35 Burst results for "Salam"

US defense secretary makes unannounced visit to Baghdad, then Erbil

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 weeks ago

US defense secretary makes unannounced visit to Baghdad, then Erbil

"Defense secretary Lloyd Austin has visited Iraqi Kurdistan after an unannounced visit to Baghdad. Austin reached the Kurdistan region, where he held talks in erbil, with the region's president natcher van Barzani. In the meeting Barzani discussed U.S. support to the Kurdistan region in the war against ISIS and terrorism, according to Kurdistan media, the Austrian visit comes to stays before the 20th anniversary of the U.S. led invasion that ousted Salam Hussein, Austin had earlier visited the Iraqi capital, where he vowed to continue the fight against the extremists until their defeated, despite their defeat in Iraq in 2017, IS militants and their sleeper cells are still launching attacks in the country, as well as in neighboring Syria. I'm Charles De Ledesma.

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin President Natcher Van Barzani Barzani Erbil Salam Hussein Baghdad Austin U.S. Isis Iraq Syria Charles De Ledesma
"salam" Discussed on The Cryptoshow - blockchain, cryptocurrencies, Bitcoin and decentralization simply explained

The Cryptoshow - blockchain, cryptocurrencies, Bitcoin and decentralization simply explained

04:51 min | 2 months ago

"salam" Discussed on The Cryptoshow - blockchain, cryptocurrencies, Bitcoin and decentralization simply explained

"I run a question that I'm really interested what you think. So the last bull run we saw all these Ethereum killers, smart contract platforms, and everybody was there to flip Ethereum. But it didn't happen if Ethereum was easy, a good easy hold its spot, and it even docked in itself even deeper. So do you think that next cycle will have the same story that a lot of platforms will say, how many female killer or they were going to compete with Ethereum or you think that Ethereum is kind of moving up a level and Bitcoin and Ethereum are just in another league. I think I wouldn't invest into a Bitcoin color. I wouldn't invest into an Ethereum killer. I really I never invested in job Bitcoin killer. I have never invested significant money into an Ethereum killer. I think there's one exception at the moment that Solana, for that simple reason, not too much because it wants to kill Ethereum, but because Solana had such a really kind of ground shared moment with Sam bankman fried and FDX. So everything is really, really down. If they can if I really, I think my position in Solana if I still have it, I think I do. It's like negligible, really. So unless Salam does another hundred X in comparison to the rest of the market, then it becomes relevant. Otherwise, it does not matter. So if it's a big if and really, this is not a win, it's an if. If Solana manages to recover in comparison to the rest of the market, it could really be extremely strong, but because then you can kind of say, hey, you know what? It actually does have a lot of inherent power. And Solana fundamentally is differently structured in assuming. So that is a powerful kind of tool. That to me is the only big question mark. I would not bet on it. I would rather at the moment bet on Bitcoin Ethereum and protocols that kind of try to connect unite, build on top of icy way more value in debt.

Solana Sam bankman Salam
"salam" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

07:59 min | 8 months ago

"salam" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Graphic designer and artist run a Salaam splits her time between the Middle East, Europe and North America. Over the course of her career, she has played a significant role in elevating the design culture in her native Lebanon. Known for her mixed graphic style and bold color choices, she designs products and interiors that are playful and uplifting. For proof, we can look to her recent collaboration with Lebanon founded women's wear label milia M together, they produced a colorful Kim abaya, a hybrid of the kimono and abaya, with Rana's trademark, yellow striped patterns, front and center. To find out more about her design approach, I caught up with Rana in the studio at Midori house. I began by asking her how she found the use of color to be an integral part of her practice. Believe it or not at the time I realized I was good at colors at the art school. During the martyrs, I was taught by morag meros cough. And bizarrely, she was the queen of color, I have to say. And being a young student of hers, she commented on my work. And I remember she said, Rana, you're brilliant with color. And I couldn't see what she was saying. And I just thought, my God, this is for me. It's so natural. But for her to say that, I realized that I'm onto something that I could expand on and celebrate. And realizing through my pieces and my understanding of design and how it works. Color is a very emotional ingredient and design. It moves you when I would look at my own culture in the Middle East or places like India or Egypt, color is the thing that they use most in their work, especially when it's actually you're dealing with a poorer environment. Bizarrely color is what lifts the spirit. When you actually reach more black and white and slick, the color is not really consumed that much. It's very interesting when you start studying the whole relationship with color in the humans. So with my work, I was able to move people not just through the visuals of Middle Eastern culture, but definitely through color. People would walk in and it's a very eye catching. It makes really people move emotionally. And that's very powerful when it comes to design. But I remember I was actually working on at that time at tomatoes. I was working on some tea labels, and the way I approached the brief, I actually translated all the tea, packaging with a burst of colors and probably that was so unexpected, because England is supposed to be very proper and everything monochromatic. And I was like, wow, you know, just went for it. And that for them was like, what the hell did you do? This is brilliant. And that's what's called their eyes. So I was going against the grain, everything that was not supposed to do. And for me, it was very instinctive, taught at instinctive. Color for me is instinctive. I know some schools they teach by the laws of color. I was like, what the hell is that? There's all these formulas complementary and I don't know what, but I never worked like that. It's very instinctive. So tell me about that instinct. Is it? Do you think that was something that was perhaps accidentally cultivated in your childhood or is this just something of color? I don't know. It's like when you don't teach somebody how to play the piano, it's the same thing. I don't think it's an instinct. It's can not be taught. So you just started using them. I started using a bit. Of course, then I saw enjoyed and realized the power of it that I would actually get very inspired from fashion. Fashion was a huge influence on my work. And there's actually two things that are very influential. It's fashion and food. These two my observation and enjoyment of how things are put together. I had a huge impact on my design results. And how do you start to pull particularly food into graphic work? And in relation to color, is it looking at the color in the food or is there something else is there flavor is there? How does that start to, I guess, distill down to graphic work? I think with food, for example, when I was young, my father would always send me to the shops and I would just be joined by something. Some of these specific, I don't know, definitely through the colors. Not just flavors. It's very rich when it comes to food. And that had a huge influence of how I would go and buy stuff. For a flowers, fashion, I would look at a lot of wonderful brands like Marnie, Portsmouth, the king of color, a lot of other brands that elika moto and all of these browsers were so mesmerizing when they came to their color combination. But there's no real formula. There's no secret formula. It's pure instinct. People think that navy belongs to a bank. I was like, why? Green belongs to it's an Islamic color when it comes to doing something from at least in companies. There's no rules. Absolutely no rules in my books. What it works, it's just you know, it's working. Why do you think we put these rules on ourselves though? No, I don't know. That's the contrast between the Middle East and the west. I found that when I was studying here, there was so many strict graphic design rules. They come from maybe, I don't know, the Bauhaus that comes very strict. And they filter into design courses, especially with grid systems, a color coordination, you know, when something looks specifically Norwegian or Japanese or, you know, when something looks Indian, it's very colorful. So these things do influence culture. Their behavior through color, so when I was studying in London, I felt there was a lot of room for me to come and create a splash which the British loved. The love the sense they were like thirsty for this. And I was very much welcome to work and put that into my projects. I mean, you talk about the influence of color in different cultures. I want to know about the influence of color on us as people. You know, when you're designing something and you're thinking about the colors that you're going to use, are you thinking, you know, I'm going to pick this yellow because I want it to be uplifting or I'm going to go with a blue because I want it to be calming. Is anything like that coming through in your work? I think it's really like when a composer is putting music together. It's instinct, but you can feel that yellow, which is mainly a part of my brand as you probably know. Actually, when I look at the kind of then I might analyze why I'm attracted to yellow. And then you understand it's a very attractive yellow color. It's something that is uplifting. But it's really for me. It is like music when you mix colors, it's like music is the tonality how it affects how you feel. It creates a mood. So it's like playing the piano. I don't know if I make any sense. You are making sense. I want to know who gave you the permission who gave you the permission to break rules. This is what I want to know. This isn't my big thing. It feels like you've come in and you're like, well, I'm just going to do what feels right. I think I've always been able as they say. I've always broken rules. I think my dad gave me a key to a Vespa when I was very young. That created the rebel in me. And I've always been that kind of person from the age of 15. I love breaking the rules. I love provoking. The rebel and rule breaker ran a Salaam there. You can find her current collaboration with milia M at milia M dot com. And that's all for today's show. For more design stories, listen to our 5 minute mid week bonus show, monocle on design extra. That is, on Thursdays. Or if you prefer print, then pick up a copy of monocle magazine on all good news stands now. Today's show is produced by maile Evans, she also edited the show with assistance from Emily sands. I'm Nick manis, and you can reach me on NM at Monaco dot com. Thanks for listening.

Rana Kim abaya Midori house morag meros Middle East Lebanon Salaam North America Egypt Europe Marnie India England Portsmouth navy London maile Evans Emily sands Nick manis
"salam" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

05:16 min | 8 months ago

"salam" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Schiaparelli to a level that I don't think anyone would have ever thought it could it could go. I think we're already on that trajectory that the voice of the house has become sort of undeniable in the landscape of what's happening in fashion. I have an intense ambition for the house that I think is very much what Elsa would have wanted and the dream for me would be to be able to expand beyond fashion. I really am looking forward to forays into and really being able to apply the language of scap to everything from interiors to fragrance. Also to collaborations. I know a lot of people ask me about collaborations and I think collaborations with fashion might not be the answer. I think we obviously dress a lot of celebrities and that's a way of collaborating and co creating a moment with someone who is creating a cultural moment. But I also think collaborating with musicians, for example, would be an incredible way to kind of expand beyond fashion. I mean, when you think about what I think about scap, I think about the way that she did go beyond fashion and I see the future of the house as very expansive. Obviously, we're taking steps to grow the ready to wear, which is a really exploding and beyond. And that's all fine and good. Sounds so exciting. Just to end as well. Can you tell me if there are any special pieces or anything new that you discovered from the exhibition and from working with Olivier Gabe on this? Despite your knowledge, intimate knowledge of the house was there anything else that came up during the process? One of the things that felt really satisfying to see was there's a wall. There's a cabinet of buttons and bijou of hers and specifically some pieces from giacometti. And it was really important for me to see those pieces in person. They were buttons and brooches and there's this finks. There's a few, I think there's an angel in this incredible giacometti textured gold. When I saw those pieces, you know, in the archives as imagery two years ago, it was the thing that unlocked for us the hardware and the jewelry and what has the body bijou that we do. It's just such a part of the language of the house right now. There's a jacket, the shot glass jacket with Dali that she did, which has these shot glasses filled with absinthe. It's one of my favorite pieces. I love that Garmin as well. And I really regret not putting a version of that on the runway where the model's walking around in the absent is spilling all over the runway in the audience. I thought that that would have been great. But yeah, there's so much, actually, that the exhibit is really rich and deeply textured with layers and layers and layers of her work. Daniel roseberry artistic director of Maison schiaparelli. Natalie, thank you very much for that pace. It was a pleasure having you in the studio. Thank you so much. Always a pleasure. Amazing. So the exhibition shocking the surreal world of Elsa schiaparelli is on at the Musée des art decorative until the 22nd of January 2023. We'll be back after this. Tune in to monocle on culture where we grill our panel of critics to get the inside line on the best in the world of film, music, art, literature, and more. It's just got this synth section that kind of makes you want to swing through the saloon doors straight to the dance floor. I appreciate that some of the most brilliant art most of it grounds you in this moment and makes you confront it. With industry insiders and the odd bit

schiaparelli Olivier Gabe Elsa giacometti Daniel roseberry Maison schiaparelli Dali Elsa schiaparelli Garmin Musée des Natalie
"salam" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

07:39 min | 8 months ago

"salam" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"I think people really cherish the fact that they feel like the house is founded on creativity rather than marketing and us trying to pedal a product. That's what makes schiaparelli feel so pure. And also the fact that her legacy has remained largely undisturbed for like 90 years, you know? And the fact that we get to pick up where she left off and there's such a direct through line between her work in the 30s and today, I just think of it as like a brand that people who love fashion love schiaparelli, you know, it's like for people who really, truly love fashion. So it has such a unique place in people's hearts, I think. And what was it like for you working with a curator Olivier Gabe and going through the archives and planning the exhibition together? It was incredible experience it was a huge learning experience for me too just to learn a different rhythm and pace that the curatorial side has because it takes so long to procure the pieces that are needed for the exhibit and there's such a methodology to it that was fascinating to watch. I was not personally involved in Olivier's curation. That was really all done before my involvement. I was brought in to be a part of finalizing the stenography and choosing the pieces from the last three years that would help tell the story of the exhibit. And I think he knew also intuitively that his work would be bettered and be made more relevant or more compelling to a younger audience if we used the work of the last three years as a storytelling mechanism throughout the exhibit. So I think he was really open to that and embraced it and it was a joy to work together with him. Amazing. And have you been drawing a lot of inspiration from the archives of Elsa schiaparelli, whether it was during your day to today design work or going through the process of planning and launching the exhibition. And how do you balance that with also bringing the brand forward and adding the sense of modernity that you've been adding since your arrival? What I took this job, I knew that the odds of successfully reviving this house were quite low in a way. You know, because we watch these revival attempts kind of happen. And it doesn't always really work. A huge, huge part of why it has worked is because the legacy that she left behind and the work that she had done is so innately modern and still very compelling in and of itself. It's not like, you know, V and a or something where it's more of a technique or more of a way of constructing garments that is the greatest legacy scap is much more, in my mind, much more iconic and compelling. If she had been alive today, she would have long since moved on from the lobster dress and things like that. So I've tried to be really where the heritage very lightly and that being said every season one or two pieces sort of present themselves as essential to the collection that we're working on. So I think for me regarding the archives a little goes a long way and that's sort of been my mantra just sprinkling it in can make it feel so connected to her. We don't have to. I never want people to feel like we're doing an impersonation of Elsa or that I'm trying to do an impersonation of her work. And when you speak of Elsa schiaparelli's legacy, I mean her relationship with the surrealists for whether it was of adore the Li or Jean Cocteau is a big part of what she's known for. Do you find that she really challenged this ongoing discussion about fashion's relationship with art? And this is a theme that the exhibition draws on. I think it's one of her strongest contributions. Is that she really broke down that barrier? And I think allowed fashion designers to imagine a world in which their work could be elevated by an approach fine art. That line being blurred. I think it's something that so many designers after her have been able to take advantage of. And she really was the first to do that. Cocktail and Dali, I mean, there's many other examples too, but those ones are so ubiquitous when you talk about her you can't not talk about them. And it was really moving to see the pieces all together. I know that, you know, as someone I'm not an archive obsessed person, but I've seen those pieces a lot over the past three years. In photos and in imagery, but seeing them all physically presented together, you really do have a sense of how groundbreaking it was and how shocking it was probably at the time. And I mean, the title of the exhibition is shocking and like we spoke about now she really challenged a lot of norms. Is that something that you are hoping to do with your work and your involvement in the fashion industry? The thing that I keep coming back to is that I don't think Elsa consciously tried to have an agenda when she was making her work. I really had this sense that it was she was working in a way that was so free. You know, I think that a lot of people have asked me my family is asking me, you know, what did you learn about her? From this exhibiting from seeing everything. And I think it's this incredible sense of freedom that you have that she was so completely free when she was creating. And every season, it was like everything changed. You know, the buttons changed. And the theme of the collections were so wildly different and specific. And at the same time, it all felt like so schiaparelli, you know, and so uniquely her. I just want to be free to put work out there that is a really direct and uncontaminated version or reflection of the way that I feel about fashion today. And what I think people really want and need to see. If you try and be shocking, I don't think that this is how that is how it works. You know, I think I want it to feel more effortless than that. And the house is, I think, before it was very it was overly linked with her work. And we've really, since I've started, we've really tried to take a step back. So shocking, yes, but without trying is my hope. And you're well on your way to doing that. I mean, in the last three years, a house that was largely dormant and now it has so much attention from the global fashion industry and with the opening of this exhibition, even the general public is becoming more aware of the brand and its heritage. But what's next now that you've laid the foundations, what are your ambitions for the brand and what you have coming up next that you can share with us? I want to take

Elsa schiaparelli schiaparelli Olivier Gabe Olivier Elsa Jean Cocteau Li
"salam" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

06:51 min | 8 months ago

"salam" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Begin today's show in the French capital where a major retrospective devoted to an avant garde fashion designer is well underway. Shocking the surreal world of Elsa schiaparelli is on at the Musée des art decorative and focuses on the Italian born Paris based designers provocative and playful pieces. Schiaparelli collaborated with surrealists, including Salvador Dalí, Jean Cocteau, and man ray in the 1920s. Monocles fashion editor, Natalie, reported on the show, but before we hear that audio, Natalie's join me in the studio for a chat. First, welcome. Thank you. Second, let's dive straight into it. Tell me, you see a lot of fashion shows and exhibitions. What attracted you to this one about Elsa schiaparelli? Hi, Nick. First of all, I think it was really exciting because schiaparelli is having a real momentum at the moment. There's a lot of excitement around the brand and it's the first time since Elsa schiaparelli shot the house in the 50s that there is a revival around this brand. The timing is perfect and that's really exciting but also schiaparelli as the fashion house is extremely unique. Elsa schiaparelli was one of the first designers to collaborate with artists like Salvador Dalí, like you said in John cook Tom, man ray. And to open the doors of fashion and fine art. So as the first designer to merge those worlds, it's an exhibition that can really expose you to art, sculpture, fashion, and also you get to travel back to Paris in the 1920s, which is great. Is that what made her, I guess. So respected, the fact that she was really the first one to combine these two disciplines. I think so, yes, there was, and I think there still is a little bit of snowberry around fashion designers going into the world of art, but she did it in a really bold way, and she was really part of that crowd in the 20s, hanging out with the artists and being part of that community. So she did it in such a unique way. I think no one has been able to replicate that ever since. And she also injected humor into fashion, which again, especially at the time where things were a lot more serious and stiff. It was a completely unique approach. Can we talk a little bit about those pieces? So I mean, she was born in Rome in 1890. She moved to Paris and created Maison schiaparelli in in 1927. In that time, what came out of the house that maybe we would know or perhaps influenced other pieces that are significant. I think all her surrealist pieces is what she's really known for. So if you think back to some of your earlier works, she collaborated with Jeanne cook tone this lobster dress it's called. It has this giant lobster embroidered all over it. And she also created a lot of over the top accessories. A bag that's shaped as a telephone or this giant earrings in the shape of fish. Things that maybe you and me wouldn't think of ourselves in, but they are really visually stimulating their humorous. So they're always worth seeing. I guess when we see people with playful pieces, you know, I have seen people with phone shaped handbags. Is this coming from schiaparelli herself? She was the first one to sort of do this. Exactly. She was the first one to bring surrealism into fashion and to create this really playful out there shapes that not many people dared to create in the past. We're sort of touching on her legacy there and you mentioned that before. So the house went out of business in 1954, but has been revived in recent years. There's a little bit of a gap in, I guess, the maisons history there, but what's that legacy, even if there is that gap? Is it pieces like this that other people are now or have been copying for years or is there something more to it? I think even if the house was dormant for a lot of that times since she left in the 50s, there is a big legacy, especially the surrealism and the way she worked with artists. This is the biggest thing that she's left in fashion. And a lot of designers use her as an example. I think also the way that she created a fashion house that was niche and it was about very specific to her point of view, she never tried to please everyone or do something for every taste. She just did her own thing and catered to a very specific audience. And I think that's really special in fashion. And not as common, a lot of her peers like Gabrielle Chanel, christabel balenciaga, those houses have gone on to become this luxury conglomerate, but schiaparelli is like a little jewel, the very boutique niche brand that whether you want to wear it or not, it can bring you joy and it's beautiful to see. And is that what makes this exhibition relevant now so that there are some lessons whether you're a fashion designer or a business owner, I guess, how to create work and run a business in a way that's really true to yourself. Exactly. I think that's a lesson that anyone can take even someone who's in a completely different business. I also really think that going and seeing the fashion next to some of the Dali paintings, the sculptures, there is perfumes as well. She had created a really famous perfume in the 20s called shocking, and it was in a bright pink box. The shape of the bottle was a naked woman, which was clearly shocking at the time. So you get to see all of this together and understand how fashion sort of permeates into culture and informs art and sculpture and all these other creative mediums. Amazing. So we're going to cut now after a chat. You had with Daniel rosebery. The current creative director at Maison schiaparelli. This has been a long time coming but does it feel like now that there's so much momentum around the brand with your arrival as well? This was the right moment to open this exhibition and to tell the story of Elsa schiaparelli to the broader public as well. Yeah, I think timing wise, I don't think we could really be asking for any anything more. The house has a new voice and at the same time, I think people's understanding and appreciation of schiaparelli will be so enriched and deepened by learning about the origin and learning about her life and her contribution to fashion and specifically to the designers that also really inspire me in my work. So I do think the timing is kind of perfect. Unplanned, you know, that's kind of cool about it. Is that it's been such a kind of happenstance, the perfection of the timing. And do you find that there is a lot of broader interest from on the brand from the general public who might not be clients, but they're interested in the artistic side of the brand. What do you hope for these people to come away with?

Elsa schiaparelli schiaparelli Salvador Dalí Musée des Schiaparelli Monocles fashion Paris John cook Tom Natalie Maison schiaparelli Jean Cocteau Jeanne cook Gabrielle Chanel christabel balenciaga Nick Rome Daniel rosebery
"salam" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:48 min | 10 months ago

"salam" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"That's what I like to hear See That Steve spittin facts big man like that Brian know and E from Salam with you here on Fox Sports radio I'm thinking about this big man This might be now my hunch is you might not be immediately behind this decision or this idea I should say But just think about the potential here A movie review segment with our technical producer Don Brown No I knew you were going to shoot this down immediately No But he was before the show started He was telling me he saw a movie recently and I liked the review the way he was explaining it I'm like you know what I'm more interested in going to see this thing What movie was it See exactly you're interested I can tell No I'm not No you are You wouldn't have asked if you weren't interested It's Jurassic Park Don Brown went and saw that I mean okay The question is not whether he went and saw the movie The question is Don Brown Have you seen the other Jurassic parks All of them Oh man Oh boy 4000% You've seen all of them Correct Now he has a voice and a critique of the movie But you can't jump in a series in the middle talking about oh I don't even know what 'cause we got original characters back in this one And if he doesn't know the correlation then he's wasting our time But that's not the case That is not the case So I will listen to this review okay Good I will give it just for me personally I almost thought that I was going to be ruined my mood was ruined at the beginning of the movie because one of the characters Well let's not give too.

Don Brown Steve spittin Fox Sports radio Salam Brian
"salam" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

The Stuttering John Podcast

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"salam" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

"Is a Russian asset and Scott D pace is a fucking idiot. And he represents all the white supremacists GQ. We are in the war of our lives people. I beg you to support shows like mine shows like how sparks show John feeble saying Richard oh. Dino badala, I beg you to support the Amy siskins. And in a Burley's of the world, the Glenn Kirchner, the Michael Polk and Midas touch brothers, The Lincoln Project, people like cherry Jacobs and Jennifer Cohn. Gregorio and Lincoln's Bible. Zeb Salam narrative, I beg you to support all of us. Because we are the ones who are going to get the word out. We are the ones who are going to motivate because they're ain't real reporting going on at CNN. That's Jeff Zucker's bullshit,.

Scott D John feeble Dino badala Amy siskins Glenn Kirchner Michael Polk cherry Jacobs Jennifer Cohn Zeb Salam Burley Richard Gregorio Lincoln CNN Jeff Zucker
"salam" Discussed on Formula 1 Grid Talk Podcast

Formula 1 Grid Talk Podcast

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"salam" Discussed on Formula 1 Grid Talk Podcast

"If if if you see a communities in the commerce just fly off off in this probably done something similar. Okay i am. No i am after watching the Rugby gay media might Today yeah you've got the genuine pumping a gosh. I don't even know what to do. Do watch them or do we not watch them a his show for the finnish benefit type quiets the next two minutes all right peres slipstream going according to the closed captions on my screen using front. Suppose sorority as you say it's it's it's definitely not my two max's behind noah's ark formation. Oh because they're all in twos k. Got it strangest captions. I tell you. There's something really to bobby. She had talked ten with the with the teams. Yeah testifies she deals love you case of peres begins his lap crowd again salam's open. They're so excited to prove it. I try not to look at the live. Timing sprain. 'cause you know that split. I've got a good idea. Okay so you come. I didn't improve his first. All right. what are we talking here. People little one.

Rugby noah bobby salam
"salam" Discussed on All Rabbi Yaakov Wolbe Podcasts

All Rabbi Yaakov Wolbe Podcasts

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"salam" Discussed on All Rabbi Yaakov Wolbe Podcasts

"Partial told us has a hundred six versus spread out over three chapters. At the end of last week's partial abraham passed away. The story line is now going to revolve. Around abraham's son isaac but more centralized around the story of isaac children the twin boys born in the beginning of the streets power. Show the two brothers. That could possibly be more different. Jacob and e salam one of the things we're gonna see industries partial and its portrayal about isaac is that the tower doesn't really treat isaac the way you would expect you know abraham got a whole robust storyline. We're told all his amazing acts of kindness it. The tour praises him lauds. His greatness jacobs going to be a central character threat. The rest of genesis. We're going to hear many details about him about his family and his conflicts that he's going to have to encounter is. That story is somewhat unusual that we don't really get a lot of detail out of color about his characteristics about his character traits about his interactions. That he's had and you know. Even the episode of the binding of isaac it's called the episode of the binding of isaac. But the way it's portrayed weights positioned by the torah is really a test about abraham and that's storyline that you need treatment of isaac is gonna continue throughout this show where the tour is going to be a little bit hands off fish with how it relates. As we will see the partial begins with telling us the lineage of of isaac the son. Of abraham abraham bhagat isaac shows a little bit of repetition that isaac is the son of abraham and abraham is the father of isaac. Sarah she explained something interesting. We know sarah was barren for many. Many years is was only born to sarah after she was nine years old. And abraham was one hundred. And abram. And sarah married for a long time before isaac was born but right before isaac was born. Sarah was kidnapped and was held in the house of avi mela overnight and door people. The staffers of the generation tells us rashi staffers of the generation. They used to say that you know is it's real. Father is not abraham. It's mela after all. Sarah was with abraham for so long. And she wasn't she didn't become pregnant. And then she spends one night with mela and isaac is born and therefore says russia. What happened the almighty made isaac visage his countenance identical to abraham. They were to piece in pod. Abraham and isaac look the same they resembled each other very strongly and therefore the kind of hints at that isaac was the son of abraham and abraham isaac and that was universally accepted. No one could deny it. If you see abram you see isaac. It's quite clear. That abraham is the father of isaac and. This is kind of interesting idea here. According to rashi we see some godly intervention. There were coffers people who would kind of try to throw monkey wrench into the whole miracle of sarah having a baby at age of ninety abraham being hundred there was a now. This is no miracle this is just. There's someone else. There's some other factor to this story and we see here the almighty intervening silencing the critics and making clear to all that this was indeed a miracle. Newton factor is an ancient jewish. Axiom that one late son. Us one staffer. One cynic is able to castaway the impact of a hundred reprimand dacians the senate people that very harmful because once they kinda cast aspersions into the narrative of the righteous. It's very hard to get the onlookers to be inspired. So i think is the son of abraham and when he was forty he marries rebecca..

isaac abraham sarah abraham abraham bhagat isaac salam avi mela rashi jacobs Jacob abraham isaac mela russia Newton senate Us rebecca
What Can College Students Do to Save the Country?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:57 min | 1 year ago

What Can College Students Do to Save the Country?

"Get asked all the time at these events. Charlie what can i do to save the country and these are people that are asking their fifty or sixty or seventy years. Old united salam. I say you need to be as courageous as are turning point. Usa students are on campus. I say you need actually stick your neck out and be really willing to lose something to do the right thing and you have to understand what's happening on these campuses where you are is the center of everything that is happening in the country as many of you know not exactly a fan of most colleges across the country but they're so incredibly important for charting the future and the cultural direction so for example when a professor starts to spout out all these terrible ideas on blm or systemic racism white privilege. How many have professors like that all the time. Of course you do what do you do. You have then all of a sudden you have to ask yourself a question. Which is the most important question that a lot of uganda ask in the next year. Which is this do. I challenge this professor and record this professor while. I challenge them and put at risk. Your great now. This is the question. Isn't it which is do you take a bold step to try to do what you know is right even though you might pay a price or consequence for that now. A lot of you've already made that decision. How many of you are like. I don't care i'm going to do the right thing now. Not every hand goes up because some people like. I don't know i might actually lie right. That the greatest thing ever and that there's unlimited amount of genders whatever and now. I'm not saying there's a right or wrong answer to this right because my friend and i respect him a lot ben. Shapiro has a different opinion on this. He thinks that grades of the most important thing you know lying. Your way through college is important. My belief is different. I would rather have a generation of courageous students. Then a bunch of a student nerds that lied their way through college. So they'll get a good grade. I would rather have a generation of young people that are stepping up and doing the right

United Salam Charlie USA Uganda Shapiro
"salam" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"salam" Discussed on Ideas

"To resolve majella understanding negotiators leafing through a bunch of newspapers and magazines in the waiting fast and the door opens and into the waiting room. Comes this guy of salam gautam sallow and i thought maybe he was from a or maybe. He's kurdish afgani them. Kit to afla niyazi gordon. Why he bought. Hi- speak decent.

majella salam gautam sallow niyazi gordon
"salam" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"salam" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Defendant, nine gunmen and suicide bombers struck at the Bataclan Hall cafes, another national soccer stadium, The main man charged Saleh Abdel Salam, who ditched his car and a malfunctioning suicide vest and ultimately fled to a hideout in his hometown of Brussels. A verdict is not expected until May. The Taliban announced a new interim government for Afghanistan packed with members who were part of the hardline rule back in the nineties. They are all members of the Taliban, and it certainly does not include any women, but it does include In Idaho, which is in the 10th percentile of state covid vaccination rates. Hospitals are so full of unvaccinated patients, Health officials are urging the populace to avoid any activity that could conceivably put them in a hospital. Nurse practitioner Brad Big for tries to soothe the fears of the vaccine averse. We need to figure out some way to to speak to these people. On a larger scale because our vaccine re tonight who are so low that we're never going to achieve any type of normalcy with the way things are going. At least one death reported in Mexico after a magnitude seven earthquake hit northeast of Acapulco, the mayor there reports, gas leaks and collapsed walls but no serious problems in Richmond, Virginia. Today, Cruz will remove a 21 FT. Tall statue of Confederate General Lee from its 40 FT High pedestal pedestal,.

Saleh Abdel Salam Brussels Today Brad Big Mexico May 40 FT Taliban Idaho Cruz nine gunmen tonight Richmond, Virginia Acapulco 21 FT 10th percentile Bataclan Hall seven earthquake nineties least one death
"salam" Discussed on RISE Podcast

RISE Podcast

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"salam" Discussed on RISE Podcast

"We're really helped me in my season. Changes continue to help me is. I realized the truth. I realized that i had to defeat the enemy. You might say. Trent who's the enemy is not the haters. People live is not true opposition. The enemy is often internal the enemy is often hear. Dr ayman says. He told me this when i was visiting me. Said it's not the thoughts that you have thoughts that you attacks to the thoughts and i thought that was a great breakthrough. 'cause i love to say your perspective can either be your power. Your prison and i'll realize the greatest battle that we're ever going to face is not an external one. It's an internal it's right here. This is the greatest war. So i to understand what my enemies were. Because i learned this. The one of the greatest needs as a human is the need to consistently realize how you identify yourself in some of us. We are made up our mind. I've been guilty of this too. We identified ourselves bar pass. We identified ourselves by our failure. We identified ourselves by our limitations in. We start to operate like that. That's the few that fuse our life and is actually a chain that prevents you from progress in life. Because you're identifying yourself by something that doesn't serve you so i wanna tell you this right now. Only you know what your enemy is. I don't know though salam battles that you have talking about the social media stuff. I'm not talking about the perfect. So it's just you and your thoughts. I don't know what those things are. But you have to the bella per game plan to slay those enemies in your life in remind yourself of who you are. And who's you are remind yourself of what your created for and this is not just motivational. Talk this accurate. Talk so number one. Defeat the enemy. So if i'm you. I'm right down all the enemies in my life and i'm gonna tell myself why i have to defeat these enemies what it's costing me not to defeat these enemies and i would think a year from now if i don't fight. in march in june july. I asked myself that question daily. And if you don't fight for this new normal if you don't fight for your life but you don't fight for those that you love fight for your mission.

Dr ayman Trent salam
"salam" Discussed on Ear Biscuits

Ear Biscuits

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"salam" Discussed on Ear Biscuits

"Always talking about old saints talk about our favorite place in the world it's like colonial williamsburg but in winston salem and i was like well. This'll be fun is right off the highway or driving through it anyway Old salem at the time was closed. So it's just all all buildings like none of the people dressed up in character so since covert the really haven't been close for long. Did you encounter so al-salam was just a bunch of quote. We did use the bathroom there. Why why are you getting this. Because got a guy to open it up for us. He was the one that told me the deal. Here's a can open to the bathroom for you. But everything else is closed okay. This is an important podcast. I mean you got to choose what you're going to tell us. But i i took a leak. So then i get to the beach now We wanna drive as those six and a half hours because we had to get up to My in laws have a have a place up on. It's not really a beach house. It's at the beach but it's a spy on a sort of a branch of the news river kind of like the sound area. You know there's so much there's so much like fingers of water that come into the north carolina coast if you look at the map right. I did look them out. And it's just amazing what all those fingers do is just miles and miles and miles of more shoreline. Then you get in most states definitely more than you get it. You know what i'd like to see. Somebody do the math on the amount of shoreline and north carolina versus california which california has almost the whole half of the entire united states yet. It doesn't have a bunch of meandering. Thinks they may. They may be pretty close. North carolina have more. I don't know. I can't. I mean if you count the sides of honor banks sh man anyway. It's awesome and they have a spot. That's way way way way out in the middle of nowhere like thirty minutes from anything that you need and well. If you've seen the notebook you know what's what we're talking. Yeah it's old house that they've they've really kind of fixed up and it's like an airbnb situation but you know the family had reserved for this for this week.

winston salem salam north carolina california North carolina united states
"salam" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"salam" Discussed on TechStuff

"I was also learning a new business and so i literally spent the first six months on the road. Traveling seeing us horse. If that hasn't happened i think you're exactly right. I would have said no. My job is to bring in putting professional management. But i was travelling enough. That i didn't focus on change. Al-salam learn the business understand our clients etcetera etcetera. If in that period of time. I saw a couple of amazing things happen by second week on the job. I was being briefed on this area called virtualization and i'm getting briefed on strategy and the technology we pit in the room was out of the head of engineering chocolate people who work for him but all the way down engineers were virtualization. Tell me the strategy while the dead. And what are the engineers was junior people in the room in the briefing said. Yeah this is what we're doing you know. It's wrong fundamentally pick the wrong technology. There's this new technology that's emerge which is kind of upstream. The lennox in this long and huge argument erupts. No no into some listen this back and forth and i remember told my wife that night i said i living in chaos. There is a briefing in front of the ceo where these people just like literally food fight arguing this stuff out four months later. That seems that team came in and said you know what we were wrong. We need to acquire the company behind the other technology. Because that's the way to go. And what i realized is you know what if they just come in and give me a brief on. Here's the technology while we did it in four months later come in and said no no. No we want to buy this other is in no way. Gimme all the reasons why this is right. Even fascinated by what i do that but because i heard the arguments that it was a fifty five forty five decision and understood. It wasn't clear cut and that.

salam Al
"salam" Discussed on The Words on Fire Podcast

The Words on Fire Podcast

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"salam" Discussed on The Words on Fire Podcast

"Why can't we change the cost of the inflation ship. Why can't we go back to where he is crazy like. My mom's house was choose hands this house thirty years already and i asked her right. And it's almost. I think was about fifteen hundred square feet. How much did you pay for the ship Just out of curiosity. When i was trying to buy mine. She's fade seventy geez. How's it god damn will no wonder one body could say you know you the my husband or the wife somebody could stay home and take care of the household or the children or You weren't reliant that both of y'all had to fucking slave away nowadays fucking houses or at least you're an old paso because of taxes and all that other shit wild pestle fucking high in taxes. We're so fucking poor Fuck fuck in two hundred thousand almost fucking five times of fucking salam's peanuts like why the fuck is and then like you said a lot of a lot of co. the jobs here are almost minimum wage or just above and it hasn't changed twenty fucking years. So why don't we change that part of instead of all the banks and everybody else getting fucking bank or making or getting rich offer. Why not keep that fucking down people to have a decent way of living. Because i mean at the end of the day my mama up on this fifteen dollars an hour certain jobs. Yes if you're at mcdonalds you should not be bringing fifteen dollars an hour because that's not the career should be looking. Fuck fucking be at once. People get all. I'm making fifteen bucks fought. Life is great. Because i'm serving burgers fucking every fucking three hours or some shit. You should not be happy that that's what you want. You know what i mean like. I mean that's fucking that's as a bit mud. And then because i know poor. Those restaurant here had put out. I don't know if you saw that sign. They had put out You know what guys are the scientists something Supposed to please expect a long wait time because we don't have enough servers because nobody wants to work here because everybody wants to get a free money off of the government is what they had put a sign saying that ship his free. Yeah so they're saying like so. Expect three hour wait times just to get a fucking steak and it's like well you know what when when you're working that shouldn't be career. You know what. I mean because people want a bit should want to better themselves because i i'm doing the math here So fifteen dollars. An hour equals out to twenty eight thousand eight hundred dollars a year okay..

salam mcdonalds
"salam" Discussed on Strength To Be Human --Global Arts & Affairs Podcast, Hosted by Mark Antony Rossi

Strength To Be Human --Global Arts & Affairs Podcast, Hosted by Mark Antony Rossi

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"salam" Discussed on Strength To Be Human --Global Arts & Affairs Podcast, Hosted by Mark Antony Rossi

"Had happened was he realized a couple of months into it when he went to quite a fire. Now the fire. He fought the first time after. This horrible event wasn't all that big advant wasn life or anything so it's a commercial building you know bunch of equipment in there you know so. You're not going to go in there with the same type urgency. I is people in there. You might not take the same kind of risks on that same firefighters sydney saying. I don't care so commotion bill and let it burn now. He got insurance. They'll say that and they don't think that but if there's not life involved then obviously take take advantage of that situation. Go about it in a different way to do the best they can to contain it in do what they can do but you know nobody wants to give up their life for for tractor or something okay. It's not the same thing as a person so he went through one of those and he felt a little anxious. He nothing unusual he. He blew it off. He had a couple of cries. Also that way where they simply didn't involve anybody. Who's this buildings stuff. A couple of salam's but he noticed something but she puts it aside but he's still noticed that every time that bell rang every time he had a suit up to go out there. He did not feel the same that he used to before that one traumatic event when he finally got to a fire i think he said it was like maybe like almost a year later. That involves people and urgency and life and death and all of that stuff. He said he had problems even getting through do his job let alone savings somebody yet all kinds of things. Some things came back to him. He almost hesitated. In some instances. In one instance. He stood there for a moment. Things that are dangerous and that kind of line of work. You can't be doing stuff like that..

sydney salam bell
Matt Gaetz sought blanket pardon from Trump

Real Time with Bill Maher

01:11 min | 2 years ago

Matt Gaetz sought blanket pardon from Trump

"Matt gaetz listen to this. He asked before. Eddie we knew any of this. He asked the trump white house. When i was still office. If you can have a blanket preemptive pardon as as innocent people do for any future. Crimes isn't even festive. I just a blanket. Pardon donald donald trump today spoke out on this. He said that is bullshit. He said it is a total fake news story. Everybody knows that. When i was in the white house all legitimate requests for pardons had to go through the kardashians and today it's in the news with matt gaetz a report. It was reported. I don't know but that his associate in this endeavor with the young woman is pleading not guilty but is going to change it. Guilty and probably testify against matt gaetz and say that matt gaetz. Listen to this us then mom to send nine hundred dollars to this guy who then sent the money to the women which ironically is one of. The only times that trickle down economics has actually worked.

Matt Gaetz Pardon Donald Donald White House Eddie
Mother arrested after 4-year-old girl found wandering New York street alone at night

John Batchelor

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

Mother arrested after 4-year-old girl found wandering New York street alone at night

"Walking alone in the Bronx late at night is under arrest. 32 year old said Icka Abdul Salam, charged with abandonment of a child acting in a manner in jury is to a child and reckless endangerment. Daughters to Dia was seen at the corner of Prospect Avenue and East Wonder to 56 Street and long would just past midnight Saturday morning. She's down the Cara VCs. Ah, third woman now has come

Icka Abdul Salam Bronx
New economic plan seeks input, investment from Washington DC's Ward 8 residents in the future of their neighborhoods

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

New economic plan seeks input, investment from Washington DC's Ward 8 residents in the future of their neighborhoods

"Are being asked to sign on to help chart the future of their community. The Ward eight Community Economic development planning process has launched with the goal of getting residents to come together and help create a comprehensive economic development plan for the area. The solutions are in the community come up with the solutions that we need to have. Organization facilitator, Mustafa Abdel Salam says He believes these kind of local models are vital to really show there is capacity at the community level to do this that we don't need to wait for people outside the community. Says to create. The plan will include mapping the area social, cultural and economic assets and taking note of the challenges, then set goals and build a master plan to reach those goals. Right now they're looking for members of Ward eight to get involved in the process. Michelle Morello w T

Mustafa Abdel Salam Michelle Morello
"salam" Discussed on Radio Fajri 99.3FM

Radio Fajri 99.3FM

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"salam" Discussed on Radio Fajri 99.3FM

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The Cultural and Ecological Implications of the Salep Orchid Trade

In Defense of Plants Podcast

06:54 min | 2 years ago

The Cultural and Ecological Implications of the Salep Orchid Trade

"Take those steps in and do something professionally with your career to actually. Contribute to the world of conservation, which brings us to the topic of Salad, and if anyone listening has heard of salad at all is probably as an ingredient, which is interesting. Because often times I hear people saying, Vanilla is the only culinary viable orchid on the planet, which is not true. So let's talk about sal up what is it? What is it used for, and where does it come from? When Salad Salad? Actually, it's not only an arcade ashamed Larkin it's like a big group of four kids. If you go through literature, you can find more than thirty five species. SLEAFORD Silane it's also depending on when a whether you are what exactly two different species or group species in Greece different one in Turkey or other countries. So when we talk about the If we see all the countries together faced in weekend, say that the most common once belonged to Janet like or he's like that filariasis also mccown. And infected, maybe it's off races when. So what's smoke one between solid core kids as their root system they most often have obeyed Bob's or? Huber's along one that look like little fingers. If. You see those on the rises. So this is actually a a salad porchet and being driven is coming through the dried and ground Cuba's that's what you get the. Fowler and the Susan Shelley Different. If you see, for example, in Greece, they like days they're just washed with water and dry. But if you go to Durkin also boy in either walking on me, it depends on very Jim. So that's what's giving you the final product of salad father. In what is sell generally used in? I mean, if someone's looking to see if it's an ingredient, what kind of food are they looking at generally or is it a lot just like the orchids that gives us it If you look at it as any greeted Bailey actually there are a lot of things you can find it most often is the traditional beverage. Back. The. Actually it's not always clear product that sometimes makes the cornstarch. Bob Is the one that you make the beverage hot beverage also techie you can find the acid thickening ingredient for they additional ice cream called on the. One that stick you on. an increase is also used or traditional ice cream, but this call, Kai Mikey by this mixed with mustard powder. The one that comes from the must be healthy. So this is more I don't mind. And less. But issue see that he starts Suzanne Masters you can not a fine sapping the most stains places even as an ingredient or bombs. So. Mrs I leave. I much. Boy. While an okay. So these are all terrestrial orchids for anyone that's not familiar with the Genera, and when you talk about harvesting routes, that immediately brings to mind issues that we have with harvesting plants here in North America for instance, panics and high dressed us. Those are two plants that are highly sought after further routes, but the very act of pulling up a plant. By. Its roots kills it right. So this is where you can kind of see the connection with conservation. If you're harvesting the roots of a plant, you're you're taking its life away from it right and so that's where you start to come into issues with biodiversity endangerment with a lot of these orchids correct yet because the production of Saleh Pro Juarez, the use of the entire. Plans. So basically in the overwhelming majority of aces harvesting salad means the destruction of the orchestras selves. Now to make one kilo solid requires a by two and a half thousand plans. To the half thousand individuals, Wallin kilo. Of. Salam powder ouch. Yeah. That's a lot of orchids. Now, if you think about one cup of sal but of the equivalent to Cappuccino or something but drinking salad beverage. you need five grams for that. So if you do the math works as Iran thirteen plans for a single cup of salad drink. Does a pretty expensive kind of process in terms of of orchids. and. There are certain people told you know taking one of the to chew birds and putting the other back but all this is all this is just talk really because the amount of work required harvesting these things it's very hard were, and that's one of the reasons why are studied we found a lot of people that actually stopped elected. Elected Saleh. But It's a bypass were talking about something between. Ten. In Turkey and the launch ed very variable. The amount of used something between twenty and AC tones in a single year. Yeah. And that I remember talk from Professor Cramps Zeke, he mentioned that every year and thirteen one, hundred, twenty, million arcades are being kids in order to produce missile of the year. So it's like a tremendous amount of individuals and as able say that it is like you're actually bringing up a whole mountain that say a huge number. Yeah and again, we wouldn't be talking about conservation here. If this was something that was produced agriculturally, right these are all being taken from the wild they're harvested and those numbers are mind blowing I had no idea what we were getting into when. We started talking about this just in terms of quantity and like you said, it's not just the fact that they're pulling these plants out of the ground and them for this it's your digging the whole time you're also disrupting habitats and that's something I never see talked about when it comes to harvesting foraging anything like that is the fact that if you're digging things up your

Saleh Pro Juarez BOB Greece Turkey SAL Vanilla Larkin Professor Cramps Zeke North America Kai Mikey Durkin Huber Cuba Janet Suzanne Masters Iran Endangerment Filariasis Bailey
Ryan Forsythe of Trevor Sorbie: Being a Happy Successful Hairdresser

How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

07:22 min | 3 years ago

Ryan Forsythe of Trevor Sorbie: Being a Happy Successful Hairdresser

"Before we go any more into that. Let's just learn about you. Ron And you'll Rosa I. He just gives a little bit more of a heads up about you'll row at Trevor Syllabi and undertakes so our senior director in the card. Salam which is our flagship store. And I've been since two thousand four and basically started as a stylist there and worked on the way up to to this position and I look to all of the education happens in the cotton solemn and I work under Tiziana prematurely. She's the international head of education. So you know together. I work very closely with her. And we way Lacoste with in house education which is for the system Sir Training and there is also Zach by and Nathan who lacoste at the technical side of the shining and yeah we look after the assistance. We also look after people that are applying for jobs like He pulled up from the outside so we take trae tests we retry them and we'll say China teaches to become teachers. So you know. That's quite busy rolling itself as well as you know. We're all working on the floor as well. Five days a week doing clients fully but is and stuff like that stuff as well as the head of the ship sound on. What led you to that role so I mean I can't trump sorby and I you know I came in from the from the outside odd had previous experience so I kind air and I started as a stylist and ostrow couple years of working trying to kind of make my my kind of inroads. They're around all these amazing addresses who I really wanted to aspire to be like no you at Angelo Seminar. A time and trevor was cutting additives carrying and those all these headdresses around you that you just aspired to be like so. I just really wanted to kind of eventually get to that level and Pi Ata of all those names futures should of delight site uproar many of them onto the podcast but for the most respected names in the world. Trestle be really is in the same levels. Vidal's essay in Mile. They probably the the world of hairdresser in the Angelo with former guest. Tom Connell very first interview previous. You have this certain style of hairdresser. Enemy galleys at that point of what Trevor Soobee is all about. And it's look it's tastes level in the head that it produces in its collections. I think first of all so continuing education things like the good foundation in Cotonou coloring styling having that foundation and then then kind of developing missiles personality the individual in the of the Hesse themselves. You know we're not trying to kind of create robots. We won't people'd Sir to flourish on. We really try to encourage creativity and yeah. I mean you know this. I guess we kind of work as a family. I'm necessity collaboration in terms of trying to kind of and that's why you see that consistency in terms of taste level. Think Yeah Salinas well before you were Trevor Sloppy. You mentioned that you was a hairdresser pronto. So you didn't start out. Trevor Soobee now. What was that before you got today and say I mean I I was? I come from a town outside. London called Stevenage in Harper Cheer. And it's also I think as thirteen IDA starts getting interesting to do hair. I didn't have any family. History of hairdressing. But you know I just. I loved anything creative. I loved music. I loved making start up fashion just I loved people but also was was London as a place and I saw was brought to London quite a lot bomb and my grandparents and you know as a place in really excited. And that's that's where I wanted to end up. I think it's a definite reason why I want to come into hair. I think just I always loved in my head coach as a as a kid. He wants governor here and I love the process before and after and fascinating. Our pain together. I loved the environment. I think it was how I fell off the haircut. That really made an impact on me me and my haircut and then we recently with James Bond the run around in the streets pretending to be twenty five. That's the Roger Moore James Bond. Put Away those. Yeah so that was. Then so yeah. You have an idea that I wanted to do and some tickets job in London. When I was fourteen so I was going to school class. Job In this great Ceylon in Maryland public image and Simona walk through the door. Just for this is this is broad belong so this is Ronnie to. I was in London as in hairdressing and this is a this is it now and I met my my my then boxes now at the Senate dear friend of mine who Barry Chriswell and he was to become a teacher and I would call mental as well because he taught me to Kuttab. He taught me really good work ethic he said Iran. We would like to pie to go out and party but just please come to work. You know that. Stay that stage that stay with me to this day so often I is kind of. I thought last album by role yourself them run as in your position that you have been not mental and how important is for your team. I don't yeah I feel like I'm in a position now where I can offer my experience for education and just infer. Two Years of working in hairdressing solve worked with great hairdressers levels and and obviously we client different manages. The norm that say so. I would consider a wealth of experience and of offering. I feel like the me. It's my duty to be able to help people whether it's with education whether it straight simply or whether it's just how to progress in the salon style saw in a hairdresser in general. I think the other thing. My my mushroom buried taught me was kindness and being a good person. You know. That was something that really stuck with me. From the

London Trevor Soobee Trevor Trevor Sloppy Angelo Angelo Seminar Tom Connell Senior Director Cotonou RON Roger Moore James Bond Ostrow Sir Training Vidal China James Bond IDA Salinas Maryland Ronnie
Getting Through the Toughest Start to Life as a New Salon Owner

How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

08:54 min | 3 years ago

Getting Through the Toughest Start to Life as a New Salon Owner

"Podcast. I want you today to listen to because I want you to fill a shed experience of somebody who is going through. Exactly what your guy for yes? We have different ways of different problems. We're all daily wave in our own way but Brooke is a hairdresser. One of the most exciting rising stars in our industry. Say she's a fainting and by two thousand twenty but in her short space of being silent owner since December. Two thousand nine teen. She has had to really grow quickly because in February of this year she had to experience flooding in her cell on her brand new salon and this was after she had to go through the process of the troubles of opening her Salam but she had to close a salon for two weeks. Then we will face with we all know now corona virus. How issue dealing with it? Well that's what she's GonNa talk as for. She's GonNa talk about what she is doing right now in this situation of the corona virus and as I tell Ya es podcast that would just give you hope it will give you smalls. It will make you feel positive in such desperate times and really is the perfect medicine for all of us need right now. And that's what I'm GonNa make sure that each and every one of you gets with these podcasts re week we are going to beat this together. And we're GONNA come out of it pasta and are no Brooke is GonNa make you feel really good about hairdressing and what you can do in this time of lockdown right now son delighted to welcome onto the show Brooke Evans. Welcome to the show Brook Hollow. What can we say I mean here? We are offering Sunday. The world's gone nuts hasn't it really has unser thinking. Is She happening? Every one of us broke his nephew wit. All everyone's being personally affected by this. And you know we're all having to come to terms with this and how we're going to do and how your mindset in not being a salon owner. You've got the Kevin's silently bridge. Where you at? Where's your head at. Am I think my head to scrambled? However you've got to stay positively situation so I'm trying to not focus on the now and more focused on the full weight on what's happening later on in life and I think it's really difficult to focus on the now because it's unstable. This is the first time this has happened and nobody has the answer so I mean we start he laughing in lots of ways. It's almost that's what we need to do. Isn't it because you know it's just bunk? World has just changed beyond recognition in one week. Really I mean two weeks. We will going this way but week. It's just changed but I mean so much I wanNA learn today really help you as you're young Solano neurons. You brought them in. How long have you I mean? How old are you? Mommy asking that question. Twenty six six. Have Your Own Salam I turn. When did you open this salon? And December serve out three months ago and premiums Guy Right. We'RE GONNA go into that. One lupe sounds just a pill. The pitcher but just for our listeners. I want them to really to learn from. You obviously has a young son and how you deal with the current Corolla Corona virus outbreak. But the positive things. How are you going to go forward but I think also I won't do I think. Why are you on is one? You are an outstanding rising star in Industry Financing Two Thousand Twenty member sallow. Now you've had you've had some problems. In those pre months it would be fair to science. Corona virus is just want to add to the layers of already in your early days. So tell us about yourself so you you open to December where is it gives an insight into the SALOM so we bought the Ceylon Staw last year? It was a mechanics courage so it been derelict for twenty years said needed loads into it. So I am formally what Tim Scott Right. The Hair Surgery Amazing Time Act told him the news and Tim. I'm going to leave in. May and by then hopefully will be opened in June come December. We still wear so the those those things to do in the salon a lot more than we ever could imagine. We had a fight with the council and climate. And because it's a conservation area. In areas outstanding beauty. There was not some rules and regulations but that we got there taking on the obvious. Hoy Street location. No not at all. I mean it was always a case of wanting to have a hope and somewhere where people was a hassle. We weren't just doing. Have you know we have local? People come in. They have the coffee and I wanted to be relaxing environment and so people feel comfortable in because quite often has daunting for paper. That Doug at the head on south is always my goal so I need an ability to fill that and this is kind of course this profiteering. What it looks Chatila Laminate looks it does look. I know you're super cool. Hairdresser you You know really are flying in the industry and things have been going great but you opened up this Salam think team there now so we started a quite small sensible which I'm really grateful for in the current climate So there's a team of four of us. Mom is very much in the picture. So my mom and dad actually have an invested in me to integrate and they built the style with me. So it's just been a three-month dot and then we've of employed a hairdresser in a ball to add to the team so business has been going great right. I'm guessing you bill because you're in the beautiful place. I am bridge. So is that Roy Bridge. Yeah it's beautiful outside of the UK and knows the embraceable nine place. Well actually. It's a lot more well known than I originally saw the island. Bridges the first of our own bridge in the world. Somehow people from all over the world come to visit my inside of the trip that remind you take very interesting breads so you sound December and it was really good but I've seen instagram pipes. And I know that you were struggling with problems so you had the the real of getting the Salon Open. I mean that's the part of the problem. But you've given asylum then tell us what's happened while sings against cooking along nicely. Yes so we have consolidated stem but that was right. You know. We had our first month which I'm used to be busy all the time. But it was steady and we look right for the new while existing clients. Then you have your January blues which you know we knew we were going to and and then February. We were strict with floods which is mad because when we bought the property. We knew that we may see how that never to the extent that we did and never in our wildest dreams we think we'd to ship the solemn for two weeks Anita Tunnel for two weeks. Yes which was mad because the solemn was drawn however it was coming up a With what we've got like a pit. Which is Philip full of alcohol and stuff for clients and the water was coming up through there and through the front dill so we were pumping the water out. So we just couldn't be Penn but the washer outside the Ceylon needed a boat to get to so it was them it stranded so you had to close. I close so what? How did you deal with that situation? So you close was any cover. Obviously you've gotta Pay Your rental. I Dunno you wrote heads. Yeah I'm suppose on really fortunate that my mom and dad were there to help. So we had my dad's pumps mojo compel Pinta out the Gills understood and are ready triumphs in the big picture here. I didn't want to pay the bills at an identity. Now what you pay them such sake. Whatever so I wanted to maintain and their wage is for as long as I could which I did manage to a But I think it's a really difficult situation to be. We ended up moving into the salons or two weeks to pump. The socks needed for our surveillance. So

Brooke Evans Tim Scott Fainting Ceylon Staw Roy Bridge Unser Brook Hollow Gills Chatila Laminate Kevin UK Philip Doug Anita Tunnel Ceylon Penn
UN envoy for Libya resigns as truce appears to crumble

BBC World Service

00:20 sec | 3 years ago

UN envoy for Libya resigns as truce appears to crumble

"The U. N. envoy to Libya Ghassan Salam may says he's resigned because his health could no longer cope with the stress of the job in recent months he's been trying to secure a ceasefire in the fight for control of the capital Tripoli the city which is the base of Libya's UN backed government is besieged by the forces of the warlord general Khalifa

Ghassan Salam Tripoli Libya UN U. N.
In Mozambique, Meteorologists Can't Keep Up With Climate Change

Short Wave

09:49 min | 3 years ago

In Mozambique, Meteorologists Can't Keep Up With Climate Change

"Okay. So so you visited a country that doesn't have super great meteorological data and there are a lot of countries that have this issue but I chose Mozambique and Southern Africa. Okay why sound sound well. Mozambique is a good example of a place where you don't have great weather data and you're dealing with the effects of climate change in a really obvious way so there's -ceptable bowl to cyclones to droughts and floods there's a very long coastline a big river delta and Mozambique was hit by two big cyclones. Last year they're experiencing a drought this year. So yeah it's a place where these issues are front and center. So what does that actually look like for meteorologists in Mozambique. They basically can't can't tell what the weather's going to be is that right. Yeah not that accurately at least so to see how it unfolds. I went to visit Mozambique's National Institute of Meteorology and I hung out with the lead meteorologist Cossio Tampa Bay will. He did his job for morning and on the day I went. It was actually a good example because there was rain in the forecast which is normal and the capital Maputo where we were is pretty flood-prone like if it gets maybe an inch and a half of rain some of the streets will flood. Oh that's not a lot. Yeah not a lot not good so with rain in the forecast while I was there is just sitting at his computer. He has all these tabs open and he is looking at weather maps from Europe from Japan from the US Navy from from the US National Oceanic Administration like up the road here thousands of miles away and he's just like going through these tabs and trying to figure out what's going to happen the resolution of the maps looking at over Mozambique. It's not that great like it's just like big things of clouds over the whole country yet. No it's not good. Yeah Yeah it makes his job super hard so like on this particular day he wanted to know when it would rain and how much but instead all he could really say was that it was going to read some amount sometime sometime in the afternoon in some parts of the area around the capital which is not enough information. If you WanNa like close roots or make sure that people aren't endanger Moose and he told me like right now. We are using global models but what we need is a weather. Model all our own for Mozambique's with better resolution because the weather threats are getting more severe weather threats are we talking about so he's specifically talking about whether other that's worse because the climate is changing. He was really explicit about that. So for example the two cyclones that hit this ear. Cyclones can happen in a normal year right without climate change. But it's a lot more likely you'll get two big storms forming when you're with climate change got US Earth Guitar and if you're a Cossio Temba you're sitting in your office. He and his colleagues were not able to tell where the worst flooding from those storms was going to happen until after they made landfall right right and then at that point it's too late. You're not you're just fixing things instead of trying to prevent things from being damaged or people exactly which is not where you want to be. So what do they need. Well you need better weather forecasting and that means you need two things need better data about what is happening and you need better computer models about what could happen in the future. And I talked to the scientists in Maputo in the capital who basically trains all of the meteorologist's Mozambique he works at the university. Edward Mondlane University city there. His name is Antonio Chaos and he is very focused on the first thing the data itself used to say garbage in garbage out about the model itself doesn't solve anything he's talking about better raw local measurements about like wind and humidity and rain like really basic stuff and Gnat is something that we really take for granted in the US Africa as a continent maybe excluding little bits of Africa discussed the of metrological skull daytime even on the continent side. And it's worse when you go to oceanside oceanside he's talking about the data that's actually collected along the coast out at sea which is where cyclones forum. It's where a lot of whether comes from and there is just not a lot of reliable local data there. Are there any efforts to to fix that to get more more data. Yeah so there's this one example that I think really encapsulates what's going on. So in the early two thousands Mozambique's government and the World Bank Anthony at this German company came together and they installed to weather radar stations on the coast of Mozambique and one of the two towers was in the town of shot which is only like three hours from the capital. And I was going there anyway. I wanted to see it because I had heard that the president himself cut the ribbon when it was opened in two thousand four presidents love to cut ribbons. No matter where you are they love it. So I visit this place and the guy who unlocks the gate for me. Is this this Guy Salomao mouse and he's the janitor for the local meteorology office and for years. He has been walking like three miles up this hill to dust. Sweep and keep it clean. Can we go inside your body red ladder you into a hole in the ceiling. Can you hear that. You're very echoey dome and telescope sort of And it looks fine but Salam mouse tells me this story. While we're standing up there in the dark it goes like like this so the radar is installed into four and before that people in this area and he's from here they didn't take the weather forecast very seriously because often they were wrong so like when there was flooding predicted people would just stay in their homes. Leave their cattle out in the low lying fields and often bad things would what happened so then in two thousand eight four years after the radars installed. There's the storm and there's heavy rain and there's wind in the local meteorologists can see from the radar data that the storm is stalled. Like it's not moving and so they put out a warning they're like. Hey guys be careful. The storm is not over. It's going to be like two to three days. Do not go out. Like don't go to areas and they were right okay and people were super impressed. Like Salma Mouse Remembers people saying like were you talking to God with that thing. Oh okay wow so yeah this radar made people really really proud proud good but then shortly after that the radar started to malfunction. That's what they do they do that. They're they're really hard to keep calibrated. And it's extra hard when you're not in place that's had radar in the past. There's not one of expertise in the area. The company that made it was from Germany and like local technicians. Didn't necessarily fairly heavily expertise they needed or the parts and in the end this particular radar towers. It stopped working altogether around twenty thirteen. And what really kills kills me is like mouse. Janitor has been keeping it clean anyway ever since like going there every few days gotta have imagine. That's like extremely frustrating right. He's like maintaining you keeping it clean like ready for somebody to come in there but he has no idea if and when somebody's GonNa actually make it work again yeah. I asked him this because I was driving up the wall and he was like of course it does yes. It is extremely annoying and he still hopes it'll start working again. Yeah so if it if it doesn't start working again is weather radar in that area. The only way meteorologists can get information about the local weather or is there something else else that they can do. Yeah that's the big question and a lot of meteorologists and climate scientists. I talked to you about this issue. They said that in the long term for places like Mozambique the better option maybe satellite data. There are already whether satellites up there in orbit collecting information about a lot of the world. And if you could just get that information mission to the people that need it it might be a better source. But it's an enormous amount of data. That's coming down. So you need great Internet. You need computing power so you need more training for the people who actually going to use this data plus you need a better weather models put it all into and all of that is super expensive and and I think we all know that governments generally don't have lots of cash around just waiting to be invested in science generally speaking no look the science slush fund. It hasn't been something that you know. I mean we're doing all right over here but it's not great. Yeah exactly and Mozambique is no different like Muslim because not a rich country they do not. I have a ton of money lying around to like totally upgrade their weather systems or they would have already done it and every time. There's a disaster. That's more money out the door or to help with the immediate recovery which is important but it's a vicious cycle exactly and actually the Paris climate agreement has something built into it to help countries Lake Mozambique deal with the effects of climate change and prepare for the future. It's called capacity building and it's a mechanism that's supposed to have richer countries the countries countries that historically contributed the most climate change. Help foot the bill for smaller countries countries. That didn't contributed so much to climate change to prepare right and I feel like that's just going to be a question that keeps coming up kind of over and over which is who should shoulder the burden for the challenges that are caused by climate. Change right yeah yeah yeah. It's really hard question. And there's what should happen and there's what is happening to like up until now. Even though most countries say they agree with the idea that richer countries the help foot the bill the actual not of money changing hands is relatively small higher Rebecca Hersher. I appreciate you appreciate you

Mozambique Maputo Lake Mozambique United States Southern Africa Tampa Bay National Institute Of Meteorol Africa Europe Salma Mouse Us Navy President Trump Moose Cossio Temba Edward Mondlane University Japan Rebecca Hersher Salam Antonio Chaos
In Mozambique, Meteorologists Can't Keep Up With Climate Change

Short Wave

09:49 min | 3 years ago

In Mozambique, Meteorologists Can't Keep Up With Climate Change

"Okay. So so you visited a country that doesn't have super great meteorological data and there are a lot of countries that have this issue but I chose Mozambique and Southern Africa. Okay why sound sound well. Mozambique is a good example of a place where you don't have great weather data and you're dealing with the effects of climate change in a really obvious way so there's -ceptable bowl to cyclones to droughts and floods there's a very long coastline a big river delta and Mozambique was hit by two big cyclones. Last year they're experiencing a drought this year. So yeah it's a place where these issues are front and center. So what does that actually look like for meteorologists in Mozambique. They basically can't can't tell what the weather's going to be is that right. Yeah not that accurately at least so to see how it unfolds. I went to visit Mozambique's National Institute of Meteorology and I hung out with the lead meteorologist Cossio Tampa Bay will. He did his job for morning and on the day I went. It was actually a good example because there was rain in the forecast which is normal and the capital Maputo where we were is pretty flood-prone like if it gets maybe an inch and a half of rain some of the streets will flood. Oh that's not a lot. Yeah not a lot not good so with rain in the forecast while I was there is just sitting at his computer. He has all these tabs open and he is looking at weather maps from Europe from Japan from the US Navy from from the US National Oceanic Administration like up the road here thousands of miles away and he's just like going through these tabs and trying to figure out what's going to happen the resolution of the maps looking at over Mozambique. It's not that great like it's just like big things of clouds over the whole country yet. No it's not good. Yeah Yeah it makes his job super hard so like on this particular day he wanted to know when it would rain and how much but instead all he could really say was that it was going to read some amount sometime sometime in the afternoon in some parts of the area around the capital which is not enough information. If you WanNa like close roots or make sure that people aren't endanger Moose and he told me like right now. We are using global models but what we need is a weather. Model all our own for Mozambique's with better resolution because the weather threats are getting more severe weather threats are we talking about so he's specifically talking about whether other that's worse because the climate is changing. He was really explicit about that. So for example the two cyclones that hit this ear. Cyclones can happen in a normal year right without climate change. But it's a lot more likely you'll get two big storms forming when you're with climate change got US Earth Guitar and if you're a Cossio Temba you're sitting in your office. He and his colleagues were not able to tell where the worst flooding from those storms was going to happen until after they made landfall right right and then at that point it's too late. You're not you're just fixing things instead of trying to prevent things from being damaged or people exactly which is not where you want to be. So what do they need. Well you need better weather forecasting and that means you need two things need better data about what is happening and you need better computer models about what could happen in the future. And I talked to the scientists in Maputo in the capital who basically trains all of the meteorologist's Mozambique he works at the university. Edward Mondlane University city there. His name is Antonio Chaos and he is very focused on the first thing the data itself used to say garbage in garbage out about the model itself doesn't solve anything he's talking about better raw local measurements about like wind and humidity and rain like really basic stuff and Gnat is something that we really take for granted in the US Africa as a continent maybe excluding little bits of Africa discussed the of metrological skull daytime even on the continent side. And it's worse when you go to oceanside oceanside he's talking about the data that's actually collected along the coast out at sea which is where cyclones forum. It's where a lot of whether comes from and there is just not a lot of reliable local data there. Are there any efforts to to fix that to get more more data. Yeah so there's this one example that I think really encapsulates what's going on. So in the early two thousands Mozambique's government and the World Bank Anthony at this German company came together and they installed to weather radar stations on the coast of Mozambique and one of the two towers was in the town of shot which is only like three hours from the capital. And I was going there anyway. I wanted to see it because I had heard that the president himself cut the ribbon when it was opened in two thousand four presidents love to cut ribbons. No matter where you are they love it. So I visit this place and the guy who unlocks the gate for me. Is this this Guy Salomao mouse and he's the janitor for the local meteorology office and for years. He has been walking like three miles up this hill to dust. Sweep and keep it clean. Can we go inside your body red ladder you into a hole in the ceiling. Can you hear that. You're very echoey dome and telescope sort of And it looks fine but Salam mouse tells me this story. While we're standing up there in the dark it goes like like this so the radar is installed into four and before that people in this area and he's from here they didn't take the weather forecast very seriously because often they were wrong so like when there was flooding predicted people would just stay in their homes. Leave their cattle out in the low lying fields and often bad things would what happened so then in two thousand eight four years after the radars installed. There's the storm and there's heavy rain and there's wind in the local meteorologists can see from the radar data that the storm is stalled. Like it's not moving and so they put out a warning they're like. Hey guys be careful. The storm is not over. It's going to be like two to three days. Do not go out. Like don't go to areas and they were right okay and people were super impressed. Like Salma Mouse Remembers people saying like were you talking to God with that thing. Oh okay wow so yeah this radar made people really really proud proud good but then shortly after that the radar started to malfunction. That's what they do they do that. They're they're really hard to keep calibrated. And it's extra hard when you're not in place that's had radar in the past. There's not one of expertise in the area. The company that made it was from Germany and like local technicians. Didn't necessarily fairly heavily expertise they needed or the parts and in the end this particular radar towers. It stopped working altogether around twenty thirteen. And what really kills kills me is like mouse. Janitor has been keeping it clean anyway ever since like going there every few days gotta have imagine. That's like extremely frustrating right. He's like maintaining you keeping it clean like ready for somebody to come in there but he has no idea if and when somebody's GonNa actually make it work again yeah. I asked him this because I was driving up the wall and he was like of course it does yes. It is extremely annoying and he still hopes it'll start working again. Yeah so if it if it doesn't start working again is weather radar in that area. The only way meteorologists can get information about the local weather or is there something else else that they can do. Yeah that's the big question and a lot of meteorologists and climate scientists. I talked to you about this issue. They said that in the long term for places like Mozambique the better option maybe satellite data. There are already whether satellites up there in orbit collecting information about a lot of the world. And if you could just get that information mission to the people that need it it might be a better source. But it's an enormous amount of data. That's coming down. So you need great Internet. You need computing power so you need more training for the people who actually going to use this data plus you need a better weather models put it all into and all of that is super expensive and and I think we all know that governments generally don't have lots of cash around just waiting to be invested in science generally speaking no look the science slush fund. It hasn't been something that you know. I mean we're doing all right over here but it's not great. Yeah exactly and Mozambique is no different like Muslim because not a rich country they do not. I have a ton of money lying around to like totally upgrade their weather systems or they would have already done it and every time. There's a disaster. That's more money out the door or to help with the immediate recovery which is important but it's a vicious cycle exactly and actually the Paris climate agreement has something built into it to help countries Lake Mozambique deal with the effects of climate change and prepare for the future. It's called capacity building and it's a mechanism that's supposed to have richer countries the countries countries that historically contributed the most climate change. Help foot the bill for smaller countries countries. That didn't contributed so much to climate change to prepare right and I feel like that's just going to be a question that keeps coming up kind of over and over which is who should shoulder the burden for the challenges that are caused by climate. Change right yeah yeah yeah. It's really hard question. And there's what should happen and there's what is happening to like up until now. Even though most countries say they agree with the idea that richer countries the help foot the bill the actual not of money changing hands is relatively small higher Rebecca Hersher. I appreciate you appreciate you

US, Iran And Peter Kenyon discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

03:21 min | 4 years ago

US, Iran And Peter Kenyon discussed on Morning Edition

"We are in the middle of another tense moment between the US and Iran, Iran's revolutionary guard announced overnight that it has shot down a US drone a US official has confirmed to NPR that the aircraft has been downed, but disputes Tehran's account of the facts. NPR's Peter Kenyon is in stem, Bill. He's been following this story high Peter. All right. So a lot remains to be seen, but what do we know so far? Well, we know that an unmanned US military drone has been taken down. And we know Iran was responsible the report, I came in from an Iranian new site. That's linked to the revolutionary guard corps. It was picked up by the state news agency after an initial US response that did not appear to confirm the downing an American official does confirm to NPR and others that the drone was indeed shut down. All right. But there is a dispute over where it was shot down. Right. Iran says it shut down the drone over its airspace. The US says it was over international waters. Why is this significant? Well, I'll tell you what significant because it's a question of whether this was a defensive move or not this was the cause of some confusion early on, after the initial Iranian reports, which said it happened inside running airspace over southern Iran. The US military's response was very narrow said, we didn't have any aircraft operating in Iranian, airspace Wednesday, then a bit later officials began saying the shootdown did occur, but it was an international waters. And that would seem a move to undermine any effort by Iran to call this, a matter of defensiveness interesting. So once that is established it could mean a lot. I mean Peter, you've been on with us the past couple of weeks, talking about this back and forth and how it's been escalating and the context is really important, how big is this development this morning? Well, it's definitely big how big depends, probably on the US response, first of all, it certainly could escalate the situation further. This was on the one hand and unmanned aircraft a pilotless aircraft I guess I should say that's important because, as you know, the Trump administration has warned that the death of even a single American in this dispute could lead to a really strong response. So militarily this hasn't altered, the situation very much. But as an active aggression, this could be seen in Washington as justifying a strong response. So in terms of ratcheting up tensions, this could be a lot more significant than the physical loss of one drone, they will likely be voices inside the administration saying this demands a response and a lot could depend on what kind of response that turns out to be Peter is there precedent for this has Iran shot down a US Joan ever before years ago, several years ago, they were parading drone that they claim to have captured. There were some disputes about the circumstances. There were no hugest coalitions intention. Surrounding that. So I know it is hard to predict, but what do you imagine happens next? Well, the one thing we're not seeing in the immediate. Aftermath is cooler heads. Prevailing, Veron's, Revolutionary Guards already saying, hey, we're sending a clear message to America commander Hussein Salam says they're not looking for war, but will react strongly against any aggression and we should note. This is different from previous instance, this is a US military aircraft direct attack. And that's why some will be calling for spots NPR's, Peter Kenyon in assemble.

United States Iran Peter Kenyon NPR Revolutionary Guards Trump Administration Guard Corps Official Tehran Hussein Salam Veron Washington America Commander One Hand
Libya crisis: UN warns battle for Tripoli is 'start of a bloody war

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:37 min | 4 years ago

Libya crisis: UN warns battle for Tripoli is 'start of a bloody war

"The time in Tripoli's approaching eight thirty six where the UN on void Libya has warned that the battle for the capital is just the start of a long and bloody war. It began at the beginning of April, when a military leader general Khalifa, half, tar, who's allies to rebels seeking to overturn the internationally. Recognized government launched an offensive on the city will since then more than five hundred people have died and tens of thousands of fled from their homes and things appear to be getting worse with both sides, receiving military supplies from overseas with Turkey backing the government of fires Al Sarraj and Jordan, supporting the rebels or the UN envoy, Gazon Salma is calling for those weapons supplies to stop. Joining me to discuss is Mary FitzGerald, who's a researcher and journalist specializing in Libya. Welcome to the program. Mary, what do you make of what Salam, I had to say. While it was a very powerful speech to the Security Council fifteen minutes long, and you could see the, the frustration on Salama's part is been the UN special envoy to Libyan average just over two years. He has been trying to get a u n political process aimed at resolving, the simmering conflict in Libya, get that up and running. And I think we shouldn't forget that the day that Khalifa after launch this offensive on Tripoli was actually the same day that the UN secretary, General Antonio Gutierrez was intrepid to try and give a fresh impetus to that UN a process. So the symbolism could not have been more striking an offensive launched by a man who Khalifa after has tried to undermine that UN process since it begun, late two thousand fourteen so I think Salamis frustration was evident in his speech yesterday. But also his warning was was stark about where the fighting that was. Triggered by half tres offensive may lead Libya, and there was one line that stuck out for me. He said the full civil war is not inevitable, but it may occur because of the will of some parties and the inaction of others. And I think that reference to inaction has to basically be a message, I think to e you Member States because what happens in Libya does not stay in Libya. And it has an impact on Europe that it doesn't say on countries that are fueling this conflict, particularly on how star side, the, the UAE and Saudi Arabia in the Gulf. And then on the other side as, as you mentioned Turkey has been supplying weapons to, to the US government in, in Tripoli. And so I think that, that, that reference to inaction and given the we've seen an inability on the used side to forge more robust collective response to. This guy during conflict, I think is pertinent, can you give us a short, but Reese a lesson in recent history Mary, because obviously in the time since the full of, of, of the Gadhafi, regime, Libya has been going through a journey of turbulence, but in more recent years at certainly been overshadowed on the world stage in terms of the world's attention by by, by Syria. What's been happening that brought Libya to this point while since the fall of Gaddafi in two thousand eleven Libyan had a very shaky at transition and it has held number of elections. It's experiment in, in democracy. If you like for forty two years of Gaddafi's dictatorship, it, it, it didn't know democracy, but essentially Libya, since two thousand eleven has been roiled by m s struggle over control of the country's resources Libya's home to Africa's biggest oil reserves. The conflict in Libya is not ideal. Logical and it is a greedy scramble for the country's resources in two thousand fourteen Khalifa after was accused of attempting a military coup, and he that accumulation that belief that after seeks to impose himself as military ruler autocrat in Libya has been a key driver of the conflict from two thousand fourteen until the present day and tops are I think with this gambled try and take Tripoli. There was a lot of wishful thinking in some international circles about how after his intentions about the possibility of bringing him into a UN process aimed at creating an inclusive civil government in, in Libya.

Libya UN General Khalifa Tripoli Mary Fitzgerald Turkey Gazon Salma Security Council Al Sarraj Salam Gaddafi Gulf General Antonio Gutierrez Salama Europe Africa Researcher Salamis
News in Brief 22 April 2019

UN News

02:53 min | 4 years ago

News in Brief 22 April 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations, the UN special Representative Libya and head of the UN mission in the country. Well, Gus on salami is continuing his efforts to try and deescalate military action in and around the capital Tripoli. The commander of the self-styled Libyan national army began an offensive to try and take the Libyan capital from forces backing the UN recognized government more than two weeks ago. Here's UN spokespersons to Fantasia wreak. We've correspondents in New York on Monday. Mr. Salam as progress he met with Tunisian foreign minister Cammie Gina we in Tunis with whom he discussed developments related to the clashes in southern Tripoli both asserted that the UN facilitated political process is the ideal in only way to solve the Libyan crisis. According to the UN office, coordinating humanitarian affairs, ocher thousands of civilians refugees and migrants during trapped in conflict -ffected areas. Unable to flee either because of fighting with attention and a statement released on Monday, ocher said that medical teams were working relentlessly to evacuate and. Care for people wounded in the conflict through the Tripoli flash. Appeal the humanitarian communities urgently called for ten point two million dollars to continue providing lifesaving relief, adding that humanitarian needs in Libya rapidly, increasing while funding levels remain, low traditional knowledge is at the core of indigenous identity culture and heritage the chair of the UN permanent forum on indigenous issues said at the annual launch event on Monday stressing that it must be protected and nor GAM who is a member of Finland Sami parliament and head of these semi councils human rights unit said the forum offers an opportunity to share innovations and practices developed an indigenous communities over centuries and millennia indigenous peoples live in some ninety countries represent five thousand different cultures and speak an overwhelming majority of the world's estimated six thousand seven hundred languages and while they make up less than six percent of the global population. Indigenous people account for fifteen percent of the world's poorest. According to the forum, MS no GAM encouraged, all Member States to. Keep children connected to their indigenous culture and community stressing that these languages enabled us to protect our traditional knowledge. Three top United Nations officials will visit Bangladesh late this week to highlight the need for supporting the humanitarian needs of almost a million ranger refugees. Now living in the country. The UN announced the visit of High Commissioner for refugees or UNHCR Filippo Grandi, the direct to Germany of the migration agency IOM Antonio Vitorino and the UN relief chief Mark Lowcock head of ocher. In a statement released on Monday in the capital Dakar, the delegation will hold talks with senior government officials, and then travelled to Cox's Bazar to meet refugees assess preparations under way ahead of the monsoon season. And visit UN support projects. The aim of visit to highlight the need to continue strong international support while solutions can be found for the safe dignified return of Hingis to me and more. Matt wells, UN news.

UN Tripoli Libya Libyan National Army United Nations GUS Ocher Mr. Salam Tunis Representative Filippo Grandi Commander Matt Wells New York Cammie Gina Hingis Bangladesh Finland
Asylum claims at southwest US border jumped nearly 70% in 2018

The Big Biz Radio Show

00:38 sec | 4 years ago

Asylum claims at southwest US border jumped nearly 70% in 2018

"People are praying for Salam at the US Mexico border are spiking. In fact, the number of asylum seekers this year has almost doubled USA's. Chris Barnes reports from Washington the Trump administration's conceding that the number of asylum-seekers at the US southern border jumped by nearly seventy percent during the last fiscal year, which ended at the end of September. Of ficials say in two thousand seventeen the number of migrants filing claims about fifty six thousand this year. The number jumped to nearly one hundred thousand the feds releasing the numbers say it's part of their effort to sell the idea of capping the number of asylum claims granted

Salam USA Chris Barnes Mexico Washington Seventy Percent
Human Rights Watch asks Dubai's ruler about runaway daughter

02:51 min | 5 years ago

Human Rights Watch asks Dubai's ruler about runaway daughter

"Wbz newsradio ten thirty and wbz news time seven twenty six new court filings reveal a plot to execute a former new england mafia boss using a remote control plane rigged with explosives that was during the nineteen nineties documents filed ahead of the may ninth murder trial of francis cadillac frank salami included 2016 sixteen fbi report detailing the alleged scheme the report says mob enforcer kevin hanrahan plan to fly in explosiveladen plane into salam as home in sharon he also wanted to detonate a suitcase with explosives at a restaurant in providence frequented by rhode island mobster luigi baby shacks manako saw salomon codefendant paul redick are accused of killing boston nightclub owner and federal witness stephen dasaro whose remains were found in providence in two thousand sixteen there are new details about the abduction of a newborn at a florida hospital decades ago at her sentencing hearing friday gloria williams testifying that you put baby kamara in a bag and worried that she would be caught she's also begging for the parents forgiveness abc's eva pilgrim tells us what's next rank can't take a baby gloria williams claims he was in an abusive relationship depressed after a miscarriage when he walked out of that maternity ward with chameleon mobely now get caught the new it that secret would catch up with williams nearly two decades later told us last year she still loved williams he loved me for eighteen years prosecutors arguing the abduction was a selfish act williams told her true identity shortly before her arrest after realizing come i couldn't get a driver's license without a valid birth certificate or social security card human rights watch is asking dubai's ruling sheikh to reveal the whereabouts of his daughter after a french expi and others say she fled the marin only to be arrested off the coast of india the organization says that dubai silence on sheikha latifa bint mohammed al maktoum could qualify as an enforced disappearance to buy declined to comment publicly about sheikha latifa since the associated press reported in april on her disappearance the human rights watches middle east director says that emirates authorities should immediately reveal the whereabouts of the girl confirmed her status and allow her to contact the outside world wbz news time is seven twenty eight right now we've got fifty eight degrees partly cloudy skies in boston wbz's charlie sherman is up next he'll have the extended forecast and all the top stories the new.

Bint Mohammed Al Maktoum Dubai Florida Stephen Dasaro Boston Salomon Codefendant Kevin Hanrahan FBI Francis Cadillac Murder Frank Salami England Charlie Sherman Director Marin Eva Pilgrim
Syria, Russia blame Israel for airstrike on Syrian base that killed 4 Iranians

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

01:06 min | 5 years ago

Syria, Russia blame Israel for airstrike on Syrian base that killed 4 Iranians

"Thirty eight at seven thirty one cbs news update at airstrike on a military base in western syria has killed fourteen people including iranian fighters syria and russia are blaming israel reporter martin chew off from beirut from the the american military has denied tied to roll leads only one of the suspects in this region and that that is us right isn't that having very bombing iranian targets inside syria by their own admission iranian targets at least one hundred and twenty times in the last five years no comment from israel syria is denying reports of a chemical gas attack near damascus that killed sixty people many of them children syrian dr john salam has been speaking with physicians treating victims civilians hiding shelters died suddenly so there was a clear usage cubicle agent which goes southern their president trump warning there will be a big price to pay the un security council meets in emergency session today cbs news update i'm deborah rodriguez wtmj news time seven thirty two from the wgn j breaking news center.

Syria Russia Beirut American Military Damascus Dr John Salam Un Security Council CBS Israel Reporter Martin Chew President Trump Deborah Rodriguez Five Years
Russia tests new nuclear missile that NATO calls 'Satan 2'

Ask the Garden Geek with Michael Crose

01:32 min | 5 years ago

Russia tests new nuclear missile that NATO calls 'Satan 2'

"To get yours today use coupon code usa radio to save ten percents off your entire order there's been another long range missile tests but this time it wasn't conducted by north korea usa radio's chris barnes with more russia announcing it successfully tested its new icbm called sorry matt early friday a nuclear weapon that's to replace a soviet era missile in its arsenal russia's ministry of defence tweeting a video showing the launch the missile earlier this month in his state of the nation address russian president vladimir putin was bragging that this missile could reach any point in the world including anywhere in the united states for usa radio news i'm chris barnes arnold schwarzenegger recovering from open heart surgery in los angeles the seventy year old taken to cedars sinai yesterday for catheter valve replacement surgery lasting several hours facebook now fact checking photos and videos to reduce the hulks is in false news stories that are causing so much damage with more here's usa radio's wendy king per month facebook has been facing criticism among users whose complaints range from the spread fake news to the use of the network to manipulate elections and the harvesting of fifty million people's facebook data by the political consultancy group cambridge analytica it began the fact checking in france on wednesday and will continue to expand to other countries soon it's good friday a day where christians reflect on jesus death on the cross christians round the world gathering to remember the pulp with salam services enrollment believers in new york city taking part in the annual way of the cross procession over.

Chris Barnes Russia Matt United States Wendy King Facebook France North Korea President Trump Vladimir Putin Arnold Schwarzenegger Los Angeles New York Seventy Year