charlie Kirk show. Thank you. Thanks a lot for the opportunity to be here and talk to you and your audience. So let's get on it. So I'm an admirer and fan of yours. I first was made aware of you and your work when you join Brett Weinstein on his podcast all the way back in April or May or June if I remember correctly. In the back in the 20th century. It feels like yeah, that was a different world. And I was very interested in that conversation and I've watched hours of your footage since because it seemed that you were confirming some of the suspicion that I had and skepticism in my head towards the current rollout and the vaccine that we are now being in some ways forced to take. Please establish your background in vaccine technology, the original inventor of MR MN RNA and DNA vaccines and talk about why and how you got concerned about this. And we'll go from there. Let's see. So briefly, the bona fides. Let's see, you see Davis, biochemistry, bachelors and science. You see San Diego and the salk institute masters in biology, MD from northwestern university in Chicago. Fellowships, research fellowships at UC Davis and a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard Medical School for global clinical scholars research training that was just a few years ago to kind of tighten up all of my credentials having to do with clinical research regulatory affairs and all that stuff also completed a internship medical internship at UC Davis. I'm a licensed physician in the state of Maryland. I did invent the core platform technology that gave rise to these vaccines. I did not invent these vaccines. And I'm a little aggravated at what's been done with these vaccines as what's happened to the technology. But I had a extensive academic career top pathology at UC Davis and new Maryland Baltimore and also was an associate professor at the uniformed services university of the health sciences. You could look up all the papers and the many patents through if you look on Google scholar is a site so you can just Google scholar and I'm having trouble with that just like you were with the mRNA. With my name on it. And you'll see the over hundred papers and 12,600 plus academic citations for the work blah,

International Alliance Of Phys Charlie Kirk Brett Weinstein Salk Institute Malone Harvard Medical School For Glo Uc Davis Northwestern University Davis San Diego MD Chicago New Maryland Maryland Uniformed Services University Baltimore Google
"salk institute" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"salk institute" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"Nine percent distinct from active coded and it was truly a. Its own immunologic signature. Now my opinion would be if this is indeed. What's happening like this is indeed some lasting thing after what we're calling cove nineteen. I mean that's and you'll see more as he goes on to explain this. That seems to suggest to me. There's something unnatural happening not just that it's lasting but what he gets into what it shows you. This seems to suggest. In the way he describes it we're talking about spike protein lasting. not only. Does that show you in the regard of the vaccine side of this which will get into that. That's not going away in your arm like they keep lying about that. It's lasting and continuing to stay or continue to be produced in your body which is continuing to be a problem. So it showed. That seems i mean on top of that ask yourself at the spike protein as we know it is is the main problem. Why are you injecting something. That makes that in their body. How does that even make sense. So then it continues to be a problem in their body. So you're continuing the same problem with the same symptoms in the same remember. This by protein can lead to disease in and of itself salk institute as the inventor of the discoverer of amarna said on himself and backed up with data of course it can shed so you can shed this to other people they can catch. They can spread it again. That's been verified by the data and peer reviewed science and the person that literally discovered this stuff and they censored him quickly and then put it back because they realize that we can't censor the guy that knows more than we do pretty much. What happens all the time. But that suggest to me that this is something interesting like a bio weapon possibly just something to consider and we developed the long haller index. so that we can quantify non subjectively Who.

salk institute amarna
"salk institute" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

07:19 min | 1 year ago

"salk institute" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

"Today. I'm joined by antonio damasio. And he's one of the world's leading neuroscientists and one of the things i love about this is. He's not just interested in neuroscience he he is a deep understanding and this multidisciplinary approach combining arts and creativity along with signs. And he's not only a neuroscientist he's also professor philosophy psychology and he's also the director of the brain and creativity institute at the university of southern california He he's also an adjunct professor at the salk institute and the whole year california so you can see how many things damasio does. He's made seminal contributions the understanding of the brain processes. You know the the things that underlie emotions feeling decision making in consciousness that there's probably a few neuro-scientists over the last hundred years who've had the impact that antonio damasio has and he's a new book out and it's feeling and knowing making conscious mines and we talk a lot of the the new work he's done that he puts into this book and it's really a an engaging investigation of how biology neuroscience psychology and even artificial intelligence have given us the tools to unlock the mysteries of human consciousness and he combines all that to to make a really fascinating and interesting conversation with very deep thinker. So i hope you enjoy this episode with antonio damasio are you looking for delicious and healthy nutrition bar that is kito friendly low sugar and protein infused if so look no further than new school snacks. Who's reinventing the low sugar snacking evolution now for me. Health is one of the biggest things i think about and eliminating the sugar for my diet is crucial. And that's why. I love new school snacks. So if you're one of those people who also want to change the way you approach nutrition snacking then headed new school. Snacks dot com for great deals on their college bar. Lewd with healthy fats from nc tea oil. And while you're there pick up one of their brand new mouth-watering french toast crunch bars. That's new school. Snacks dot com professor damasio. Welcome to a guy you there how you doing today you i'm doing well in. This can be one of those really interesting conversations. We're gonna get a lot into the brain neuroscience. But i wanna start early and i'm actually really intrigued by what impact reading detective and spy novels hat on early in life interesting. How do you know about that Quite will watch i. I had i read voraciously as a kid and it was interesting. Because i wanted to very serious things and i did. I say but at the same time there. Was this very interesting small library. Detectives stories Some of them were in english. Some of them were translated into portuguese in very intriguing and i was intrigued. Mainly because they had fantastic commerce they had very beautiful artistic coppers by some posts surrealists or serious even Painters had done very very attractive council. So i drinking by the covers and then there was this little book suit pocket size in study greeting them. And i remember the first one i read was mantle. Ben dying i think and I specified in. I was intrigued by the mystery. And i thought that maybe my of my inquisitive mind and my desire to arrive at the solution of the problem. We re giving science may have come from that. Of course it's it's not necessarily so it's so interesting though. I mean those early experiences. I mean is that's what shaped you. Those curiosities exploring those and then trying to solve those big mysteries. Those big problems i i. It certainly played a role in my mind. I was intrigued by that. And then i think. I read all the books that were available in that series and there was something about the the mystery. The suspense The plan arriving at an end and also the fact that there were relatively short so consumed them out too quickly. I know you're from portugal. Originally you mentioned some some of the books translated does regan multiple languages. has has had an impact for you. I don't know you're able to come to conclusions differently based on the language. i don't. I doubt that that is so. I think it certainly doesn't end there You know being being forced to To confront Words for the same thing in different languages is a-plus it. It helps it helps for example realized that that that language is about tax that you can put on things on actions But those vary depending on the cultures which you are so Being being forced to confront the languages is i think very interesting issue and properly it's always positive negatives to it certainly doesn't confuse anybody and And i was exposed to that. Because i i i learned languages early otherwise which is the mike. My first language portuguese french. I had vague contact with spanish. Because when does here. A little bit. Spanish once in portuguese culture. Although it's not definitely in maine and maine language exposure and then. I was exposed to english through movies Good spend interesting in. That was a very interesting. I very a marvelous law. In portugal that prohibited the dubbing of know in in europe for example most countries dopp movies. So if you go to a wide by. But today. And i still. Is that way to go to an italian movie house or french. Moriau's or german you will will watch for example in american film has been dubbed in what the local language sheets so people in those countries have not been exposed to the song I wanted script marvels as before. I knew english from study I knew english from the movies. So i was a new humphrey. Bogart sounded like. Ingrid bergman sounded liking it. Names w about people that were from that age. I didn't know what brad pitt sounded like that fit did not exist. He knew he look good. You know what he sounded like. I i think by being exposed to multiple. It's definitely a plus and i..

antonio damasio damasio brain and creativity institute salk institute university of southern califor california portugal Ben regan maine Moriau europe Ingrid bergman Bogart brad pitt
"salk institute" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

07:13 min | 1 year ago

"salk institute" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"A thousandfold. I mean first of all. We're talking about something that they claim does one that it makes one and stops and doesn't go in your blood like it very clearly does based on the scientific research and stays right in the muscle which it very clearly doesn't based on scientific research. It's obvious just now tapping whether we're gonna talk about the self amplifying discussion which it seems. Pfizer has always been just keeping that people's view or on and on and on regardless. Now there's a code optimization which seems to dramatic dramatic traumatically increase the production of the very thing that salk institute and others have said by itself can lead to disease not just illness but disease which can then be spread of. Its own accord. However in mammalian cells assumptions underlying code optimization appear to be poorly supported or unfounded so in your body in mammals body assumptions underlying code on optimization appear to be poorly supported or unfounded studios in eighteen moreover because not all sin synonymous code on mutations are neutral code optimization can lead to alterations in protein conformation and function so if it doesn't make the same thing or make the right way or it doesn't function properly. Is that gonna to do what you're supposed to do can possibly also then lead to problems in your yes. Yes to all of that but let's just kind of just go with the flow as we're being forced to take this thing. Well let's keep going further down on this article. It goes on and say something pretty interesting things million code. On optimization synonymous mutations are known to potentially affect protein expression at various levels and there is mounting evidence indicating the translation itself is affected and can lead to dramatic alterations in the confirmation and processing of some proteins a critical issue with code optimization. Is that while it maintains the meaning the amino acid sequence of a protein it can disrupt multiple other layers of information coded in mri coding sequences. I mean this. This seems to be concerning these. Overlapping functional elements are often difficult to identify. Some of these elements can affect the rate of elongation locally ultra protein folding. Remember all these. The lead to end. Lead to changes in protein conformation and post translational modifications. Now first of all. We're assuming by the way this is only going to end up focusing on the spike protein which is not an assumption. We should make but what it's saying is multiple layers of the encoded. The code coding sequences like seems to suggest that this is something that could affect the very thing that this has meant to do. Now i don't know about you but i'm concerned about any gene therapy. Let's just call it gene therapy based they don't lose their minds about it. There's obvious gene therapy product and talk about something that is doing such a at least based on gene therapy ideas and we're talking about something could manipulate the mri coding sequences. And then. what's it gonna do. Good test it out on your body. I'll stay over here and wait and see what happens. It says oh again. It says the lead to changes in protein. Conformation an post transitional modifications translational. Excuse me that's important. Although code optimization resulted in increased pro protein yield again. Which i understand why. That's something we would want. There were associated glencoe Silesians citation defects that interfered correct processing of the envelope protein which led to the production of an inactive protein another variation on where i'm going to go to in the end this segment all these all these weird situations with these proteins can lead to disease problems and your body says it says can can lead to differences with the natural protein that trigger production of antidrug. Antibodies in patients. See now we're talking about the same kind of thing that creates a problem. Your body reacts to it and then it starts attacking itself. Differences may include glucose isolation factors affecting the integrity of the recombinant protein and confirmational alterations under lost opportunities. And i find this very interesting. This is a potential problem associated with code. Optimization is that it is routinely used to try to increase protein yields when a protein moves from and pre clinical studies to clinical trials. Right so this goes back to the point. That person was making before so it. This seems like a time when that would be done when they're trying to invite again. I don't even know why that makes sense. We're talking about something that is changed right. So if you're if you're using studies to make a point and based on those studies you're allowed to go further and then in that further pot process you change it and act like you're still studying the same thing. Maybe this is my ignorance in the process doesn't make sense to me regardless we're talking about academic to pollute preclinical studies or clinical trials. What i'm looking at here. What it seems like to me is clinical trials to real world. Emergency forced coercion. And now. because we're seeing. I don't know this is an assumption based on motivation that maybe it's not working. Maybe they're trying to desperately hide what's happening so they change something and this gets approved so this is the same thing we're seeing just at a different stage of the process. If this is what's happening says however it is likely that many academic and preclinical studies are performed using gene constructs based on natural amarna sequences code optimized variants however may behave differently and underlie instances in which a protein generated very promising data in preclinical studies but failed to perform expected after being scaled up under gnp conditions. So basically what we saw they go. Oh my gosh look like we called the. I think it was even forbes. A calls the hot flash in the pan results right. We're instead of doing a two year study lakers opposed to they do a three month study and they it real hot fast and go look at the amazing results and they stop right. So that's what happened. Ninety five thousand one hundred percent. It's one hundred percent effective and then it doesn't happen in the real world. Then what do you do code optimization. The concern is that highly effective protein. Drugs may be negatively affected. Highly effective protein drugs may be negatively affected. Or another way. you could frame. That is the concern. Is that already damaging injections may become even worse. 'cause you were the assumption that it's already highly effective is not one that i'm willing to may because that's not what i'm seeing. So if affected drove can be negatively affected will the already negative ones could be even more negatively affected. The point being this action can cause that. I think that's what we're seeing to a degree. I really do. It says here we do not know. The extent to which code on optimization of recombinant proteins has resulted in reduced efficacy or increased immunity. However it is likely that in some cases these proteins represent lost opportunities and maybe worth revisiting with non code optimized marin as right so the argument being that they inserted this into the process because they were concerned about their results. Because that's all these companies are worried about and that hurt the end result the product that they then still used and the point being that where we missed an opportunity could have been exponentially better. Had we not manipulated this way to try to end to.

salk institute Pfizer lakers
"salk institute" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

07:23 min | 1 year ago

"salk institute" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"Has done for. So i'm going to ask you right out of the gate. Are we trying to increase the production of spike proteins. Is that what's supposed to be happening. I mean a real world very aware at this point despite protein is like the problem. It is very clearly the issue that it's causing. I mean they've already identified the spike protein itself as being the the. What's the blanket on the term Cytotoxic i forget. I believe that the very thing that's causing the problem right. This is what even mainstream scientists focused in on right. At the for instance the salk institute saying that these the spike protein alone can cause all of this which is then. It's a no brainer to realize that is the problem so as either before or now increasing the optimization of the code on which can increase protein production. I think we should ask why that makes sense now. Applications for code optimization include recumbent protein drugs and nucleic acid therapies including gene therapy or therapy and dna. aren't vaccines however recent reports. Indicate that code optimization can affect protein conformation and function remember. The words in terms are using. Because we're going to go through those a different point about why what this can also what this can lead to can then also cause stuff increase immuno-genetic city which i think is the argument or doing this is going to increase. How the immune the at the immune effect right but this is just like with the lipid. Nanoparticle concept yes we can. Increase lipid nanoparticles and increase the the state stability of the a and getting it to its destination except work in fact that causes all sorts of adverse events right. So we're gonna use this that increases whether it gives you a better immune response but it's going to cause all the other things possibly we're going to look at the net doesn't make sense now by the way. This is exactly what the science is concluding before this. And of course and reduce efficacy. Because that's what you want right so it. It causes a better immune response but it doesn't work as well at the end of the day so less people get it with a higher like this doesn't seem to make sense. We're in two thousand fourteen so you can argue this point. They've changed since then but we'll go through the years. We critically review this subject identifying additional potential hazards including some unique to nucleic acid therapies. This analysis highlights the evolved complexity of code on usage and challenges the scientific basis for code optimization challenges right the evolve complexity quote on usage they owls itself highlights that and challenges the scientific basis for using what they just did or have done on injections. They're putting into people's arms right now. Consequently code optimization may not provide the strategy for increasing protein production and may decrease the safety and efficacy of biotech therapeutics. Weird exactly what you want with your biotech therapeutics. They're putting your arm right now. We suggest that the use of this approach is reconsidered. Make sure here that again. We suggest that the use of this approach is reconsidered particularly for in your body applications. Now that's the. I mean you could go through this and find the same points. We're going to get deeper into the other one. Two thousand fourteen. The scripts research institute posted on. Nih public access telling you. This is the wrong way to go to doesn't fourteen here is Await this was. Oh this actually. I did go to the concluding remarks gives me so. There's a part of the bottom. That seemed more specific. This is the same study but on concluding remarks code optimization is often suggested as a primary consideration for generating high expressing constructs suitable for gene therapy genetic vaccines for cats. Not with these are though you say that. And you're a crazy madman. Although protein expression can be increased using these approaches it is evident however that aren as contain numerous layers of information that over the amino acid code and that this complexity can be disrupted by code optimization. That's interesting so the protein expression can be increased. Sure but the a can be the murray process trying to quick but it's just the as contain numerous layers of information that overlap the amino acid code and that complexity can be disrupted by code optimization. So who focus of these are rene delivery and the point is this can affect the marnie itself. Moore's a more serious problem. Is that the scientific basis of authorisation at least in mammals so you does not support. The code on usage does not support that code on usage is rate limiting for protein expression in addition there are potentially serious consequences associated with using code on optimization particularly for nucleic acid therapeutics in the absence of an analysis. These potential problems include disrupting normal patterns of cognate and wobble tr usage affecting protein structure and function report. Remember as we get to the end of this segment producing novel peptides with unknown biological activities. Sound safe and altering post transcription oil modifications that may modify protein and samba. Post transcription modification. Remember that as well. It says we suggest further studies of current code optimization approaches for genetic therapeutics and vaccines as the potential risks. In view of these problems we suggest further studies basically as the potential risks of these approaches to patients may outweigh their usefulness. Well that sounds familiar. Right benefits outweigh the risks. Won't they're finding right now. Based on the research it seems that the benefits may not outweigh the risks. Clean regard through this process then have already been done on things. They're forcing on people right now without them knowing about it now again whether posted on some abstract study somewhere on their upside which was what. We're trying to find all the time which is still possible to find. People have a right to know these things. This is what informed consent is supposed to be if there is something that can cause risk than they need to tell you that they're gonna act like this is too abstract no this leads to potential risk. The absolute definition of informed consent is that you need to be told. This is a risk one in a million one hundred one in ten. You need to be told this increases your risk. They're not doing that. and we know that. I'll make this even more clear as we go through today. It's sinister how they're choosing to hide this from you because a great vaccine hesitancy well how about. We should be hesitant now. This is from two thousand eighteen. So you see. We're going forward increment by increment color optimization in the production of rian combat by therapeutics sort of like we're talking about potential risks and considerations bio and by the way. This is the same study here. Same name as you can see. I just started on this one. And i don't want to have to do it again and i realized there's only the abstract here so i jumped over to the full one. Which is what we should always be doing reading the full study right so this one starts off by saying bio therapeutics are increasingly becoming the mainstay in the treatment of a variety of human conditions. Particularly in oncology and haematology the production of therapeutic antibodies cytokines and fusion proteins may only accelerate have markedly accelerated these fields over the past decades today most protein therapeutics are expressed as recombinant proteins and mammalian cell lines and expression technology commonly used to increase. Protein levels involves code on optimization code on optimization has been reported to increase protein expression by thousandfold. Potentially.

salk institute scripts research institute Nih Moore
"salk institute" Discussed on Tom Roten Morning Show

Tom Roten Morning Show

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"salk institute" Discussed on Tom Roten Morning Show

"Moloney is the inventor of immoral vaccines and dna vaccines. He also discovered lipid. mediated and naked are in a transaction technologies. He's been scientifically trained at. Uc davis uc san diego and the salk institute molecular biology and virology laboratories dr baloney received his medical training at northwestern university and harvard university medical school. And in pathology at uc davis. Dr malone. good morning morning sir. How can i help you. Well thank you for coming on. And you've been helping so many across the nation getting the truth out The first thing. I'd like to ask you is as the inventor of the mr in a technology and i believe that was In the eighties What was the original intent for that technology If so. I did this while i was a graduate student. And thank you for pointing out that. It's the technology. I did not invent these. Vaccines invented the technology platform. And the reason why. I was working on. Developing this system was to ask fundamental questions about the packaging of retroviruses. Which at the time was the leading technology for gene therapy and so And so what was the In your mind at the time Say retrovirus what was that retroviruses it's They're they're not uh viruses from the fifties rather their viruses. That exist is a outside of the cell and exist as dna inside the cell so they go backwards. Usually it's dna goes to arnie. Arnie goes to protein. retroviruses That you may be familiar with include the aids virus. So that's an example of a retrovirus and retroviruses Used to be back in. The eighties considered the the best way to attempt to develop gene therapies. So the mr in a technology that used in the vaccines that were seeing given out today. for cova Are they real. Vaccines are they. I'm hearing some people. call them. Experimental gene therapy explain. That so vaccine is a funny word. It means a lot of different things to different people and Those two things that you just said can both be true. They're not exclusive. it doesn't have to be one or the other so the Mre technology.

salk institute molecular biolo dr baloney harvard university medical sch Dr malone Moloney northwestern university uc san diego davis arnie Arnie aids cova
"salk institute" Discussed on The Model Health Show

The Model Health Show

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"salk institute" Discussed on The Model Health Show

"More drive in the sahara desert yup and so having like a direct one two percent drop in your body's baseline hydration level which that in of itself can damage dna lead to cognitive decline. And there's also there's some something in the mix of people and think about what are the symptoms of course like you probably feel a little bit more fatigued. She'll probably of course Maybe have maybe more irritable. You get drunk faster. Yeah talk about that. What how's that happening. You know because of the the poor oxygen the slowing metabolism Yeah you put this poison in and your body. It's a four alarm fire of trying to get this poison. Metabolize out your bike. Keep in mind. People that i know. Call the poison note raises this alarm in the body so when your body's under that level of stress it quickly moves alcohol to it's number one because now you've just ingested poison on top of all of these things so so your body's ability to deal with that gets gets compromised quite a bit And not to mention it just adds to. That's that's the funny thing is i. Don't i don't understand what people get on a plane. The kinda let go in a certain sense like they just start drinking more or they just eat all this kind of food which i always bring food. You know people like oh. You can do that like i literally. I have a backpack here of made a salad. I put it in a mason jar food. Or i'm not eating exactly. Just it's a great fasting right so By the way some research is the salk institute has really been pioneering so much of the work around circadian medicine us and one of the things that they've talked about that they're confirming the days when you're shifting time zones one of the ways to help you to adjust quicker because is gonna throw of your your body's clock you know again. It's another thing we're not designed to do is like let's pick this human up and plop them somewhere else. You're not travelling by horse and buggy. This is like within an hour or whatever the case might be can be totally different location and so that can throw off your body's connection with the environment with.

sahara desert salk institute
"salk institute" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"salk institute" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"That's so small that it doesn't matter. Well that's not what anybody's arguing if everybody's saying it stays in the in the shot spot in your arm that's what everybody's saying as today still and here scientific research peer reviewed ryan scientific research saying no. It's circulating for your blood within one day even if the tiny amount if that's what you want to argue by the way it's more than enough based on everything else you've seen to be damaging just so we're clear doesn't that show you the lie that they're even going to say. Hey look this is. This is not even the the reuters article is actually arguing for a. What's his name here. I lost it for she. Can you find his name. Now for david walt. They're arguing for him. That it's not as severe that. I actually meant that this is actually helping blah blah blah. And yet here. We are watching. Eleven of thirteen people in one day have spike protein circling through their blood. Okay that's what we're starting showing you that they're lying from within his anyway but then go on to point out that there's no evidence that it's dangerous okay. So it's circling for your blood. That's already alive that they're trying to tell you that stays in your shoulder which doesn't but then we've shown you this one. Many times salk institute april thirty twenty twenty one cut to the chase. I've read this in-depth proving that the spike protein alone by itself is enough to cause disease not problems not squats but disease disease meaning that it can spread right so despite protein self. According to the salk institute which is highly regarded is telling you that by itself can cause disease and then we go to the next one again. Your research saying Spike protein illicit cell signaling inhuman cosell's implications for possible consequences of vaccines. So this is clear. This is making the association of the spike protean the vaccine being damaging or possibly says in this article. We note that human sensitively respond to the spike. Protein to elicit cell signaling. Thus it is important to be aware at the spike protein produced by the new over nineteen. Vaccines may also affect the host cells. We should monitor the long term consequences of these vaccines carefully. Which we're not there yet. Probably another six months to a year before we really start seeing possible we're seeing short-term side effects right now and they're bad it's especially when they are administered otherwise healthy individuals exactly remember. The point of this. Is that the only reason. This works is because it produces a spike protein. That is supposed to be like this by routine in the virus. That's the whole point now. I've i've had at least one expert telling me that it's not exactly right because it is different but the argument was still the same even with this expert saying at the end of the day it's very capable of causing the exact same problem and i think that if we're aiming for producing the same thing so it affects the same problem then it's going to cause the same problems now on top of that. We have the amer..

salk institute david walt disease disease cosell reuters ryan
"salk institute" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

Making Sense with Sam Harris

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"salk institute" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

"Joining me. Thanks for having me the pleasure. I think we met probably just one. But i feel like we met about fifteen years ago at One of those beyond belief conferences at the salk institute. Does that ring a bell you know. I was at one of the beyond belief conferences. And i don't recall meeting there but it's totally possible. I just hit is possible. We didn't meet by our remember. I think we had an exchange where you know one of us was in the audience and the other was hit an exchange over fifty feet or oh that that makes sense in the audience and i was speaking up. Okay and i was probably on state defending some cockamamie conviction Anyway nice to meet you once again and You have a new book which will cover part of not in by no means exhaustion. It's topics of interest. But th the new book is thousand brains and it's a work of neuroscience and also discussion about the The frontiers of ai. And where all this is heading but they should start with the the brain part of it and and start with the really novel and circuitous and entrepreneurial route. You've taken to get into neuro science. This is the the nonstandard course to become an neuroscientist. Give us your your Brief biography here. How did you get into these topics. Well i fell in love with brains. When was just got out of college. So i studied electrical engineering college and right after i started my first job at until i read an article by francis. Crick about and how we don't understand. They work and i just became enamored. I said oh my god we should understand this. This is me. I am i brain. I no one seems to know how this thing is working. And i just couldn't accept that. And so i decided to dedicate my life to figuring out what's going on when i'm thinking and how we who we are basically as a species and it was a difficult path so i quit my job. I essentially apply to to become a graduate student. I in it. And i. but then. I sell that.

salk institute Crick francis
"salk institute" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"salk institute" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"Maybe we can serve chatting a little bit about the world of chronobiology circadian rhythm. I mean many people listening to this conversation may have a general sense of what a circadian rhythm is but a lot of people have never heard of it so maybe you can sort of explain what. It is such an why they're important. Is it just a imagine that you have to a lot of different things in a day. You just can't do them at trend knock. So that's why you come up with a calendar and twad time how to do certain things so that you are more productive so similarly. Our body does jillian different tasks in a given day for example dozens upon months there many digestive juices than planned chemicals genes adapt to turn on and off. So that's why body also has a daily timetable that repeats itself day. So that's why the terms acadian to them security and literally means approximately a day and rhythm is rhythm so this is a timetable that repeats every single day so what it means is the thing that comes to mind is sleeping because sleeping. The big chunk of time that abbadi boats to at a specific time of the night so similarly almost every organ in our body whether it's liver kidney heart or even your skin. I've been your hair follicle has to do certain tasks so that means visiting log on every single cell as its on daily timed off circadian rhythms.

Dr pande salk institute for biological Dr pandas Dr panda dr pande sasha
"salk institute" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

06:24 min | 1 year ago

"salk institute" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"And windows are already set and then our main chemical engineers have to come in and design a system negative energy efficient as possible. That doesn't work nearly as well as if engineers are at the table from the start so getting the whole project team together the beginning to identify what those goals are figure out how they can work most efficiently toward them how they can integrate new technologies wrong concrete most appropriately to meet that project goals. Those are all critical questions that were very lucky. To stewart from the market and find ways incentivize those issues more while. I'm glad you brought up concrete because someone ask you about that. It's interesting that you mentioned the communication thing. Because i was watching a video earlier in prep for this former conference. That actually happened like a week before the world shutdown kovin which was kind of interesting in of itself but they were talking about how that communication is key to have all the all the players at the table from the beginning. And then people can say. Well what if we did it this way or that way instead of having it all come come later. But concrete is at the core of the structural problems with seems to be with surf side and there are a lot of new innovations with concrete. One thing i saw that caught my attention was that eight percent of global emissions. Come from the making of cement which is kind of astonishing to me the fuel and process of making cement so there are some really cool innovations coming down the pike including from captured. co two. which i understand is being used. Perhaps the san francisco airport even or hydrogen is another option. I've heard some things about so. How would those new technologies. how do they how. Well those new technologies heaps the structure safe. How do they address structural integrity. And how do you. You can't tested until you build the building right so you don't really know until you wear and tear but how do you have. How would you test that. How does that work. That's a great question so every architect and engineer sort of concrete slump test than you often do that in school and you sort of Have container and you learn you know that. Concrete has curing link and cures best certain temperatures as any concrete new mixture whether it's higher body carbon or or any of the sort of innovations in making concrete more sustainable one way or another In terms of the material itself those are all tested through a rigorous standardized process That's laser outside of the scope of lead. That's a structural engineers purview. Really kind of comes in is encouraging education. That were holistic way. To think of like salk institute is a famous example of really gorgeous concrete. Finish work and so if the concrete can be both the exterior or interior finished product as well as the structure of the building than. It's doing two roles and there are lots of variations on that. Of course you still wanna endlessly everything. But how concrete gets used in a thoughtful way Bring everyone to the table. Getting that expertise there absolutely agree. But that's a critical part of how we think about.

stewart san francisco salk institute
Scientists search for ways to lock more carbon in the soil

Climate Connections

01:17 min | 1 year ago

Scientists search for ways to lock more carbon in the soil

"Plants absorb carbon dioxide as they grow and store it in their roots stems and leaves but when plans decompose much of that carbon returns to the atmosphere joanne. Corey is a plant biologist and geneticist at the salk institute for biological studies. Her team is working to develop new plant varieties. That can lock more carbon in the soil long term. She says these new plants need to have more and deeper roots. In order to bury the carbon down deep where there are fewer microorganisms that can decompose the plant and made all the company go back up in the atmosphere correy says the ideal plants will also have high concentrations of a molecule called subaru which is found in cork it holds a lot of carbon and breaks down very slowly. The project is in its early stages right now trying to understand what those traits really mean in terms of jeans with that information. Researchers can selectively breed those traits or engineer them into widely grown plants such as corn and wheat. These owners of crop plants. Because you really need a lot of land you do. This corey hopes that in ten years. These climate-friendly crops will be growing in farm fields around the globe. Climate connections is produced by the center for environmental communication

Salk Institute For Biological Correy Joanne Corey Cork Center For Environmental Commu
"salk institute" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"salk institute" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Ron followers stepping down this Padres executive chairman I'm Marilyn Haider. He will be replaced by general partner Peter Seidler, who is purchasing Fowler stake in the team, becoming the largest single equity holder. Side. There's new title is chairman while Fowler will be vice chairman. The 76 year old Fowler will continue to serve in an advisory role with the team, and he will retain a prominent role in baseball's labor negotiations and maintain his place on various league committees. President elect Joe Biden is praising frontline health care workers. He met with some virtually today as national coronavirus cases inch closer to 250,000. They told him they are anxious, seeing the surge, describing their day to day fight. The FDA is approving the first at home covert 19 test users simply swab their nose and stir the sample into a vile results will come in 30 minutes. The test is from loose Sarah Health and requires a prescription for those 14 and older. A judge has issued an emergency restraining order that prohibits the Trump administration from making civil immigration arrests at the San Diego federal courthouse. The judge, saying the wide spread practice invades the decorum and dignity of the court and violates common law principles dating back to the 15th century. The UT reports for the past couple of years Border patrol agents of Saturn courtrooms waiting to arrest migrants after their criminal proceedings. No matter the outcome. The world's richest man is donated $30 million to LaVoy Assault Institute to help fight climate change Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos donating the money from part of his base, Zoe's Earth fund, which gave away 791 million to 16 institutions worldwide. Salk Institute will try to find ways to get plans to capture and store more carbon dioxide from our atmosphere. Pandemic is changing the way father Jos villages hands out its annual Thanksgiving meals. This year's meals be prepared to go and president of CEO of Father Jos Deacon Jim Vargas is expected to serve about 1000 people up from the typical 700. Or so he talked with reporting partner 10 news. We still want to make it festive. It's a period especially in this year where people need to be lifted up, especially those who we serve. So we're gonna We're gonna be decorating the courtyards. We're going to make sure we have music. Was receiving a meal. We'll also get a backpack with some personal protective equipment, and Wal Mart is striving to help all families put a Thanksgiving dinner on the.

Fowler executive chairman Joe Biden Jos Deacon Jim Vargas president CEO vice chairman Marilyn Haider general partner Wal Mart San Diego federal courthouse Peter Seidler Salk Institute Ron Jeff Bezos baseball Sarah Health Jos LaVoy Assault Institute
Sequential Comparisons Could Mean Better Witness Identifications

60-Second Science

02:41 min | 2 years ago

Sequential Comparisons Could Mean Better Witness Identifications

"In two thousand, six, a twenty, six, year, old California man named your riot courtney was sentenced to life in prison for kidnapping and rape despite having an alibi for the time the crimes were committed to witnesses. They saw lineup the police station and they both identified the same person and he was convicted entirely based on those two eyewitness Accounts Salk Institute for Biological Studies neuroscientist. Tom. Albright he says years later the California Innocence Project looked into the case and it turns out that the DNA that was found at the crime scene was not the DNA of Courtney after eight years behind bars courtney was set free, but his case is not unique now. Of cases in which individuals have been exonerated based on post conviction DNA analysis most of these innocent people were sent to prison because witnesses miss identified them somebody. Out of a lineup and that information was taken seriously by the police in the jury believed it why witnesses sometimes get it so wrong Albright explains that our memory for visual events is notoriously flawed. Somebody tells us that they saw something we figure it must be true. They saw with their own eyes lineups. Witnesses photos of six faces, five of innocent people and one of the suspect the eye witnesses simply asked to identify any person that they remember from the crime scene but only having them pick their top choice doesn't account for how well the witness remembers that face. This issue can result in errors. Albright's team thinks there's a better way by tapping into the strength of the witness's memory in an experiment they had volunteers watch a clip of a grisly crime scene from an obscure Hollywood movie. The next day these studies subject witnesses viewed a six person lineup that show just to faces at a time think of an eye test better. Now or now. So on each hair witness will vote for one or the other the faces which one looks more similar to the person you remember from the crime scene, we've been tabulate that vote and the face that has the largest number of votes is the winner compared to traditional lineup techniques. The two faces at a time method lead to a less biased and more accurate identification of the fictional perpetrator people are far better at making relative judgments than they are making absolute judgements. The study is in the journal Nature Communications the researchers think their approach to lineups has the potential to reduce wrongful convictions resulting in more justice for

Albright Courtney Salk Institute For Biological Kidnapping California Innocence Project TOM Nature Communications Rape Hollywood
"salk institute" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"salk institute" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"The act of creation we are horrible as I said I was walking across the Salk institute which John assault and are asking where did you get the idea for the polio vaccine and he said I got it in her dream she said of course Robert Louis Stevenson who wrote up you know Robinson get cortisol yeah he got he he used to say I give myself a suggestion and the gremlins of my mind presents the story to me in my sleep and I wake up and I write it down it's powerful it really you're sleeping your dream state is powerful and that is all tied into consciousness at all of that is aspects of nonlocal consciousness yes let's take some calls for you Steven and we'll take calls after the break is this clock is ticking Richie's with us in Virginia hi Ritchie welcome to the program Hey George how you doing okay wonderful thank you get a talk to you two days in a row there you go yeah I was just gonna talk I have to agree with your guest on all this being tied in the consciousness of the way it's kind of like I made the predictions in the beginning of the year twenty twenty ever yes I do Kyle I felt the best remote viewing and all kind of see it is and so far everything's come true which is quite the shocking to me actually because nomination most of it would be true and then some of it is but what I'm concentrating a remote viewings like a bunch of flashes of images that come to my mind kind of like white noise in a way okay and and I had to focus enough to be cross street on the one stronger but I cannot calling frequencies in a way because I'm saying like multiple different things and I caution the stronger one like in the prediction I gave us said that dot com will be acquitted from the impeachment charges and asset expect surprises in the months of March June and September and the pain upon if trump will be present depends upon the ordeal she's gone through between the months of may June off within the first few weeks of July now this is come to you in a dream state rich or is it kind of like in a meditative remote viewing state it's like I can sit in and concentrate for men and like if I just close my eyes all these images just just like comes at once in my mind sometimes even hard to go to sleep sometimes when I go home and go says I lay down or try to close my eyes like a whole bunch imagery a bunch of different flashes of images comes as kind of like white noise hi Steven analyze that for a little bit for us well George's rich is describing exactly the kind of experience he goes into a state of attention focused awareness stop recedes into the background of a season in fact rich I did they put up a U. R. L. for the remote viewers people want to do about getting of the future why don't you fill that out for me you'd love to have him in there he's already tuned in as a way what what rich is describing is absolutely difficult I mean you know it has everybody has their own little way of doing it but you know you relax you've got into a quiet space and then these images come into your mind and if you allow them and you don't try to analyze them you're just reports some that's what mobility what a powerful tool Stephen absolutely I mean when you realize how many.

Salk institute assault John
How Does Jet Lag Work?

BrainStuff

05:34 min | 2 years ago

How Does Jet Lag Work?

"GonNa talk about jet lag. I grew up flying back and forth between America and Singapore. So I wanNA share what I know about jetlag with you. First of all jet lag occurs when you travel between two or more time zones via air travel and the thing is it disrupts your circadian rhythm. Your body's natural cycle and you're sleeping patterns now. The Circadian Rhythm dictated by the daily appearance of the Sun. So light and darkness. Influence our bodies. But when this is disrupted it's official name is D- synchronous symptoms include insomnia fatigue loss of concentration irritability depression and even gastro intestinal ills but look jet lag or decent. Kronos is prevalent a nineteen ninety. Eight study found that ninety four percent of Americans get it and forty five percent reported that their symptoms were severe. So what causes jetlag? Well there is a whole field that exists to study how life is affected by time it's called chronobiology and here is what it's taught us. I late triggers a reaction in a special I pigment this activates response in the neurons of your brains hypothetical. Mus The twenty thousand nerve cells located. They're they're called the Super Cosmetic nucleus or S. C. N. for short are what starts your body's daily processes and also the lack of light causes other developments in your body. Circadian Rhythm tells you when to sleep and went awake and it regulates your body temperature blood pressure digestion urine production and hormone secretion so for example when it's time to sleep the SEM releases Melatonin and that encourages you to go to sleep when you cross into multiple timezones though your body has trouble resetting quickly and this is worse when you fly east. This is called phase advance. Flying West is called phase delay. This is because our circadian clock is actually closer to twenty five hours. Going East would require going to bed earlier. A study showed it takes four days to adjust to a twelve hour phase delay. In comparison. It takes more than eight days to adjust to a twelve hour phase advance and also jetlag is worse when you have to awaken when your body is still at its minimum temperature. There is also research from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. The indicates jet LAG is connected to your L. H. x. One gene and this gene regulates neural development and Circadian Rhythm. And Sleep. Okay. So we've got what causes it. What are the symptoms? How do you know if you've got jetlag? Well it's time to talk to Dr Christian beyond the insomnia fatigue loss of concentration irritability depression and even gastro intestinal ills. There's even more symptoms. It can aggravate menstrual discomfort or contribute to the development of heart disease and diabetes jetlag also releases stress hormones. Which make you anxious and grumpy? It drives up your blood pressure. It sends inflammation stimulating chemicals here arteries it also disrupts your appetite regulating hormones. It disrupts the release of Melatonin which we mentioned earlier. Not only does this affect sleep but it can also protect you from cancer in finally research on animals shows that there's other symptoms as well. A twenty ten study at the University of California found that when subject to jetlag the brains of hamsters created neurons? At half their normal rate they showed memory and learning deficits. And a two thousand. Six study at the University of Virginia. Found that younger mice rebounded from jet lag but making older mice undergo the equivalent of a Washington to Paris flight. Every week would actually increase their death rate yet. That's how big it is well for mice at least so we've got what causes jetlag and we have it's symptoms. You're wondering Dr Christian where the remedies. How do I fix this? You've probably heard of some of the common remedies like operating on your new time zone before you fly there or wearing yourself out before exercising by exercising in two thousand nine researchers recommend the following regimen to beat jetlag. I you readjust your rhythm before the trip by using a light box that simulates daylight now depending on whether you're flying phase advance phase. Delay us the light box either. In the morning or the evening to stimulate your circadian rhythm another suggestion from the same researchers was to take a Melatonin supplement by changing when you take the doses in relation to going to sleep. You can alter your circadian rhythms the CDC actually recommends exercise to a balanced diet. And lots of rest in the weeks before you fly. They also recommend avoiding alcohol and Caffeine as well as drinking water. Finally they recommend wearing loose comfortable clothing. While you're flying and moving around the cabin this can help avoid thrombosis or blood clots so do not take sleep medication. So you can sleep it off in your seat. In mobilization for long periods can actually raise your risk for thrombosis and this can actually lead to a stroke. So there you have it. The causes symptoms and remedies for jetlag.

America Melatonin Dr Christian Singapore Salk Institute For Biological Insomnia Official Cancer Caffeine University Of California University Of Virginia Washington CDC Paris
"salk institute" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

09:47 min | 3 years ago

"salk institute" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"California ten million broadcast country radio at a hundred fifty radio stations a hundred seventy five countries got it you got a thing on I got a thing going on Burgundy what is you look like a rematch realtor for any ticket taker at the savopoulos with that jacket but I like the jacket can I offer you a may I offer you a television TV you don't for television by the way your name here I do have the Emmy Award winning rusty do they have you on today I'll get to the numbers and just a bit and excited to talk to our friend Jay cal picking and who's going to tell you about the world the business of poker which I don't think we've had on that we had on the air but not talking to the business support you realize the poker business the online gaming I'm not talking about other stuff going to twitch Carmen Sandiego whether it's like a comic companies because the these these video gamers yes yes are are making a living I'm talking about the game of poker you know can you like digital poker right so much that you know what the market size is on that from the K. if you're good you can you know not good you get good online playing these games learning is one of our regular guest on the program is a big poker player Janice no Steve Forbes forms reader does he do though he's a big poker player Hey do you play poker when play anything do it Neil deals but your when you do when you headline on the cruise ships don't you walk into the casino there for the youngest person instead of the cruise ship the youngest person the forty two year old yeah every so often we get email from our viewers and our listeners across the world in this case it was if you were that tells us about a company they want us to talk to because well it's frankly they're they're they hear us interviewing for everyone from icons of business to to your doorstep and one such company is it coming out I want to I want to spend a little bit of time can you end up your bio dot com yes northwest by therapeutics NW bio dot com all right so if you listen to us on the radio you can't see what's going on here west yeah but here's what's interesting the standard okay the standard in treating cancer as you well know art our television studios are here in San Diego California we are a nine iron away from UCSD Salk institute and scripts from where the TV studio for us it's a five iron but for me it's a it's a nice little trip up and in and one one thing you hear about in San Diego California is chemotherapy and radiation so beam radio and all of the hot air all kinds of stuff okay but but there is an interesting and I'm going on here and that is using nature and nature system instead of a toxic or synthetic system right from the case organic sought to treat the cancer and and that's the reason that someone got a hold of us and introduced us to northwest bio and I will tell you less Goldman who have gotten no over the last week or so is the senior vice president and general counsel by the way the guy owned seven TV stations while the guys took it was punched he was chairman of the board and his he even even after he was done he was playing this is him this is this was well that was what he had nothing but he found that he saw this company was so impressed yeah I like that in my opinion to move from basically being being done lazy boy lazy right and I and I give you less cold last these interviews I feel like I know you're more like a lot of money I'm accurate in saying that radiation and chemo are basically toxic and synthetic and there must be a better way my Akron saying I think you're very accurate talk about so talk about your approach because you have something called the DC VAX L. and you're calling it nature's way so before we talk about the company talk about what you guys are doing differently well cancer is our enemy and there's hardly anybody and isn't affected by and so the the enemy that is particularly in Arkansas is right now relates to GBM which is the worst kind of brain cancer and one of the most lethal cancers of all cancers the standard of care today and has been for decades yeah is an operation to take out the to or the the most you can get out chemotherapy and radiation and the the results for these decades have been not a lot of movement but a recurrence based on these treatments occurs within seven months after surgery and death in fifteen okay hold on a second okay let me repeat that Kate recurrence in seven months after surgery death within fifteen months after search on Amazon average yeah so here it must here's what's interesting is that one thing that I've learned from talking to you off there is the fact that just like there's not one size fits all for fitness or one size fits all for diet there's also no one size fits all because it's a very personal disease and every patient even with the same type of cancer has a different version of that cancer and and different gene mutations different term Russian ally ways our own bodies having said that there is there is there is no personalized treatment as of yet Intel enter northwest by therapeutics talk about it's called immune therapy and and it is a completely different approach than what the standard of care is banned you see a lot of advertisements on the some of the big farmers have started getting into we've been at it for twenty years and we think we've worked on a much better approach which is basically based on nature's infrastructure developed over millions of years of our immune system's evolution and what we do is invigorate one's own immune system which is very special for each person is different I also like the internet correct I mean it's it's it's early in and the only thing more complex perhaps than than us and our immune systems and how they've evolved over the years only go after foreign objects that you want to you know do something about is the fact that cancer and solid tumor cancers in particular and that's what we work on and what I'll describe some more about our full of mutations and the reason that GBM killed John McCain and Ted Kennedy for two examples at him those numbers seven months in fifteen months right on target and and thousands and tens of thousands of others is because the current treatments the current standard of care does not deal with the vast majority of the biomarkers in the tumor or utilize the vast majority of the weapons in the union because everyone tries for silver bullet as you of seven there's no silver bullet correct yeah it was called in by the way is our guest I'm gonna call these guys north was by they're more they're northwest bio therapeutics they are publicly traded that's a mouthful yeah there there are probably traded their stock symbol in W. B. O. and you can go to N. W. bio dot com and learn about their DC VAX like all the other questions where I'm getting out of it you treat other thought is in solid tumors or something like that but rather than like in the blood or something you got this big hunk of something here yeah some people just going to cut it out on leave the hospital but they forgot that they were you know ugly in the alley behind them to come back out after the big ones gonna start making a new tumors horsing ever set the problem too is anything you cancer is always a sizer grapefruit which gives him great part about named it does that's already the worst route let's go with can I ask you let this is a proprietary technology talk about sort of the genesis of this because I want I want to get to the fact that how a company number to you this is gonna bulletproof management team it's an unbelievable sort of thing where I get to the company part of it but what I'm always interested in is when you think about something the arc of the story who was the guy that for Saddam you know we need to combine eastern what it medicine western medicine and use our own natures system instead of using you know toxic stop yeah I want to know how that works Lester.