24 Burst results for "Salina"

Selena And Abraham

Latino USA

04:23 min | 4 months ago

Selena And Abraham

"In early march twenty twenty. I was on a plane on my way from boston. to corpus. christi. Texas selena's hometown. It was the early days of twenty twenty the before the country was still flying. People were still out in the street. I'd gone dancing the night before albeit a hand sanitizer on every ten minutes so i was tired on the plane but i couldn't sleep. I was ansi. My stomach was in knots and it wasn't just because of the impending pandemic. I was on my way to a month long reporting trip in texas interviewing scholars fans and all kinds of people for this podcast. Accept this podcast. Of course didn't exist yet and that's because the whole theme hinged on the first leg of this trip this is when i hope to meet with abraham gained nia salinas fall who's notoriously protective of her image and music. I'd hope to land an interview with him and also ask him to let us license some of selena's songs for the podcast. My is thinking was no music rights. No podcast before this plane right to texas. Our producers have been working on securing those music rights for a few months. We'd had to wrangle all these parties songwriters record labels small publishers and convinced them that the project was worthy of selena's music. But i knew that the final deciding yes or no would come from. Selena's family manage to reach selena's father abraham on the phone a couple of times before he wasn't really interested in interviews said too many reporters had asked him to many foolish questions. I told him. Oh this podcast. It's an oh to selena. It's rooted in love. I wanna show her legacies true impact and he was like everyone wants to do that when he heard disappointment in my voice. He told me not to feel bad. He rejected journalists every day. Meanwhile i heard from the record label. They said selena's family would not approve our request to license her music. I tried reaching abraham again. I emailed him left two messages. Nothing so back on the plane. I wondered how things would go down. Abraham knew when i'd be in corpus christi but he'd stopped short of setting an official meeting with me either way. I felt like i had to at least try to talk to him. But i felt this apprehension. This like skittish feeling. I've been a journalist for fifteen years. I've met plenty of people who make me nervous but this fell like there was so much more at stake yes to some degree because of the music rights to some degree because of his famous temper but really it was because abraham felt like such a big part of selena's story a foundational part. He wasn't just her father. He was her manager. Her mentor and selena. Talked about him all the time. My influences were. I would say oh my father. My father used to have a ban the way back. When and i guess it's where we get the musical talent brahmin and i don't really remember seeing or hearing about salina's mom allah growing up. But i remember knowing. About abraham. I was eleven. In nineteen ninety seven when the selena bio pic came out edward james olmos portrays abraham opposite of a young jennifer lopez. Selena

Selena Abraham Nia Salinas Christi Texas Corpus Boston Salina Edward James Olmos Jennifer Lopez
Test Burst On Salina Gomez

Valentine In The Morning

01:26 min | 10 months ago

Test Burst On Salina Gomez

"Gomez has a new song with black pink coming out on Friday. It's called Ice Cream. In honor of that Selina is releasing a flavor of ice cream with the brand serendipity. It's called cookies and Cream remix. It has pink vanilla ice cream, cookie bites and fudge, and this flavor will be available in supermarkets across the country and online at serendipity brands dot com. And comedian Kevin Hart lost his job is the host of the Oscars because of things he had said years before it in a new interview. He says he does not agree with cancel culture, Kevin said. If people have done something wrong, the idea of cancelling those people in ending whatever career thing they have. What's a teachable moment for them? Said What happened to the days of making a mistake learning from the mistake not doing that and educating others on what not to do because of your mistakes. I'm Joe Hollywood Headlines by Jill. Thanks very much. Have a great day. Enjoy those Pastika. Seriously world rooting for you. This one, OK? Yeah. And, you know, just I really hope you can find some of that. Ah soy sauce, a gluten free soy sauce as well. I'm sure that would enhance your pot stickers that would make it. Yeah, I think it's much better but my gosh. Hang in there, kid, and thank you and God love you Those pot stickers, Brian. Good luck with the kid Learning French. Thank you. This was ballooning Spanish. Thank you for your show will thank thank you you for for your your show. show. Think Think Kevin's Kevin's back back tomorrow. tomorrow. He He took took today today and and yesterday yesterday opening opening should should be be back back tomorrow. tomorrow. Tony Tony Jordan's Jordan's a a final final check check the the morning morning traffic. traffic. You have

Kevin Hart Tony Tony Jordan Selina Gomez Joe Hollywood Brian Jill
Could Science Build a Better Grain?

BrainStuff

05:34 min | 1 year ago

Could Science Build a Better Grain?

"The ever increasing need to feed Earth's growing population and not always cautious ways that we grow our food are some of the factors that have put our plants environment in peril. Farming accounts for nearly a quarter of human emissions that are warming the atmosphere, and as much as half of that comes from plowing the soil to grow crops, such as wheat, corn and soybeans, which releases carbon, dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide, the latter byproduct of fertilizer use, but researchers have been working on ways to reduce the harmful environmental effects of agriculture. One potentially promising innovation is a grain the goes by the trademarked name, her Kneza like familiar grains it can be made into flour for use inbred breakfast, cereal, and other foods, and also as an ingredient in products, ranging from beard ice cream. But unlike many other grains, Kerns is a perennial plant meaning that once it's planted. It'll keep coming back up year after year. It doesn't have to be replanted from scratch year, so it cuts down on labor. In addition, Kerns a has a deep root system it reaches over ten feet or three meters into the soil, and may help to sequester or capture atmospheric carbon that root system could also make more resistant to the impact of drought related to climate change in some areas. Currency was picked by the Land Institute a Salina Kansas based organization founded in Nineteen, seventy, six, the founder West Jackson recognized that a big problem of modern agriculture was that it was wearing the soil by focusing upon monoculture, growing a single crop in a certain area as that practice intensified on modern farms. It's destructive. Downsides became more and more evident in the form of erosion and worn out soil that required increasing amounts of fertilizer, creating increasingly polluted groundwater Jackson saw the development perennial grains to replace annual ones as a vital part of the solution to those problems. The Land Institute's website explains given that grains makeup over seventy percent of our global caloric consumption and over seventy percent of our. Our global croplands, transitioning from an extractive annual model to a perennial model is the best chance we have create truly regenerative food future, but developing new food crops is difficult and time intensive challenge back in Nineteen ninety-three scientists at the Rodale Institute and Other Research Organization identified a plant called intermediate wheat grass species related to wheat as a promising candidate that might be developed into a perennial grain. They worked with researchers from the United States. Department of Agriculture to breed the plant and improve its fertility and seed size in two thousand and three, the Land Institute began working with intermediate wheat grass as well after years of breeding the plant. They developed Kerns the trade name for their variety. In some ways, the process of developing a new crop hasn't changed much since prehistoric times. It involves breeding generation after generation of a plant taking the best from each new batch, and reading them together an effort to promote whatever desirable characteristics your seeking, however plant breeders these days have some tools that the ancients lacked the land institute employed a process called molecular breeding, in which they use genetic analysis to determine the traits of the plant should have even before it grows to full. Full size in order spot plants, but the most potential for breeding. We spoke with Rachel thrower the institute's Chief Strategy Officer. She explained it's taken us ten thousand years, and an intensified two hundred years of modern reading to get the crops. We have today. It's taken twenty to get Kerns to where it is, it might take another twenty to get it to competing at scale with the annuals. But in the effort to turn Kerns a into a commercially viable crop. There's a lot of work ahead. Stroller says that researchers are now working to increase the size number of seeds produced by each plant, and to increase the height of the plants. One drawback of currency is the unlike conventional wheat. It doesn't yet lend itself to free threshing, in which the edible grain is easily loosened from the plant. It instead requires another step called D. hulling to remove the skin of the seed before it can be turned. Turned into flour, that's because the stems remain green, after the plant matures conventional wheat withers, and is thus more easily separated in addition to breeding currency to make suitable for free threshing in the future, scientists are working to make the yield produced by real working farms match what they've been able to achieve on their research plots to that end. They're gathering data from the farmers to help figure out how to time the harvest. What settings would optimal for combines and other factors that might make the fields more productive. Researchers are also working with Baker's chefs, brewers and distillers to develop products that utilize curtains to help create a future market for it. One product already on the market is long route. Pale Ale who's maker Patagonia provision sites Kerns environmental positives in its marketing and last year general mills. CASCADIA and farms brand produced a limited edition. Honey toasted Kerns, a serial, which it sold to raise funds for the researchers. We also spoke via email was Steve, Coleman and assistant professor in the School of Environment and Natural Resources and Ohio State University, and the CO author of two thousand eighteen bioscience article on Kerns cultivation methods. He said up and working with Kerns F for ten years, and it's been a fun adventure. I think one of the things that I've really come to appreciate. Is that successfully? Domesticating developing a new crop requires more work than anyone can really appreciate.

Kerns F Land Institute Nitrous Oxide United States Rodale Institute Department Of Agriculture Stroller Salina Kansas Rachel West Jackson Chief Strategy Officer Cascadia Founder Baker Assistant Professor Steve Ohio State University Other Research Organization
"salina" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"salina" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Washington Examiner, is salina zito dot com to reach Selina's columns altogether. And other column she writes from New York Post and CNN. We are now in coal country. This is Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio into Kentucky. Cole has lost its attractiveness to the smart set in Washington and across the world. Cole is no longer desirable. It doesn't represent the future. It's not green. Well, Selina's spent time with the Department of Energy secretary, A man by the name roulette, Dan Roulette. He's from Louisiana Cajun country. With a wonderful French name probably derives his forefathers from the evacuation of Canada back in the French and Indian wars. I'm guessing in any event, but he's now in charge of all energy as the Trump administration is I was especially smiling. When I read about how the energy secretary came from launching the Lordstown, Ohio plant. We talked about it most recently that's to produce electric vehicles. To coal country to talk about the many possibilities of coal into the future. What I take from your excellent interview, Selina is that Denver? Let does not think Cole's going away going away, he thinks is going to adapt. How so? What did you learn from him? It was a really fascinating first of all this coal mine is the largest In the country. It's massive, and it's astounding the efficiency that it run run that runs along with it. This is West West Finley, Pennsylvania. The cold? Yes. Yes. And what was equally fascinating is they've been working with this high tech company and the scientist, um, to develop cold, not burn. But to be used as a zoo building material. Um ah, because it's a mineral and they showed us jacking and structures to build to build homes for foundations for home building. And there's no burning of the coal and all the cold minded used Teo to build these homes and the Jackson grows. And it was a fascinating really interesting. Um Ah, demonstration, and it's just on the very beginning of of being developed. So you know, Cole looks to have a second life and what that screen The coal mine, the largest called what it's the largest six. It's a huge plant, right? We're talking about my enormous right and it's entirely mechanized. As far as I can tell robots dual, almost all the work except for their work crews to direct the robots. I'm fascinated the fact that it's still developing a technology because to read the headlines in Washington, the last coal mine has been Has been nailed shut closed. 400 men and women that work in the coal mine that day when we were there presses operation and, uh and what they're developing for the future is, I think incredibly intriguing, right? I will no longer assume that Cole has gone away. I will say that it's adapting a cz. We all must in the time of climate change now. General. It is also the energy secretary for all the energy that would be western Pennsylvania, right? She's sort of the Prince of Western Pennsylvania. He's in charge of everything you have fracking. You have oil you have coal. You're very rich. Clear. Yes. You have nuclear a very rich And does he observe dizzy observed the prosperity of western Pennsylvania. Does he talk about it? Yes, Absolutely. He talks about how it has changed. Not just, um um, is bringing back and then factory jobs, but this is also brought high tech jobs. Geologists and chemist and and computer scientists. But it's also you know, increase jobs with Um, and it counts around there. The barber shops, supermarkets, hotels of the schools. It's increased the tax base decrease the cost of a home and that makes AH community more prosperous. The nuclear energy doesn't get much attention in the national scheme. As I understand it, it's not considered green. But then again, it's not a fossil fuel. What's his secretary brah let make of its present and future. Well, he sees nuclear energy and nuclear power plants as being almost these miniature one, as opposed to these big, massive one. Three mile island status. Lee Ah ah, located in Pennsylvania, and so you could conjure up that image, but he's he imagines nuclear the much more scaled down but still completely operational. Um, news to support our grid in our infrastructure and renewables of famously solar and wind. What did you make of those prospects on and their immediate future Because there's all this Big talk about how it can replace fossil fuel. It can never replace fossil field, but he that the president says all the above and what the president says all the above and that's what we do. And and so, um, you know, Thea ministrations is fully supportive of all of energy. It strikes me is deeply ironic that he went from Lordstown to West Finley. Well, it went from the future of vehicles that can produce magic, really, with what was 600 horsepower per wheel and back to a cold mind that represents a Pennsylvania's passed he and and one How far is that from Lordstown? Western Ley? Is that a couple hours drive or less than that? It's like 60 to 70 miles. It's really not that far. What all it's a time machine. Now it's a it's a time machine. It's what it is. It's the coal mine to the electric vehicle in Lordstown, Ohio, Selena Zito She travels the middle of somewhere from prosperity to Carlisle to West Finley. She writes that the Washington Examiner, it's Selena Zito dot com to reader columns, especially of the wonderful town of prosperity. I'm John Bachelor. This is the John Baxter Show. It's a it's a time machine. Get some news. Try Dynamite Burger at Roy Rogers restaurants. It's a juicy burger with jalapeno bumpers, Bully ranch paper, Jake cheese and bacon. So come.

Cole Pennsylvania secretary Lordstown Um Selina Ohio Washington Examiner Washington West West Finley Selena Zito Department of Energy salina zito CNN New York Post Canada
"salina" Discussed on Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"salina" Discussed on Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

"Situation. People are mad at you. 'cause you're black and listeners did religion Sat at Salina Salina Religion. Play a role in your your background. My mom tried to push a lot out. Shucks Christianity on me. I'm GONNA break this thing after a minute. I got insurance But yeah I'm not really pushed or whatever that's just what she was doing what she believed in To be perfectly honest I guess I grew and seeing. Kinda were like. I don't know necessarily like what the religion aspect of it had to do with what humanity was showing me like kind of thing where I just didn't feel as though I was finding connection specially being in the region that I was into like being an all white charge again looked like. Oh we're not judgmental. But you're GONNA sit in the back we'll Niblett like e e and now we ain't playing that right so to see that grownup stuff though I don't know like kind of put me in a difference respect too so I was in the military I ended up. Really Kinda like doing some soul-searching like even when I went to Cairo and stuff why I kind of found my own path and found my own belief system and stuff and you know I'm really into like the the leaf of energies and that the transfer of a transference of energy is actually like you know kind of the big thing as far as crazy and whatnot. Yeah we have a creator. But I don't feel like there's a God and in Jesus and Moses and all that kind of stuff you know what I mean I feel as though we all have that kind of built in like cultural book. We'll call it the Bible. It say but these are stories that are made by man to man in their place. I don't feel like they were like prophecies are like things that were coming up that. Oh my gosh I have to right now. You just WanNa make sure we. Yeah Yeah so you know what I mean. As long as you have a good heart you know soul and things like that. I mean I do feel like your soul is your energy. You know what I mean so like. Yeah you know what I'd necessarily manifest. You know what I mean I create you know I create what I want for myself through thought and consistency. In that way you know what I mean I mean if you wanna cooperate you can totally you know? I feel like there's just different explanations for how I feel. I just don't put a religion like specifically on it so we have also That's what we've embraced to. We've we've stopped actually years ago. We were going to church when we first got together. And then it's just Kinda we tapered off. We realized that that's just not wear. Our heart was taking.

Salina Salina Religion Moses Cairo
A Climate Change Solution Right Under Our Feet

Gastropod

10:55 min | 1 year ago

A Climate Change Solution Right Under Our Feet

"Got into soil as an undergraduate student at the University of Osmar. This is Asmara at Bir. Hey she's a professor of soil bio geochemistry at the University of California and mirsaid where we went to visit her but her lifelong love affair with soil began in Eritrea. So when I started I was an eighteen year old student at the university. It didn't know really anything about soil. And I took an introduction to soil science course I was blown away at how that opened my world in my eyes. I was hooked still learning Asmara at fell in love with something that seems just like this every day brown thing we might occasionally get stuck to our shoes but really what is it. What is soil? It's a product of breakdown of rocks and also incorporated incorporates residues of dead plants and animals that used to live in the land before but the mixture of this breakdown products of rocks and residue of organic matter that lived creates these incredibly rich resource that we then every living thing on. The face of the earth depends on for our life for our livelihood for our food. Fiber needs in everything else. You can imagine there's only about six foot of this magical rock and residue mix covering the earth surface on average and so it's not very deep when you think about it in reality it's that thin veil that represents the difference between life and likeness in the system all this is beautiful and obviously incredibly fundamental life on earth and there's plenty we could and probably will say in the future about soil and food but this episode we're focusing specifically on the carbon and soil in carbon is continuously being exchanged between the soil and the atmosphere because when plants photosynthesis they take up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and then they use it to build their bodies and upon death the bodies in the bodies of every living things that consume the plants into the soil and get stored there are soil carbon basically carbon gets into the soil through two main butts. There's the plant matter itself when it dies but also while the plan is live its roots. Push out carbon-based sugars into the soil to feed microbes. Those microbes are also of course made of carbon. So that's more carbon the soil but like Asmara's said this is a cycle plants take up soil. Carbon use it for food and some of the carbon escapes back into the atmosphere some carbon just cycles through soil really quickly. It doesn't stay in the soil but some of it does. There are particular microbes that can help soil carbon get stuck together into clumps so it can't be consumed or escape to the atmosphere and there are particular soil minerals that react with soil carbon and form chemical bonds that also keep it from being consumed in released scientists call these clumps aggregates basically they're like little vaults some carbon might leak out of those vaults but most of it stays there for decades some of it stays for centuries so in a way you can think about the soil serving as the bank for Carbon Carbon comes in carbon comes out Just like we deposit money in our bank and then was drove over time. But if you deposit more than you withdraw than your bank account grows and the soil carbon over time basically grew because the system as a whole we were depositing more into the soil carbon bank than we were withdrawing but right now we're doing the opposite in the past our soil. Carbon Bank account was in good shape. We're talking geological time here but over billions of years more carbon got deposited than was released. That's what made places like the midwestern prairies. The world's great agricultural soils so fertile. But here's the thing in the past two Hundred Years. We've released a lot of carbon from soil. Scientists disagree about the exact amount but everyone agrees it's a lot billions and billions of tons. So how exactly did we lose all that carbon for soil bank account? What have we been doing since the war? The farmer has nearly doubled his production until today. He is beating himself and seventeen others. What made this greater increase possible. Power power made available through the farm tractor which meant greater efficiency modern agriculture and especially tractors. Anytime you break up soil and expose it those clumps. We talked about release. Their carbon in the past farming was more small scale and not mechanized so it causes less disturbance in the soil and so it released less carbon. But that's not how things work today. Tractors Rolling over fields and breaking them up so they can be easily planted that releases a lot of carbon quickly over a much larger area plus all these machines mean. We can farm a lot more land more quickly which means we release. Its carbon to the amount of land used for farming around. The world has grown exponentially especially since World War Two. Of course there are other things that expose and break up. Soil deforestation draining wetlands but agriculture is huge. A profound drop in Solar Ganic matter has happened virtually everywhere we've farmed no one contests this somewhere. Between thirty and seventy percent of the Solar Ganic matter is gone from agricultural fields after several decades once. You Start Farming Tim. Cruz is the director of research at the Land Institute in Salina Kansas and he says soil that has lost that much. Carbon is considered degraded so there was a recent report released by the UN that stated that close to about half of the world soil so now considered degraded half which is obviously not good. So why don't we stop with all the tractors in the plowing to understand why we need tractors our current system? Why we tear up the soil for all our crops. The critical thing to understand is that nearly all of our crops are annual plants. Annuals have to be planted each year and at the end of the season they die. Most plants in the world are not annual plants there. What's called perennials? They just grow and then one day after decade or hundreds of years in the case of trees they die. It's interesting note that there's almost no natural. Ecosystems that are dominated by annual plants in the world it just does not exist prairies forests savannahs deserts. Tundra and rainforests all of these ecosystems are overwhelmingly dominated by perennial species. And it's the roots of those species that developed the soils have the world most plants are perennials are of course some manuals in nature as well but if most plants are perennials. Why are nearly all the plans we use for food annuals to answer that we have to go back thousands of years to before the start of agriculture so when you start looking for grains to eat annual wild plants tend to have relatively large seed and relatively large amounts of them? Wild Bernal's tend to have lower C- deal so if you're looking for something to eat usually going to be attracted to that while Daniel Plant laid to haunt is a plant breeder who works with Tim at the Land Institute and he says our ancestors would have found these large seeded annual grasses bringing up in disturbed areas maybe like an animal wallow because that's the ecosystem that annuals are adapted to. They thrive on freshly churned up land but annuals turned out to have an even bigger benefit for our ancestors than just their grain size now of course thousands of years ago. They didn't know anything about genetics or breeding but they would have planted seeds of those annuals and then each year. They chose their favorites to eat and replant. Annuals were perfect. For this process you can get robbed cycles. Obstruction happening unintentionally. Because every year. It's going to have to come from a if you had perennials growing out. There very hard to just accidentally improve them improve their seats is because you just keep going back to the same old plants and harvesting them and they would never change so there was some sense to choosing annuals for our food crops but that choice locked us into tearing up the soil each year to make the kind of environment are food. Plants prefer so with agriculture. What we have to do is mimic disturbance so when I give a presentation to show a picture of volcano. 'cause that's kind of what we do every year. Now you're cultures we level everything we'd wipe out all above ground plant life and re seed our annual grain crop so you're starting from kind of biological ecological ground zero every year we do it. Some perennials mostly fruits and nuts that grow on trees. There are some wild grains like wild rice that's a perennial but eighty percent of all. Our crops are annuals and we locked into that way of growing food at the beginning. And we've lived this legacy when farmers plow their fields before sowing the seeds each spring that triggers a big withdrawal from the soil carbon bank because it busts open those aggregates that were guarding carbon safely in the soil. And when you break it open with with tillage plow disc microbes have access to that stored carbon and they have a heyday. They just start shout out and they eat up that Solar Ganic matter and they breathe out carbon dioxide in the process micro string and honestly a drink might not be a bad idea at this point because the impact of tilling the soil like this is pretty bad first of all like we said disturbing the soil releases a bunch of carbon into the atmosphere and then of course that carbon isn't available in the soil for the plans to use his food soil carbon is also critical for water storage because those clumps help soil hold onto water when the klumps break up the structure of the soil changes. It doesn't hold water as well. Water runs off the fields. Instead of thinking in and the soil runs off to erosion becomes a bigger problem so carbon storage and soya's good for many many reasons beyond climate change mitigation but also so carbon is really important in terms of climate. Change Mitigation. Because there's so much carbon and soil compared to the atmosphere the small change in the amount of carbon stores and soil can dramatically change the concentration of greenhouse gases in the earth's atmosphere and hence the atmosphere temperature and because so much of the earth is farmland a third of the entire planets ice-free surfaces farmland. That means changing the amount of carbon and agricultural soils would have an outsized impact. Carbon in soil is great for plants and great for the environment and so people have been working on ways to get more carbon into soil for a while but this focus on climate change is a new one because it's becoming clearer and clearer each year that we have to do something anything about our carbon emissions. So what do we do? How do we build our soil carbon backup? I mean the only way to get it back totally is to reverse the process totally and go back to how that organic matter was accumulated in the first place which involved perennial species and not disturbing the

Carbon Bank Asmara Land Institute Eritrea University Of Osmar University Of California Professor Solar Ganic UN Mirsaid Wild Bernal
"salina" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"salina" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Salina president trump said Wednesday his administration will immediately impose new economic sanctions on Iran in response to Iranian missile strikes on U. S. bases in Iraq but the president took a more conciliatory tone which ease concerns about imminent war Iran appears to be standing down which is a good thing for all parties concerned and a very good thing for the world trump defended the US strike on Iran's top general that touched off the missile barrage and said as long as I am president of the United States around will never be allowed to have a nuclear weapon in Tehran Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said the overnight assaults didn't go far enough they were struck with such as a slap last night that's another matter military action like this is not sufficient what is important is ending the corrupting presence of America in the region the house will vote on Thursday on a measure limiting president trump's ability to take military action against Iran as democratic criticism of the U. S. killing of its top general intensified the democratic war powers resolution seems certain to pass in the house over solid Republican opposition a similar proposal by democratic senator Tim Kaine Virginia faces an uphill fight in the GOP run Senate Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is standing by what he calls the Clinton precedent in which witnesses were not heard in the impeachment trial of president Clinton until after both the house designated prosecutors and the president's defense have presented their cases house intelligence committee chairman Adam Schiff so the Senate should commit to hearing testimony from former national security adviser John Bolton we now know that all those willing to testify in the center so he says the senators ought to demand that that's.

Tim Kaine Virginia chairman GOP Salina John Bolton Senate Adam Schiff Clinton Mitch McConnell trump senator America Ayatollah Ali Khamenei United States president Iraq Iran
"salina" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"salina" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You Salina U. S. and Iran step back from the brink of possible war on Wednesday as president Donald Trump signaled he would not retaliate militarily for Iran's missile strikes on Iraqi bases housing U. S. troops no one was harmed in the strikes but the US forces in the region remained on high alert and at the White House president trump issued a warning nations have tolerated Iran's destructive and destabilizing behavior in the Middle East and beyond those days are over for more on the Iranian situation we're joined now by Nick Wadhams Bloomberg national security reporter Nick has the immediate danger between the US and Iran been defused well it looks like at least for the time being the big question is what happens now with at tax attention we buy Iranian proxies in Iraq in the Lebanon from and he's like Hezbollah and there are a whole group of she ate malicious in in Iraq that around expensively has control over and may be planning new attacks so Iran is saying that it conducted a proportionate response after the killing of custom still money but we don't know what else may be coming from these proxy militias and you know the US has drawn a very clear let redline they said if if any US soldiers are killed that would result in an a disproportionate response so we were all really looking out for now what happens from these groups inside Iraq I suppose it's possible those groups may act on their own and get around maybe blame for what they do well that's the big question the degree to which Iran has control over those proxy groups now analysts we've spoken to have said repeatedly that custom sewer money who was killed near strike last week had very firm control over these proxies especially in their attacks on a U. S. or or other and he's like Israeli at forces for example so if there's an attack on the U. S. it was believed in the past that that would have only come with the express authorization of customs will Mahdi entering the officials of course he's now been been killed so we don't know whether there will be a loosening of that of that chain of command so while everyone's reporting that the president step back from the brink he still had some tough talk for Iran is applying more sanctions so the pressure and the tense relations will continue I suppose that's right I mean you know there is hope from some of the president's skeptics that he will seek a diplomatic solution here but all the administration US officials I've spoken with say that the only way a Ron agrees to a new deal that would restrict its nuclear program and and limit what the US says this call I behavior is if it remains under this sustained pressure so they believe that you really have to continue choking off the Iranian economy so you don't in high school to the negotiating table but you're really forced from their with their arm twisted behind their back to come to the negotiating table because they recognize that they have no choice to their economy will will be a total collapse so that was something that certainly gathered a lot of skepticism from critics of the president but that's what is the ministration police at this point in terms of what what constitutes sound strategy our nic thanks very much Nick Wadhams Bloomberg's national security reporter joining us on the line global news twenty four hours a day on air and on quick take by Bloomberg powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts to more than one hundred twenty countries I'm mark mills this is Bloomberg mark thank you let's get to global sports have got Dan.

Donald Trump Iran president
"salina" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"salina" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Native Americans affected did by domestic. Violence can call strong hearts native helpline offering free confidential support and resources. Strong hearts takes calls from anyone hurting in the relationship with who may be concerned for someone else available seven. AM TO TEN PM central time seven days a week at eight four four seven native. That's that's eight. Four four seven native more at strong hearts helpline DOT ORG program support by the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center Nana Gate in the holiday season. which is a shaky eastbound Bandana Indoneisan? I saw on Basal Nikki. Baena daily Allah on patient case of Healthcare Dot Gov this excuse dot. Org Achey one eight zero zero three one eight two five nine six audio message from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services says native America calling to produce the Birds National Native Oi Studios in Albuquerque New Mexico by Broadcast Corporation and Native Nonprofit Media Organization. Funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting on casting with support from the public radio satellite. Service Music is by Brent Michael Davids native voice. One the native American radio network..

Birds National Native Oi Studi Broadcast Corporation Brent Michael Davids Resource Center Nana Gate Basal Nikki National Indigenous Women Bandana Indoneisan Centers for Medicare Albuquerque New Mexico America
"salina" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"salina" Discussed on Native America Calling

"I? I wish I had asked and I could tell you. Well we know we got a lot of people with a lot of knowledge listening anything you want to share in that one. Eight hundred nine. Nine six is to eat four eight. Let's say hi now to Robyn into Harris New Mexico listening in on K.. UNM Robin thanks for giving us a ring. You're on here. Hi Tara Just WanNa thank you for The wonderful programs you have on this this show Oh I'm relatively new to New Mexico and to native cultures and it has been so insightful in today's especially exciting because I'm also an artist and so I'm curious to see what the artist renderings are for each specific month. But I just I I welcome. Welcome the the expansion of my cultural knowledge through The various components you have on your show so thank you very much all right Robin. Thanks for calling We now go to Joan in Albuquerque New Mexico listening in on K.. UNM Joan thanks for calling. You're on air. John Are you there. It's your time to talk. Okay you're going to have to call us back Got One more calendar. One eight hundred nine nine six two you eight. Four eight is the way to join us. You know what Let's give them more knowledge in in a in a definitely WanNa hear about why the days of the week bear the names at the do evangelism go ahead well. It goes back to possibly during the time of Fort Fort Sumner when the Navajo people were imprisoned there for four years when the soldiers told Time or days the week by starting with Sunday and so or else it also may have come about because of reporting school the Boarding School era the early era where Sunday was the beginning of the week and so we have our calendar set up in the same way so Sunday would call it. The Mall and Monday is the Maltese. The conduct and be Kinda means the day after the more and then Tuesday is the more though not get Sunday and two days so Sunday plus two days when say it's the morning to target him Sunday plus three days Thursday. The more though Sunday plus four days in Friday in niche in. That means you're putting your work down after a full week. Then you stop. You're working so you're putting your work down laid aside and then Saturd- Saturday gate is the more. Yeah just go back to that word Damore. Yonge means little so the literal translation for Saturday. Saturday is little Sunday in those other days per week individually and you do a lot of work so that you know Oh this Navajo culture. The the language is really thriving And you've even written in a book and I'm sure you do a lot of explaining There too just as resource go ahead and share the title of that book to of people want to get deeper into this Maybe this calendar is an introduction into the Navajo language so it's a Navajo language textbook which is based on the language. You see a lot of language textbooks. Books that introduced only the language. And the meaning of the words the vocabulary but I chose to focus upon the Navajo Culture Navajo History Navajo language. So that the students would be exposed so a very well rounded form of Navajo teaching and the name of the book is called the Nabizadeh. But not whole and the English translation that is rediscovering the Navajo Language and in the chapter of this book which is chaptered. Twenty five is the M- the chapter that is dedicated to the month. The meaning of it. What happens happens during each month and what happens within the environment? There aren't the month so I explain all that. Yeah well well thank you for sharing that I think Jones Back Joan. Thank you for calling in. Go ahead real quick. You're on your hi. Sorry I put down the phone for a second. I was just wondering I just had a question of where I could get a copy of the calendar and. I don't think that you mentioned that. Some I mean I guess. Now get one but Are you there yes. I'm a you can sure. We have a link on our website but the website to connect is Salina Elena Bookshelf S. A. L. I N. A.. BOOKSHELF DOT COM. Well thank you for that and we are just about to wrap this up in by anything. You WanNa leave us with just These images that are going to guide.

Navajo Culture Navajo History Harris New Mexico Joan Robin Robyn Fort Fort Sumner Albuquerque New Mexico Salina Elena Boarding School era Tara Yonge John Jones
"salina" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"salina" Discussed on Native America Calling

"And it was always one for place to go because you always have wonderful story you know? Yeah yeah by. I think we could do a whole hour. Just going to grandma's and what that means I'm gonNA write that one down in the picture you've painted I can see I can see how It reflects some of that and even just the gesture of grandma in the look in her face in how tidy her is You Know Oh you're telling a lot even just through these motions and always appreciate our artist. forgiven us these reflections and maybe even teaching us how to appreciate just these simple things by. Thanks for being here with us. And if you'd like to talk with him directly call in right now one eight hundred nine nine six a two eight four eight. Let's go in here from another one of our callers. We have Albert in Bethel Alaska joining us on Koa UK radio. Thank you for calling in Albert Bert. You're on air. I'd be morning. Thanks for taking my call right. I'm very interested in what the whole calendar had to say. I heard The month of my birthday which means Little legal and I have a couple of children in Mesa Mesa Arizona and I remember my my daughter's calendar from when she was in grade school and and and I'd like to know the meaning behind their dates. Also so very interesting right Albert. Thank you for calling there in Bethel gain and you can join us one eight hundred nine nine six two four eight. We now go to Carolyn in Cortez. Colorado tuned in on case. Jd Caroline. Thanks for calling. You're our own ear. Oh there go ahead Carolyn. You're you're on here. Thank you. I am a a former teacher on the Navajo nation. For four years I live in Cortez Colorado and I wanted to let you know how much that counter would have meant to me. I would have been able to possibly with students helped to learn how to pronounce some Outta hope and meanings I think is very important. I have a background in horticulture gardening things too and so I find it very interesting and always attempted to learn more about the places I live in the people who live there. Well we hope you enjoy this calendar Carolyn in gladys bringing you back to those Memories in that time in your life and We look forward to hearing your feedback. Once you get it in your hands in and you see all of this beautiful artwork and you can also share your thoughts to there are many any different artists were also featured in this Different months Give you an image from different people. There's People Cup Peterson Yossi Looks like He. He is Mr April rex. Lee Gyms a work is also featured poetry book that he did in March and Daniel Endeavor another another one featured out of February and I'm looking at an illustration from Corey began that hangs with January. We'll hear more about how these images relate to The different months coming up here. But if you'd like to share some thoughts go ahead and give us a ring. We are also giving away copies of this book on looking. Let's see we got three more left so better dial in now. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is the number to join us. will continue to hear about Selena Selena bookshelves calendar of twenty twenty Thank you for tuning in dial in right now. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is number. This is what we're bringing you before. Twenty twenty starts go ahead dial in now with Ford to all of your calls support support for journalism that raises the awareness of child wellbeing to citizens and to policy makers provided by the Annie E. Casey Foundation building a brighter future for children in families and communities information at eighty. CF DOT org support by AARP AARP creates an connects people to unique tools. Listen programs helps conserve personal resources and tackles issues that matter most to individuals families and communities more at AARP dot Org.

Albert Bert Carolyn AARP AARP AARP Selena Selena Mesa Mesa Arizona Cortez Colorado Cortez Twenty twenty Colorado Annie E. Casey Foundation Jd Caroline Bethel Alaska Koa UK us. Lee Gyms Daniel Endeavor Ford Corey
"salina" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

10:20 min | 1 year ago

"salina" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Native voice one the native American radio network. This is native America calling. I'm your host Teruyuki would tomorrow. Oh marks the first day of twenty twenty for many that means time to hang. A new calendar disturbed marking important dates. Today were introducing you to a Navajo. Take on the New Year Book of the month feature this time around is a calendar from the Selena bookshelf publisher it's also a lesson in Navajo culture in language as well as the spotlight on the work of a handful of renown need of artists including by White Burn. Senior Peterson Yazdi and Corey. Ba- gay just a moment we'll visit with some of the contributors of this visualization of twenty twenty to hear about moon cycles and why the days and months bear the names that they do do in the Navajo language. You're also welcome to join us as we start counting the days at twenty twenty on December book of the month. Ten callers who dial one eight hundred nine nine six two four eight in make it on air with your comments and questions will receive a complimentary copy of the calendar compliments of the publisher. And Right. Now we're GONNA start off in Flagstaff Arizona with us today is Navajo an educator. Dr Evangeline Parsons Yahtzee and she is also known for her work. As a professor of Navajo in northern Arizona University her books include novels about the Navajo Long Walk and a Navajo language book rediscovering the Navajo Language. evangeline thank you for joining us for another native America calling. Thank you for inviting me Keira. Well eventually when we think of twenty twenty. I'm sure we think of all kinds of stuff This project act is giving us a view in tune Navajo culture and so when you think of all of the words that are contained in this calendar. What do do you think people are really being welcomed into especially with this language being featured? They're saying that the the language has been preserved through another medium such as the calendar and so then the students also see the names of the the months and the days of the week and our hope and I think it encourages them to learn more about their own language. Guage and the elders are happy to see their language in Navajo as well and it is a rich culture in language You know has been handed down in because people are using it Still there is a lot of life in it in so evangeline. When we opened up up this calendar we start learning the numbers in talk to me about wanting to even include a lesson in this in this calendar so that the students who are in class can see when they get home and they see their mothers there's calendar or they go to the trading post because I see them up there a lot or when they go other places and they see the calendar they know that their teacher went through the numbers numbers and I think it brings a sense of comfort to know that other places are displaying the calendar under other than just the classroom so encourages them to begin to look for the language and listen for the language In other places other than the classroom into maybe people have never heard it Give us one through ten in Navajo. One is to not kill three Four B five six. I call seven so eight B nine. Nah Eight ten Nasr. No and I won't make you go to thirty one but You know this is really encouraging. Maybe even that dialogue log of how do you see certain things and if this calendar is hanging in in a prominent place in the home You know you're seeing that in in the different names of the month. I'm curious about that evangeline evangeline Tell me more about the names of the month. I love the name of the month because it helps the Navajo people regulate their days. There our weeks is there months according to what is listed in them name of the month to you do it. Okay if I go through the months. Let's talk about them and maybe it's your birthday month. Now you'RE GONNA learn how to say it in Navajo Doing remind you. This is our book of the month. We are giving away ten copies of this calendar. If you would like to talk with our I guess our our Language expert as well as author. You can call in one eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is a number we do have ten books to share. Also GonNa meet an artist coming up here in just a moment. Dial in now one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. Go ahead evangeline. I hope our audience will notice that the names of the months present the Navajo people with the environmental characteristics of each month. So when we start out with October the Navajo Year begins with the month of June or October and haunt means beginning of the year. Are we move onto November and the Navajo name is missed. Missed missed it. Supposed to translate. As slender wind missed it would be the winds and also would be the slender December brings us or big wins. which is the name of December and we do tend to see big wins rushing across the cold during in the month of December and then January the Navajo named for January is? Yes this is yes breath being snow and this is is cooking but what it is is the. The translation is melting getting snow in times past no would have to be melted because the places where water could be obtained by the people were frozen and so therefore they had to melt the snow and they called it yes and ask them literally cooking the snow. But it's the melting of the snow. Hello kept wearing is a Tupi. Josh meaning equal Biaz. It's the little one. which is the name for February and translation of of Sepe is the literal translation would be hatching hatching of the Eaglet. In March into those those are just a few in and woke will continue going through those But eventually vigilant this to me is kind of I think You know really showing how we is indigenous people how we take he can look at the different times of year or just even time in general in those descriptions are almost You know not uh-huh guide. I guess maybe that's a good way to say it. A guide to what is exactly happening at that time of year. And for you understanding life this way is a Navajo woman. In knowing why names were given to certain times of the year. What does that say about? How smart your ancestors are? They recognize the characteristics of the weather. During that time and a lot of the the end the happenings they activities and so the the month would take to the people. What should start happening opening? Such as I mentioned February they would see the eagles flying up above and they'd see them finding leading an analysis making nest and so then they say we need to start listening because we're seeing eagles flying close to the May he says we need to start looking and listening for the first thunder so the flying Eagles lose as though they're looking for something was the sign that the first thunder would come and because of the first thunder is very very important in the spring ushers in spring but it also tells the Navajo people that activities. He's within the winter. There are limited to the winter are just stop and they are just start looking towards the planting the corn preparing the Cornfield Renita out of it winter slumber so that it may begin to increase. Its for Tilleke for the summer. That's one example.

Navajo evangeline evangeline Dr Evangeline Parsons America eagles publisher White Burn Flagstaff Arizona Cornfield Renita Keira Peterson Yazdi Tilleke Tupi professor Sepe Arizona University Josh
"salina" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"salina" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news on Tonio. Gonzalez advocates say the survival of hundreds of species in North Carolina hinges on on conservation action and legislation in Congress. The bill would give the state some twenty six million dollars annually to support species conservation as Nadia Ramleh. Lagaan reports some of that money would go specifically to the eastern band of Cherokee. The only federally recognized tribal nation in the state. Mike Lavoie is natural resource manager for the tribe he says native American tribes own or influence the management of nearly one hundred and forty million acres. Nationwide tried I just have a large responsibility for conserving. Wildlife in America. Tribal Lands are sovereign nations and have the authority to manage fish and wild populations relations that exist within their boundaries he also points out that although tribes have historically not been eligible for federal funding tribal lands continued to provide provide vital habitat for more than five hundred threatened and endangered plants and animals Olivo says Cherokee lands located in the southern Appalachians are teeming teeming with biodiversity and rare species many of which hold cultural significance like the eastern l.. As well as other non game species such as box turtle are also I'll receive focus conservation effort ten guest wicky of the North Carolina. Wildlife Federation says the State's lucrative outdoor recreation economy depends on healthy wildlife populations relations James Species over the years have received plenty of funding from hunting fishing licenses and gear. That's the non game species the species we depend upon for pollinating automating or crops for cleaning our rivers and ecosystems and for overall ecological health does not receive the funding species identified as is being under threat. Include these Rulli and warblers songbird and Aquatic Salamander known as the eastern hell bender and the bog turtle. I'm Nadia Rum. Lagaan Montana tribes are working on conservation efforts through a Bison Corn Team Program Female Bison were recently transferred from Yellowstone National Park to the cinnabon ensue. Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation Rachel Kramer with Yellowstone Public Radio House. More wildlife managers oded up fourteen females and their calves along along with five balls into a trailer at Stevens Creek Capture Facility in Yellowstone Robbie Magnin the fishing game manager for the cinnabon ensue tribes followed the semi-truck as it hauled the device. Nearly five hundred miles to the Fort Peck. Indian reservation aren't really really great. It's we've always wanted to get female. He called it an exceptional bonus because some some of the females are pregnant said the tribes get more cavs in the spring. Magnan said the new arrivals will spend the next year and the tribes half a million dollar quarantine facility and be tested regularly early for Bruce alozies bacterial disease that can cause pregnant bison cattle in October their fetuses he said the bison will then be sent to a tribe or federal agency trying to boost Houston conservation. Heard this summer the Fort Peck tribes sent its first graduates of the quarantine program. Five Bull Bison to the eastern Shoshoni of the wind river reservation in Wyoming combing nearly five thousand Bison live in Yellowstone National Park and over half of them test positive for Bruce Alexis. There hasn't been a confirmed case of Bison spreading the disease cattle but wildlife officials. Say this is in large part. Due to keeping the population from getting too large the agency's management team earlier this month set goals of hunting two hundred to three hundred bison that Migra out of the park this winter and capturing another four hundred to six hundred to be shipped to slaughter a park biologist said the quarantine program has faced for or one hundred ten Bison for National Native News. I'm Rachel creamer in Bozeman Montana and Damian. Tony Gonzalez.

Yellowstone National Park James Species Fort Peck Tony Gonzalez North Carolina Montana Mike Lavoie Nadia Ramleh Fort Peck Indian Yellowstone Robbie Magnin Wildlife Federation Lagaan Bruce Alexis Yellowstone Public Radio House Nadia Rum Cherokee Magnan Rachel Kramer Rachel creamer Stevens Creek Capture Facility
Selina Tobaccowala Discuss Growing up Coding in the 80's and How She Was Often the Only Girl in Class

How I Built This

08:15 min | 1 year ago

Selina Tobaccowala Discuss Growing up Coding in the 80's and How She Was Often the Only Girl in Class

"If you're already business idea in Haiku form it would go something like this. It solves problem. Super Easy to explain people will use it and back in the early days of the worldwide web. There were a lot of problems that were right for solving including paper or rather other how to use less of it about the last time you wrote a letter on paper though that a registration form with a pen or filed a physical document into way metal filing cabinet right for the most part e mail and electronic documents have replaced paper same with invitations. Most of the invites I get and I'm pretty sure you get common an email and for that simple convenience you can thank you salina. Tobacco Allah because back in the late. Nineteen Ninety S Selena and her friend Alid wrote the code that would power the first online invitation business eve and for a time was a darling Ling of the DOT COM bubble within two years of its founding it was valued at around a hundred and fifty million dollars of course when the bubble burst in in two thousand so did E. value but unlike other dot com era companies such as COSMO or pets.com Lycos or G. who cities eviter hung in there. And it's still around today. In fact invitations from eviter reach more than one hundred million people eight year company is now owned owned by Liberty Media and while it has tons of competitors eve. I is still one of the biggest players and online and -tations as for Selena Tobacco Allah. She still an important name Silicon Valley. She's become a kind of role model for women and girls who want to get into tack in fact back. When she was a kid she she loved computer? She was obsessed with them. She grew up in Ramsey New Jersey. The daughter of two emigrants from India's for my parents perspective. If you ask who I was I mean I was always that person like waving my hand in the air with the answer class which I think annoyed a lot of my teachers. Most of the time I love to read. I am A terrible athlete. I'm but I always love team sports and it was something that was important to me. I actually was voted basketball captain of Ramsey high school basketball team but not because my athletic ability but only because I built a stats program in high school to help the other players shoot better. Wow using like built a statue program on your home computer I did. It was on the army pro database and I used to come home after every game in like database who shot from wear and then a printout sheet the next day and give it to the good players and they eventually decided that they wanted me to be there captain which was very funny because I only play the last two minutes of the game either if we were really upper really behind. How did you get into computers as a kid? So is really from influence of my dad. He started off as a punch card programmer for a company called. EDS and he was there for. I think about twenty five years and he rose from being this punch-card programmer to a a multimedia president couples away from the CEO of this huge organization. Her and he always exposed us to technology when he would take us to work work every so often we would see that entire you know. It was a huge mainframes and servers. And you'd walk in and you see all the computers and the technology and it was just always exciting to me and so he brought computer home. I'm probably when I was eight nine ten years old and I got excited Abou- coding and starting to build things and then my mom Schlep me summer coaching camps in all different places across New Jersey. To expose me to it more. I mean this is before like now of course every parents like I want my kid to learn how to code but like in the early mid eighties. That was not the thing. What were you learning? What was the code? I'm so pretty sure. It was logo and basic at the time. I I and then I do remember learning Pascal when I was in middle school. Were you often one of the only girls in those classes definitely and if I look back now now I think about that you know I remember I took the AP Computer Science Class of my high school. And I'm pretty sure I was the only girl in class but it never occurred to me at the time. Do you remember Birlik even as a teenager thinking like when you ask a teenager would. He won't be when he grew up. You know some of them have an answer and some of them might say the president and some might you know say businessman-rebel Dan rea billionaire like would you say I want to do something in computers right from high school. I wanted to do something in computers. That was what I got excited about. That's what I wanted to study Eddie. And when I was looking at colleges I was only focused on okay. What are the best colleges for computer science and that was my criteria? And so you decide to go oh to to the west coast to Stanford. Yeah this is like the beginning of the DOT com boom come one point. Oh did you get that feeling. England was that was that energy present on campus nineteen ninety-four so that energy of starting a company and the company starting around you in that dot com boom. I mean that was all around you especially by nineteen ninety six one thousand nine hundred seven. I mean there was excited. There was Yahoo. There was so many different companies in that the idea that you were computer scientists and you could go start a company with absolutely in the air one thousand nine hundred hundred important year at the year. Netscape and Netscape Browser. Comes out for mass use. Do you remember using the web for the first time and I don't remember the exact moment I use the web for the first time but I remember burn my year. One thousand nine hundred four freshman year was the first year everybody had email all my high school friends that e mail and it just changed everything like that time. In in computer technology technology was just this mash shift to introducing that consumer to all of this content and communications that nobody had access to prior. I guess like in your first year you met somebody who was who go on to be an important business co founder and partner Later on again in Aleve Aleve mad at you as you meet them so I lived in off freshman dorm compromiser and two doors down for me was the sky. I'll he was from Wisconsin. He was a swimmer but he loved computers and he was always building stuff. And this will. This will age US we worked on the first yearbook that was going to be digital instead of physical he put it on a multimedia CD distributed to all the freshmen and it was just photos. And you put the CD in there's your yearbook. Yeah exactly so you know like you work on this yearbook and then did you just continue to kind of talk about ideas or so I had a little blip. which was I took a computer science class in my freshman year there and I didn't do that well and I got a little nervous? which is is this the right field for me and that summer I got a job Bob? which was what I thought was going to be database activity in the mall and it turned out? I was the mall greeter where I would literally stand there and say welcome to Paramus Park and and I was complaining about it to my friend's dad he ran the IT Department for an Investment Bank Warburg pincus and he said quit your mall job. Come intern for me. And I had the most amazing summer experience I helped build one of the first websites for this investment bank. We built this application called morning meeting notes to help them. You know Record all their Monday meetings and I fell back in love with computer science and it was really then my sophomore year that I went full steam ahead on CS CBS. It was once I saw using computer science in the real world and I saw I was I reaffirmed that I was good at it. You know when you walk into Stanford and and all of a sudden you know. You have been the Valedictorian and you've been the best student in your class and then you walk in and all of a sudden your average and it makes you question in the sense of like. Oh Am I going to be good at this when I get out into the real world and having that summer experience I saw I can do

Selena Ap Computer Science Class Ramsey High School President Trump Programmer Salina Paramus Park Pets.Com Lycos Liberty Media Netscape Ramsey New Jersey India Stanford Basketball Silicon Valley New Jersey Investment Bank Warburg Pincus
What Are The Traits Of Inspirational Leaders?

FlashCast By PDB, With Phil Di Bella

08:28 min | 1 year ago

What Are The Traits Of Inspirational Leaders?

"Today i tackle as subject of traits of quality leads salina's that are amazing to me that what traits do these guys have in gaza and gaza goes will be <hes> as as many inspirational leader in the world some young some alda. Let me tackle some of the <hes> trikes delayed that are say amongst the leaders and dump. Let's kick off with number one integrity and these no nos vicinity quota but integrity an integrity is important because they site and then they do an short to maintain criti is the difference between what they do so people that have integrity will always do with us are they gonna do now in might not be something we locked in might be something we do like. It doesn't really matter. That's not what i'm tackling here what i'm tackling his that one of the great traits of of one of the great leader's is integrity. They will always do what they say they're going to do. Another one is resilience. There is the meta avenue tons get down. They get back up and they go go go and this is something that can be saying in great leaders. <hes> you know i eh with at a sports whether the politicians when they'd business whether there has wife househusband it doesn't really matter <hes> leadership taxonomy wolf forms and resilience is key pop to you know being a great leader now nixing tomase accountability accountability is bright ladens have the <unk> of accountability if the negative like they put the hands they they they don't the concept of winning and losing his team. You know this is something that is important. It's not when something goes wrong. It's somebody else's fault <hes> and when everything is right it's each it's the glory lady with the leader. That's not something that some great leaders do that always accept accountability an inspiring now bright and inspiring to me go hand in hand because bright people tackle adversity bryce. These people make that step and we know that if you don't make the stick things doesn't happen but at the same time they're inspirational in the way they do that so they're not bright bald an arrogant that brave an inspiring that willing to put themselves forward but they understand that they're inspiring people people like martin luther king nelson mandela. These people were bryant but there were some spotter. They went out there to buck the system that were there. They were bright on our inspiring in such a big kohl's addicting now. This is something that so important is adaptability. Leadership doesn't often talked about the adaptability isn't talked about often in the concept of leadership but great leaders not to attacked than to adapt when things are good than i had to adapt the things that they have this constant energy of the depth ability they make sure that they can adapt people to situations situations to people people etc etc compassion. Something that often doesn't get talked about in leadership is compassion. You know another way to put it. His empathy now <music> out empathy compassionate doesn't mean that you have to you know be sitting next to somebody crime it really simply to me is is the concept compassion and as you feel that you understand that you listen the compassionate they will apply the right outcome for the situation a great way to look at this. Is you know to to me. I know that i'm compassionate. What i'm saying is doing the best that they can with the resources at the half at the time attack me that today's a great way to to show compassionate is that you're willing to look the situation or whatever it may be and say is the best at the time with the resources of behalf and to make compassion is is obviously important trait of equality later the ability to look in the mirror and i talk about this a lot. Is that a lot of latest look in the mirror. They don't understand that they need to be leading by example that they need to make sure that it's different rules arabas in different roles for them. They need to make sure ooh what they what they're actually doing. You know they can look in the mirror and say hi. I n leaving. Do i believe i should be leaving acting acting the way. I believe i should be acting. This is something that's agassi. So important i mean we all look at people like bill and melinda gates amazing leaders in what they looking in the mirror yeah they wealthy very roughly however looking in the mirror and saying wait human and we want to show humanity by doing doing great things around the world and that's something that's obviously very very important to them. Just a dan in new zealand prime minister is different trick whether you like his policies or <unk> policies. That's not the point. The point is as a leader. She has this ability of looking in the mirror and saying i'm human and i will therefore for act with compassion with love and dumb you know with with anticipate so these are people that really really good another. Try is quality holiday. Leaders have the ability to ceram selves with people that challenge them now. A lot of people don't like that. You'll find that a lot of people dynegy like to surround themselves with people that challenge them rather surround themselves people that say this all the time whereas i believe quality leader has try surrounding themselves around of people that challenged aw and challenging them to be his visions of themselves challenged them when when things are not raw challenge them things ira challenged them on different different things that's not challenging for the cycle challenging you not pointing something apple someone just to the point of trying to be right but challenge to make can be a positive city challenge not not not doesn't need to be a negative challenge to me an idea lita is the one who has a positive attitude encourages to be positive even in across so the concept of challenging has to sickness it has to be about positive attitude has to be that encouragement it has to be you know eat when the times a dan that you had the ability to have people around that were challenging to ensure that they you performing at your best as a leader now you know some one of the great things around the world as a leader bono mate now cost later tonight then upon you know born alita. You'll make it's behavioral theory. It's the right carry yourself. The people you have around your mind sick because all of this putting self inconstant mindset mode is exactly really what it's about leadership skills that can be learned we can be learned by training can deliver perception can be practice and most of all it's my experience so leadership leaders are night for this reason because it is a city schools that can be learned by trying bucket section by practice and of course bike spirits approach the older we get the more experiences we have which builds wisdom so of course important is that as we evolve in get older when he to constantly evolve their mindsets and our ability so that we are learning so whilst we take our experiences and turn that into wisdom president we also have to make sure that we occurred because one thing i can't stand about setting lead is when they talk about doing this the twenty years and my rebuttal to that is but will you still be doing it in twenty years to come because as many brands in the past like kodak knock knock yet that will not get leaders that are no longer market ladies and some. I'm an even exist today because of that editor so touched on some of the heights today that make a great leader go out and be the best you can be identify unify what your own avatar looks like in terms of leadership. What is is brand. What is your brain. Look like when it comes to the word leader so when i say your name and later what what are the types they gonna say about you. You know visualizes write it down. Use the resources. Whatever it is pictures woods you know music. Whatever it is that will help the pick exactly exactly what you'll ever time looks like as lakes and what you want to be known for.

Gaza Salina New Zealand Bryant Nelson Mandela Agassi Martin Luther Kodak Melinda Gates Prime Minister Apple Bill Editor President Trump Lita Twenty Years
"salina" Discussed on GSMC SciFi Podcast

GSMC SciFi Podcast

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"salina" Discussed on GSMC SciFi Podcast

"That may be like, you know, let us know more. Okay. Why are these to put together what's really going on? What's the new alien threat because okay, supposedly compromise? Like, I said, but okay, it was an alien compromise them was it a past age in the compromise them what's going on here. Because you know, in most these trailers like the they showed I think Earl was the bad guy in the first one ended up being a giant cockroach bug type thing in the second one. There was Selena. I think those names Salina Salina Salina sons, right and the third one it was Boris. So we at least new K who's the main bad guy, who's the main alien who's the main, you know, like they person or creature that, you know, men in black, Jane Cain. To take down. In this. We don't know that. So this is a film that I wanna be excited for probably going see when it comes out. But I do want in no more before I get really really excited about it. And that's just the truth. So men in black four or men in black international. I I've seen it named both online. So it's I'm gonna go call it men in black four. But I think it could go either way some we'll see that's all I can really say. Yeah. This trailers available on YouTube. Now, you can watch it. You can check it out. And now move your own judge want it maybe you're on a different footing than I am. So we're gonna take ourselves refers short little break back in a moment. With more scifi news..

Salina Salina Salina Earl Jane Cain YouTube
"salina" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

07:40 min | 2 years ago

"salina" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"I'll be making about fifty thousand dollars a year, and how long would it take you to graduate? Only take me about two and a half years. Okay. That's pretty cool. All right. And who's paying for college? My grandma my grandma. She she paid for it. Pretty nice good place to be okay. You know, I would set that money and something like a mutual fund because of your young age, and because you're going to go through a lot of changes in the next three years. And we don't we don't know exactly what what that's gonna prescribe for you on a house with a low income. Like you have the day. You don't want to buy a house based on that you're buying a house based on your new income after you become a financial planner and then put one hundred thousand dollars down on that house. And so I I'd probably sit on this until I was about twenty three and let's get out there. Get that financial planning thing going get your own place rent a little while. And then start talking about buying. Let's let's get out there a step or two further down the road than you are right now. And then you'll make a better decision. There's no rush. I mean, if you buy a home at twenty three you're still highly blessed an unusual in good in a good way. And so at eighteen can almost be called unwise because you could really get yourself into something today that that you can't get out of later, or they you know, doesn't thing about real estate is. You know, you have to sell it. And. You know, you might very well be in a different place, a different locale, certainly a different place, financially and everything else. So I'm gonna tell you tap the breaks its weight park that in a mutual fund or something like that until you get to about twenty three Salina Salina isn't isn't that? Right. Is this Selena's that right? Yes. Salina Salina Salina. Okay. In Baton Rouge. How are you? I'm doing good. How can I help? Just recently been unemployed for months. Now, I have debts. I have more I have everything with no income coming in at the moment. I am looking for job. And and hopefully, I'll find one saying. I have. On the mountain my 4._0._1._K plan. And I was wondering I mean, can I take it out? Hey, I mean, pay my bills off. I mean, what do you Dave? How old are you? I'll turn without this year. And how much is in your 4._0._1._K hundred twenty three thousand and you're single. That's pretty scary place to be in right now. Yes. It is. Well, here's the thing any money. You take out of your 4._0._1._K will be hit with a ten percent penalty plus your tax rate. And so we don't know what your tax rate is until you're working. But it's let's say it's a twenty percent tax rate. That would mean you to be hit for thirty percent. So it's kind of like saying, Dave I'm so scared that I'm going to borrow money at thirty percent interest to pay my bills. I don't think I'm going to get that scared. So I'd be cleaning somebody's house balking. Somebody's dog. I'd be taking a job. I'm babysitting at the moment. I'll be doing almost anything to keep the wolf away from the door until you land the next job. What were you making before? I was making twenty seven an hour. Okay. Doing right now interviews I went to their or starting right? Maybe fifteen dollars an hour. Yeah. What were you doing? Was a timekeeper out at a chemical plant in Baton Rouge. Okay. All right. And they just did a layoff or yes, they get away. Oh, okay. All right. But you've been there and work your way up on that our league because that was hourly rate, correct? That you're very correct. Hard to replace that. Okay. All right. Cool. Well, that's one thing you can do. Of course, the other thing you can do start your own business doing something you might make twenty five an hour cleaning houses, if you're willing to do that. I don't know what you want to do. But I mean, you can run a lot of little small business ideas that are service things and doesn't require that. You have, you know, a PHD to do them, and you can make a lot of money. If you watch what you're doing and think about it. And so I'm gonna send you a copy of Christie rights book business boutique, which is all about women running and starting businesses equipping women to make money doing what they love and she works with ladies that have no education all the way to live ladies that have extreme levels of education. No sophistication in business all the way to very sophisticated and business, and so this will help you consider that as a possible way. But I you know that you can cash out the 4._0._1._K, but it's thirty percent. And so it will be the last thing I did to avoid foreclosure or bankruptcy or homelessness, and I'm gonna do everything else to keep from borrowing money effectively just like borrowing money at thirty percent. Christina is in San Francisco. Hi, christina. How're you? Hi, thank you for taking my call. Sure. What's up? All right. So I am thirty one. I'm also a single parent who is terrified of investing. And I would like tips online as know I live in California. So everything is high Broncos are high and buying a house is high. So I'm trying to figure out what to do. Okay. Well, we're gonna walk you up. What we call our baby steps to begin to build your self a foundation before you do start investing, and that would get you out of debt and get your emergency fund in place of three to six months of expenses in this start. Putting fifteen percent of aside when you say you're terrified of investing. You mean like having a Roth IRA with mutual funds that terrifies you? Yes. I really don't have education about the stock market in. Or a one k I have at my job. Now, I gave me a free six percent without me, contributing anything more you putting that what's that invested in? Invested in a target sign. Okay. What's that? At at fidelity tickets at twenty fifteen Pakistan. What's that? What do you mean? What what is it? What is the fidelity target? I'm sorry. I don't know what I thought the answer was. Okay. I set you. Okay. Okay. This is how you lose money. You put money and stuff. You don't know. What it is. By the way, your anything. That's a perfectly okay yourself. There's nothing wrong with what you did during the wrong with what you did is. You have no idea what you did. Right. You can't do that. That's how people lose all their money. Okay. So you should be terrified of investing. Because you don't know anything about it. But the good news is it's not terrified of investing. Because investing is to be terrified of. It's just because you don't know. So you said you're thirty years old. I'm wine. Now, do you drive a car Clark? Does that terrify you? No good. I shouldn't. I hope not. But yet people die in car wrecks every year. Right. Right. And so there's reason to be terrified, but we have reasonable knowledge on how to operate the vehicle and we limit the risk, by the way, we operate the vehicle.

Salina Salina Salina Baton Rouge Salina Salina Dave Christina Selena Broncos Pakistan Clark San Francisco Christie California thirty percent one hundred thousand dollars fifty thousand dollars fifteen dollars fifteen percent
"salina" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

05:28 min | 3 years ago

"salina" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Dumbest criminals. Are you one is bring Selena onto the neighborhood Selena? Hello. All right. Criminal speak on it. All righty. Well, I got arrested for DUI though, then holding. So I asked all the. Guys in here for. Same thing a DUI. But there were two chicks that were in there that had robbed a Bank, and they said when they came out the guy that was the getaway driver had stolen their car. So they went down the street and called the cops were their stolen car when the police showed up they fits the description for robbing the Bank, the basically they called the police on the good Lord. All righty. So you already in jail for being one of the dumbest criminals as well. You got a DUI. You know what I'm saying? But you ready in the holding tank, and it was two girls in there. They went in and robbed a Bank. And then when they ran out the Bank the getaway driver was gone. So they called the police to report their car stolen, thinking, they're not gonna pink us. They fit the description and now they were in jail. Yes. Robbing a Bank calling the police on yourself. Oh, wow. You are so gung how many years do you sit down and sink? Like, dude, why I been just waiting try to get to the house, and then call them up and say, hey, why did you leave knowing how stupid the other like why did we use our own car? The first thing is for one. You gotta be careful. Walk into a Bank modern day. Bank legally getting my money. I'm looking around like man, there's a lot of cameras in. Yeah. You're like, oh, maybe you're gonna think I'm suspicious. Just like acknowledging where the care is this a lot of a man. Let me let me just ask Salina Salina. Did they appear to be like on drugs? No, they did it. You know, there's no banks opened a tweak two thirty in the morning. Dumbest criminal stick around your radios. Big. Now. Now, you only say. Not. Election. Thank you. John. Aw. Goes. Aw. Ronin Iran, Iran, Iran. John is. China. Anything that you had enough? Now. Don. Hussy you do. He's he was pretty cool. You. Over can you do? Do. How'd you? Now. Not allow. Let you down. Thank you. Everything. Thanks. Ninety two three. End the most tickets to see Drake. Wayne happens every hour. So continue to hang out with us main. Let's go and get a phone tap, right? Here is his laundry day to cause a woman to tell him. You know, a trinity is down and I needed to come by. And put some things in your refrigerator while I'm there could I watch and dry a load of clothes. He's gonna get his phone tap right here. Big boy's neighborhood. Hello. How you.

John Selena Salina Salina Iran Don Drake China Wayne
"salina" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"salina" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"J b show eight oh five we've got a meeting in the ladies room so before celebrity spin this is where we're going to drop in grams dare again the movie really looking forward to seeing this like i said i'm a huge movie guy there's movies i get excited about this is one of them truth or dare so far who's dead salina salina and crystal because she announced she goes hey i'm i was dared so here's autumn about to do graham also said i'll take a dare we dared him to rip on his wife's food i remember a kate works very hard and she's trying to mow they both are they're raising baby ford and she's working extremely hard and then she's coming home cooking imagine someone then ripping on the food meatloaf just a bunch of meat by the way i cut this way down because it's much longer so this is right to the point and she eventually is onto what he's doing a pan it looks discussing eanet don't try to give that any of this like it's just like there's a bunch of that like on the top of what is wrong ham bone or some i don't even know she's looking right now he was pretty brutal and she was like dude like she was getting upset but then finally she goes look at me is this for the show freaking out they dared me to rip on your meatloaf one time you've ever not eat what i put in front of you okay wait a minute weird.

salina salina kate graham
"salina" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"salina" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"So that's that's where we are and it is it's at let's head to you we go to let me see we go to dave in salina kansas dave you're on red eye radio welcome to the show thanks for having me on i do have to say i was a little taken back by that you're saying i just wanted to say just on the point that the point on this is what the american people want the majority what the majority want not all i know i know you probably don't and i don't but i have to be a realist and understand we've been saying this for years we've seen the polls and where the republicans have gone when it comes to candidates that they support we've come to see that there are only thirty two true concert and they're not even true conservatives semitrue conservatives in the house and only one or two senators that really stick to conservative fiscal ideas they represent the people okay i would i would agree with that i can agree with probably most is numbers but here's my question even in the last election of course people that voted trump sort of said like all the other candidates were running for the republican side they really like okay no we want something different.

kansas dave salina
Christina Aguilera reveals a gay ex-boyfriend inspired her song 'Infatuation'

Lori and Julia

02:03 min | 3 years ago

Christina Aguilera reveals a gay ex-boyfriend inspired her song 'Infatuation'

"To that group member that reflects teach girls personality so at least they're not doing the yellow submarine thing even do their own boys actually going to sit in a booth for a day okay all right let's get something straight here justin bieber is definitely not finished with selena gomez okay yeah he's been spending time with the twenty two year old baskin champion fine now my favorite part wallace source tells people but champion spent the night at the entertainers house on tuesday night all along with other friends selena is still on his mind got one of his people telling people magazine hoping salina's grain to read this and i take it too much into trouble that he's got his hands all over some blonde good luck with that he thinks and talks about selena all the time the chapter with her is definitely not finished not sure about this when christina aguilera says she was left heartbroken which he discovered that one of her ex boyfriend's had come out as gay she was repulsed drag race after she's judging is and it was the saw it was the inspiration behind the two thousand and two song infatuation the songs have but centered about a forbidden the lavin obsession with their latin crush but that man was gay it was heartbreaking because i found out he played for your team not mine walk christine didn't name her lover competing queen vanessa mateo said he's going to see this he's going to be mad christina had no issues with that in fact she wanted it to happen i hope so girl what what does this little about why she been talking about this i don't know the dvr but you know just people inspired the song and i don't have any problem with that she wouldn't be the first gal who fell in love with a woman who is not interested in you oh really.

Justin Bieber Selena Salina Christina Aguilera Christine Vanessa Mateo Christina Selena Gomez Wallace Lavin Twenty Two Year
"salina" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"salina" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"So that's that's where we are and it is it's sad let's head to you we go to let me see we go to dave in salina kansas dave you're on red eye radio welcome to the show hey thanks for having me on i do have to say i was a little taken back that you're saying i i just wanted to say just on the point the point on this is what the american people want want what the majority what the majority want not all i know i know you probably don't and i don't but i have to be a realist and understand we've been saying this for years we've seen the polls and where the republicans have gone when it comes to candidates that they support we've come to see that there are only thirty two true concert by they're not even true conservatives some might true conservatives in the house and only one or two senators that really stick to conservative fiscal ideas they represent the people okay i would i would agree with that i can agree with probably most of those numbers but here's my question even in the last election of course people have voted trump sort of said like all the.

kansas dave salina
"salina" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"salina" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"So that's that's where we are and it is it's sad let's head to you we go to let me see we go to dave in salina kansas dave you're on red eye radio welcome to the show hey thanks for having me on i do have to say i was a little taken back that you're saying i i just wanted to say just on the point that the point on this is what the american people want what you want it's what the majority it's what the majority want not all i know i know you probably don't and i don't but i have to be a realist and understand we've been saying this for years we've seen the polls and where the republicans have gone when it comes to candidates that they support we've come to see that there are only thirty two true concert by they're not even true conservatives some might true conservatives in the house and only one or two senators that really stick to conservative fiscal ideas they represent the people okay i will i will agree with that i can agree with probably most of numbers but here's my question even in the last election of course people have voted trump sort of said like all the other candidates were running for the republican side they really like okay no we want something different.

kansas dave salina
"salina" Discussed on The PHP: Perez Hilton Podcast

The PHP: Perez Hilton Podcast

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"salina" Discussed on The PHP: Perez Hilton Podcast

"Well from salina to her friend taylor swift her i think i've mentioned it on the podcast before her former fred carly clause that that has not been confirmed carly clause was spotted out having dinner with taylor's arch nemesis katy perry wow now that that's pretty much all the confirmation we need that carly clause and taylor swift are no longer friends you know taylor still not friends with kim kardashian kim kardashian also got people talking recently when her daughter north west took one of her topless photos did you see that i did what is that all about that didn't bother me did it bother you i don't think introducing a camera around a child or an adult that doesn't have clothes on at any time is appropriate that's that's how i would parent obviously you don't parent that way but that's my opinion well no problem with that i would limit take naked photos of be topless photos of me but it is a bother me that she's doing it why because it's kim great acid i don't care she can do whatever she wants i'm maybe maybe i answered that incorrectly does it bother me that she did it women can do anything that she wants if i i wouldn't put myself in my position if i was married and i had a kid i wouldn't be happy with a camera being out at any point of me being naked or my wife being naked i just think that's inappropriate but it but i wasn't bothered by the facts of her doing it which a lot of people were.

salina taylor katy perry kim kardashian fred carly