35 Burst results for "Salim"

Understanding Freedom in Business With Author John Warrillow

Entrepreneur Perspectives

02:24 min | Last week

Understanding Freedom in Business With Author John Warrillow

"I remember going out of town or scoring in my kids school or going to do something with my white. Doing something had really nothing to do with the business. Could my business exist for that day for that week. If i wasn't there or was i coming back to just complete chaos and of course earlier on you have to be more involved but that's always been a test like i'll go out of town and i'm never going to totally turned off maybe at times but you can like let things happen. You can let things. Just take place that i think is a big part if you correct me if i'm wrong in regards to your thoughts and your theories on bill to sell absolutely absolutely funny story. I was being interviewed on. A podcast. Goes back years ago and usually podcasts are pretty softball kind of question. They're usually pretty fun right. Relatively warm audience if you will and the guy starts off no one who relies like okay. Yeah warrilow you're the douchebag who built the cell and like wow. That's an opener like yeah like anyone on distance. Chastise me for promoting this kind of building to flip silicon valley start sal and brought off into the sunset kind of attitude and i was so befuddled and like totally put off by his opener that i did a crappy job of sort of rebutting him at the time but since then i've thought about it a lot i mean i think i think you're absolutely right building to sell us not about how you sell. Your company built to sell his really about. How do you credit business. That doesn't need you. Which is the essentially. The bra material prerequisite four having a sellable company. But it doesn't mean you need to sell. Oftentimes i'll do a talk. A good like an e o meeting and i'll be like okay. So how do you guys want to sell your company. And if there's one hundred people in the room at one hand might go up right. Whereas if i asked the question okay how many of you would like to know that you could sell. If you're ready like virtually every hand goes up to that question and so that's really what it's bad. It's about like in your example taking playing hooky in spending a day with your wife like that's a precious resource. That's an incredible luxury of owning a business. To kind of be able to drift off for a day or two no one notices. The business doesn't break down. And i think that is what i think. We all crave is that sense of freedom and independence. And i think that's really what built cells all about.

Warrilow Softball
"salim" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

04:12 min | 2 months ago

"salim" Discussed on Toure Show

"A new show on the cw plaque lightning he and his wife mara brock. Akil have made so much interesting television over the last decade. He's the perfect person to talk about. Where uh show begins. Listen to him. A character will start talking to the side of the blue driving. Mostly drive and i'll find interesting and A pretty much badger me over over a period of time. And so then i start writing things down that they say and then i asked i must it will in we start having that conversation been i start to figure out what kind of world is person is living in. That's more like a spiritual thing you know you just kinda sit down take a breath and some people would call it. Meditating and the story starts to come out. The trick is to make sure that you're paying attention to if it's a story that you're hearing or is it a story that i'm telling to myself and there is a difference that i would like i would like in. The story is telling itself. You don't have to think about it. Just right it's there it's up in the you know the koch realm than you. Just pull it down right. If i'm telling the story that i'm really thinking a bit by bit by bit by bit. So i have developed over the years the ability to let the story come to me. And that's how it starts. That difference is really huge. And i can think of times when i've been writing stories. And like mapping out. Different scenarios of the character does this. Is this then. This would happen verses almost letting them talk to you and tell you where they wanna go right right right. It is a big difference. So you got it written you start it. You starting to develop the character starting develop scenario. Then what happens then you. You're getting to know this character. Then you getting to know the world and you start writing and the character starts to bump into people that they know right and this is this is i want to be clear. This is writing for yourself. This is not fighting for Black lightning was different. So writing for yourself is is a different thing and this is when you're writing for yourself your characters actually start to bump into people and things and you have that character react. There is the structure so there is some technicality to it but in the beginning i always believed that i don't pay attention to the structure of it very soon. I just right in. The scene can go on for three pages in boom okay. right. The best feeling to me at least is when you read something and it's done You look at it and you literally can say this 'cause you know i'm not that smart early although it comes out of me I really feel like you're just biding with with. Spirits are so many spirits around Who's who they want their story so right and so you get that win as somebody else will i. I wanted this song. Also and that's sort of the way you do it so then you just put you know you pull out your laptop and you start. You know doing doing this thing. You know writing it down for more from me and salim akil talking about television business of it the creation of it how to get into.

salim akil three pages Akil last decade
The Story Behind James Taylor's Fire and Rain

How Good It Is

01:59 min | 3 months ago

The Story Behind James Taylor's Fire and Rain

"Doing the research for some of these shows one of the things. I bump up against a lot of weird rumors regarding the meaning behind the songs. And one of the biggest to james taylor's first big single fire and rain specifically the story that the song chronicles his reaction to the death of his girlfriend in a plane crash. So let's get out of the way immediately. No well not really okay. That was a little harsh. Let me roll myself back a little bit. The song was written in three stages each of them related to a specific event in his life. So let's take them averse at a time. Taylor was working the local coffee houses and clubs and so forth in new york city in the late. One thousand nine hundred sixties and he had a friend by the name of suzanne schnur who everyone. It's seems called. Susie now taylor said that they used to hang out together and they used to get high together but also said he thinks she came from long island which is not what you say about girlfriend material but were good friends. And that's a fact in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight taylor landed a contract with apple records to record his debut album which means he was off to london to do some recording. Now taylor had three roommates that he left behind a new york. All of whom were also close too suzy's and it was while he was in london that suzanne committed suicide. Now i did see a reference to interview. Taylor did with a british magazine called petticoat which susie committed suicide. Because you've been put into an election. Sal and couldn't handle it but unfortunately i couldn't dig up the primary source and all the internet based sources they basically point to one another so i couldn't really determine if that part of it is true at any rate the roommates all knew about it but they didn't tell taylor because they didn't want to shake him up while he was working on this record as a result he didn't learn the news until he got back to new york and she had been dead for about six months

Suzanne Schnur Taylor James Taylor Susie New York City Long Island London Suzy Suzanne Apple New York
The History of Animal Trials

Your Brain on Facts

07:16 min | 4 months ago

The History of Animal Trials

"According to author ep evans in the criminal persecution and capital punishment of animals. There were two types of animal. Trials are strengthen and their process. Their straw phin were for capital crimes. Which would warrant the death penalty. I e homicide usually committed by pigs horses and other larger domesticated animals which were presided. Over by a secular tribunal. Their processor were judicial proceedings in ecclesiastical courts against vermin like rats mice locusts and weevils the object being to spell the vermin from the orchards. Vineyards and croplands. They were eating by means of exile extra schism or excommunication in sixteen fifty. Four sentences were handed down against of locusts in a spanish obvious. Santamaria the last sentence calling for the locusts excommunication and in order for them to leave the region in the next fourteen hours bishop alonzo de madrid excommunicated another plague of locusts condemning them to confinement in a cave and a bishop in cordova excommunicated a flock of swallows that had set up shop inside their parish. These were at best here. Eric victories just to make the people feel better. While evans's book lists nearly two hundred such cases the animals in their process cases never really seemed bothered by the ruling domestic animals. Barely listen to us. What do we expect. The wild wants to do either way. It was thought to be important that the animals have day in court. Why not just exterminate the offending critters. We're pretty good at that. Since even weevils and rats were considered god's creatures the destruction they caused must also have been part of the plan so destroying them would be an act against god's will but if the animals were tried in a church court and excommunicated or otherwise condemned then it was kind of okay for example in the fourteen eighties. The cardinal bishop of autun in france ruled against some slugs that were ruining the estate grounds under his purview. Ordered that for three days announcements be made to the slugs that they were to leave the area or be cursed. They didn't leave so it was game on for the gardeners to get rid of them. On purely legal side of things were the cases against livestock typically for murder. Apparently pigs are just mad for murder at least when it comes to humans and most cases involved them eating the victim whole or in part. This was a time when both animals and children might freely roam through fields and streets and accidents did happen. Pigs may not eat everything as people think but they will taste everything and god help you. If they find out your made of meat it reminds me of a bit from zora. Neale hurston story where the family sow gets into the kitchen where toddlers zora is alone and her mother panics. Even though the sal was less interested in eating. Mrs hurston baby than the other way around evans describes one fairly typical case from thirteen. Seventy nine in which two herds of swine were feeding together. When suddenly three pigs became agitated and charged the swine. Master's son who died from his injuries. All of the pigs from both herds were tried and fort after due process of law were condemned to death on appeal. All but the three instigating piggies were later pardoned. The courts really do seem to have put effort to try animals in the same way they would humans which is less woke than it. Sounds when you remember how readily the death sentence was handed out in those days. I've never tried to hang a pig. But given their incredibly muscular necks. I imagine it doesn't go easily. Also high ranking in the crimes animals could be charged with was bestiality. Although those cases were usually known to go in the animals favor both the human and the animal might be put to death but sometimes the case could be made that the animal was not at fault as it didn't consent to participate in the act so it wasn't punished if they were convicted. The animal might actually be imprisoned with the human who got them in the mess in the first place. In those cases the owner of the animal was charged for the animals care and feeding as a sort of second hand punishment for as much as. I'd like to say that animal. Trials are brutish fossil symbolic of a decayed era gratefully forgotten and i've got stickers for anyone who can identify that movie quote without googling it cases persistently pop up even in more recent times in tennessee in nineteen sixteen. An elephant named. Mary murdered her trainer. The strangest verse of the cell block tango ever and was hanged with crane in nigeria. In two thousand nine a goat was arrested. After a mob of vigilantes told police it was a shape shifting car thief no word on how that case turned out of all the creatures critters and creepy crawlies that plagued late medieval france. None could hold a candle to the weevil ricochets artists not to be confused with the palmetto. Weevil rinca forests fabricius the largest weevil species. You might say are. Eras is the lesser of two evils. Working the first complaint against the insects was made by a group of grape growers in fifteen forty five which resulted in a proclamation for the public to atone for their sins in hopes that the weevils would leave and it worked a generation later though the weevils returned and the town was forced to take them to court lawyer. Antoine filial was appointed the weevils public defender after all. It's hard to carry cash in carapace. So they reason. The weevils wouldn't be able to pay for representation feel argued that his clients had been placed on earth by god along with the food that they needed to survive. And it wasn't the bugs fault at that food happened to belong to some local farmers. The prosecution who i will picture being played by sam waterston and his glorious eyebrows contended that animals are meant to be subordinate to man and the weevils towing the line. The villagers believed their sins. Brought the pests. But the pests were part of god's plan but but humans are supposed to have dominion over animals so they should be able to do with them as they darn well please this back and forth. Stalemate is the central theological paradox of animal trials. Maybe i'll recast the da as linus roache.

Ep Evans Straw Phin Bishop Alonzo De Madrid Zora Neale Hurston Evans Santamaria Mrs Hurston Cordova France Eric Weevil Rinca Master Antoine Filial Nigeria Tennessee Mary Sam Waterston Linus Roache
Hebrew At American Jewish Summer Camps With Sharon Avni, Sarah Bunin Benor, And Jonathan Krasner

Jewish History Matters

04:57 min | 5 months ago

Hebrew At American Jewish Summer Camps With Sharon Avni, Sarah Bunin Benor, And Jonathan Krasner

"Hi sharon hi sarah. Hi jonathan welcome to the podcast. I'm so excited to be able to talk to you guys about this book. Hi jason i'm sarah buchanan. Nor thanks so much for having us. Hines the sharon me. It's really nice to be a part of this. And i'm jonathan crasner. Thank you guys so much. It's such an interesting book. Such a fascinating topic very specific topic. But it's one more. I think there's a lot of really interesting directions in which we can take it. You know talking about jewish camping talking about jewish languages talking about american jewish life. American jewish culture. Kind of broadly speaking. I think that that it might be really useful to actually start out where the book starts the hebrew spoken at jewish camps in the us. What you call cap. Hebrew english is not the same as vernacular hebrew which is spoken in modern day israel. So do you guys. Have you wanna comment about what this idea means to you. Is this language. And why is it important. In terms of understanding the dynamics of jewish culture jewish education and so on we went into camps and we started to hear and see the hebrew that was being used. We recognized immediately that it wasn't hebrew spoken in israel and that it was really a variety of language that was drawing from lots of different sources this variety however look these cam is really drawing for all sorts of histories and experiences and one of the things that we tried to tune in. The book was to trace these histories of cow. Hebrew found its way into american jewish camping. How it changed over time. Both in relation to the american jewish community was happening in the united states. Obviously with the establishment of state of israel. How the american. Jewish community reacted responded with its own relationship with hebrew and then bringing it into the modern times of what's happening today and so when you look at it across the trajectory we can see that this variety of this language really has a very specific meaning within the camp context in has rich cultural meaning for american cheats. I see cap hebrew in three whiz. I see at first and foremost as an insider language. These is a language that is understandable. Only people that are in the group. It's something that they share in common. It's a community building exercise if you will the creation and the dissemination of this language second is jewish language inspired by and it is definitely located with in a jewish context and third. It's zionist language. The decision to have a heavy iced english as opposed to. Yiddish is english or a latino english. That was a specific decision. It was a very conscious decision that was made early on. If you go back and you look at the early history of these camps and how this language was created the people who were invested in the creation of this language were zionists and they were looking to the project in palestine and inspired by it when they started speaking hebrew it now the listeners might be wondering what we're talking about when we're talking about camp. Henry is english. So i guess i should give an example in some camps you might have just jewish life words like they might say after beer cut. We're going to go straight to own egg. And those are words that you would hear outside of camp. In many jewish communal settings but many camps that are more to the right of the on the continuum of hebrew richness would have sentences that have a lot more hebrew words in them so they might say something like honey theme and module him go to the tach run for a lot era of now that has so many hebrew words that it really wouldn't be comprehensible to somebody who didn't go to a jewish summer camp that has a lot of hebrew words but note that it's still an english sentence in that the grammar and the function words are english right. They wouldn't use a full hebrew sentence at most camps and then even farther to the right on that continuum of hebrew richness. You have camps that do all of their announcements in hebrew and in some cases this is a hebrew that is mostly set phrases so they might just say something like guess share a mirage cadore saul Salim live bait knesset right so that they would be saying the name of a group and the place where they're supposed to go and people listening to that would just have to listen for the name of their group and the police. They're supposed to go. But then some camps have much more complex sentences in hebrew in their announcements and in other camp public language.

Sharon Hi Sarah Sarah Buchanan Jonathan Crasner Israel Hines Jonathan Jason United States Palestine Henry Saul Salim
Interview With Maz Saleem

TMV Podcast

05:54 min | 5 months ago

Interview With Maz Saleem

"Salama's like like you very much. Thank you both for for for joining me today. so like i was. We just said we recorded this. Podcast like two three years ago and we had some technical issues so we lost the entirety of the recording. Unfortunately so we're back for round two trying to do this again So thank you again. I guess for agreement comeback. We've had a few of these kinds of who issues in a few weeks and it's frustrating. You know we we get by right. So i guess to kick off with. I think the for context. When i came across your personal story and your father story specifically I was quite alarmed. The fact that this was like going back a few years. But i was alarmed at the fact that i hadn't come across it sooner. It wasn't more prominent in the kind of mainstream And there wasn't talk of this reference of this as a particular case of anti muslim terrorism that had taken place on uk soil. And i think what's again quite alarming is that i only stumbled across it because i was kind of researching and i was trying to prove a point in an article or something that was putting together and i saw this and then i kind of went down the rabbit hole of finding out more and it was just astonishing that i there was no prominence to this so i guess i assumed that a lot of people. Listen this may not have come across yourself or your father story. So would you be able to very briefly. Kind of recap what happened. And how your family's life change in two thousand and thirteen yes of course On the twenty. Nine april twenty thirteen. That's is going to a eight years This year My father mohammed. Salim was eighty two years old at the time and he praised at the local moisture which is green mustard which is at the end of our street. And he's done that most of his life any praise at five times a day to day one so that dodge the mice jed back involve To read always press on this particular night He went to read his issue press and when he left the mosquera roundabout. Tim poston pm on this particular. Actually dad wasn't feeling great. Normally my uncle would does with him to the mosque and comes back and not nine. My uncle had some relatives so he basically said oh. I have to go home with you. Go don't worry i'll walk. You know because he's just not far as just at the end of our road and On this night my phone was followed home and know on the cc tv at one who lives on a street. Not many people will have double glazing. They can hear dot because he's not normally walking in the middle of the road because he's a quiet coup de sac area on these guys walking steak and he's normally hitting a code cannell something on the street and this particular night you can notice on the tv's walking quite fast. And then he crosses over the road to the school gate and he was basically funded home By a neo. Nazi called pablo up shane. Who'd only been in the country for five days and who got british sponsorship. He shook behind. Firstly of the british ambassador. In ukraine then go sponsorships small eve the predominantly muslim area and lived on the premises of dell com-. He followed my father home and this nine stabbed him to death from behind And then he went on a three month bombing campaign air and bombs side now bombed that saw three mosques in also over rampton tipton. This was one of the biggest oxyde terrorism on uk. So yet today your board explained now. Many people have heard the media have played down you know. At the time you know a doug's stanford they. We were prime suspects. That's how how disgusting. A was west midlands. Police say they treated our family. The came to our house and they told his record italian descent. A racist tunc. A we said you know. How can you tell us. It's not racist attack. You know tried to. They look to every other motivated by hate. Crime was never possible motive and you know we were suspects in this case as well and was quite disgusting because he had they not called pablo and we're ready to pin this on one of one of my family members. That's how reporting west midlands. Police were the way they treated us. than they were suspects united muslim household when doing source. You know when you'll pay no respects. Men and women are segregated. They had a male Family liaison officer. Googly is just standing there staring. All of us are looking at us. Like it was us and i do understand. The case is quite high number cases where certain cases off family related. When this particular circumstances they weren't and we made that playoffs and Yeah we had a very challenging time with west midlands police and yeah. We went back to taking complaints seriously. And prior to this six months earlier die My brothers jim who's got jim. Montcalm derided was receiving frightening letters from the house. If you don't close your terrorist jim. Because predominant muslims go there You just wait. What would happen and a lot of these letters. Were going out in the area. We showed those to the place. Could it be linked. But they didn't take any seriously and then six months later for the was murdered and this neo nazi was known neo nazi in ukraine. He's dip retort which add and again. He was making open pound bombs air in the forest. So no neo. Nazi get to british sponsorship counterterrorism. How degree allow these nazis into the country.

Tim Poston Salama Salim Rampton Tipton Pablo JED UK Mohammed West Midlands Shane Ukraine Dell Doug Googly JIM West Midlands Police Montcalm
From Australia to Canada, how Indigenous people are coping with isolation one year into the pandemic

Unreserved

04:27 min | 5 months ago

From Australia to Canada, how Indigenous people are coping with isolation one year into the pandemic

"It has been almost a year since the covid. Nineteen outbreak was declared a pandemic. it's an anniversary. I'm sure many of us are not too happy to celebrate. This year has been a real challenge in the pandemic has fundamentally changed our lives but many folks have found ways to not let isolation get the best of them. I know so many people out there all around the north. Were ready to support you. I think a good storyteller reminds you that all storms pass. We've been here before but we can help to route at resilience and make them more aware of how strong young folks are this week. Unreserved how indigenous people are turning to digital communities storytelling and culture feel connected to squash those isolation blues cleo denny writer richard van camp has essentially been on a one book a year pace for two decades his latest called gathered share some secrets to great storytelling and it includes seven stories. Elders from his community have shared with him. Richard is here with us now to talk about his new book and how storytelling can help fight and banished loneliness especially during this pandemic. he joins me now from edmonton. Welcome back to the show. Richard musi cho- feeling sal. My see my friends thank you. So let's party. yes let's party. So can you tell us about your latest book gather. Oh thank you. Must he chose so. Gather really an exploration of my journey as a storyteller. For those of you. Who don't know my name. Is richard van camp. I m c show denny. I was born and raised in fort. Smith northwest territories treaty. Eight country goes born in nineteen. Seventy one and i was raised in a town. It was. It's the maty capital of the northwest territories if it's paradise schwartzman throws territories officially quadri-lingual so bush cre- dna a french and english spoken at any given time. And when i graduated from high school i ran. I went from hero to zero. Because i had no idea what i wanted to do. No idea at all. I wanted to be a break dancer. I wanted to be a minjah. i was nineteen. I had a mullet. Some pinch hickeys. And i actually had a real existential crisis. I had a midlife crisis at nineteen. Cause i was like what am i gonna do. Who am i supposed to be. And i saw that. They were looking for drivers for the handy bus. They were looking for volunteers. And when i saw that on the green screen in fort smith northwest actors. The bango channel. I realized that that was what i was going to do. I was going to volunteer. I'll start driving the elders around. Because i was a really good canadian. Really good treaty indian. I was a really good person. I was a former. But i was a really poor ki- chou denny. I didn't know anything about our language. I knew a little bit of butter culture through our mother. But you know i was so busy having fun growing up by what i realized when i showed up to begin my apprenticeship as a handy bus driver in fort smith northwest territories to the matriarchs to the lighthouses to the mama. Bear's portsmouth arthritis territories. And i'm talking about irene centers. Dora toronto seraphine evans. Emilia gate tricks. I'm talking about the sweethearts of our community. They could see right away. That i was a really hollow indigenous person culturally and that i was searching and they took me under their wings and it was bingo runs. Hospital runs medical runs. It was trips to cancers in the northern store and trips to the landslide to watch the pelicans return it was through those driving shuttling and careering the royalty of our community wherever they wanted to be that they started sharing their stories with me so gather is really about what i learned. The smartest thing. I ever did belan was i realized a few months into apprenticeship as the handy bus driver. Fort smith risk territories. No one was recording our elders. Nobody because the mistake we make as we think everybody is going to be here forever. And so i remember explicitly having this. Oh my god. If i don't record our elders and get these stories downs. I think we're going to. We're not gonna have this opportunity my message with gatherings. Don't wait to record your heroes. Honor them now.

Richard Van Camp Cleo Denny Richard Musi Cho Quadri Fort Smith Chou Denny Schwartzman Edmonton Denny Dora Toronto Seraphine Evans Richard Fort Smith Bush Belan Arthritis Cancers
Suspect in metro Atlanta student’s death surrenders

Atlanta's Morning News

00:18 sec | 5 months ago

Suspect in metro Atlanta student’s death surrenders

"Of concealing a death and contributing to the delinquency of a minor after a 16 year old girl is found dead on Valentine's Day. Do not disclose house Salim's connected to John's Creek High School. Junior Carly Brooke Jackson. He may be in court today. The Henry County sheriff is taking this one personally because I'm going CERN. This is Henry County's most

John's Creek High School Carly Brooke Jackson Salim Valentine Henry County Cern
UNs education agency lauds worlds most exceptional teacher

UN News

03:03 min | 5 months ago

UNs education agency lauds worlds most exceptional teacher

"This extraordinary teacher even had a hand in helping to call off underage marriages speaking to you and newses anshu sharma. Mr de sal began by telling her what it means for him to have received this accolade a group this aboard lot of to my students. It's all about celebrating their success and at the same time this award means to teaching community as well because it shines light on teaching governor and it gives them other spec that they did so. It's not just about me. But i android budgeting. Who teaching in teaching committee had crossed the ball. So just talking about the moment i still remember the day told of december twenty and will win mr stupid Announced by name. And i think might know late. You might have seen that reaction. And i was very humble and i hope express methods so with excite winded fully loaded excitement. I just had my mom. It's a proud moment. Pull me as relates is like lifetime to to me. I never imagined to become up posing the individual who will become the global teacher prize else about your journey. How did you start as a teacher. Then how did you reach this milestone. you know. I never dreamed near-total becoming a teacher. I suppose to be in engineering. It's it's what my dream and my biggest fan of taking this inside food. And i decided to go to the mike In the technology. P i did started michael jordan. Engine in deal in in During college but had to leave it off. I went back to home with. I was ready to defrays. Toddler would detail who don't mean yet to advise me rented why. Why don't you go joining So i went there the train college and they're is realize what teachers can't do. The teachers destroying college had painted pure bass hitting me and change me throughout just experiencing that change. I thought of. I don't change the life of students so this is how i become a teacher. After completing bachelor's degree there in the teaser Go meant abundant me. The teacher in deliberations with And a stupid remember the day one well pupil january two thousand nine and i bendon and mice would put me to my classmates visit your classroom and i just looked at it. I was really shocked. I say so. I'm sure he said yes. This missile glossop rancid. So it's looked like cattle sit classroom. Twenty procedural looks like

Anshu Sharma Mr De Sal Michael Jordan
South Africa suspends use of AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine after it fails to clearly stop virus variant

1A

00:31 sec | 5 months ago

South Africa suspends use of AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine after it fails to clearly stop virus variant

"South Africa announced it was suspending its rollout of the AstraZeneca Corona virus vaccine. A small clinical trial revealed the shot provided on Lee minimal protection from the virus variant that's widely circulating in the country. Professor Salim Abdul Karim, co chair South Africa's Ministerial Advisory Committee on covert 19. We don't want to end up with a situation where we vaccinated Million people are too many people with a vaccine that may not be effective in preventing hospitalization and severe disease.

South Africa Professor Salim Abdul Karim Ministerial Advisory Committee LEE Severe Disease
South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine rollout

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:57 min | 6 months ago

South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine rollout

"South africa has halted its rollout of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine just a week after the country received. Its first million doses. It seems the vaccine offers limited protection against a new variant of the corona virus. That's now dominant in the country. Salim abdul karim co-chair of south africa's ministerial advisory committee on covid nineteen spoke to a world health organization briefing yesterday. We don't want to end up with a situation where we vaccinated million people too. Many people would have vaccine that may not be effective in preventing hospitalization and severe disease in total more than one point. Two billion corona virus doses have been allocated for the continent. But it's not clear when all those jobs will arrive. The longer any region remains unvaccinated. The greater the chance that more variants arise vaccines though can be tweaked in a formulation of the oxford vaccine targeted at the south african variant could be going into arms by autumn. What scientists cannot address is the long run damage to africa both in human and economic terms so far continent to have been spared from the worst case scenarios predicted early on in the pandemic but the longer term picture remains bleak many ways the impact of the pandemic and africa is worse than it appears on the surface around the official numbers. Kenley salmon is one of our africa correspondent based in dakar. It is the case that having a young population has to some extent protected the continent from the virus africans and died from it that americans europeans but the true scott of infection. Death is really hard to gauge. Studying sudan recently showed the perhaps only two percent of all the covid desk for a quoted in the official tally and the economic impact is worse than it looks last year. The region's economy shrank for the first time. In twenty five years tourism has been badly hit as have commodity exporters things like oil in nigeria and taken together. Gdp per capita fell below twenty ten levels last year so things are perhaps not quite as bad as some other parts the world but certainly still very tough and things may get tougher house. What are the particular challenges to africa. Africa faces quite a number of challenges in the next few years as it tries to recover from the pandemic but the biggest i of the really is vaccines. Some african governments have perhaps failed to grasp the urgency of the situation in tanzania for example the populace president john food even casually cast out with a vaccine work but i do forgive aside claiming the postman precautions such as steaming nation were better than vaccines and even added that if the white man was able to come up with next nations then. Vaccinations for aids. Malaria and cancer would have already been found. So it's not so much a question than of supply. I mean given that quite a few vaccines have been essentially booked at the stage. A number of vaccines have been booked but the big question is when will they arrive because right now there aren't anywhere near the number of axes required forever on in the world and rich countries are of course the front of the queue for those vaccines have been produced africa's going to need perhaps two point six billion doses to vaccinate everyone and those are not being made locally so they have to rely on supplies elsewhere for the moment so that means joining the queue. All this means that whereas rich countries aim to vaccinate most of their people by the middle of this year the african. cdc a public health. Bali in africa's aiming for sixty percent of africans to vaccinated by the end of next year. But even that may be too optimistic. For the poorest countries. The economist intelligence unit sister organization estimates that in most african countries most people will not be inoculated until mid twenty twenty three or even early twenty twenty four and there must be serious consequences of it being that long until the continent is on average vaccinated. Africa is likely. It doesn't get those vaccinations into suffer. Further waves of the infection while after the disease may have amped in the rich world. And that of course will cause more death and more suffering. Doesn't risk that. Having the virus transmitting between people frequently africa could allow new variance to evolve. We've already got the south. African variant and these new variants could endanger people even in rich countries if they prove to be resistant to vaccines and then finally of course not having vaccines could force. African policymakers to continue with these very difficult economic lockdowns curfews even after many other countries around the world set free of those kinds of restrictions and if the public health concern lasts that long then surely the economic concerns will last at least that long. That's right in many african countries facing pretty severe crises at the moment just getting finance to pay their bills. Africa has very limited fiscal space on average countries in sub saharan africa. Spending more than thirty cents on every dollar. They raise and text revenue paying their debts. And that's up from twenty cents on the dollar before the pandemic on the debt side to over half of low income sub saharan african countries are now classed as in distress or at high risk of distress. According to the imf and what about countries with bigger economies the two biggest economies in africa nigeria and south ever both in pretty deep trouble nigeria for example was described by the world. Bank is being an unprecedented crisis. Recently the bank is not normally quite so blunt in nigeria. There has been a legacy of management for a number of years and pandemics really accessible that quite badly. Now focused suggested by twenty twenty three. Gdp per capita may go back as low as it was in one thousand nine hundred eighty time when the oil price was some high on so africa too is in trouble that have been in recession twice in the last three years before the pandemic hit of course now is dribbling itself with a particularly heavy toll from the pandemic so both countries in fact are facing a difficult road out of the crisis. And what about outside help in terms of financing has been quite a bit of outside help although the crisis of course is very big but in twenty twenty the imf for example provided sixteen billion dollars in loans most of that came with relatively few strings attached and this help frigging countries to respond to the pandemic to avoid some of the liquidity crises that were looming the world bank also dispersed another ten billion but many countries got that funding to if the imf under emergency allocations that came quickly and relatively easily and those allocations for many countries will soon be exhausted. The rich world has been trying to help when it comes to debt. They've provided liquidity to countries through some bits of suspension initiative that basically allows poor countries to put off debt repayments until july. Twenty twenty one. This is of course helpful but the trouble is that those payments just suspended and they have to be paid back with interest in about five years time so as the chief economist for africa the world bank put it to us. It may just be kicking the can down the road to. How do you see this playing out. Then how high could the human cost of all this be while the stakes are pretty high. The pandemic has already done lower damage to people's health and africa. it's hitting their economic prospects and they wealth and it's also affecting education of course. Hundreds of millions of students in africa have been affected by school closures. This increases the risk of dropouts and reduces the prospects for africa's largest every generation so overall the costs here really quite significant. There are some reasons for optimism. We may see vaccine rollouts accelerate. There's also hopes that commodity price rises could give africa real boost as the global economy recovers been on balance. The evidence probably points to at pretty difficult road ahead with several more waves of the virus hitting already struggling health systems and perhaps a form of economic long covert in africa. So you know africans have come through this showing remarkable resilience but it may be toughest years are still to come in. Thank you very much for joining us. thank you

Africa Salim Abdul Karim Co Ministerial Advisory Committee Kenley Salmon Nigeria Oxford South Africa John Food Astrazeneca Dakar Saharan Africa IMF Sudan Tanzania Malaria CDC
Intermittent Fasting for Menopause with Marcelle Pick

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

05:43 min | 6 months ago

Intermittent Fasting for Menopause with Marcelle Pick

"Welcome everybody to the fasting. Transformation summit rear uncovering the most inexpensive and powerful healing strategy known to mankind. We are talking about fasting. And i'm your host. Dr david shockers and in today's interview. I'm really going to be talking to women who are going through menopause. Maybe peri menopause period of time before menopause. Or perhaps you're younger and you're thinking you've heard horror stories about menopause and you are be prepared. We're going to be seeking directly you and perhaps your man out there and you're married to my going through menopause. this is gonna be beneficial for you. just how how understand what menopause is. We're gonna talk about basically what happens with our female hormones during this period of time of life and lifestyle strategies that can help ease symptoms and help improve the this life Life transition As you get older and have this kind of change up in your hormones recourse. we're gonna copper. How fasting can play a role in adding best strategies fasting. So because it's topic was so important. I reached out to my good friend and literally world expert in this topic. Dr marcel pick and dr marcel co-founded the world renowned women to women clinic in one thousand nine three with the vision and not only treat illness but also helps support her patients who proactively making healthier choices to prevent disease. She successfully treated thousands of individuals three unique approach to wellness and then in two thousand one. Marcel created marcel. Pick dot com great website. They can go check out and her goal is able to reach inspire and educate even more women. Worldwide website offers informative articles on women's health issues natural solutions to some of the most troublesome symptoms experienced today. Marcel also discovered functional medicine very early early adopter in functional medicine movement was honored to be one of the first that he certifies functional masters titian. She's written a bunch of books including the core balanced diet. Is it near my adrenals. And is it me or my hormones create great titles by the way and so these books have been been read by millions of people around world. Made a incredible impact on helping house armor sal. Thanks so much for joining us. Here on doc- transformation summit. Thanks for having me. I feel like. I have loud information to share. Can't wait to get started. Yeah absolutely. I'm really excited. You know we talked. I was sure where your experience with was with. Fasting was many. Let me know how this is something that you practice in something that you recommended and saw really excited to bring you on the summit's region guy deep into menopause obviously about fasting and how can impacted. Let's start with your story though. And i and how you really got into natural health So probably don't even know this. I was born in australia. I grew up in the outback. And i spent a lot of my time with the aborigines. Knee aboriginal caves very early age. I was surrounded by natural and natural medicine and then came to america. One eleven on after having been exposed to know cars. We didn't have toilet. I i should tell that really different kinks america and my parents are both holocaust survivors. They were from europe so we never did a lot of the conventional ways of eating to begin with and from a. You're young time. I knew that i was very interested in going into alternative medicine. I went to a program with harvard. Medical school nurse practitioner. Actually and boston college. Because i knew then i needed have a standard had to do research. Look at double blind placebo. Controlled studies also understand. Where does the notion of nutrient come into play and we started women. Two women in nineteen eighty-five before anybody was doing any alternative medicine. We were the first all women practice in the state of maine. No one had done functional medicine or anything like it in the state of maine and we were equal partners. Md nurse practitioners. so we. I've been on this trail for a long time understanding that if we educate women in particular about their biochemistry in their health and start to understand. What's upstream we will be healthy no matter what age in our medical system now says many times. Here's the drug will get you better well. It doesn't get you better. It takes his symptoms away and oftentimes makes worst symptoms on the other side. So i'm passionate about this. I love what i do. And my goal is to change as many women's lives as i can with information data and also the supportive things like internet investing. Yeah you're definitely making a huge impact your books your website. Everything at you're doing so let's talk about menopause. What is menopause happening with. Female hormones during that stage. What kind of symptoms do many women experiences. They go through a loss you know. It's interesting many years ago. If you'd come to me as a patient the symptoms would have been flashes. Night sweats getting some way. What i see now more than ever before his anxiety. Applications abnormal weight gain an absolute frustration with their body. Many times. they'll come in say. My body's deceiving me. What the hell happened. I feel like a train wreck under depressed can't sleep Hot flashes. I don't have a sex drive anymore. gamal dried up. What the hell

Dr David Shockers Dr Marcel Pick Dr Marcel Co World Renowned Women To Women Marcel America Maine Boston College Medical School Australia Harvard Europe Gamal
The 3 Stages of your Selling Skills Development

Ag Sales Professional's Podcast by Greg Martinelli

09:35 min | 6 months ago

The 3 Stages of your Selling Skills Development

"Today we're talking about the three stages of developing in sales specifically selling skills and most salespeople stop at either stage one or they fall victim to stage three point five in previous articles we cover the journey segments of a sales career in a four part series. I went through the life and times of the early years all the way through to the later years of a sales career. He can go back and look for the blog titled the life and times of an egg sales professional their early years and so on so forth. Today we cover the selling skills development stages these are how you learned to sell learn to manage a territory learn to become a positive brand new. Your customers and ultimately remain top of mind as the go-to salesperson in your market will stage one. Is the basics this. This is hard skills. It's the beginning the bread and butter the basic training course on sale. This is getting your bachelor's degree in selling skills in the stage you learn how to connect with customers. Ask questions present on your products and finally asked for the sale. Most of us have been to one or several of these courses. They are engaging for sure for the new salesperson as they find out that there's an actual process to selling which they can go through to help them. Sal now the majority of this development stages designed around what to do rate when you get in front of a customer and that's pretty important you got to know that in order to continue to sell. Everybody knows how to drive their vehicle out to the customer and meet them now. You need to know. What do you do from the minute you get out of your truck and start talking to your customer. When the last thirty years. I've been through about a dozen of these programs and a facilitated hundreds of them they're great. They're a requirement while engaging for a newcomer they can seem repetitive to an experienced sales person especially the person as an instructor but they are a great refresher each time. You go through them. And you hear new ways to understand the old basics. Here's an interesting thing. Often sales people think they will attend a course like this and learn some revolutionary way. That no one else knows no one else out. There knows the trouble is that selling steps are a fairly old concept. And they're all based on the same or similar staps. This stage is really the you gotta look at this. Stage is like the anti-gay it into the selling game. I'd like for you to look at it as just as described. Bootcamp your bachelors. Do your stage one in your development now if you want to be just a little better than the average sales person out there tune in to stage one point five and that is time and territory management. I've written a couple articles. Call the number one and number two salesperson killer and you can go in there and google and you'll find those articles they're great. The number one and number two sales person killer is not the steps of the selling process. It's disorganization and calling on the wrong accounts. Both of these are fundamentals of time and territory management and the problem is that few sales training courses ever discuss these topics as a salesperson. We are left to figure it out on our own. Give us the keys to the territory so to speak to a pick and keys to a territory or the assumption is that we will interrupt our very busy sales manager and ask her. Hey what should i do next. Or who should i call on today. You know that's just not going to happen. We're not gonna stop and ask for help like that. We office from our homes even more now since the pandemic so we wake up take a guess as to who should go see and then turn right or turn left out of the driveway for the day and i know many of you just like i did got to. The top of the drive win said flip a coin. I don't know let's go right today or we go see the accounts we haven't been to in a while or the accounts that have been complaining recently. Kind of the squeaky wheel. Well let's move on to stage two and that is what we call the soft skills and i like to call him the essential skills to that sounds better. We're getting now into the best part of selling and developing yourself in your role. The essential selling skills are often mislabeled. Like i said as soft skills as if their easy the soft really means that they don't have hard and fast measurements however they are the most important for long term success in your agribusiness territory. These skill separate the sales person from the day to day weekly or monthly selling process to that of the trusted adviser very important. Step the salesperson. Who goes out and does their job of asking questions and presenting on their products and then closing sale. Will they'll have success. you know. rinse and repeat. Keep doing it keep doing it. Keep doing it. You'll have success however they will also get price shopped and they're gonna fight the feature benefit comparisons that customers are constantly doing by applying the essential selling skills. You can begin the transformation from vendor to trusted adviser now. This doesn't remove all price resistance nor does it combat all objections however it does tip the scales in your favor. A question is how much or how many dollars connect charge from my tractor versus the next competitor. Mike seed variety versus the next competitor. Well that's a great question. One that i spent a lot of time discovering with sales people in workshops and coaching discussions and as always it depends. It depends on how much you can differentiate. How much value do you bring. Your customer and value is in the terms of dollars time or emotional impact. That's the only three things that you can provide of value to your customer. It's either you save a money making money save time make them time or you have a emotional impact. You reduce frustrations you increase Happiness or you reduce risk. Whatever the case is so what are some of the essential selling skills out there that you need to develop communication empathy teamwork interpersonal skills work in problem solving flexibility continuous improvement and finally leadership. There's others i'm sure. But those are some of the key ones that i like to think about as i work with developing sales people and how to go from vendor to trusted adviser as you can see. They're tough to measure and tough to determine how important any one of them is over the other however they are learnable and they developed over a lifetime career in sales the struggle is that nobody really teaches them specifically and speeds up that learning process. So that's what i want you to do. Speed up the learning process on the essential. Selling skills will you can also of see that no matter how good you are at asking good questions inclosing or using the right words in your closing the hard skills if you lack some of these essential skills. You're not going to sell customer for very long. You might get a sale but it might be the last one you get ultimately these to develop in stages lead to you becoming a brand so stage three. Is i want you to think about your development as you becoming a brand in a recent training session a salesperson in the group i was talking about prosperity. He stated that if the prospect doesn't buy from him on the first call he moves on and does not return. What i. I had a lot of doubts on this and i started a challenge. Does that's not normally the case. We have to call people out no three four ten twenty times sometimes in order to get them to buy from us so some discussion. It turns out that this sales person has been selling in his market for over twenty years the customers he works with have some of the highest production yields on their hurt so this salesman's local brand image is so high that he only works with the big herds who know him you know. He is filled the his territory and only takes on a few new customers. So if you are a prospect and you wanna work with him you need inside pretty quickly now. This is a unique situation. And i had to challenge that you know. It's it's an example of the highest form of a personal buran. He is very well known and people prefer to work with him. I'm sure it didn't happen. Overnight in this salesperson goes above and beyond for his customers and the reward comes in the form of excellent referrals and customers who value every chance to work with him to important concepts to keep in. Mind when you think about your personal brand number one. You do have a personal brand. Yes you have a company brand and a you know maybe a manufacturer's brand but you also have a personal brand to your customers. And i describe it as what it's like to do business with you specifically you your customers form this brand of you in their mind over the years as they work with you. Let me share a few personal brand images of sales people that might be out there first of all helpful to talkative. See him when there's a sale stops by with no real purpose driven to do what's best for me well connected in the industry. She's my go-to person when something goes wrong. Talks and talks but never delivers on the talk old school. But we've done business with him for so long. Those are some examples of brand images that customers may have of you. Secondly it's important to keep in mind that your customer owns the brand of you. Yes that's right you can. You can and you should do allow positive steps to develop your brand. But they actually own their

SAL Google Mike
"salim" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

04:50 min | 6 months ago

"salim" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

"For. You guys started this business. Goal casts really really recently. And you've got an so good so fast that justin bieber's agent scooter braun braun. Lebron's the guy who's responsible for some of the most viral music videos in the world. He's the man who basically created justin bieber and he said these guys are some of the best and most masterful storyteller he's ever met. There's a funny story. There actually go ahead and scooter wants me to share this. But when we were filming his video for goal cast we were telling him no. Do this or say that story again or focus on this and at one point he just turned us. Zych like guys. Do you know. I make the most viral videos on the internet. And we're like. Yeah but you've never made a goal cast video. This is different and he just looked at us and he was really pissed. And he's like guys. I brought justin bieber look up videos like it has two billion views on youtube. Stand down and all that and then we just to our guns. were like. Listen if you wanna make a goal video we know what works with our audience. We know what works on facebook. Like you have to tell the story your way. And then what happened is that she then went along with it and video when we released it to him before we posted it. He called me up and he's like guys really. This is amazing. I've never tried to my own video. And i was crying watching video psych. Good thing you guys in listen to me and most people usually listen to me and you guys just stuck to your guns just reminded me of the amazing. That's really proud of you guys. How long ago did you start bowl. Cast for three years ago. Three years ago awesome and so three years. That's how you can get in three years. How many fans you have right now. More than thirty million across all social networks in three years three years. Yeah that's incredible. Please give them around of applause. Sa- break it down for us. And i want you to break it down for a step-by-step in a rap with a frenchaccent norm kid. What's going on what was going on in that rock. Thomas video works so well. How did that get eighty million views. I would start by saying that what we try to establish his four thinks it's credibility authenticity right sympathy and then relayed ability. I see you guys writing down some credibility that authenticity sympathy and reliability and ability. Yeah awesome rhyme. Oh yeah. I didn't even know so he can do it in a wrap. Your those things usually a lot of speakers. All storytellers usually focus on the credibility. Part if you notice and what we try to do is actually focus on the three others because people a lot of people already have the credibility part really down and one really good trick one. Good way to have all three at once is to be vulnerable so think about it. You know you have authenticity. if you're vulnerable. Authenticity is basically being yourself shawn stevenson. Just talked about that right like if you share. Something vulnerable yourself. You're instantly yourself right. Sympathy sympathy. Is people feeling what you're feeling right. People have to feel in your shoes and when you say something like as an example i went to talk to that girl and she broke my heart bright. If i share it with someone than instantly you feel those three things. And then you can relate also the third part relating. Is you going back to a story in your life that relates to what i just shared with you and that instantly makes us feel connected. And that's what we try to do with our videos. That's brilliantly said. Could you state those three things again for people who are taking no yes. Authenticity sympathy and reliability authenticity sympathy and relate ability. Could you go more into sympathy and reliability. Yeah sympathy and reliability to us. We try to do with both at the same time. Sympathy to us is a lot about the feeling. It's a lot about feeling the same emotion as a speaker or somebody in movies. They do that too right. You feeling the same emotion as a person going through it. If you notice alexei the rock thomas video. We do that in subtle ways as well. There's a part where his father screams at him. And then you see the kid starting to cry that is sympathy because when we show an image of a kid crying. You'd bloody feel you didn't need to have the same experience to feel that because we show an image of a kid crying you can feel it so related to the other side really ability. Is you thinking about a time which your own father. Maybe where you felt the same way. So that's how would differentiate it.

justin bieber youtube facebook two billion views one point
How Goalcast Creates Viral Videos With Salim Sader And Cyrus Gorjipour

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

04:50 min | 6 months ago

How Goalcast Creates Viral Videos With Salim Sader And Cyrus Gorjipour

"For. You guys started this business. Goal casts really really recently. And you've got an so good so fast that justin bieber's agent scooter braun braun. Lebron's the guy who's responsible for some of the most viral music videos in the world. He's the man who basically created justin bieber and he said these guys are some of the best and most masterful storyteller he's ever met. There's a funny story. There actually go ahead and scooter wants me to share this. But when we were filming his video for goal cast we were telling him no. Do this or say that story again or focus on this and at one point he just turned us. Zych like guys. Do you know. I make the most viral videos on the internet. And we're like. Yeah but you've never made a goal cast video. This is different and he just looked at us and he was really pissed. And he's like guys. I brought justin bieber look up videos like it has two billion views on youtube. Stand down and all that and then we just to our guns. were like. Listen if you wanna make a goal video we know what works with our audience. We know what works on facebook. Like you have to tell the story your way. And then what happened is that she then went along with it and video when we released it to him before we posted it. He called me up and he's like guys really. This is amazing. I've never tried to my own video. And i was crying watching video psych. Good thing you guys in listen to me and most people usually listen to me and you guys just stuck to your guns just reminded me of the amazing. That's really proud of you guys. How long ago did you start bowl. Cast for three years ago. Three years ago awesome and so three years. That's how you can get in three years. How many fans you have right now. More than thirty million across all social networks in three years three years. Yeah that's incredible. Please give them around of applause. Sa- break it down for us. And i want you to break it down for a step-by-step in a rap with a frenchaccent norm kid. What's going on what was going on in that rock. Thomas video works so well. How did that get eighty million views. I would start by saying that what we try to establish his four thinks it's credibility authenticity right sympathy and then relayed ability. I see you guys writing down some credibility that authenticity sympathy and reliability and ability. Yeah awesome rhyme. Oh yeah. I didn't even know so he can do it in a wrap. Your those things usually a lot of speakers. All storytellers usually focus on the credibility. Part if you notice and what we try to do is actually focus on the three others because people a lot of people already have the credibility part really down and one really good trick one. Good way to have all three at once is to be vulnerable so think about it. You know you have authenticity. if you're vulnerable. Authenticity is basically being yourself shawn stevenson. Just talked about that right like if you share. Something vulnerable yourself. You're instantly yourself right. Sympathy sympathy. Is people feeling what you're feeling right. People have to feel in your shoes and when you say something like as an example i went to talk to that girl and she broke my heart bright. If i share it with someone than instantly you feel those three things. And then you can relate also the third part relating. Is you going back to a story in your life that relates to what i just shared with you and that instantly makes us feel connected. And that's what we try to do with our videos. That's brilliantly said. Could you state those three things again for people who are taking no yes. Authenticity sympathy and reliability authenticity sympathy and relate ability. Could you go more into sympathy and reliability. Yeah sympathy and reliability to us. We try to do with both at the same time. Sympathy to us is a lot about the feeling. It's a lot about feeling the same emotion as a speaker or somebody in movies. They do that too right. You feeling the same emotion as a person going through it. If you notice alexei the rock thomas video. We do that in subtle ways as well. There's a part where his father screams at him. And then you see the kid starting to cry that is sympathy because when we show an image of a kid crying. You'd bloody feel you didn't need to have the same experience to feel that because we show an image of a kid crying you can feel it so related to the other side really ability. Is you thinking about a time which your own father. Maybe where you felt the same way. So that's how would differentiate it.

Justin Bieber Braun Braun Zych Lebron Shawn Stevenson Youtube Facebook Thomas Alexei
Philadelphia Eagles head coaching search tracker

Bleeding Green Nation

03:13 min | 6 months ago

Philadelphia Eagles head coaching search tracker

"Cody. Thanks for coming back on. I in the enemy man. How are you. I'm doing great great to be with you. I'm excited to talk some football absolutely and let's jump right in to the eagles. Coaching search here. Because more names get added to this list everyday to say that the eagles have cast a wide net would be understating it a little bit. You tweeted out. And i think it was either yesterday or today but as a recording. This on the fourteenth is was on the thirteenth. You tweeted out a whole list of names. We've got carolina offensive coordinator. Joe brady tennis offensive coordinator arthur smith san francisco defensive coordinator robert soleil tampa bay defensive coordinator. Todd bowles new england linebackers coach. John mayo kansas city quarterbacks coach mike kafka philadelphia assistant head coach do staley oklahoma head coach lincoln riley ohio state head coach ryan day. Cincinnati head. Coach luke fickle and more are coming each and every day and i know among eagles fans. You know we see this as a pretty dysfunctional team right now. We see this as an organization. That doesn't seem to know exactly what they're doing and we're skeptical as to whether or not a a really high profile coach is going to want to come here given the list of names here. Where are you at on this eagles. Coaching search as there really are just getting started right. Now yeah and we saw it just kellen more added today and obviously you know they're going to continue to cast the net and i think just in general. I think there's a little merit to the idea that you know when you compare openings. The eagles aren't A bursting with attraction just because of the situation. I mean Doug peterson clearly. If the reports are to be believed is is kind of worn down from from this run with eagles. And but i honestly don't put too much stock into this idea that they're undesirable because at the end of the day there's thirty two jobs. There's thirty two head. Coaching jobs in the nfl. We see guys in view with with teams like the jets and the jaguars every coaching cycle. Yes they sometimes have high picks so they sometimes have a lot of cap space but at the end of the day. It's nfl fell head coaching job. You can't tell me you know if you're joe brady and you're getting interest from all these teams. I mean you're not going to just not going to turn down the opportunity and so And eventually some of the spots are gonna get filled For me i mean i. I start for the eagles with looking at the offensive side of the ball. I know that's it's a big talking point. Jeffrey lurie with with you know really any eagles fan. That's been under or watching. Jeffey larry hires run. The team I i think really it comes down to are you going for You're gonna have to sacrifice somewhere. Because with somebody like joe brady even kellen moore. You're really banking on them. Being kind of an offensive mastermind and up and coming mastermind as opposed to this Person who's been around the league for years and respected and you know doug peterson even though he didn't have head coaching experience. Jeffrey loria himself talked about that emotional intelligence he talked about. Doug peterson former quarterback. In this league he had time under andy reid and so i. I think it's just a matter of where are they gonna sacrifice. Because if they go with robert. Sal the forty niners you're sacrificing. You might bring in a nice offensive coordinator with them but he may leave here for another head coaching job. And so what do they want. We're gonna find out.

Eagles Joe Brady Robert Soleil Todd Bowles John Mayo Doug Peterson Mike Kafka Lincoln Riley Ryan Day Coach Luke Fickle Arthur Smith Cody Tampa Bay Kellen Kansas City New England Cincinnati Football NFL Tennis
The Container Concept with Cas and Dawn

A Slob Comes Clean

05:40 min | 7 months ago

The Container Concept with Cas and Dawn

"I'm here with my friends. I can actually say that now. 'cause i know you guys like in real life my friends don and cast and i've already given my little spiel at the beginning before we're getting started but i just have to say that we had so much fun when we worked on this project. Take your house back which everybody can go find it. Take your house back dot com. It was just a lot of fun. Although i was just informed by both douyin casts that they had a lot of fun when i wasn't there so i'm choosing to not be hurt and offended by that as well. We did but more fun with you bear. Oh we would have liked to be there. I heard that you cried member. Didn't y'all say that all right there. I talk non stop and somehow i talked my way into my childhood issues and then i started sobbing port. Daud she's just like. I am not a therapist. Could you be quiet. Now i could. That's just me. And then that's on film because i want to hear the whole okay. We won't make you do it today but okay. So why don't you guys go ahead and introduce yourself and just kind of tell us what you do online and then we'll get into your own personal slob story don when she while. I'm dawn from the minimum. If we haven't met before. I married to tom. We have four kids ages. Six through eleven. Now and iphone minimalism about six years ago. Because i you know. I just felt like there had to be a way to stay on top of your house and still like pursue some kind of outside either happier working right. I'm when they're just has to be away. And so i was just trying. I was just trying everything. And finally i listened to a podcast by joshua becker who is a well known west end. He's just like did you know you don't have to have all of this stuff like that. Was my lightbulb moment. And he went on to give permission to get rid of it. And i pretty easy sal. Like i'm not gonna lie about that. And so i'm always like well. You don't have anything to lose so Next year we got rid of about eighty percent of our stuff. I did not invite tom into the process until i was about. Seventy percent of an is focused on my own stuff in the kids staff But i couldn't believe how it transformed our house and it truly made it a place where i could keep it picked up and stay on top of it still feel like i was doing a good job as a mom and get to start a blog and do some of that stuff that i was interested in and so now out on youtube inci luxury and videos to With just tips and tricks to help you. Simplify your house quickly. Got to read. Dina's book this past summer With another group of women and as we dissolve to cutting at the speed of light. We're to salt lake. This woman gets it and we had so many of the same ideas. I have some different terms for them. But i felt like we could be best friends and just felt like i finally got someone else who the normal systems didn't work for me in. Identify ordina dana. Either so i thought we could be friends and that's how we ended up. Actually we ended up meeting. We're at a conference a year ago. Yup you're ish ago. Something like that. A fault fall of nine. And we're in a took a random picture. And i put it on instagram and people were like oh my goodness. It's the two of you altogether and we were like who. Who are you talking about. I don't even who. Yeah you are with dana for us outcomes clean like and i had to look up and see which one you that was me too. I was like what are you talking about like like i should know this anyway. That's how we ended up. Connecting was was my listeners. Your youtube watchers saying you two are my favorite people and the other person that i hear about all the time from my listeners. And my readers casts. Hi thanks for having me. I'm cast from clutter bug on the mom of three kids. My oldest is fourteen which makes me feel so old and then my middle is twelve and my little guy is eight and my story sounds so much like both of your stories. I was always a messy person. I mean i was that kid who had rotten food my desk at school. I was the kid who's locker was filled with crumpled papers and a complete disaster. You couldn't walk in my room. I just always thought that. I was born messy and when my first daughter was born knows like i want to be a stay at home mom so bad so badly and my husband's like al what we have to still have two income swabs like i'm gonna run a daycare. I had nine children in this home daycare. And i'm a slob and their toys everywhere and it looked like toys r. Us at vomited. And i felt like all i did all day was clean and it was never clean and so i just fell. There must be something. Fundamentally wrong with me is doesn't take brains. This doesn't take like how come i can't do. This and i felt it was depressing. Let's just the way it was. And i was watching at. Tlc and peter. Walsh came on the tv. He had a show called cleaned sweep and he was talking about different organizing techniques and taking out of the house and letting go of like fifty percent of your stuff and i was like. I'm i'm going to give this a try again. And what i found was my brain doesn't organiz the way. It looks like on tv and other people organize

Douyin Joshua Becker Daud TOM Ordina Dana DON Youtube Dina Dana Walsh United States Peter
The Amish Pandemic Sewing Frolic

The Kitchen Sisters Present

04:30 min | 7 months ago

The Amish Pandemic Sewing Frolic

"It was friday april tenth. Two thousand twenty. The pandemic was really starting to roar. Ppe was scarcely in the supply chains. Were already breaking down. Every hospital was scrambling to find enough masks gowns and face shields. It was already every state every institution for itself. It was everywhere in the papers. Page one page to page three on page nine of the new york times dateline creek ohio. A headline cut on ape. Make a sewing frolic in ohio. The amish take on the corona virus. The story struck a deep chord in a state with us throughout these long months. The way this isolated centuries old self. Reliant community was rising to the occasion and collaborating with the world. Outside was something we wanted to know more about your attempt to record story. A new collaboration was born in that way that the pandemic has triggered all manner of new collaborations artists. Laurie anderson ohio born designer stacey hoover and producer. Evan jacoby all joined with the kitchen sisters to bring these voices to wear today. The kitchen sisters present. The great amish sewing frolic sugar creek. Ohio inca i. John miller manufacturer here with deep connections to the close knit amish community of central of got a call from cleveland clinic. When i get a call from purchasing cleveland cleaning at midnight i know needs. The hospital system was struggling to find protective face masks for it's fifty five thousand employees plus visitors. I thought about the fact that every amish lady in a community knows how we could then utilize the talents of the ladies into to make protective gear. Could his team so twelve thousand dollars. In two days he appealed to abe choi. Kind a local lumber neil and goods business and leader in the amish community. I called deep. Troyer and said make a sewing frolic a day later. Mr troyer had signed up sixty amish home. Seamstresses and cleveland clinic sewing from was i made patriotic ones. I think mine are also the other ones are from my sister. Sarah may meet those jeff. I am rudy Homemade candies. I'm curious sister. I am esther troyer. We had the candy store in the basement of our house. Frolic usually is using up as barn. Succumb people come from all around spectators as well as i have. Four course meal nash. Potatoes some kind of me sal desert. Some kind of dessert should be retire. But that doesn't pay the bills. So i can do this. The frolic of masks sewing is just. It's a group getting together doing a project as good. 'cause i went to egypt troyer to bring supplies. He's got three or four women in his own that console and they were cutting. The little wire knows please. That goes in the mass to conform to your nose on the kitchen table. Literally within three days the sewing machines were set up we had. I'm running in times like this. When can't have you no more than ten people in a room together you know. There's there's around. Ten thousand sewing machines in amish homes abe went and recruited sixty or one hundred sewers literally overnight and we may twelve thousand masks for cleveland clinic and forty eight hours that then turned into an order for one hundred forty thousand which scaled again. Currently we are making seven hundred and thirty eight thousand masks for the state of ohio.

Ohio Stacey Hoover Evan Jacoby Cleveland Abe Choi Laurie Anderson Mr Troyer Sugar Creek John Miller Rudy Homemade Esther Troyer New York Times Sal Desert Troyer Nash Sarah Jeff Egypt
A Face-Punching Legal Battle

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:31 min | 8 months ago

A Face-Punching Legal Battle

"The ufc has an overwhelmingly dominant position as the biggest promotional organization that runs fights in mixed martial arts. It likely made close to a billion dollars in revenues last year. And that's estimated to be as much as ninety percent of all the revenues in mixed martial arts and it achieved that dominant position both by successfully managing and promoting the sport but also by buying out all of its biggest rivals in getting all of those top fighters from its rivals to fight for it. So you have. These numbers are not public but these estimates come from nash analyzes the business and finances of mixed martial arts for the website. The bloody elbow. He's our guide to this world and is the lawsuit filed by the former fighters against the ufc has unveiled all these documents. That show what the fighters get paid. We had an inkling. We had an idea but now we have like concrete numbers. Okay so here. Are some of the points made by the fighters and here are some of the. Us's agreements i the fighters argue that they simply get paid a much smaller share of the ufc's revenues than athletes and other major sports leagues. And this is true. Those new documents from the court hearing revealed that fighters get paid roughly twenty percent or less of ufc revenues in a given year for the major basketball baseball hockey and football leagues athletes. Get paid close to half of what they're leaks make and in boxing the other major combat sport. It's even higher close to sixty percent of boxing. Revenues goes to boxers. And one of the reasons john says is it. There are several major. Boxing promoters trying to sign fighters it's just a more competitive market so for the fcc. The fighter has to pitch to the of c. To hire him to give them a fight because he needs to be in the afc to make money were in. Boxing promoter has to find a fighter and convince him to let him promote them. Because he's the person drawing the money in response to the fighters. Ufc's arguing that even though it's fighters getting smaller share of its revenues. Those fighters are still getting paid more money over time because the ufc is making more in revenues over time so the overall level of the fighters pay is still going up and john says if the us seaward some other kind of company that response might be enough to win the case if the fighters are just like other workers and their pays going up. Why would it matter. If the fighters are getting a smaller share of the sports revenues than the athletes in other sports. What makes this case different honest with the plaintiffs argue is that the fighters aren't workers like a typical worker on a factory line. The fighters are the product and as the product. That's being sold. They deserve a share of the sales. Dmc has also argued that nick martial arts is still a young and growing sport should not be compared against established. Sports leagues plus. Dear makes the case that a big reason it makes so much. Money is not because of how great it's fighters are because of how good the you have c. is at putting on big lucrative fight nights that effectively. Ufc has a special ingredient that it adds to its fight cards john. Nash is a little skeptical of this one. But what is the special sauce is a little confusing. When of would claim it's their production. It's the way they things but then can you be more specific because you know. Boxing does the same thing they they promote fighters they put on events they they make packages that you know all that stuff that seems to be part of the special sauce is done by other other promotions plus john says if the ufc does have a special sauce and the specific fighters don't matter too much. Then why did the ufc go to such lengths to buy out its rivals and get their fighters and why does the ufc put restrictions in the fighters contracts that prevent them from fighting for other promotional companies. Look there's lots of other complexities in this lawsuit. For example the ufc also makes its fighters except the sponsorship deal with reebok and keeps a lot of the money from that deal the fighters say they could get their own sponsors which they used to be able to they would get paid more but really we're just scratching the surface here on this lawsuit and it probably has a long way to go anyways. But what is clear is that the lawsuit is a fight. About worker power the former fighters say they lost power to negotiate their pay because a ufc made the market for their talent less competitive the ufc disagrees and has argued that it should not be punished for being a successful company by the way we emailed a spokesperson for the ufc about the lawsuit. They have not yet responded. What's also clear right now. Is that the financial life of a lot of you. Have fighters is really hard fighters who are not highly ranked will sometimes get as little as ten thousand dollars for a fight and finders will have at most a few fights a year and they pay a big share of their earnings to their fight camps. The places that run their training and provide coaching things like that and so these former fighters are basically suing the ufc for what they believe they are owed what they argue they would have made if the ufc had allowed a competitive market for their services. Nate quarry one of these x. fighters says they're also hoping that the ufc has to change. Its approach to paying fighters going forward. We deserve our seat at the table. Whether it's talking about sponsorships whether it's negotiating our purses whether it's being able to fight for someone else free agency that's what we truly need in the sport where the fighters will have the ability to really test out the free market and see what our values this episode of the indicator was produced by jamila huxtable. In fact check by sean sal donya indicators paddy hirsch and is a production of npr.

UFC Boxing John Nash AFC FCC Hockey Basketball Baseball United States Football Reebok Nate Quarry Jamila Huxtable
Exploring Sacred Spaces with Michael Whalen

Anxiety Slayer

05:30 min | 8 months ago

Exploring Sacred Spaces with Michael Whalen

"Hello and welcome back to the anxiety slayer podcast. I'm shannon vander leak and today. I'm speaking with michael whelan. He's a two time emmy award winner and grammy nominated composer. Music supervisor and his work is just fantastic. Michael is a veteran of more than eight hundred television and film scores thousands of commercials and numerous tv themes and video games. He's also a world renowned recording artist and producer with thirty two solo and soundtrack recordings to his credit since nineteen ninety-three. Hello michael oh ho shannon so great to be here with you. Thank you so much for the opportunity beer. Oh you're welcome. And i must tell you this morning. I was listening to your new album sacred spaces and i had been listening several weeks back but i wanted to listen again this morning and i thought you know this music is perfect for this time in our in our lives on earth and i had a different experience and i decided that an ocean of candlelight or ocean of candidate is my favourite today. Although i love. I love the the entire album and i love for you to just dive right in and talk about the inspiration for this body of work that that you put your heart and soul into for over ten years. How it represents your spirituality is interesting. It's people here the title sacred spaces and they think it's like a religious record. Michael you've made a religious records way. Everybody just calm down. So it's really about the places that people the experience the memories that you hold a sacred yeah and ultimately it's about gratitude it's ultimately about not only holding these things close to you but why are you grateful for because to have things that are important to you. It's not enough to kind of come from scarcity and to be sort of fighting things off as you're descending pieces of your life. I think. I think what i have learned in my fifty years on this planet is bats. The only the only place for walking us in some ten years ago i had this delusions of grandeur. I was gonna write a symphony. I've written a lot of pieces so this was not going to be one. But i was gonna write a symphony. This was going to be search for god and all the stuff. And and i got a sort of a movement don and material written the wall and i put it away for years and about three years ago i called the charts in look at them and i was like well. You know what would wanna to estimates are no fussing with the some of the themes and i said. Maybe this isn't a class copious. Maybe this electron piece. Ab there's an entirely new way to be treating this material. So then what i did was i spends a almost four months designing sounds and i had no idea what sounds. We're going to go with wet song. Or when i was going to do is made a big pile things and so i got so bad. Eight hundred different textures salim's samples of different things did and i said to myself. Ok mail that. I house some females dawn. I haven't been kyle stuff amazingly. The album came together very very very thousand about seven weeks later. The ryan was done on warp speed. I got to finishing the record. It was really. It was a very intense experience. The listen to it done for the first time because what it gave me was a sort of an access to all these places memories things all that the music was inspired by in this entirely new way and also beat me a really deep sense of peace relax. H i'm one of these people who has a very hard time relaxing. Even though i've known for creating music if i'm relaxed forbid awfully so. This album has created a very Interesting palace for me to relax to betaine to a stretch jorgensen s and i've heard from many many many people around the world that they do their daily access those album now which is a very early. You've really captured this. What i've found in the in the couple times that i've listened is the that i'm energized while i'm relaxed and i'm like what that's really cool. Do that very very very hard balanced. And i was loved to say wow garcia just like and i have to say that you just showed up that way

Shannon Vander Michael Whelan Ho Shannon Emmy Award Michael Grammy Salim Kyle Ryan Jorgensen Garcia
"salim" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

05:31 min | 11 months ago

"salim" Discussed on Masters in Business

"Listening to tell us what's keeping you entertains while. You're sheltering at home. You know I've been watching a it's kind of an obscure TV show it's called the Kim's convenience. It's about this family up in Canada which is where I grew up that runs a small convenience store and my dad used to run a small convenience store and I used to work at it when I was a kid and so that's my kind of. Will Comfort Food TV, that I've been watching, it's a great show but I think it's more any other people who grew up in Canada and work to the convenience store would love it. So it may not have broad appeal but for me, it has a lot of comfort appeal that is niche for sure. It's Niche Canadian convenience, store workers. So so tell us about your mentors who helped shape your career. You Know Gosh there've been so many people along the way. Charlie. Haluk. Partner saved me from not just save me for making a real career mistake, but I was also in the couple of years that we worked together at the firm before he had passed. was both a really important mentor and at times a really harsh critic and a and I think some of the things that people sometimes misunderstand about mentors is that you know they think mentorship is just a good cheerleader could support her sometimes mentorship is really about tough love Charlie for me was very much about that tough love. But he really became a really really important guide for me to really understand black rock to really understand how it worked to really understand some of the genius of the firm that a relative newcomer might take years years to appreciate. I got a crash course in a couple of years through Charlie that you know I will certainly always be grateful for along with him of course, correcting my career with his own blood style when I mistakenly turn the firm down that's great. Tell us about some of your favorite books what what are you reading now? What have you enjoyed reading? I was reading a little bit earlier on What I'd call a bunch of disaster despair books. My wife thankfully talked me out. Of It because there's a whole genre about like the twilight democracies one, it's actually really good book but I've now moved to reading a biography of Wellington which looks to be very good and also reading a book called Wolf Hall that I have owned but haven't read, and so I'm using this to make a dent in in both of those anglophile occasionally guest but we'll fall in Wellington kind of a bit better and at times at least the Wellington can be uplifting. Quite. Interesting. What sort of advice would you give to a recent college Grad who was interested in a career in either wealth management or indexing or ATS I think. The. Important thing is each of those industries, right? So just take wealth management when you're very familiar with having built a firm or asset management, they're going true vast changes and I think that you know Chong great to talk about change in the abstract real time, it can be painful and it can be. Challenging. And so I think they're really exciting industries industries that I've been part of for a few decades, two decades. But but I think for a new graduate, it's really making sure that one they're up for that and to. That they really love client service because whether you're a fiduciary manager. Or whether you're a fiduciary acid manager, you've got to be comfortable with the notion that you're here to serve the client that it isn't your money. If there's and you've got joy out of that aspect of it, which I think is an errand to to to both of those businesses as much as you know, constant radical changes as well. And our final question, what do you know about the world of indexing an ETF today that you wish you knew twenty years ago when you were first getting started in this field so I'm going to give you a boring answer to this one berry, which is that in the late nineties I was a very unsuccessful occasional day trader and I had a good run up and then it. All ended in tears around a late two, thousand and two, thousand one it took me away from the market shy about the market for a few years after that and I think that the thing that I wish I knew was just the importance of staying invested. Now that's a boring and reliable answer but I am the Beta Guy. So I believe in boring and reliable over the long term. and. But it really has paid off and and just the thing I wish I knew it was stopped worrying about kind of timing the market and I just really focus on staying in the market. And for investors like me and I think for many investors who are able to take a long-term view that's probably the soundest and best way to build wealth over the long term you know I totally agree with that answer. Thank you Salim Ramji for being so generous with your time, we have been speaking with Salim Ramji the global head of shares and index investments for Black Rock which his division runs about four point six, trillion in client assets. If you enjoy this conversation, be sure and check out all our previous podcast we're up to about three fifty. You can find that at I tunes, spotify Google podcasts, stitcher overcast wherever your fun or.

Charlie Salim Ramji Wellington Black Rock Canada fiduciary Kim spotify Wolf Hall Partner Chong global head
"salim" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

07:09 min | 11 months ago

"salim" Discussed on Masters in Business

"This week on the podcast I have an extra special guest and I know I say that all the time but Salim Rahm g global head of shares and index investments. For Black. Rock I share runs about four point six, trillion of the seven trillion in all of black rock index investments about two point, three trillion ATS or another two point three trillion, and really who is there better in the world to discuss ETF's and indexing than Salim. Ramji. We pretty much cover everything from passive to active. We talk about ESPN as rising investment class white black rock thinks that's going to exceed a trillion dollars over the next decade we discuss how? The entire fixed income and bond market has moved so aggressively to eat. From what used to be a bespoke over the counter sort of old school type of Wall Street trade. We also talk about the business of ATF's how they've grown, how they've traded, and then most importantly, we went over a variety of things involving governance and what Larry Fink is to drive better behavior amongst the C. Suite. In Reality Black Rock looks at es G. as a fundamental risk factor and it's a way to help identify what companies are going to perform better. It's not politics, but it's risk management the whole conversation was. A Tour Force about indexing ATF's if you're at all interested in wealth management or passive investing or active investing for that matter you're GonNa find this to be absolutely fascinating with no further ado my conversation with black rocks, Salim Ramji. This is masters in business with Barry Ritholtz on Bloomberg radio. After special guests, this week is Salim Ramji. He is the global head of shares index investments. For Black, rock that group runs about four point six, trillion dollars in client assets. Salim comes to us with an economics politics degree from the University of Toronto and a law degree from Cambridge University Salim Rahm Jim Welcome to Bloomberg thanks a lot very severe. So that's an interesting background. Toronto to Cambridge University doing law prior to joining Black Rock. You're a partner at McKinsey how did that transition from consulting to asset management come about you know I haven't thought about in a while I had worked with Black Rock and worked with I shares for a number of years as an adviser before I joined. back with ice shares in two thousand. Five. And with Black Rock, I'd gotten to know the senior team around the time of the merger with be Gi. And it was back in two thousand and thirteen after I'd gotten to know a bunch of the senior leaders and a bunch of the members of the firm and really liked the culture that Larry had approached me and. Asked me whether I wanted to join the firm. And after a couple of discussions actually turned him down. He handled it pretty well, and week or two later area was speaking at a conference and our late partner Guiding Charlie Hallak. Who'd really built the Aladdin Business and was CO president of the firm before he died he came up to me and he said he said I heard you turned us down I said yes. And then he asked me why I was such an idiot. He put it in slightly more colorful terms than than that. But then he sat me down and explained to me you answered his own question for about an hour explained to me why was such an idiot? And the very next day Larry Call back 'cause clue the two of them were in cahoots and I'd accepted the offer. So I'd say it was a bumpy kind of pre start. But after a couple of wrong turns that came to the right decision than a lot that ever since ever since that day, that's pretty funny I. I suspect you left out an important adverb. Absolutely. So you go from global head of Corporate Strategy How do you migrate to ETF an indexing doesn't seem to be a natural path or am I Misunderstanding that looking in from the outside. Yeah. There was one important beat him between You know I I can't say I was I was the head of strategy for for just over a year Truthfully I'm not sure that I had major impact in that one year on the firm. But what it was really useful for me but I learned the culture from the inside built relationships. I've really learned how the place worked and Blackhawks a unique place and we're a large public company but there are aspects which feel like a small family run business because we still are run by our founders. And I think for me in that first year getting an appreciation of how the firm works and operates and what some of the magic is inside I think was really important. The first place that Larry and robbed the. Pedo. At asked me to go after that year was, are you US wealth business? And our US wealth business at the time this is back in two thousand fifteen. was really in the early days of Breen together they're active investment teams and their index investment teams. You know these two groups had kind of grown up almost warring tribes and the goal was, how do you bring them together and how do you reorient the whole business around financial adviser as wealth managers principally, big fee based wealth managers, which you're well familiar with and how do you really reorient the business around helping those clients build a better portfolio. And so by the time I left a few years later, the US wealth business became the source of more than half of I flows globally and so i. think it was a very natural than extension that when Larry called me up just around two years ago instead it was time for the next move that I went into this role around is here's in and our. Index investing business quite fascinating. So let's talk a little bit about that index investing business the index funds more or less have the assets, run themselves but the business of ETF's anything but passive how do you describe what your primary responsibilities are overseeing indexing TF's at Black Rock? You know one of the luxuries I had when I was running our client areas in US wealth. Was You always got to assume that everything worked. And in my current role, there's a Lotta. Engineering and precision and making sure that the whole ecosystem works..

Black Rock Larry Fink Salim global head Salim Ramji Salim Rahm US ATF Salim Rahm Jim Welcome Bloomberg partner Aladdin Business ESPN Cambridge University Barry Ritholtz Toronto Blackhawks McKinsey University of Toronto
"salim" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"salim" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"She's the order is just wrong someone told you Salim nor is it for anything and fourteen years a sailor and I couldn't see him well as planned in order to check me in anyway and you don't happen obviously in the order form schuessel door could forty split ends yeah eight he could get his troops the technician I know she scored even at that time I say that for me and I know that she had told me that it is chichi former owner let's me see in order to conceal as you were you see the numbers that say six nine what when you shut your eyes and so you thank you for St Louis it was the students in the the sweepstakes they all okay I got it for you three thousand six last night can and the only is great the guy now and should I am today the guy but is no story is great a guy the state war only you it was somebody else waiting for him to me help you Hey go in on the to me Tony night after night I'm all right great guy and a sweet sending all your money on those drunken fools I can't tell you I don't need no help from nobody Connie's takes what he wants it shows yeah me and give a great guy he's in wait honey listen listen to not only the man said that the what to wear and then that was here he doesn't have his midnight looking for me hi course what you want I don't know we wanted you I was afraid what what was your freight with whoever wants to know why was he was and he he me you mean for me he he spoke so honey what is it with her you it does make jokes on a I'm not really I'm not he said that he says something I'm kind of tell you is that tell him but what what what I couldn't understand it he took me by that I think he said him I was here and and then I think he said yeah the Tony was what he looks like an added on what he looks like he he was tall and he looked like a sailor and I think his clothes were wet when he came again the way you know before anyone if you when he went away like me don't go away you that maybe they can the six month ago today Toyota water if you look at my watch which I don't scare me we'll try some going from the I got a the ones who on the thank you thank you this is yeah my you could help me locate the days are told me take it is we've got you killed one of one would expect Kim or nobody can stop me nobody but my do you my friend the get me out of the how much does and I'm not Kate you win the sweepstakes and Prisco didn't tell you Mike listen to me called killer because every road every people every thought and just don't cover if it's free you want to get in its money it's going to cost you recently got it he kept me out so far during the call in the world can get you listen to midnight tonight the S. as provas is pulling out to go down to the concern over the coast of Ireland to go hunting for gold call your courage award should pony buckle gold I set a goal to do is only they're going under the sea for under the sea a million dollars in gold in the hold of the Tonya sung by itself and these boys are going to die for side in the pit they get a put my high give me in front of me with every sing kick up in your pocket it beyond bought that ship Swenson he'll the idea for gore and meet us and me I won't be on the pole.

Salim
"salim" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"salim" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"Of San L Salim Ohs, spectrum a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender advocacy. Group was surprised that police released a statement on the matter. Well, it was interesting. How the media was right there to go to report a crime that was not to the feet of the innocent. But to the guilty, isn't that interesting how they withheld information? The media's real quick to go ahead in. It's not allegations friends when it's not their own when they wanna accused someone a demonize someone polarized someone. They just give the slant in their reports in their propaganda reports that the person's guilty without even having the facts. I don't know is it just me. But I thought we were innocent until proven guilty, and then when the guilty or fawn when it spun out to be one of their own. They don't release that information. Because it didn't fall to their narrative America. This executive director said it is unfortunate that this information is being released to the public in this manner. She said the next few weeks will no doubt be difficult for everyone involved, and I hope that the community reacts with compassion. Wait a second. When this individual was going out there blaming everybody for the crimes that she was guilty of was that when she moved by compassion or was she moved by hate friends. Put this in to perspective as to what's going on in your country today Floyd Elliot of Independence, Missouri told police that two subjects attacked him in the parking lot of his apartment complex. He said that the attackers cut him in the stomach Brandon him with a hot knife. And attempted to carve the word fag on his forehead, guess what? Friends investigators were suspicious about the report because the head carving was backwards as if done well looking into a mirror later Elliott admitted to the police that the injuries were self inflicted this Sodomite friends. Was standing in front of a mirror writing fag on his forehead. Only to blame the innocent for the crimes that he is committed. Friends before allowing your government to pull down the laws. You might wanna ask why they put them up in the first place. This is why this is why you know, and to take it a step further. Look what's going on with this little eleven year old that ABC promotes is being folks. Just incredible. Incredible. Just incredible little eleven year old boy who's dressing up as a woman going into homosexual Sodomite day clubs in New York City and getting money thrown at him in that bar in the United States of America. I thought it wasn't about the kids friends. Hockey meeting here from the LGBT communities friends about this little eleven year old boy being baited in to dance before a bunch of pedophile. By the way, friends or busy seeing what we can do about that. This is a felony. Oh my goodness. By the way. This Elliott's who wrote fag on his forehead. And he admitted to the police that the injuries were self inflicted. I gotta say Elliott stepped in it Dinty. Yeah. He did. After reading the report friends, I had to look up the word stupid. I'm not kidding in the Webster's eighteen twenty eight it's defined is very dull insensible senseless stupid. I say not only because he got his forehead backwards. But because he acted as if his contrived crimes will go unpunished before the God who sees all things naked and open Hebrews four thirteen France..

Elliott San L Salim Ohs Floyd Elliot America executive director Missouri New York City United States Hockey France ABC Brandon Dinty eleven year
"salim" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"salim" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Rosa's to give the giants Salim forty four yards out over time. Right down the middle. Sauce gives the giant Salim? The bears failed to score. So New York improves to four and eight loss. Kaga falls to eight and four the titans beat the New York Jets twenty six to twenty two the patriots. Founded the Vikings twenty four to ten the Seahawks stopped the forty Niners. Forty three to sixteen the LA Rams defeated Detroit. Thirty to sixteen to clinch their second straight NFC west title, Jacksonville. Got by Indianapolis in a six nothing honor. Arizona got my Green Bay twenty two seventeen afterward. The Packers fired head coach Mike McCarthy. Joe Philbin was named interim coats Pittsburgh, lease the LA chargers. Seven did nothing in the first quarter. The college football playoff is set top seed, Alabama battles Oklahoma in the Orange Bowl. And Clemson will face Notre Dame in the Cotton Bowl in the semi finals on December twenty nine in the National Basketball Association. The Lakers blotted out the sons one twenty two ninety six in the National Hockey League redux rallied with five consecutive goals to shock the capital six five and Washington seven game winning streak the New York Rangers lead the jets three two in the third period. The sharks are. Ahead of the Canadians. Three nothing in the second in golf, John raum. One the hero world challenge finishing at twenty under par. Four shots ahead of Tony female Tiger Woods finished next to last at his own charity after ending up at one par. I'm Donna page. That's your Bloomberg NBC world sports update. Juliette done. Thanks so much. We are at the highest level on the Asia Pacific index since October ten with a level of one hundred and fifty six point zero as.

Salim New York Jets New York LA Rams Orange Bowl Joe Philbin New York Rangers Rosa Tiger Woods Vikings Packers Bloomberg Seahawks Jacksonville Indianapolis National Hockey League National Basketball Associatio patriots sharks
"salim" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

03:39 min | 3 years ago

"salim" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"The deal is active. So I hope you go for it, but now it's jump right back into my conversation with actor Dr Salim about his performance in dark land. Tell me about the redemption of Zayd in the end because you know, he's he's already fixed one of his victims in the hospital. And now you have this kid that that he decides to drive to the hospital, but he probably knows that things are are not going to keep going his way for too much longer, but it's almost like the doctor's side of Zayd kind of kicks back in which he's not going to leave this kid to bleed out either. I mean, that's the thing that's this. Get so frantic side of Sade because he's been drawn into this dark land side of himself for so long at that point, you know that he's lost. Basically, you've lost for the last ten minutes of the film. You've lost his eight as we know him in the beginning. But you know, it's instinct. He's a doctor company. She's this kid, he's bleeding and he wakes up from the blood rush. What do you think happens to aid afterwards? After he's taken away, you'll have to watch dark lane to to find out. I would by the way I would definitely watch that would tell us tell us what was your toughest seen? What was the scene as an actor that actually and your toughest action scene to, but but as an actor, what was your toughest seen the one that you kept getting sweats over before you did it over over and over again that the one that you kept feeling that he needed to prepare for more than you really did? What was what was the scene that kind of nervous going into? You know, I have a ton of those scenes when we did Borgen or dictator shirt like that. But honestly, I didn't have that feeling with it felt magical from day one because the whole production was done in a way that should have been impossible I, but it just didn't feel like a problem because which should have been impossible. I just told you about the budget for instance. Right? And so the time kept running out and like I, I give you an example, the scene where dude fee the the, the, the new kid, he's sh- he's, he's been. Beaten than I come up. I think we had maybe one two takes to do it for Alex when you're putting pillows head and everything. So there was no dialogue in that scene. So I called the doctor friend of mine and I said to him, listen, I'm a doctor. So when I come to this in this situation, I can't just say anything like anybody. I have to be professional. So he said what I had to say and I couldn't remember it right then and there. So I wrote it down on the pizza box in front of me, and I told tooks to shoot from the other side. So I could look at the pizza box pretending to look at Alex and reading my lines as I speak on the phone, finishing the phone call and then we can play the scene. So it was stuff like that all the time to make it work like the scene. I don't know if we should say this when you know when I drive the kit to the hospital and run the red lights, I was running the red lights. The time was it. That was in the middle of the night and the shoot was over. And so just me and the director and the DOP who said, we're, we're going to drive the. Car back to base. And we. So it was it was this film sh you cannot do it again the way we did it. So it never felt I was never nervous or I we, I was so well prepared for that film and I was so looking forward to doing it that it just. It was. It was just it was a good thing you. You gave a fantastic performance, your your, your acting chops are of course up to par. I'm curious..

Alex Zayd Sade Dr Salim Borgen tooks director ten minutes
"salim" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"salim" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"We wanted it to be dirty, like all the fights we didn't want because we knew all the kids. We're going to watch this film. We didn't want to glorify. The violence that we wanted to be disgusting. And I think we succeeded, then you seated. So was wearing that bloody contact knowing then for the rest of the movie? Yes, I would. I would think that's not so good. It's always too big and it's always couldn't imagine that. I say he goes the hospital a couple times and he's taking shots. I'm guessing, what is it? Actually, I'm not gonna even guess. What does he taking? Yeah, a lot of people ask that. I think it's a type of, you know, a combination of painkillers and adrenaline and stuff to keep him going. It's not like steroids or that doesn't make sense. It's more like stuff to keep you going. It would seem that this is a movie that I could imagine there being some cut scenes. Were there any like were were there seems that now that you watch it, you kind of still miss going back to what you said about devils double in, which there's there's good stuff left on the cutting room floor a, yeah. There are definitely some good scenes cut out, but I do not miss them. I tell it tells what some of them were. You know, there's always like over explanatory seems like when I go back after the guys burned and I talked to dul fee again the the new little brother, there are some more scenes with the Stena which you know that would have been good. But I think they chose the editor did a great job and they chose really, this seems that tell the story. What was the personal moment for you? What was the moment in the movie that you had just kind of a personal agenda that you wanted to put a part of you into a scene? I'd say that had to be and it's probably my favorite scene of the film is with the the father and the couch because I think in up hadn't had a lot of response on that scene as well from kids saying, you know, that's the. The the thing that they wanted to say to their dad that they never could. You know most of these things that go wrong is because a generation come and I'm not blaming anyone. It's just the fact when you come into a new country and you don't know the language and you've been through wars and terrors, you you, you, you deal with your own stuff. And so the kids are left alone to figure out their own moral compass and their own social rules. And and that's what creates these parallel societies. And so I enjoy that scene. We wasn't totally scripted like that. I had an idea had just roll it. And is that you know, is that Iraq, you know, because he's sitting in the same place in Denmark is said there for thirty years like so many others, and they still have a lot of pride and a lot of, you know, it's just it's just warm air. It's nothing. It's such. A short scene too, but it had the power because he's reminding his father that we do not live in Iraq, and he wanna live in Iraq. And you have a responsibility to get your ass off the couch and educate your son. It was. It was a great scene folks. We recently released issued thirty-three at backstory dot net, and you could read backstory magazine on a desktop laptop, ipad or via Google play on an Android tablet issued. Thirty three.

Iraq devils backstory magazine painkillers Google editor Denmark thirty years
"salim" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"salim" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"Area maybe it motivated to the events the alleged your cell fight what are you are coming up salim the oprah said she will run for president if there's one thing happen are you serious one this is one thing that's got to happen i'll tell you what it is neck these music what does easing into you music resembled luck batter you play music when you celebrate when you're happy when you're sad even when you aren't playing in you here's you see it music evola music timeless it's this case and escape it's a motivator hearing music scene music feeling music is now than you off wild maybe more nine fm hd amazon echo google home rhocagil again wild 94 nine guy come on iheartradio paid gaby dea that if you want to make that when smile go to daniels jewelers and get an idea they offer nc credit and interest refinancing so you don't have to worry about your budget tuesday for her great selection of certificate diamonds gemstones and watches including de sac do think it's orma bottle and preowned rolex apply online and daniels jewelers dot com and use the code gaby for free fifty dollars gift card makes you the news daniels ula is making diamond dreams come true since nineteen 48 feeling singled out because all of your friends are in relationships it's time to live a life you love me new people while doing the things you love to do or of always wanted to do events and adventures plans over thirty grit events for singles every month from outdoor recreation sit indoor celebrations to world vacations we do all the work you have all the fun event than adventures is a social club for singles there's no pressure no profiles everything after that happens actually live alive you love get started at events in a ventures dot com events and adventure as knows how to make the most opinion single you have to get the result in person if the chinese things and most of all he just have to have fallen really the best part about being single is doing what you love joint event than adventures we've been doing.

oprah president gaby dea daniels jewelers salim google fifty dollars
"salim" Discussed on 1075 KZL

1075 KZL

04:52 min | 3 years ago

"salim" Discussed on 1075 KZL

"David seven i then so so i know hadman prayers he the you do nine then the board number there is hey no man y'all open up the martin made a you one of these happy the girl next door you know in order to do the new planning i'm nick lenovo again dead man all this for years then name oh yeah though you'll be las palmas know or they'll pay lot if i want a gun and duarte lot of georgia's the jurors unethical that may not trump all have written a gum admit who won't versus age let's economy homolka was in me tommy cinematographer in me even better in his power some of them have so much older was the only person that at all was me wasn't xiaomi redmi the day salim among the gym on the campaign the was accounting's he new all right i'm by far you'll just north of the inner complex aim has been given thunder their budget now what about the envelope on the path come come on all of them off on your home thought all brittan what he threw balk out more norio backfire on path lucky gave me on the counter was in his tommy on its author even better in this hour on was with all of them have so much what was the only banner was he was amazed there china's economy they do we move on again on them algeria dad as up on earth are you obtain thank you liam payne new may be yup in in as live they do the again god in bed and ending two cheering haiti in the morning of the number one hit music station wpro seven five qaisy l time for jeered.

David nick lenovo georgia salim china haiti duarte algeria liam payne
"salim" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"salim" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"To five four 1030 tripoli 929 1030 there's no question that you should be embarrassed about asking anything that you had that you'd like to get in appraisal over the air from king laws he does this force every year and it's amazing what you can't stop me very rarely you could stop let's put it like that salim in revere salim how are you tonight oh you dan i do just great you're with keg lost salim garetta ahead can go very well thank you but we have led five years ago at windows were and we'll would you remember that yes i do as a matter of fact i found a restaurant and your dope i give you who toil away and everybody lego carling yes you will you had the restaurant right around right on the same block yes he used only out eight yep i you and the restaurants going well oh we totally it but i look at the congress all right up okay all right well the mood was very good i hope you've got a good price for its sulaiman dam sure i'd that's okay i mean developed very good we're wary where is your restaurant now is it yours are you working no and looking but uh it linda will win it's online creek now with get will give you a plug was the name of the restaurant hard hard brit hot bread all right if you up and woburn go in and see salim salim you want to ask kennedy question yes i have crop low like maybe a couple of hundred books uh light even though baseball and football and walk thing for all lining 62 pool ninety ninety fake in general most you go ahead yeah and have below autographed books from the players well obviously.

tripoli revere salim salim garetta windows congress sulaiman dam kennedy baseball football five years
"salim" Discussed on Jenna & Julien Podcast

Jenna & Julien Podcast

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"salim" Discussed on Jenna & Julien Podcast

"It was exit we will always love you move salim dion make to come on share no unlock you know what let's move on all right ready where it began i can't begin to knowing but then i know it's growing strong was in the spring then this summer then spring became the summer who would have believed you'd come along i can't ferguson kermit scream queen guys stop stop coming up me go go i care where it began i can't begin to knowing but then i know it's growing strong was in the spring then spring became the summer who would have believed you come along am i knew of the things is really really hard is this easy for you i mean you have the song it had already so it's nice isn't it true so the same singapore just like a little thing but you're seeing it over towards a single orbit current get out of here i'll say at like how it goes in this order where it began i can't begin to know in but then i had no it's growing strong was in this spring then spring became this summer who would believe you come along who abboud the curve uh i need you now to now is that it and indonesia more than ever is that it.

salim dion indonesia
"salim" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"salim" Discussed on Super Station 101

"That limosine maneuver i think that's like legitimate legitimate just waiting okay elegance miramax maxwell's taxi if imagine salim taxing aim together she was called enter this show that the day but disguise herself as somebody name rose really was clearly mary maxwell how could you tell how could you there's or older is that what really is right there isn't rose oshii so sweet sweet resident then it really was rose i thought of has love rose by by none other that's rosy as row for events rattling enough jettison the muddy girlfriend this is rose you wear main to her where you learn through that mean to maxwell i invite her on frequently oh come we can't find her oh she back in all general you hear it after the last time she was on the show oh my just lost the election dear who they are that the ear figure that was a little little interesting here i'm disappointed shows this weird so speaking of elections we have the us senate primary runoff in what two and a half weeks now so it is coming the ads are coming fast and furious from the luther strange came out our yes big names endorse and him on some spots yeah yeah i saw that yeah i don't think bigname carries a lot of big name i don't think he can get mine it it it did not carry a tremendous amount of weight in the primary it might carry more weight if it than the other i think for the other of the duet th right well here's the thing i think before the people that would carry weight with those people already knew his stance right and his a game changer yes i think you're right that's a good point huawei download until you get that one and you've got mitch mcconnell lose four luther that's a really poland's in white that is a lot i mean it's like you know the dead the head gator.

salim mary maxwell us mitch mcconnell poland rose senate bigname huawei
"salim" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"salim" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"So sawara used hungry for abc's moved become a member of the conscious fuss the fall as i am seeking fragile this idea were pretended that has come out second i have that question of serving the people that one calling and to kenya justice to on the ground you have a drop at the moment at the moment again said yes out with the extra jobs you do casual drops was sort of casual workers setting of this products cheaper products that was far lower prices for euro hooker it's like a hawk and you go around salim your wears a now you want to jump for that to becoming a member of the county assembly yeah i want to get out from that job to become a member of assembly and they do that job of serving the people the suburbs yorker to an honest enough to say that you're looking for a drop how how much money you make of the moment and how much would you live and if you actually causes strong for suffering that give that i'm doing an less than one dollar body so we're getting the money to fund you campaign i have friends while supporting because they have seen my ambitions eric louis talk to know i'll defer to you from jerusalem is never would money it's about seven leadership it's more what what you projects five ten fifteen ten years from now so you have to start from small and grow big so you have bigger political ambitions of this was the foster yes show this is the first step in the next ten fifteen years at cool a cold front for governor and yet i have a lot of ambitions and i believe that can make its 25 years old isn't that too young to be meddling in politics it's never too young to do anything in life.

abc jerusalem kenya salim eric louis five ten fifteen ten years ten fifteen years one dollar 25 years
"salim" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

Scriptnotes Podcast

02:14 min | 4 years ago

"salim" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

"For me to get what's going on there but i mean overall these are very good good pages and it's and it's a fun tone and certainly makes me want to keep going uh i i think you put your finger on it why it seems to note he's doing we're in good hands her so good job well right let's get to our next three challenge mr sees this if you please give us our next entrant tmu a pilot by a source salim london eighteen forty seven night at the tabart in in a lodgers room in oil lantern slickers leather case slams on the table irvin a small haggard man frantically grabs his belongings around the room he lifts the mattress retrieving reams of paper mechanical schematic machinery layouts anatomical drawings of human body parts irvine falls the papers away into his carry case he's crawls a message on a sheet of paper than doubles over throwing up a thick tar like substance as he tries to compose himself a burly man bursts into the room the two men tussle with burly man going for the carry case urban fights back rescuing what he can of his papers and a final desperate effort to escape urban leaps out of the second floor window burly man expects to see his quarry dead on the street below but to his surprise irvine is gone and those are has your salim 's three pages all right i will start off this one so i had a lot of notes here i had a lot of things that i had a hard time balans on the page so there's i liked overall where this going i liked overall the the tone we were able to create it felt over written to me and i felt like every sentence was about one clause too long and so i want us for released dig into the words on the page here less than about the the plotting that i saw so it's a start to the teaser so this is some sort of pilot for some sort of show we're bethnal green london hurst line here hopeless poverty stains the fabric of this boro down one squad street several silk weaver's close up shop.

salim london irvine salim irvin irvine
"salim" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:14 min | 4 years ago

"salim" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Whatever whenever the state can make more money from new they're going to pass it and so at me they're going to definitely pass it and instead of looking at the taxes that they charges now the ripping us off and their overtaxing as an every level they're they're trying to figure out more ways that they can take your money they can steal our money what's one solution they could actually just lower prices on all ticket you think california's gonna do that a lot of people i talk to you today that was their solution for this that won't hold are brought to our country and everybody just laughed at that right the state of california they're still funny yeah they they they can charge for ninety dollars for a red light ticket scrawl salin dion right is there new song salim is it is it in your yet where's that new song your told me about belial is is it in there oh sleep under okay i leave dion selena gomez oh when you came in your i thought he was talking about indian all this lena gomez his new song it's like salim i do it's news conduct street john and distracting us all right that's gone john thank you and i think that the this place commune among seventy given this hm in fact some ooh oh ooh two.

california salim selena gomez dion ninety dollars