35 Burst results for "Sala"

LaVie Tidhar Discusses His New Book, "The Best of World SF"

Read Between the Lines

01:16 min | 2 weeks ago

LaVie Tidhar Discusses His New Book, "The Best of World SF"

"So can you tell me about your books. Can i thought well. I steer year. I'm supposed to be talking about the solid you'll thing Which is called the best of world at saf and it's a huge sheets on solid. James is the largest spine of ever had on on a book. Hugh measure them by spine. Inches now runs as a really big book. And that's kind of a passion project of mine of gene editing international Science fiction of sala cheese for about ten years of been trying to get anyone interested in this. And i've been doing these with a small press in in the states and this is the first dunno i get to do a big you know definitive. Best of unsolved of international speculative fiction from any from all over the world every continent except except for america But in my in my regular line of work. I'm i'm a novelist nicely. Long story writes bit of comex and so and everything too many novels to be honest.

Hugh James America
Interview With Mia P. Manansala, Author

Books and Boba

01:51 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Mia P. Manansala, Author

"And we are here with author. Mia p monot sala the author of arsenic adobo. She is also the winner of the twenty eighteen. Hugh colton award and the two thousand eighteen. Eleanor taylor bland. Crime fiction writers of color award. Welcome thanks for having me. It's always great to bring award winning for unpublished. But yes good. I mean it still counts. Still mary impressive award winning author. I mean like those awards are for my now soon to debut novel. So i guess you're right accounts it can cam nine like in publishing. You need to celebrate every little thing. So you're right you're right so how are you doing. How's how's covert publishing life going for you. What my book cut like as of this recording my book comes out in three weeks. So it's that weird thing of like. I've been waiting over a year for this to happen and now that it's starting to happen. I'm like oh no what like like people are going to be reading my words and and having opinions and oh you know. It's a weird super exciting and super scary time right now. Your your book is a book of the month choice. And that's like that's a pretty big deal too so congratulations. i think. I think that's also was kind of adding to this weird like inbetween feeling because i see my book like on instagram. People are tagging me and photos but it hasn't officially released. So i'm like is this real like. Is this actually happening. It's called marking. It's called marketing. Not a lot of authors. Get it but you're very lucky. Your book definitely deserves it. Because i had so much fun reading it.

Mia P Monot Sala Hugh Colton Eleanor Taylor Bland Mary
Dalai Lama urges others to get vaccinated as he receives first shot

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:18 sec | 3 months ago

Dalai Lama urges others to get vaccinated as he receives first shot

"Boxes. Jeff Man also reporting the Dalai Lama has received his first covert 19 vaccine shot The 85 year old Tibetan spiritual leader was administered the first shot of the Corona virus vaccine on Saturday at a hospital in the north Indian town of Dar Sala. He got his shot. After doing so. He urged others

Jeff Man Dalai Lama Dar Sala
How 9/11 Set Robert Saleh on the Path to Coaching the New York Jets

ESPN Daily

03:55 min | 5 months ago

How 9/11 Set Robert Saleh on the Path to Coaching the New York Jets

"And how many years have you been covering this franchise. Pablo f govern the jets for thirty two years. Which is longer than any person in history that's deserves a purple heart or you know a trip to the insane asylum but yes. It's thirty two years. And so how. Many coaches coaches have you seen. Come through the new york jets in that time. Yeah it's funny because the other day w- before they introduced roberts sala. I went back and checked because we need covered. That long. And the jets chains coaches so often you lose track over over time. He ends well. Total man okay. So you're the perfect person to talk to today. Your latest piece rich is about number twelve robert sala and his decidedly unique journey to new york city and the nfl coaching ranks. So before we get into all of the football and there is so much there. Tell me a little bit about robert. Saleh's background where did he grow up in. What was his upbringing like. Robert grew up in dearborn michigan which is just outside of detroit. Most people know it as a home of ford motor company but it's also the largest percentage of arab americans in the country. He is the grandson of lebanese immigrant. Muslim neighborhood a very strong and closely knit neighborhood and football was a big part of it. At robert really has football in his family. His dad played at eastern michigan university. He was. I'm told a very good middle linebacker. In fact he had a tryout with the chicago bears uncles who played cousins. Who played his older brother. David played all at ford's in high school. You mentioned the solid name at forts in high school and there is a strong tradition. Some of the best players in the schools history are members of the family from an early age. When robert was a seven year old waterboy for his older brother's football team. Football has been a huge part of his life. The family's life very much part of his upbringing in dearborn michigan so robert is growing up in this lebanese-american muslim family in dearborn a football family. What kind of player was robert himself. Yeah very good player. A captain in highschool played two ways. He was a linebacker in a tight end and really good. I talked to his high school coach. Jeff sturdiness in. I asked him. I said what kind of player was robert. He said he was like all the other solids he can really hit. You actually wears a bracelet to this day on his on his wrist during games. It says extreme violence. So i guess we could describe him as a very physical player who was good enough to get a scholarship in northern michigan and he went on to become an all conference. Tight end in northern michigan fell was ever a serious option for him. But i would say you know a really good ice school football player who enjoyed a solid career. So if you're a football player with that decidedly unsubtle mission statement rich. What do you do after college. Robert went to the exact opposite spectrum of what that mission statement would be. I mean he goes to work behind a desk working a nine to five job in a very stuffy. Corporate office building in downtown detroit is a credit analyst for america bank putting his finance degree work. His brother david is in the financial world is well you know. He graduated with a finance degree. So this is just following in the footsteps of his family. You know his dad had some done. Some business work. His grandfather was actually owned his own furniture store in dearborn. So he's really robert. Sala is point in his life in the year. Two thousand just anna colleges just following in the footsteps of some of his other relatives.

New York Jets Football Robert Pablo F Roberts Sala Dearborn Robert Sala Michigan Ford Motor Saleh Jeff Sturdiness Eastern Michigan University Detroit Chicago Bears NFL New York City David America
New York Jets Hire Robert Saleh As Next Head Coach

Niners Nation

00:37 sec | 5 months ago

New York Jets Hire Robert Saleh As Next Head Coach

"Robert sala is leaving the san francisco forty niners to become the head coach of the new york jets. The jets themselves tweeted out the news last night and adam schefter. Espn reported that solid is going to take passing game coordinator mike leflore with him to be as offensive coordinator in new york. Schefter added that sahlin. The jets have agreed to a five year contract in a tax to the monday morning. Quarterbacks albert breer gm john lynch said quote. Roberts earned this opportunity. He's a very smart tremendously. Gifted leader and ready for this challenge will miss him dearly but he's left as better and will be proud of all that he'll accomplish. The jets are very fortunate.

Robert Sala Jets Mike Leflore Sahlin Niners Adam Schefter Albert Breer Schefter San Francisco Espn John Lynch New York GM Roberts
Wilson, Lockett help Seahawks rally for 26-23 win over 49ers

Around the NFL

02:14 min | 6 months ago

Wilson, Lockett help Seahawks rally for 26-23 win over 49ers

"Turn it. Hand called his time inside. The ten inside the five touchdown seahawks back. It's up five. Doesn't matter alex collins is gonna punch it in for you anyway. Steve ray will. Kiro with the call outs. Columns ran for eight yards on a yard score. Russell wilson threw two fourth quarter. Touchdown passes the tyler lockett the seahawks rally twenty six twenty three win over the niners They end twelve and four. The seahawks four game winning streak But they are locked in at the number three seed. because of the saints packers winning the seahawks will host the rival rams in the wildcard round next week and mark. How good you feel about the seahawks. After today's game i would. I'm concerned about their offense. It's almost like a flip inverse relation to where they were earlier in the year. Where the offense was we watched it through the air. We had russell wilson pegged as a potential mvp because of how they were allowing him to play and how decay metcalf antilock. We're playing and the defense was all the concern. I mean lock it today. Set a seattle seahawks record for receptions in a season decay metcalf set a franchise record for yardage in a season but a lot of that has to do with the compiled numbers from earlier on this team. At one hundred and nine yards the start of the fourth quarter. They couldn't run the ball and it took a very typical seahawks. Finish the tyler lockett touchdowns and the alex collins dash for a score. I mean they came up late in a game where i would put this a little bit into divisional game against cal shanahan. Who robert sala. Who thought again. It's been weeks in a row. Coaching lights out. I'll made things real tough for seattle seattle things tough for the niners in the opposite way just sort of a typical nfc west beatdown and this niners team. They keep flashing to the box up in the sky where like star players not in the game. I mean they're doing with nobody and seattle. They work themselves out of a funk to some degree. do i trust them

Seahawks Alex Collins Tyler Lockett Russell Wilson Steve Ray Niners Kiro Touchdown Packers Rams Saints Metcalf Cal Shanahan Robert Sala Mark Seattle NFC
"sala" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:59 min | 8 months ago

"sala" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Believe that you will get stuck in that automatic kind of grasping mind what about me But. After I told everybody. There was this great laughter in the room and instead of this being about. The money they got. It became about. Just the joy we were all sharing in in all our responses in our own heads of what happened when they said this. and. This joy began to just kind of the laughter of it and the fun of it. Completely. Changed this impulse reaction of what about me so the what about me? I think I think that's just something that are grasping. Minds are always going to think it's just part of the worldly way in which we live as human to human but below. What about me? Is this ability that we have to feel the joy that person is feeling in this good news that they have, and that's what would to is not to is below that. Impulse level of. Good for you. You know it is very important aspect of practice, and before we get to the social issues here, the current situation I wanNA talk a little bit about what? is to practice to be a strong practitioner to this idea or aspiration. We can have an awakened mind and. Put it in some contexts. Because when you start practicing and you start looking for peace and calm I, mean, that's the thing that everybody's trying to. Just. Need to get to this piece and the calm. But before that peace and calm. Is Joy. It's almost like joy is the bridge that turns our efforts. Of practice of returning to the breath returning to the breadth or returning to the breadth, it's like the joy is what enables us to let go of striving and relax into this more tranquil calm. Peaceful Place. We need the joy to do that because without that joy. The basic effort or energy that we use to return again to be non-judgmental to be accepting, allowing returning again to this neutral object returning attorney. It in of itself can get mundane, it can get boring. You could be sitting there saying Oh cam coming back to the breath coming back to the. And without that joy that uplift. Learning to court avait that joy. Then it's very difficult to to the more peaceful calmer blissful states in meditation, and so the joy is the what I would consider the bridge between the basic difficulty of settling the mind with the benefit and the reward that comes when your mind to settled. The joy is that bridge and so it's necessary that we cultivate this just. So I can be happy all the time even though I am happy all the time. That's not why we're cultivating it. We're cultivating it. So that, we can get to a level of calm and peace in gathered mind. Much more of my conversation with Tewarie Salah read after this. Staying, informed has never been more.

attorney Tewarie Salah
"sala" Discussed on Ali on the Run Show

Ali on the Run Show

07:45 min | 9 months ago

"sala" Discussed on Ali on the Run Show

"That other races are starting to show and I think that's okay in the education piece comes in and so if you have a race that you love and they're saying we're going virtual, it's not because they want to go virtual it's because they have to and so if that is something if that race. You and hate virtual like so many people seem to maybe you make an exception you know the thing that I have been saying is. Support your favorite race virtually like you support your favorite restaurant with takeout food during the pin down if your job or your finances have not been affected by Covid nineteen and you can sign up for a race like he would have sign up for that virtual race and then there's still other races and again, one of the examples where the race gives. One hundred thousand dollars back to four charities year and they still feel strongly about wanting to do that not because it fulfills their yearly kind of quote of what they've been doing for thirty seven years now because probably those charities need vast support more than ever. So that was another reason we decided to go virtual not to just take a complete pass. You know we felt very strongly not needed to put something out there so that we can still support those charities in some way shape or form. Heck Yeah I love that right In spite of it, all I'm sure there are people listening who are thinking. You know what I know it's been a hard year, but I want to be the person who puts on my local five or hey, maybe I want to work for Michelle someday to anyone who is listening to this and thinking I might want to get involved in race management. What is your best piece of advice for them? Yeah I always say you don't have to be a runner to be involved in the management side of it. It does help in in my case I think it helps immensely that you see things that you wouldn't normally see you didn't go out and run races. And be able to kind of you know put these scenarios through your mind as you go you want to be involved. Ron Races volunteer at races volunteer to take like a key staff role like sometimes you know there's like a medals key staff person who manages the other volunteers do that reach out to the race and say, Hey, I want to help but even more so say I WANNA help in these are this is what I'm good at. Because otherwise it's like. I don't know you. I. Don't know where I could put you I mean certainly as we dive into our staffing and certainly as we get closer to the races there become lots of holes that you that you see in your like I need to fill this this and this, and so in those instances, it would be helpful if you knew Oh this person emailed me and they said that they wanted to help out of this event that they specifically said they really like working on course in I need a person this. So this would be a great fit. I think when when we get into the position where we're trying to. Were trying to help people to get into our business you need to help me help you. You know. So you gotTa tell me exactly what you watch or how how I can be of service to you. But that's one of the things that I always say. And just as a business owner I, guess in in this industry. Is. I'm not going to be around forever and so while I'm here and while I'm in this industry I need to teach every person than I have the opportunity to teach. All of the things in my head because otherwise I mean this job is you have to learn it by doing. This is not something you study in a book. This is not something you learn other than from you've failed at it at some point you didn't covers the years with trash bags and they got soaked and ruined. and. So you you have to. You have to be able to like somehow instill those things in other people, and the best way to do that is through working is through you know working on an event. But then also just trying to like. Noun load what you? Were or why you know it you know what happened in why do I do it this way? Well, because one time we didn't do it this way and this what happened And so in my position, you always kind of have to intimidate all of these things, which is where I think the science background really has helped me because it's like an if then situation always everything you do in raise production is if I do this than this will happen if I put these toilets here than the lines will backup into the course. So it's it's a lot of scenario based things but I think that the. The only place for this industry to continue to get better. The only way for it to continue to get better is for more people to have more knowledge of what we're doing and why. The. Running industry as a whole is very a very sharing and caring place. It's a very small industry and many people know each other which I will through the namic has been wonderful because we're all affected pretty equally and we're all here for each other and if if someone's getting traction somewhere during this, they're sharing it with everyone because at the end of the day, most of us are all friends we all WanNa, see each other succeed but I think that. Yeah if you if you want to get involved, involve yourself, you know don't sit by the sidelines. And the other thing I will. That I know has helped me in terms of like building my career to the point of being the president of my own race management company is don't be afraid to start at the bottom You know I think that that has really distinguished mine knowledge and skill set in the industry is that I started as a volunteer coordinator than I was a charity coordinator than I worked on grassroots marketing than I did permanent then I became a race director then became a business owner kind of overseeing all of these things and I think that as you go along your skill sets change or you build on. Knowledge that you learned from what you previously did I I don't it would be very difficult for me to go back at the time in be a volunteer coordinator because my my mindset in the way think now is so much more top level But I I wouldn't have the knowledge I have if I didn't do that job at that time and so I would say you know if you want to be involved, get involved at any level that you can get your foot into because it all matters all plays into kind of district greater scope of knowledge for the industry had to whole. So good while I am grateful for all that you do I know that we all are we cannot wait to be back at your races whatever that looks like and thank you so much for coming here and sharing so much with us today I. Appreciate You. Yeah thank you. I can't wait to.

volunteer coordinator business owner Covid race director Michelle coordinator Ron president
"sala" Discussed on Ali on the Run Show

Ali on the Run Show

06:41 min | 9 months ago

"sala" Discussed on Ali on the Run Show

"Because we were at this event. And so that email I just couldn't get it out of my mind in I kind of tried to go about my day and I think even tried to go about my day the next day and my husband got home from work and I said you know I think I can do that I think. I. Can put on that race and so I, knew someone who knew the person who insulted this inquiry email and I, I went to them and I said, could you find out if they would be willing to take a bid from from someone who didn't ask directly? And so they ended up saying, yes and I put together a bid to manage the event and I said if you pick me are will form a company. I don't I don't have one yet. And they picked me. So here we are. Five years later. and. Blistering pace you know is what it is today but it started off as an idea that I pitched through a bid with accompaniment I did not have time. That is so awesome opportunity that is so great. I love this story so much so. When you submitted that and found out that you got it that you've got the job and that this was going to be happening and you're creating your own company. was there what what were the feelings around that? Was it how? Yes this is what I've worked for or was it. Oh my gosh. What did I just do or a little bit of everything. It wasn't hell. Yes. Definitely excited. I. Was I was cautiously excited. I mean I knew there was a ton of work to be done I wasn't necessarily scared but I knew that in setting up the business certainly, I was GonNa like tread through or run into a lot of things that I didn't know I had to do was supposed to do. So you know when you're setting up in L. C., there's like this paperwork in that people were blah, Blah Blah and. Setting up a bank account for my business was one of the hardest things like they. I mean I don't need to go into detail. It was like I would go into one bank and they would say something and I'll go back and get what they said I needed then I would take it back in they're like, no, you don't need this unit something else. I'm trying to get some money like I. have this big check. I WANNA give it to you. And I want you to make it accessible for me like what is happening here. But I think part was the scariest and then. that. Kind of. As I go. Now there's you kind of learned that there are things that you forget to do as a business owner and it's all just like. Oh, it doesn't really matter if you just pay a late fee, you know like there's nothing you can't really undo or like do that. Wrong is just like Oh yeah. You just pay a fee and they don't really care not that I I don't operate like that I don't mean to say it so blase but it's hard to mess things up when you first start you're scared you know you're like Oh my God what if I do something wrong when I don't what if I check this box lots to None of that really matters in the grand scheme of things but I think as I got going. What I learned the quickest and what was what did become very scary is that when you get a contract, the size of the one idea to put on a half mirror eight, thousand person events, it seems like it's a Lotta money and that time I was a one man band it was just me. I knew that I was capable of doing all of the things that I needed to do to put on the race from from the very beginning to to the very last door to the storage unit closing after you put everything away I knew that I could carry all that out myself. But I thought I have X. amount of dollars I'm going to be able to pay person to do. This and I'm going to be able to pay person to do this this this and as it starts to unfold in your booting up your business and you're like, okay I need I need a monthly subscription or constant contact in I need quickbooks and I need somewhere to store my file so that we can share them amongst each other not money starts to go away at a quick rate. And then you kind of decide like at some point. Oh my God. There is not enough money here to pay anybody myself. You know like I can't when you only have one contract which at the time nine just hit the sauce. It really doesn't amount to anything, and so that was when so I think I signed maybe the contracting like June and the races in February. So at some point around life December I think started to get very hard. In would. Have a lot for work and so when he was gone and he would be gone for like a week at a time. I would just work all night. Because when he's home, he hit, he loves sleeping and he loves sleeping from like ten to six. He's like return shnell person in. So if I would try to stay up late trying to finish something he gets super annoyed at me and so I knew when he wasn't home i. Work with reckless abandon. Like six days in a row. So I would work from like four am to noon. The name would take half, and then I would work from like four PM. To four am like basically the only time when I could get things done was when the workday wasn't in swing. So from eight am to five PM, it was all I could do to just answer emails that were coming in to me so that I was like a real person behind the computer screen like, Oh, unions only. Got It for you you know whatever, and then during the overnight was when I actually had to do everything that needed to be done but the race on. So like email the toilet vendor email the ten vendor with updated were and like all these things that you actually need time to like. Look at this gene and look at the numbers and crunch the math and do all these things that I would be. So distracted during the day because I'm trying to.

business owner L. C.
"sala" Discussed on Ali on the Run Show

Ali on the Run Show

07:03 min | 9 months ago

"sala" Discussed on Ali on the Run Show

"I love that story so much because. It's just I. Mean I think it's a combination it's a bit of fate shore, but it's also it sounds like a lot of just. First of all someone believing in you bar being like, I know a woman who can make this happen and awesome at it and you being so good on the spot and getting a job out of it starting an entire career it's just. I feel weird saying fate because I'm not like a big believer in fate. Are you a big believer in fate? What's your take on how that all played out? I mean I don't know if I'm a believer in eight. That's a good question. I am a believer though in opportunity. So there we go. Yes. Are you know he asked me to do something and he kind of? Put His name out there that I'm going to go get this person to help you out, and so I thought I'm GonNa take that Opportunity Okay so you take this job. Unexpectedly, you're like, I guess this is my life. Now, I'm not going to work with fish. Little bit different talk about what it was like. Once you got started, what were your responsibilities on the job and and what did those first couple of days and weeks look like with the La Marathon so and my job. On was the Volunteer Director Volunteer Coordinator whatever you WANNA call that. So, my job was to fill twelve thousand volunteer spots. As a young person who was eager to have a job in eager to work in the running industry as it turns out I mean I hadn't really been eager about that. But once the opportunity presented itself I was like Oh. This is great. You Know I. Really WanNa find myself to this. This could be really great. I. I really was energized to do that job. And not being from Los Angeles that I provided. Few hurdles here in there because you know I mean, I think you know as well as many people know that getting on tears in so many instances is about who you know and connections that you have to the community. I'd I had zero connection to the Los. Angeles community. But I think that I was. Just very energetic and excited about the tasks that I had to do and and as a runner and someone who had run marathons and run in many races I kind of knew at least what all the jobs were that I was looking to fill went the tasks at hand for all those jobs were. So in searching for roots are people. Like it would be great if they had this skill set and so that part of the job came quite naturally and in honestly I didn't really have a lot of trouble filling the roles in I need to dis-official. I think along the way the best thing that I did for myself was that I just paid attention to everything else that was going on in the office. So what was the operations person doing and what was the community relations person doing just so that I had a better understanding I, definitely didn't live in my volunteer box. In at the time that Les Marathon was a staff of. One two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, I think in two of those were like the top top. tippy top people in the organization. So it was really really six of us who were kind of in the trenches every day. Working in they everyone was wonderful people I still keep in touch with hugh them to this day and we all I was the only runner. But everybody just kind of had. A passion for the event. Or just the idea of the event which was really cool I. Think as I have moved on in the industry. If you don't have an enjoyment for what you're doing especially in Res Management, it is probably not going to be very fulfilling. You know it's it's hard backbreaking work. It's long hours in its even longer as you move forward to our race day race week, and so it was just everyone just had refreshingly positive attitude and we had a lot of fun together. Okay. So what came next to La is that when you came back to New York Yes, so the volunteer coordinator job was A. Seasonal. Job. So I worked from December through March the the race is used to be the first week of March. It's bumped around a little bit. I think it's now back around that date. So wrapped up my job by the end of March and they were like you are great. We'd love to hire you again, but we don't need you until December. So as a young adult talk living in Los Angeles with no. INCOME WAS NOT A. Possibility warming and so I kind of was like Oh. God what am I gonNa do next and. Director of operations. Happen to know someone who worked at the New York roadrunners foundation which the foundation kind of got rolled into the near runners that used to be a separate subset. Of. The organization. But he got word that they were looking for a team for kids charity coordinator, and so he said Oh this girl wrapped up her volunteer coordinator job here I know she's looking can connect the two of you. Long Story Short flew to New York had an interview was offered the job the day after the interview before I had left New York on. So then I flew home packed up you know several bags of things flew back to New York like two weeks later and started with the near Furner station. So have you always been someone who's very open to I know you said you believe in opportunity but it's not all that common to go. Okay from Pennsylvania to California back to New York like those are huge just decisions but it sounds like you're just like okay let's do it is that accurate? Is that your personality? Yeah I. It's funny because I was on a podcast a few months ago and. As I was describing, you know kind of similar to what we've been talking about here. She said the woman said you should host the masterclass on opportunity and I thought about that after the call and I said, you know it's it's really interesting because I never really thought about it until she said something but I am not generally one to turn an opportunity down in the reason for that is because It's kind of like. Well, what happens if it doesn't work out?.

New York Los Angeles Volunteer Director Volunteer C volunteer coordinator New York roadrunners foundatio Director of operations Angeles community coordinator Los Res Management hugh Furner station Pennsylvania California
"sala" Discussed on Ali on the Run Show

Ali on the Run Show

07:00 min | 9 months ago

"sala" Discussed on Ali on the Run Show

"Michelle by very popular demand everyone every runner wants to hear from race directors right now. I am so excited to have you here for the on the job series. Thank you so much for doing this. Yeah. Thanks for having me. It is. A pleasure to be here and This kind of thing keeps me going. Weird Cova. Twenty twenty time as well to get to talk about what I would do in a normal time. Yeah. Well, we're GonNa Talk About Normal Times. We're GonNa Talk Cova times we may even try to talk future times. We'll put on our Rosey colored glasses and look to the future before we do that, can I get you to introduce yourself in your words tell everyone who you are where you're from and what you do. My Name's Michelle Sala and I am the president of blistering pace race management, which is a raise management company who In Large scale mass participation running events. I was born and raised in Sacramento California I went to College in Portland Oregon University of Portland I currently live in Napa, California which is about an hour from where I grew up and yeah, the taking it day by day right now. But excited to be talking today about. Running and what it was and what it is and what it will be. Yeah. I have so many questions about all those things Let's go back in time though tell me about young Michelle did young Michelle always see a future for herself in the running industry. I wouldn't say no off the bat but young Michelle was a runner I started running in third grade with my dad. I would well initially I, started I would bike well, he would run. And then when I kind of felt like I could hang in Powell run I would run and he would run but he would run ahead of me and then like loop back behind me and then come past me so he would do five or six miles I would do three. So that's kind of how my running got started. In Fourth Grade I was able to join the track team at my school, which was normally reserved for fifth through eighth graders. But if you had a sibling on the team which my brother, my older brother came, you could join early. So I joined track at that point in time and running was was kind of like A. You. Know I got started early. I kind of never looked back in college I went to school i. So I, did not go to school for like sports management or business management or anything like that. I wanted to teach high school science and I actually during college took some time off and I worked at a fish technology center in Montana. I love fish. I was like, did she say fish? I I wanted to go into fish and wildlife management. And so Montana was a great Scott for me to do that and It was wonderful it super interesting I I love science. I actually like math as well. But what I found out while I lived in, Montana were have the fish technology center was that The jobs are very scarce in very beautiful places like Montana. You could. You could get a job it working with inefficiency in Maimi Missouri and I'm not saying anything bad about Missouri. But that's not really where I saw the rest of my life. And so kind of determined that field for me and where I wanted to be and what I wanted to do be a bit limiting. So I went back to school in change my major to life science so that it was much more broad and I, finish college and. Proceeded to do absolutely nothing with life science nothing really science at all and I got down this running industry path which I'll talk about. But the thing for me is that I do use science and math. Every single day in this career. So I do think that my interest in that subject in all of the studies that I did have with science. Definitely help me to where I am today but one day I decided to go visit my friend named Laura who lived in Pennsylvania, and at the time she was Bart IOS wife. They're no longer married but I went out to Pennsylvania and ended up staying for three months, and in that time got to know bar very well, we would run together. I was doing a lot of running at the time and he had to go to the New York senior on for work we workout runner's world at the time, and so he left in Laura and I were to go into the city for the weekend to see the race kind of just being caught up in all the. Great stuff of New York City marathon brings to the city on that weekend and he called back to the house and said Hey Michelle. Can you get on a bus and come in early I ran into the folks at the La? Marathon booth and they're short handed at the expo and so I told them that you would work mayor with them, and so I get on us, I head into the city early I. Get to the booth in they want me to like promote the LA marathon from their booth to two people in the nearest. Mayor. Expo and I'VE NOT RUN THE LA. Marathon I have no idea where the course is. You know don't know anything about race but I'm like, sure. Yeah. I can tell people how great it is. So I'm in the booth you know just sell people on how wonderful the L. A. Marathon is. long story short I at the end of the weekend. The Guy who was from La Marathon was kind of like you know, what are you doing living in Pennsylvania because we been talking in the Buddhist and I'm from California you know Blah Blah and. So he was like you know we actually have a position open at the. Miramonte of you're interested. So I ended up having an interview later the next week with the race director of the La Marathon. That's Times nameless net curl and they they hired me in. So I left Pennsylvania left left in Laura's house and. started. what has now become up to this minded a fifteen year career in learning street. So..

Michelle Sala La Marathon Montana Pennsylvania race director California Laura New York L. A. Marathon La Cova Sacramento Powell Portland Oregon University of Maimi Missouri president Napa Missouri Scott
"sala" Discussed on The Current

The Current

02:13 min | 10 months ago

"sala" Discussed on The Current

"Global consequences. Investing, in nature investing in thirty percent of the planet would cost only a fraction than the cost of having to respond to a pandemic the the international. Monetary Fund talking about nine trillion dollars for the next two years. What course to protect the third of the planet is less than what the world spends today on video games. That's really interesting the way that you put. I mean, it's about priorities in some ways. Yeah, not investing in the provincial and is always cheaper and smarter than having to pay for the cure for the treatment by we humans are very discounting the future. What do you hope comes out of this moment when it comes to the world that we live in that realization that we are all connected now just to each other humans but also to all other creatures on the planet and that the we tamper with nature on one side of the planet. Everybody could tougher. So let's invest in preserving our lives of persistent. That's the best thing we can do for the future of humanity. Do you favorite spot in the ocean. Have so many that he's won the first expedition with with pristine season two, thousand and nine and the. Millennium. Belongs to the Republic of Kitty bus in the South Pacific. Uninhabited that all in the middle of nowhere unfished you jumping the water and as soon as you you bubbles clear you're surrounded by a dozen grey reef sharks. I soon after a while the shark board than they go do their thing, and then you look down and ninety percent of the both scored by life thriving coral fool fish. Traveling five hundred years back in time. And that's what you are fighting to preserve. That's what our team of DNC is fighting hard to preserve. And accelerate it's a real pleasure to talk to you. This is a powerful book. Thank you. Thank you so much and Rick Sala is a national geographic explorer in residence in the founder of the Pristine sees project. His new book is called the nature of nature why we need the wild for more CBC podcasts go to CBC DOT CA slash podcasts..

Rick Sala Monetary Fund South Pacific DNC founder
"sala" Discussed on The Current

The Current

05:51 min | 10 months ago

"sala" Discussed on The Current

"It was sandy was not the most a spectacular place and we had our our weather Robert tethered to the boat. Hundred meter. Meters deep. And after showing the Breslin whether we had seen a around the country during the expedition, he looked at his watch and I thought Oh, we're going to los. Him. And I ask him Mr Person would you like to pilot our what Robert? Oh. Yes. so his size sparkled. So we put him on the console and like he was playing video games, he studied driving the the Robert. N wissies dark shape a distance. So he that is the rubber to that shade and there was big rock at the edge of the amount. Fool fish full of starfish in all of a sudden huge grouper show up, and that was the his head while I didn't know we had these in our country and so basically that was a sign for him the he had to make sure that Gabon protected these underwater thresh. Did He? He did he putting the Minister of the environment and my fellow explorer Mike Fay. Who was on board he had been involved in the creation of national parks on the land. So he was put in charge of the development of reserves and today on has twenty marine parks covering twenty eight percent of their exclusive economic zone. National Geographic is pushing to preserve something like thirty percent of the planet that's land and Sea by the year twenty thirty. Is something like that possible given the scale of the destruction that you detail in this book in and just how because we have that reserve of of oil and natural gas and other we don't need the balance in some ways that other species do can you preserve thirty percent of the planet? I think we can because some countries have already done it. But also we have no alternative. If, we are to prevent the extinction of one million species globally. If we are to prevent the collapse of our life support system. If we won nature to continue helping us. Reviews the impacts of climate change. Through absorption. So absorbing throwing much of the carbon pollution that we explained to the atmosphere, we need half of the Planet Natural State And the scientific studies are very clear about this and thirty percent of the Planet Protected Land And Sea by twenty thirty is a I would say. Absolutely necessary and negotiable milestone. We are not talking about. A luxury for.

Robert Land And Sea Breslin Mike Fay Gabon sandy Mr Person
"sala" Discussed on The Current

The Current

03:44 min | 10 months ago

"sala" Discussed on The Current

"New book it's called the nature of nature why we need the wild and Rick Salad Good Morning. Good Morning. Ned. You grew up. Along the Costa Brava. Outside of Barcelona in Spain. Tell me a little bit about living there and what it was that got you hooked on the see. It was the undersea world of Jack Usta which I. Swallowed every Sunday evening in front of the TV and I was like doing the summers I was in, of course with my family and I was able to start to emulate my heaters. So that would it Was the big inspiration and I started snorkeling and swimming probably faster than they could run on land. What did you see? You read about this in the book? What did you see on Jacques Cousteau that was so interesting. In his shows I saw everything that they couldn't see in real life. So he showed us these world of abundance, coral reefs, whales, dolphins, sharks, Kelp forest but when they win swimming in the Mediterranean in the seventies. It was nothing. Sea Urchins and barren grounds. Nordic animals and the smallest the largest fish were more or less my my little snorkeling mask. So I live in this schizophrenic world where on TV I saw these richness and diversity that was a dream. Then when I was confronted with reality, it was very, very different. What was it like he goes scuba diving for the first time and swimming in the ocean being near the ocean one thing getting beneath the surfaces another matter entirely what was it like when you first went scuba diving? It was like I was reborn and I was very lucky because the first. Dive with scuba thanks ever was in a marine reserve, the mets islands marine reserve over the course. And I still remember the dive I had a full tank. Now, I can I can spend with us the size of. Our in the half and their what their it lasted me only fifteen minutes. Know I. Jumped in the water and I saw what was shown us in his TV shows. The groupers, Scorpion Fish, the sea bream, the CIBA's all these abundance of all these fish, all these large fish. So then I realized that if we project of the ocean that plays had been protected for a few years or not when I did my first scuba dive and I realized, wow, this is what the made Iranian. Used to be like everywhere. And Right now, we only see these pockets of richness and health in idiots are protected. So to me that was. One of the early, the first that be funny of my life this book is like a love letter to the ocean in some ways and will often say the cliche is. The forests of the world are the lungs of the planet you say that the oceans are in some ways what the sweat glands of who we are. The forest of the foot glance. The the ocean actually has produced most of the oxygen in the atmosphere, and that's something that people know that most of the oxygen has been produced for millions and millions of years by bacteria and microscopic algae in the ocean. And the bacterium that produces most of the oxygen species, abuses, and most of the oxygen on the planet we discovered did thirty years ago. So, there's still a lot that with a non weather planet, but of course, we take it for granted. What happens when we take it for granted?.

Jacques Cousteau Rick Salad Costa Brava Ned Barcelona mets Spain CIBA Mediterranean
Pit of Serpents

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:23 min | 11 months ago

Pit of Serpents

"Welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Land and dime Joe McCormack and I'm so excited because today we're diving the snake bit. That's right. not slashes snake pit. We're discussing before we started recording the show but this idea of a pit of snakes, the sort of a place you might want to drop a a doomed hero or a Damsel in distress that sort of thing right and I think the great place to start here is by discussing. A. Sort. Of Snake pit. Very much a snake pit that we encounter in raiders of the lost Ark, film that we've, we spent a lot of time talking about on the show we did we did a couple of episodes on the Ark of the Covenant that I encourage everyone to everyone to go back and listen to where we spin off. We also frequently refer back to raiders for examples of things that raiders does that refers to. Various qualities of the arc in ancient traditions. I've just thinking back on those Ark of the covenant episodes because I remember we talked about this one professor from the. Nineteen twenties or thirties who had this crank theory that the Ark of the Covenant was a real historical artifact and it was a giant electrical capacitor yes. Yeah. That was pretty good. Yeah. But what I was laughing at when you were talking, I'm sorry if I sort of interrupted but I was laughing the fact that you called the pit in Raiders, a sword of snake pit. I mean, it's definitely a snake pit don't beat around the Bush here. It's very much a snake bit it. It is an amazing and really game changing one of the many amazing engaging sequences in the film. It is the well of souls sequence now to refresh everybody. First of all the well of souls is an actual place. It's a partially manmade cave located inside the foundation stone. Under the Dome of the Rock Shrine in Jerusalem. The name itself pit of souls well of souls stems from medieval Islamic legend in this where the the spirits of the dead or supposedly awaiting judgment. Day. But that it has nothing or very little to do with the well of souls that we encounter in raiders of the lost Ark. In raiders, the well of souls, and this is straight from the Indiana Jones Wicky is quote part of a temple built within the ancient city of tennis where the Ark of the covenant was placed after Farrow she sacked stole it from Jerusalem again, that is entirely within the context of the Indiana Jones world don't confuse that with actual history right now there is no indication that there's an actual pit of snakes in any archaeological site in ancient Egypt. Right but it makes for a great scene because of course, we remember what happens is that. Indiana Jones and his cohorts discovered that Oh. This is the actual resting place of the Ark of the Nazis are off their digging in the wrong spot. So they open it up, and of course, they immediately see it full of snakes. He hates snakes, they lower him down. Anyway they go. His friend who is it Sala. Sala. Yeah. Solid goes down with them. They they crank the the arc up in. That's win Belloc and the Nazi show up they steal the Ark and just for sheer meanness, they throw Marian down there into the pit with him in an a seal inside with a bazillion snakes

ARK Raiders Jerusalem Indiana Jones Robert Land Indiana Jones Wicky Joe Mccormack Rock Shrine Bush Professor Marian Belloc Farrow Egypt Tennis
"sala" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

06:20 min | 11 months ago

"sala" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"But people thought that the Ebola or HIV or something that happened in San Francisco or in Cameroon Novo Affect me by these pandemic has shown. You know this is just a glimpse. Of what the worst case scenario could be there could be much worse pandemics. It will be much work chronic crisis look at what's happening with a wildfires in California in Australia and hurricanes in the Caribbean this is just a little supple. What's coming if we do nothing so I don't think anybody wants the world. So we have no option and we have until twenty thirty to protect thirty percent of the planet and we have until twenty fifty to go carbon neutral and still even if we do that, we're going to lose ninety percent of the coral reefs. I, but this is better than doing nothing and the economically. If we could go business as usual is going to be an economic crisis that the the world has never seen. It is much cheaper much cheaper to invest in prevention than having to respond to the impacts of loss of nature and global warming right? MAZING when you look at it that way. But. Yeah. What's the good news but the good news is that if we? Don't have people to live with this sense of doom and gloom and just go in. Either space donate nature has these extraordinary ability to bounds by we've said that I was thinking. I. Was trying to formulate a question about just the incredible resiliency of the Guy Mother Earth. Bounce back. So you believe that's true. I seen it I have measured it I have. More than one hundred scientific papers in scientific journals showing what happens when. You protect nature that are hundreds of cases all around the world and if people think. Nature you're keeping people out. No no no. Is The opposite. You have more nature people are going to be able to have a better life living around these areas. They will be able to make more money inside the stadium, threw them outside from agriculture and better point nation better fishing in all the services that nature gives us. She gives them to us for free right? You've you've had. Ask much return except to be treated a little bit nicely. We're going to wrap up pretty soon here but the the ANTHRO PAS right what have we seen from the answer pause that can inform You know the future decision making this discussion. I think the end boss is teaching as a great lesson, which is now people are so excited. Right everybody loves to see the dolphins or the humbug oil inside the Marina. In Mountain Lions in. Your malias which they've never seen you know cities highly. And in just. A few weeks right. So for me, this is a great signal that nature sending as the guy sending us. Look what I can do if you just give me some time in some space. How fast I can come back. Yeah, that's cool. I love that. So maybe we just keep this pandemic going for a couple of years. Rather. Have no pandemic and people do the right thing actually. All right. Awesome sub. Super excited to read your book. You says out in August. Nature of nature why we need the wild and I imagine you cover a lot of the stuff we talked about in great detail. Where where else can folks find information about you or learn about your work or you know what's coming up for you? If you go to our website that pretty stint sees dot org pretentious. Precedes. Dork. It's our National Geographic the national graphics or Native. and. You'll be able to see all the places we've been through from the Russian. Arctic to Antarctica to islands in the middle of the. Civic and videos photos. You'll be able to show will be able to share some of the adventure and the results with you. That's cool. Now is that a nonprofit? Where someone? WHO's? Maybe during their part already in terms of voting and eating vegetarian, but they want to donate or not support the efforts. Well, that's very kind of you of mentioning that Absolutely National Geographic Society a nonprofit organization. IS A. Nonprofit that initiative and of course, if some fans of the ocean, some are interested in helping they can contact us through our our website I'm going to do that once we hang up. Chris Mind. MICE DOT ORG awesome. Well in Rick. Dr Solace. Thanks so much for your time. This has been very enlightening, started out kind of depressing, but now I have hopes. And I'm. GonNa continue on being ninety percent. Plant based Diet. So I think that's Goo-. Good enough. And, I'm GonNa vote and I hope everyone listening does both of those because it's good for your health and. The world needs us to be. Taking this on like a Manhattan project. All Fronts, no stone left unturned, right? We are. Well, thanks again and I appreciate your time and we'll look forward to that book coming out and the hopefully we'll connect you know when you. visit, San Diego or you know. Meeting. Person Someday I have so we can travel safely. Thank you so much for having me on your great podcast. Mark. Yeah let me know if you go on an expedition and you need. Someone to hold Kammer something. New. Some experience there. Okay I'll let you know you to the list. Okay. Thanks. I'm sure you have a lot of people are all right. Take care. Thank you mark. All right. All right folks thanks so much for listen what A. Extremely important podcast please share it with your friends.

Cameroon National Geographic Society San Francisco Caribbean California Australia San Diego Dr Solace Antarctica Chris Mind Rick Mark Manhattan
"sala" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

04:53 min | 11 months ago

"sala" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"State. Half the planet naturally but we can start by committing next year that is a meeting of the UN Convention on by Diversity Hundred Ninety six countries are going to meeting China they're going to agree on how much. We're going to will be willing to give. To, nature and that is a target. Now on the draft agreement of percent of the planet London's see protected by twenty thirty. Okay. So how do we get fifty percent of for my thinking thirty? While right now, we add sixteen on land percenting the ocean. So thirty percent is already. REIMB- issues, but it's feasible and the third thing we need to also is changed the way we produce foot. You mentioned that you vegetarian for while and yet now reflexive -Tarian. And the way we produce food is not only. Understandable because we are taking things out faster than they can reproduce also is very inefficient and polluting very linear right extract US discard timeless to be more circular excitedly and run in. We don't have another planet as a landfill. So we're running out of space here and culture is one of the biggest causes off. Of greenhouse gas emission co two emissions, and also uses seventy five percent of the fresh water that we. And the soil who said mentioned before the soil is. Stealing and so many chemicals that go into these industrial monocultures. That we are aware see everywhere we're losing the soil, we losing billions of pounds of soil every year that go to the ocean. So we need to shift into regenerative agriculture that is less dependent on portions on chemicals, which helps plans create an older fauna, all the animals in the soil create more soil, which in turn the soil absorbs a huge amount of co two also, which will help to mitigate the impact of climate change. So these are the three things. The. Three biggest things that you put him. To. To I mean, the first one obviously has a lot lot of momentum in the fossil fuel even though there's still a lot of resistance. And greenhouse GA grants, but alternative energy sources I think that you know if we were to see a different ministration coming into the US next year, there'd be a big push for that. More space for nature I think that's awesome. I think America what what does America have set aside because it seems like we have quite a bit of. Natural Land set aside is still fifteen percent or do we have more the US is about. Twelve percent I think and most people many people believe that. We have some many national parks in the US, which is through about. The largest user of the US soil is livestock forty-one, percent forty, one percent of the land in the US. Because, used the race beef. Okay, which brings us to the third how much work has already been done on regenerative culture. What does that industry look like her that potential look like it's not? Significant yet, that are the Rodale Institute in the US and others have done amazing job. Showing? That regenerative. Culture health figure this oil and produce healthier food. So here's something that I think people are starting to realize and doing the pandemic you see people got anymore and blending their own tomato plants on the Rue slowed down enough and felt like I get back in touch with nature and then they feel better about themselves and they start making better decisions. I'm sure. Absolutely right. So hopefully, there's going to be a shift to more local for which also be healthier food in it will have a lower carbon footprint to someone inc benefits for that. I think the. One of the positive outcomes of this end besides what we just talked about getting people, slowdown and pay attention. Ask better questions. But also you know maybe this whole idea that you know buying your beef from. South America right and having shipped across the oceans. Maybe that's maybe that's not sustainable right and we need to bring things back local. Interesting. So. Much. We could do a whole podcast just on that. Are you ready to experience eternity You've heard me talk about neuro hacker collective. I'm a big Fan of this company so much so that I invested money and I'm an adviser and most importantly the consumer. First product quality is there newel tropic a love of been using every day..

US UN London newel tropic Rodale Institute China South America America
"sala" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

02:28 min | 11 months ago

"sala" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"Release from the cattle. Right? Has it a second co two? Seems be focusing on Co two when they talk about global warming what do you think? Is that really a big deal or is that just kind of a? Siren. Call for. For people to rally around, IT'S A. Deal it's. C O two his and his mother gas, which is still wars, which is methane She's what the cows because. Exactly Only through burping but Yet the greenhouse gas. For the has effect of Methane, is twenty five times larger than that of CO two. Luna. So so pound by pound of gas methane is a much more. is much bigger of of global warming. And so the global warming then warms up the seas and the changes weather patterns. But also what is the effect of the warming CS have on the biodiversity? Cornel race dying. The Paris. Climate Agreement. Shooting for. Five, thirty Celsius or two of the most. Above pre industrial levels. We had already at one percent out one degree Celsius. A two day world, which would be considered success by climate experts. He's a world without coral race. We will lose them because we already losing. We have probably lost a quarter of the corals on Oregon's around the world. And our features that can move lobster is being from Maine to Canadian waters which are colder. Authority warm waters. The Gulf of Maine is warming faster than the average area of the ocean. By the corals move the corals have a hard time an expanding the the distribution, and so fees can move to highlights to escape from the warming waters bad species corals are attached to the. Ground are are in for a really bad time. Unaffected the coral reef have on the balance in the ocean or you know. If they all went away. Someone might say so what I've never seen one I don't really know what it is. What's the impact? Yes that's a very something that we hear. Often the coral reefs have the rainforest of the see they are the places where the largest.

Maine Climate Agreement Cornel Paris Oregon
"sala" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

07:18 min | 11 months ago

"sala" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"It's interesting. So you draw circle, it's five kilometers inside that are square. And inside you're going to have a thriving ecosystem or as best as can be. Recovering, and then literally on the other side of that imaginary wall, it's GonNa be. Differently less. Yeah and you can see with an aerial photographs or satellite. Images the fishing boats are fishing the line they lined up on the limits of this grilling. Limit Line because that's all the good stuff is. because. The fish that crosses the line, right? Where why do rubbers row banks because this is where the money is right so That's incredible. Tell us about. Let's just like really pan out like from your perspective like. How is the health of the planet? The health of humanity and economics all relate. It's all related. Exactly. It's the health of the planet is is bad and we have the planet has become wild. Today. Do. Thirds of the ocean have been impacted by industrial fishing. Three quarters of the inhabitable land have been transformed by sees. A An organ culture. Seventy percent of the mass of mammals is an hour domesticated livestock. Only thirty percent is everything else from elephants to plan the bears through. Including Ocean life or Osha. Ocean life is different but we have. killed nine percent of the large fishing the ocean in the last hundred years, the tuna, the sharks, the be groupers. So it's not good and this is affecting us. We reached the point where the planet, the natural world, these producing only services that we enjoy everything that we need to leave the pens on the work of other species, the oxygen we breath, the clean water, we drink the food we put in our mouths. So we reach the point where we are using is like having an investment account with the principal that entire timber use returns, we not only it all the returns, but we are eating away from the principle of the planet. And what does this look like to you if we don't do anything for the next Hundred Years Right now we are using the renewable resources of the planet as we have one and a half planets. We're going to to a point where the natural world will not be able to shelter us from catastrophes in these covid. Pandemic thing is the loudest wakeup call for humanity because via started when vipers spilled over from a wild animal to a person in China. Thanks to our globalized lifestyle. Though outbreak spread like wildfire. And everybody you me even heads overstate presence of country's reach people. We are all connected. We are all together in this, our health and our economic well-being depends on the wellbeing of the poorest person in the poorest country of the planet today snowscape anymore. We temper with nature in one part of the planet in the consequences as we have seen can legal. Talking. In your advocacy work. Are People starting you know people in government, UN, and US government in China. Are they starting to take this seriously because it just seems like extreme to me like literally humanity could literally US outside the next fifty years if we just don't. Create a Manhattan project at all levels. I I love the Manhattan project. That's a that's a great analogy and absolutely it's too bad. Nuclear. Just an analogy. By get get get get people together to a major issue and China has already banned wildlife. Markets. Show me like a once but China's moving into other action day already have a national plan to protect thirty percent of the land. Okay. Good Data Paean. Commission has by diversity strategy also committing to protecting in national parks and reserves thirty percent of Europe's land and waters twenty thirty. By the US is not the doing much these days with the current administration actually we are reversing environmental protections. That's a real shame. There's even a lot of climate deniers right I mean how do we? Deal with that like what? What is your strategy for dealing with someone just flat out denies what you're. What you're talking about. Yeah I have thought a lot about this and. You the win. When you debate with with contrarians or deny right because they have their playbook and they are listening, they have their their points to persuade people that that that is the among the scientific community. It's what my friend now rescues. calls the merchants of doubt. Are The people who were hired by the tobacco industry to proof that the tobacco wars wasn't. Bad for your health, right then people who were hired by the. Oil companies to to deny that there is no no climate change and that are. A few things that we can do one is votes for the leaders who Agree on environmental values but also the economics we always hear these arguments it's either the economy or or nature any trump because. That pandemic has shown us that not protecting nature. Moving wild animals around the planet like commodities Cost Demi. Who's economic impacts going to be on the order of nine trillion dollars for the next couple of years. But we have an analysis, an economic report that we released a few weeks ago. That shows that if we protect thirty percent of the planet Landon See. The global economic output would be larger. And for every dollar that we invest in protected areas, nature would leave us five dollars in return. It's interesting. So how how do they come up with that? Like how does this study validate those results come that there are two types of benefits. One is economic revenue. Tourism within reserves. Within. Birthday's before pandemic. The tourism sector on nature protected areas was growing five percent. Every year is huge agriculture. And timber was growing at less than one percent per year. facially is a sector that these declining. Economically. So so the potential for tourism idiocies, Rulli huge, and the other one is all the benefits that come from things.

China US Manhattan sharks Europe UN principal Birthday Osha
"sala" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

07:05 min | 11 months ago

"sala" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"Welcome back this muck divine the unbeatable mind podcasts. Thanks so much for joining me today. I know with the Kobe lockdowns you probably have some time on your hands, but also know how busy you are. and. The fact that you're spending some time with us today means a lot right because there's a lot of places you can put that attention. Factor, you're focusing in on us and what we're doing is really cool. My guest today. Wow. It's going to be so interesting and really really important. So if you're double tasking or multi tasking, I, encourage you to not do that because the future of humanity is at stake. Doctor and Rick. Sala. National Geographic. Explorer. In resident author of the nature of nature. Why we need the wild. And in this book, which is due out soon right doctors when. August twenty fifth I can't wait to read it. He discusses the irrefutable link that binds humans, economic health and the health of the planet and I hundred percent agree and and believe that. We're all this one interconnected whole and when we ignore mother Earth renewed at our peril, he's the founder of the pristine sees a product that combines expiration re shirts and media to inspire the leaders of the country or the globe. To, protect the wild places left in the ocean, which should be all the ocean. Right. Unfortunately. Just that. The project had protected check this out more than five million square kilometers, which is half the size of Canada. Ocean. And he's created twenty two marine reserves. Amazing. Dr Sally has received numerous awards young Global Leader Award by the World Economic Forum. Lowell Thomas Award from the Explorers Club? In, hero award from the environmental mediation I. Love the fact that Prince. Charles wrote the Foreword Yearbook. Was that? Yeah I'm very lucky. Well, he's a committed environmentalist. He's telling as that we are depleting nature at the rates that is not sustainable for decades when he's a beautiful writer, also he's published some beautiful about environment. So I happened to know him. So I asked him if he would be so kindness to ride the forward then he accepted. So yeah, very likely to have his wise rewards. To, open the. Book. That's really cool. Let's talk first before we get into all, you know. Gosh, we take this in so many directions, but I want to focus on you as a person. and. How you got so committed to this cause, you were a first academic, right you're an economic professor you mentioned at scripts, which is right down the road from us. And then you kind of had an epiphany that you know that wasn't enough probably right. So tell us a little bit about your journey. Yeah I was a well first of all Mike. Thank you so much for having me on your podcast I. Love Your. So it's a real honor through to be here and used to be a professor at Scripps Institution of Fortune in La. Hoya? Studying in bags of humans in the ocean they in books, fishing and global warming, and in one day I. Realized that all I was doing was writing the obituary of the ocean. So. I felt like you're just watching and and and cataloging how it was dying ex more and more precision. So I feel like the doctor who's telling you how you're going to die with excruciating detail but not offering a cure. And I decided to quit academia. And they became my full life to to ocean conservation. And what gives us a timeframe for when that happened in two thousand and seven, two, thousand, seven. Okay. Interesting. So as an academic. Even an oceanographer, you have quite a few specialties. So what was your specialty Marine Ecology is that the relationships between species, the functioning often entire marine ecosystems and the impacts of human activity on them. And what were some of the biggest findings that scared you to basically say, I, need to quit and become more of a you know impact player. Well, the finding where I didn't need statistics to prove what I were seeing with my own eyes we when back through the places that we loved and we saw them more and more and more degraded because of too much fishing pollution in ocean warming and the scientific data just. One Thousand Five, what we saw with our own eyes. So it was continuous revision of ocean life within our lifetimes Anything in particular like that that. You could share that really scared you. Were something. In, reverse. Yes. When I was a little boy growing up on the Mediterranean coast of Spain, I was glued to the TV on Sunday evening watching the undersea world of Jacques Cousteau, Jacques Cousteau. Those shows were amazing I watched every one of those two right in back. Then there was nothing nobody else will showing us the underwater world. So we were glued to the TV on Sunday evening and I fell in love with ocean because of that but then I went swimming in the Mediterranean. and. There was nothing of what he showed us no large fish dolphins nor sales norcal reefs. And I thought that the rain was poor see naturally and that vs richness happened only in locations that store shortest but then. When I turned eighteen, I was allowed to to get a living license and I went diving marine reserve of the cost of colonial for Barcelona. That had been protected for a few years and then I saw what I miss during my childhood a place that hadn't had fishing for the while the marine life recover spectacularly, and it was like diving into one of those documentaries right especially. So you know most people think that the ocean the ocean is. You don't like it's hard to imagine that particular area that could be protected would be able to recover because everything is just water everything's connected. So do we really have local ecosystems that in the ocean where if you just say, okay, no more fishing in this peculiar that little start you re thriving how does that work? Yes and yes. So you said Yes to the first thing you said that everything is connected right and impacts on one side of the world can affect the rest of the world like we're seeing these panic but also. We have seen it everywhere around the world I've seen this miracle happen over and over and over you close the place these served there was telling you about it's only one square kilometer. And the abundance of fish is five times larger than nearby unprotected.

professor Jacques Cousteau World Economic Forum National Geographic Lowell Thomas Barcelona Canada Global Leader Award Explorers Club Rick founder Dr Sally Charles writer Scripps Institution of Fortune La Mike Mediterranean Spain
Tibetan Yoga for Health and Wellbeing

Hay House Meditations

06:20 min | 11 months ago

Tibetan Yoga for Health and Wellbeing

"Hi, Allie welcome to the PODCAST. I'm Madeo. Thank you very much for having me. I'm really excited to talk about we haven't had anybody on the podcast that is speaking directly to yoga and breath work in the way that you teach install very excited to have you today. Thank you I. You know excited and I, Love Hey House and. That last book of Tibet. The newer for health and wellbeing. This is my passion. So yes, excellent. Excellent. There's a there's a number of things I'd like to talk about with you today including your. Your advice on integrating meditation and Yoga into our everyday life and are busy schedule as well as your work with Yoga and breath work in a clinical medical sending including with your with cancer patients. But I, I like to ask you about how you got here how we got here with you, and maybe we can start with your own yoga and meditation training under your revered teachers in Nepal and India. So can you give us a brief version of of how you began your studies to help us situate where you're learning has is coming from Sure sure. Emmy see how brief I can. So really when with the Tibetan tradition, it really started when I in my first trip to India in nineteen, eighty nine. And I was really looking for teacher. I wasn't sure if it was going to be an Indian teacher Tibetan teacher I was more familiar with the teachers I did get to meet with Yuji Christian motifs of not the famous one JD. Wonderful Yuji Chris for more and more. And then some g my analogy, and then actually when I met the two BETTON SAT in La. It really started inspiring me and particularly the way that. They had this devotion to the picture of its own is a Lama and I have to admit I didn't know too much about His Holiness yet. But then doing the trip. It was when he was. Awarded the Nobel Peace Prize I was actually cashier at that time I remember reading that in the US favor now it's like Wow so happy a give my mom. My Dad had been awarded the prize and and and I said, I need to meet this man. In fact that evening they showed on the Indian TV. Heart of Tibet. That I la that was actually the forward or was by pressing Carter. And I. So I went from touch me to down silos where the Delilah was. It was. During that time, he was the fortieth anniversary of the children village. That's the first time I saw him talk. Then I went for you know a public interview and I kind of. was trying to be there as much as I could and at the same time I got my first. Personal teacher, which was you should origin. Bodies, Yogi. And he was particularly into the tradition of true and. Whether he was the Weatherman for the Dalai Lama. and. I started training with them I. Did my longer with him or started the non right ended up seventy slater finishing That really led me to come back towards t Tina where I'm originally from. And really start devoting a lot of time to practice and then was in ninety one that. I, I met a number no group chain that he came to Argentina I nine, hundred ninety and I am Alejandra can I can I just mention here that that sort of what you're talking about a little bit is that when the Tibet you mentioned that you met the Delami in in in northern India in Dharamsala. And this is after for our listeners who don't know the when the Dalai Lama a came into exile when he left Bet in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine, he and about two, hundred thousand. Refugees settled in the northern regions of India and where the Dalai Lama lived was Dharmsala, and so that was one of the first places that you went to in. That is sort of this hub of the Tibetan diaspora that is sort of surrounds the Dalai Lama, and then eventually Tibetans have gone of course throughout the world and there's two. Betton. Buddhist. Centers throughout the world and so you were kind of a beneficiary. You came along in nineteen, eighty, nine, nineteen ninety and started studying with some of these teachers who weren't only in India around the dilemma. But who had gone elsewhere you mentioned non-pwi Norbu Rhumba Jay who had gone to to Italy, and then there were other centers where you were living in Argentina. Yes, and so I. I did consider you know for for some time Don, Sala my second home I spend many months there. And that's where actually ish adorned pitches monastery wall. So. As, you said Dharamsala was this hub and I really considered my second home. I spent many months there intermittently going from there to other places and back, and that is really were you had his monastery and and. So meeting the Dalai Lama and trying to be as much as possible with them. But also really having a personal teacher like you should was really important to me so that when I came back to Argentina that I felt there was no one there in luckily I was wrong was a small. Karma Kagyu Center. And also kind of a unique center the first teacher I met when when I go towards. Metering And then Nunca Norman as I mentioned the Nunca over pitcher was a big change for me. In the way he taught. So the Tony Brooke he brought the teachings. Into everyday

India Dharamsala Tibet Argentina Carter Yuji Chris Allie Emmy Yuji Christian LA Karma Kagyu Center United States Cancer Nunca Norman Nepal Tony Brooke Norbu Rhumba Jay Tina DON
"sala" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"sala" Discussed on Amanpour

"Of jobs. Are Building sustainable infrastructure. And Echo, clean energy future. So joining me now to mayors who cities at different ends of this corona virus pandemic from Milan is Mayor Giuseppi Sala. He's chair of the global task. Force in his city is gradually recovering off to Italy you. Remember became the European epicenter of the disease, and from New Orleans male Latour, Cantrell the first woman in the job in three hundred years and new. Orleans is currently closing down Baas. Once again is corona virus cases surge. So welcome to the program. Both of you mayors from very different parts of the world as I as I sort of outlined, can I I ask you may Asala, because I think the whole world, certainly the United States took. Took care a lot of warning, and what was going on in your country, and particularly in Milan, and indeed the first cases that came over to the east coast of America came from Italy. Just describe how you doing there. You completely out of lockdown. More or less now situation I'm the hesitation is under control. We don't enough aw. How long for how many weeks or months, but now they should we honestly under control, so we are inviting people. To come back. It's off not. It is difficult for me because. We had the two thousand that. and. So it is not simple. Now..

Milan Mayor Giuseppi Sala Italy New Orleans Orleans Latour United States Cantrell America
Schools and businesses continue to close in efforts to contain the coronavirus

KFBK Weekend Live With Sam Shane

09:24 min | 1 year ago

Schools and businesses continue to close in efforts to contain the coronavirus

"Trying to keep you up to date on everything that's going on with the corona virus what we know at the you know the latest information on corona virus and school closures and what not a speaking of school closures we did get some information today about Eldorado county which is joined to the school closure effort and in this case it's so far just next week so here's part of that letter from Eldorado county safety and wellness of students being for most families and school personnel being the highest priority for Eldorado county school district in recognition of the statewide code nineteen situation and the potential impact in Eldorado county school district superintendent and Dr ad van Sala county superintendent of schools have decided the in concurrence with the county public health officer to close all public Eldorado county schools during the school week of sixteen to twenty March at that that's just next week now other school districts have said at least two weeks some had said three weeks I was talking to somebody had been warned for Eldorado for rather another county I kid I'm drawing a blank on which one right now try to get try to get that information get back here but the they were talking about potentially five weeks in and that's a more of a it more often this year kind of accounting not Eldorado county one of the other ones can the president said this morning that he had taken the corona virus test and he feels fine and now we know by getting information from the White House doctor that that test is coming back has come back negative and the president is not positive at least at this point for corona virus he also extended a travel ban to Britain and Ireland is the administration wraps up the efforts to control the spread of covert nineteen the virus that began in Wuhan China also praised the house for passing a corona virus aid package which now goes to the state center the U. S. Senate the families first run of Irish act will provide free testing for the illness and paid sick leave for impacted Americans were using the full power of the federal government to defeat the virus and that's what we've been doing last week we secured an initial eight point three billion dollars from Congress for the coronavirus and that was quickly done and very efficiently done no one thank all members of Congress yesterday declared a national emergency which was a very big deal because it opened up avenues that we would never be able to open up without it and it will make it more then it'll make more than fifty billion dollars available to us immediately and disaster relief funds and that's available for states territories and local government so that was really really good we also reached an agreement yesterday on a new legislative package that will provide strong support for American families and communities in dealing with the corona virus so it was done very very bi partisan use it was very nice to see it president today also calling for a national day of prayer for Sunday one of the commentators said to the president vice president Mike pence's news coverage today along with the president there was Dr Ben Carson secretary of the U. S. department of housing and urban development this is what he had to say about that and I just want to thank all the people who are involved and I and I hope that you know we as a nation can't use this as an opportunity to pull together for good now president trump is going to be recommending a national day of prayer and you know we've gotten away from prayer and faith a lot in this country there's nothing wrong with godly principles no matter what your faith this loving your neighbor caring about the people around you developing your god given talents to the utmost cities become valuable to the people around you having values and principles that govern your life those are things that made America zoom to the top of the world in record time and those are the things that will keep us there to also Dr Anthony Fauci who is the president's point man venture essentially on this coronavirus in here as the vice president is low he was heading up basically the task force there but as chief medical advisor is Dr Anthony Fauci who's been calm voice to the American people on this subject quite impressive there's I do have a lot of information about him I I wanted to find out more information about how she I and I do have some more information on him but first I want to get to what he said today about the international numbers just a quick review of the numbers as of late afternoon yesterday let me start of quickly globally and then we'll go to the United States right now they're at a hundred and twenty nine countries that have involvement with corona virus globally the numbers are a hundred and thirty two plus thousand so it's a little bit more than a hundred thirty two thousand about seventy five hundred of which are new cases importantly and this is something we've mentioned over the last couple of days that if you look at what was formerly the main feature of this corona virus outbreak was China they have eighty thousand old eighty one thousand new cases but only eleven new cases and only seven new deaths things have switched over now to outside of China which is actually triggered our decision the decision of the president to do the travel restrictions in other areas besides China he also had a chance to talk about today's numbers which have changed slightly from this point here but here's what he had to say earlier which brings us now to what we can expect in our own country so if you look at the domestic cases there about twenty two hundred twenty six including the re packed repatriations fifty deaths five hundred and thirty two new cases and nine new deaths which means we have not reached a peak now we will see more cases and we will see more suffering and death predominately as the vice president said among the vulnerable in our society the individuals with the conditions that we spoke to and the elderly also there's a economic impact here probably more than anything else at this point you know the families that are touched by the extraordinarily ill people and those that have died there is little else that's more important than that but there of course is a a worldwide economic impact there is the U. S. impact in L. information on that with U. S. treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin Mnuchin on people calling in sick obviously people who need to be quarantined and people who have the virus we want them at home and we want them to continue to get paid we don't want to be in a situation where they fear not getting paid during this two week period of time so the first thing that this does is it creates a very seamless process for people that work for small and medium sized businesses they will continue to get paid by their employer they don't have to worry about big government in coming to big government debt to get their checks they will continue to get paid we were also very sensitive to small and medium sized businesses many of these businesses covered sick pay but they're going to have many more people that may be on quarantine the normal sick pay and we didn't want them to have to bear the cost so a hundred percent of the cost for these limited situations will be taken care of by the federal government and then finally we want to think of it again as I said how do we deliver money to the people in the quickest way we didn't want to take six months to implement some government system so I want to thank everybody at the IRS the way were able to do this again the IRS will issue tax credits for most employers will just deduct the money from what they owe us but I want to emphasize for small and medium sized businesses that have cash flow problems we will issue guidelines you'll be able to come to the IRS get the money in advance so you don't have cash flow issues so we were very careful in balancing of making sure that people got paid with not creating undue burden we also will have unique circumstances where schools are closed in many places our parents may be able to telecommute and take care of their kids and continue to get paid for their companies but in certain circumstances that parents have to be home to take care of youngsters are elderly people again we wanted to ensure that they had the ability to do that and is the vice president mentioned for kids that received meals in schools the schools are closed we want to make sure that those kids would continue to get lunches paid

Italy Battles an Eruption of Coronavirus Cases

Weekend Edition Sunday

01:02 min | 1 year ago

Italy Battles an Eruption of Coronavirus Cases

"Italy is suddenly become the European country with the largest number of cases of coronavirus topping one hundred cases appear Sylvia Poggioli reports that two people have died and dozens of towns are in lockdown in northern Lombard in the bend of the region's the patients in the two new clusters have no direct links to the origin of the outbreak in Asia many of the infected have been hospitalized in Milan Europe's third largest city with some three million people Milan mayor Beppe Sala ordered schools be closed in today's first league soccer matches have been canceled with fashion week underway Milan designer Giorgio Armani show will be in an empty show room and streamed online in the Venditto region after two new cases of corona virus were reported in Venice governor look inside yet announced the rest of carnival the city's major tourist event will be canceled the daily publico reported several diocese have removed holy water from churches and told the faithful to abstain from giving signs of peace during mass so people Jolie NPR news

Italy Sylvia Poggioli Asia Milan Europe Beppe Sala Milan Soccer Giorgio Armani Venditto Venice Jolie Npr
Why won't NFL teams hire minority coaches?

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

11:19 min | 1 year ago

Why won't NFL teams hire minority coaches?

"Three head. Coaching spots have been filled this week. But none of those. Three coaches were minorities while the Rooney rule has been followed. Some are beginning to believe that minority forty candidates are not being taken seriously for the open jobs and anonymous African American. NFL Assistant Coach said that the League has quote finally shown. It's not the place as for black men to advance. It's ridiculous it's disgusting. We can sell tickets and make plays but we can't lead Shannon. Why isn't the Rooney rule role working? Well I think until skip this diversity thing yeah. Diversity is a great great to talk about but until you get someone the leadership position that says you know what. I don't just want to talk about it. I want to be about it so until you get older ships that actually wants to put some substance to this and this is what that you're GonNa get now if the general manager there's one general manager that's what minority and that's CR- Chris greer in Miami. There's zero owners that are it shouldn't say minorities. I guess because shot con radically a minority. But when you get the gist of what I what. I'm trying to say until leadership gets more diverse. You're I'm not gonNA have a more diverse hiring background skills. This was puzzling to be. Is that Eric. Enemy has the exact Zac job that Matt Nagy had negative and call plays any recall. Please man they can get the job. Doug Peterson sedinko plays true. Recall to play around Rivera's on but Ron Rivera was not the defensive coordinator in Philly. He he became a D. coordinator what's he got to the D. Coordinator in Chicago. You are you in San Diego. Yeah but he got his getting these enter coaching tree. Eric B enemy has the exact same job. That Matt Nagy Doug Peterson has and he's not getting opportunity is spirit but this. I don't really think that they go into it. Unless you incentivize this. Okay if you how minorities kill we maybe you have an extra three to five five dollars and cap space. That's the only thing that resonates with these owners because I get it skipped if I spent three billion. Let's just say I spent three billion dollars for a restaurant run. You Go tell me what the hell I need to cook. Cook whatever I WanNa Cook it there. And that's how they look at it. Jerry Jones spent money for this. This this mind you oh tell me why should get killed but but this notion that Oh and they brought Muhiba Marvin Marvin Lewis. He brought him in to to do that. Situation wasted the same with the giants the giants they had irebi enemy. They what Joe Judge Chris Rashard Rashard. Excuse me Chris Restoring. Yeah so now. Now we're down to one. Vacant Cleveland Reunion. I'm talking about how good already know. Angle get no frills JAYCO network skill. He already interviewed there. So you would now now the take my name off the leader and solid rubber solid. Take my name off the list. Because he's GonNa get Mad Max two and a half years if you're lucky that seems to instead that's all Jimmy can stomach now if you look at it they keep these. You look at Mike Patton. You look at all the guys they've had and these guys have had I think. Hugh Jackson stayed the longest at two and a half years. But everybody's been two years the list huge only two and a half two and a half long but you get you get these other guys you get pretty kitchens and you look at patent and you look at a I forget. Just give all these one year jazz. WE ACHE AAC CLEVELAND. That in Cleveland of the North this skill ruining rules a joke. I get it. You know minorities Cadillac. An affirmative action thanksgiving. Yeah but in -firmative action. I guess it's federal dollars. You'RE NOT GONNA get the money if you don't do this. The NFL is a is a private entity. So what can you do. What Ki- what can you give? Nfl Do not the so. I have been tracking this for a long time because one of my best friends is John. Wooten who is now the retired leader of the Fritz Pollard. Alliance and he was the driving force behind instituting the Rooney rule as I hiring practice in the national shirow all league and John's point from the start was I just need interviews because if a young assistant coach gets interviewed a couple of times times it gets reported in his name gets out there and if another owner sees that name enough over maybe a couple of years hiring cycles else maybe an owner says chee that guy. He's getting a lot of interviews. Maybe I should bring in. Maybe I should be more open minded to him. But if you're GONNA curse because if I get a a lot of interviews and I'm not getting hired was wrong why here the me getting hired cave liability with that. But John's point in the end was I'd rather have interviews than not have interests. Okay okay so let's go back to the stat that I use last week. The Institute of Diversity and Ethics In sports twenty nine thousand nine racial and gender report card for the National Football Bali. The League got actually an a plus for hiring of color. Assistant coaches right a sit a plot. Oh that's progress right. It got a deep loss for hiring head coach of Color White eight-plus assistance d-plus head head coaches. There's a big disconnect there and it shows you. That owners are fine. Oh hire two or three black assistant fine with that but nope nope. I don't want to head coach to be black. Right gives quite to the restaurant you can cook. You'll be in the bank but Michelle not the bridge. I roll up now okay so when I texted back and forth last we can use this last week of John Wooten just beside himself now. He is devastated by this this development his point was that only one. GM Chris Grin Miami. Point out is use. John's word heartbreaking because it could start with the GM right a black GM of or of color could be more open minded to say to the owner. Hey listen this guy is really bring him in. Let me let me introduce him to you right. The conduit to the owner can be stronger. Iran have I don't know six or eight black. GM right right. We've had them around the league four or but all of a sudden there's a dearth to rape Barma with Barma within Cleveland. He'd Gone Rick Smith who I know very well be in Denver. He interviewed for The Washington. Ashington John Daniel Snyder said head coach could be a head coach. Basically general manager after the Washington like who are the head coaching after the draft. The General Mattis. Okay so sometimes there is group think or shink sheep among the owners because in the end they do want to win right. And if they're looking around the League league and that black head coaches really successful they say well I want one of those. I want to go that direction right well. There was one black head coach who started to have success late in the year ear and he happened to be allied with Chris. Clear in Miami and Brian Floors off the Patriots. Well they started out all time badge for about what seven seven games fifty. Nine seven opening renders and then they basically it felt like they turned the whole roster iside down which they needed to do and then all of a sudden the last nine games they go five and four they upset the eagles and then they went to foxborough and just basically ended the season. I thought for the new New England Patriots playoff teams right. Okay so all the sudden Brian floor floor with the help of Chris greer. They're having big success. It looks like it's headed in the right drug us us but it wasn't enough of a splash to create momentum through the hiring process and right because John Wooden again texted me back with so many names he said we have so many in the pipeline. Who already started with Eric? B Enemy and Chris Rock. I think Chris Shaw Bad Year on defense but when I watch him interviewed when I watch his body language. It's a stunt man he's he's got. CEO Written all over him. He looks like a commanding officer to me. There's not enough black head coaches skip. Because because you look you look at Mike McCarthy guest job he hires the guy that gave him his opportunity coordinator fifteen years ago so you see the circle. We'll skip once you become a head coach. What do you do you go to the combine? You go to say elbow you got your drake. He goes to the coaches meeting and Yada Yada Yada and to connect with the boom boom boom right right. So if I'm not in that Lou. How do I get into loops? Because a rid of staff they said eighty percent of the jobs are never posted so in other worth people get hired somebody a friend or family member is not what you know who you know There in live the roof. It does house so to finish John. Bruton's list of pipeline candidates being AMEE. Chris Rashard Robert Sala. He threw Jim Caldwell on his list. Is Jim Colwell was highly successful zestful. Jim called wheel lost his jaw. Going nine and seven in two years Matt Patricia has nine total win and he's still got a job now he goldwell still doesn't have another job he in four years. He went to the playoffs twice in the last year he went nine and seven and they said well you know we need to move in a different direction. uh-huh and the guy that's replaced has yet to win nine total games in two years. Do you still own a still on the clock. Okay Steve wilks got one shot in time. I'm one year in Arizona and he was gone. He's now the defensive coordinator in Cleveland which probably didn't help his cause this year that much but I don't hear his name no in Cleveland right right on the list. And then there's Terrel Austin who's young stripes potential star coach and John Wootton into his list with Marvin Lewis who he thinks deserves a second shy right. Okay so Jerry. Jones did observe in qualified for the Rooney rule by bringing in. I Marvin Lewis. I think Jerry was shrewd operating waiting there. Because he didn't pick a young like like Chris Rashard type interview him because of Jerry had interviewed a young potential upcoming head. Black coach right. There's more pressure on Jerry. What was wrong with right? What's the problem exactly? He went to Marvin Lewis because he thinks Marvin Lewis is kind of old news right right. He got his longtime time shot in Cincinnati. Listen I still think Marvin did a good job job seriously. Yes okay he went. Oh and seven in the playoffs but still it was Andy Dalton Alton you re you with covering the NFL and you remember what Cincinnati before. Marlene got there was John. Carter number one overall. You Got David Cleland with the fourth. The fourth picket. You got big day to day and Wilkerson purse around the second pick in the draft year after year after a year people. Forget what I know. Marvin didn't win a playoff game. But they weren't even getting close to the playoffs for Marvin got there. No so I was disappointed in Jerry because you know my heart Hartz. I'd love to see Jerry Jones higher black head coach and I think I probably won't live long enough or Jerry will live long enough to know.

Muhiba Marvin Marvin Lewis Jerry Jones Cleveland Rooney John NFL League Joe Judge Chris Rashard Rashar Miami Chris Greer John Wooten GM Eric B General Manager Defensive Coordinator Patriots Marvin Lewis Matt Nagy Doug Peterson Chris Restoring
Emiliano Sala Suffered Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Fatal Plane Crash

AP 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 2 years ago

Emiliano Sala Suffered Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Fatal Plane Crash

"The late Argentine soccer player Emiliano Sala and his pilot were exposed to high levels of carbon monoxide before their small plane crashed in the English Channel killing them both AP correspondent Charles de Ledesma reports on the investigation into the crash from earlier this year solid was with the pilots David if it soon with the single engine aircraft crashed into the channel island of Guernsey on January twenty one the body of the twenty eight year old footballer was recovered from the wreckage two weeks later well it would since but he has not been found the accident investigations branch now sake toxicology tests found a high saturation level of C. O. H. B. the combination products of carbon monoxide and have a blessed and inside his blood is not known what role if any carbon monoxide exposure they have played in the

Emiliano Sala David Guernsey Charles De Ledesma C. O. H. Twenty Eight Year Two Weeks
Supply demands: Yemen peace talks

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:15 min | 2 years ago

Supply demands: Yemen peace talks

"Today representatives of warring sides in the conflict in Yemen are due to meet in Jordan for the latest round of talks aimed at ending the violence. They come as Yemen's war stretches into its fifth year. Across the country. The rebel group known as the who 'this is battling the forces of a western backed government that governments also supported by Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. The people of the world's poorest country have suffered extrordinary famine and disease as the violence has dragged on at the end of last year. There came a whisper of hope as the United Nations secretary general until Goethe's announced an agreement between any factions that were meeting in Sweden, Sealy hope. That's we are living the beginning of the end of one of the biggest tragedies of the twenty first century the conflict in Yemen. The deal focused on ending standoff between who these and government forces at the vital port city of data. And it is my belief. That's the question of day. There was the make or break. But the agreement didn't seem to herald much of a breakthrough. Has seen issue number to start calm agreement. We didn't feel that was major change Dalia cost. Him is Yemen. Humanitarian who works in data. She spoke to journalists in London earlier this year. The only thing that changed was the bombardment stopped inside the city itself. The fighting continues to happen outside the city and the frontlines continue to shift. The humanitarian situation is just getting worse and worse physically any. Today's talks are part of an effort to break the deadlock. Today. Jordan, the derails and the Yemeni government are sitting down. And this is really an effort to consolidate a ceasefire agreement that was reached last year. But that what they never really took effect March McShane are Middle East editor one of the biggest parts of that agreement was meant to be a pullout of the rebels from the main port of data, and they did not actually pull out. So part of the focus of today's talks is not only to make sure that pullout is actually happening, but also figure out how to share revenues from the port of data, and that might seem like a small thing. But it's actually quite important. The rebels control the bulk of the population areas in Yemen, and in those areas people have not been paid salaries for years, and the thought is if that if you can start to get some revenue from the port, and then spread that revenue around it will ease the economic crisis in Yemen. But but why data why is that so important so up to eighty percent of imports and aid a pass through data, and the rebels have controlled the port on the ground at see the coalition that by Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates, they control. The parents is for ships to come in. And the problem with that is the coalition has been using this power to really cut off the north in the areas of Yemen controlled by the who tease cut them off economically and really strangled them. And so do you think the the meeting today represents the chance for some progress on this? I mean after a an agreement that's stalled for months. I mean, there is so much distrust on all sides you want to be optimistic, but you wanted to be optimistic back in December. When all the stuff was agreed initially, and what happened then was you know, the these kind of faked a pullout they handed over power over the port to the guard and police forces that were basically just aligned with them. So they basically just handed power back to themselves in other uniforms. So I'm not terribly optimistic about this. I think it's just really hard to be optimistic about Yemen in general the reason to be a bit more optimistic. This time is that the UN is overseeing this pullout. And so far they say it's all going to plan at the same time. You have government officials who disagree with them Cessna. So the UN is mediating these talks, but but who are the real power roofers here who has to be convinced who's who's working from the sidelines. So this is a really difficult thing about Yemen at the talks in Jordan, you have the rebels you have the government. But that's not nearly all the players who are battling in the country the offensive last year on her that it was led by the marauders and they're using forces Salafist forces their line with secessionists in the south their partner with Saudi Arabia. Saudi arabia. Meanwhile, partnered with local Islamists. There's also the forces that are loyal to the former president Elliott Dila Sala there were previously along with the who 'this that alliance broke up in that the end of two thousand seventeen there now aligned loosely with the Maradas. So it's it's a bit of a mess in a bit of a Patrick, and you have she you have a lot of the other forces who aren't part of the talks in Jordan feeling quite left out will end, and you mention Saudi Arabia a couple of times. Amid the patchwork and Saudi is and turn backed by America, where talk of this humanitarian mess seems to be sort of increasing recently. Yeah. Yeah. So in April of the Senate and the house voted to end American support for the war in Yemen. And it's an issue that seems to come up whenever sort of America wants to take a shot at Saudi Arabia in particular. Now, Donald Trump really values the relationship with Saudi Arabia's. So he he vetoed the resolution that was meant to end America's support. And I think you'll continue to veto any efforts that are that are meant to cut America's support for the war in Yemen. I mean, it's an issue in America that doesn't really resonate. You know, the war in Yemen is also often called the forgotten war. And I think that that's really true in America. And earlier this week Saudi Arabia said that some of its ships had been damaged by an attack. Is there any connection with with any of this? It's all quite murky right now. You have reports from American officials who are figuring on. But doing so anonymously in their speculation that could be Orion proxies at the same time. You have a reports that the who 'these are attacking Saudi installations again, it's not clear if that's related at all to these ship attacks. But it's the type of thing that gets you quite nervous because you have you now have hawks to the controlling policy in America, and the Ron and they're looking for publications and Yemen sort of plays into this. I mean, certainly America in is invoking Yemen as part of its anti Iran campaign. So, you know, an attack by proxy on some ships in the strait over moose might be the exact type of thing that leads to a bigger war. Roger thank you very much for joining us.

Yemen Saudi Arabia America Jordan UN United Arab Emirates Yemeni Government Cessna Sealy Goethe Donald Trump Sweden London Editor Roger Elliott Dila Sala Salafist
 Saudi Arabia arrests more activists, including 2 US citizens

The World

03:29 min | 2 years ago

Saudi Arabia arrests more activists, including 2 US citizens

"Just last week. It seemed as if Saudi Arabia's government was starting to respond to international pressure over human rights. It released several women's rights activists in prison. But then came more arrests were hearing about eight people who've been detained now in two of them are Saudi Americans the world's syringe afar. Reports. One of the Saudi Americans arrested is Sala a heyday, his the son of a prominent women's rights activists who was released from prison. Just last week. This Momani is a Saudi on its who teaches at the university of Waterloo in Canada. She says she was shocked when she heard the news because one had expected that there was a climbing down that the regime or the government was trying to move the spotlight away from the continued arrest of the Saudi activists we had seen the release of at least two of the activists. And slowly slowly were being brought forward to the courts. The woman who was released last week as a use of has fought for years for women's right to drive last may as the driving ban was lifted she was arrested and imprisoned along with about a dozen other activists, but last week was a joyful moment. The first thing our son did was to take a selfie, but his mom and posted online. It shows them in tight in vase both have huge grins on their faces today, though, the son and mother have switched places is now hater the son who's in prison and his mother is on the outside. There's a new chill. Now. I think that's going to be vocal with this new arrest of all of these family members of activists. Hey, there is a US citizen. He owns a home in Virginia but lived with his wife and children in the kingdom. Among those arrested. This week are writers and intellectuals husband on his pigment wife. It's surprising bus. Omani says that the are considered a threat given that they all have either stopped their activism over never politically active in the first place. There's no official explanation for the arrests. But we'll money says is soon the only crime is being related to activists for them to be arrested is is really quite cruel. And it does I think make it very clear to a lot of individuals that there is collective punishment. It is not just about your particular life. That is going to be up ended. It may be your families. And I think that's that's really chilling crown prince Mohammad bin someone has gone after activists dissidents academics since it came to power into fifteen. These arrests have created a sense of fear. Among Saudis says Mamani Saudi Arabia has been under pressure from the international community after the murder of the Washington Post columnist Jamal million Louis professor of Middle East politics at the college of New Jersey. Says the latest arrests show. The crown prince is not bowing to pressure from the outside the Saudi government is saying that the reactions of the international community, the various governments and organizations and associations does not affect them. And they will continue to run their internal affairs as they see fit this week, the Senate Foreign Relations committee confirmed John at his aid as the US ambassador to Saudi Arabia is the first time the US has invested their to Saturday via in two

Saudi Arabia Saudi Government United States University Of Waterloo Sala Senate Foreign Relations Commi John Middle East Washington Post Jamal Million Louis Virginia Canada New Jersey Murder Official Professor
Algeria, Army And President discussed on City Arts and Lectures

City Arts and Lectures

00:57 sec | 2 years ago

Algeria, Army And President discussed on City Arts and Lectures

"The head of Algeria's. Army says President Abdelaziz beautifully com should be declared unfit rule following two decades in power booed Affleck has rarely been seen in public for years because of health problems. The BBC's Yousef Taha says Tuesday statement is the strongest signal yet that Algieria powerful military is abandoning the country's leader following weeks of protests GDN media described. The army chief's comments at the dropping of a massive bomb. Addressing the military Lifton in general guide Sala referred to an article in the constitution, which can declare the poster president, vacant if the officeholders unfit to rule General Saleh said this would be an immediate solution to the crisis in ALgeria, which would meet the legitimate demands of the people there have been weeks of mass protests against president under the constitution. The speaker of the Senate Abdelkadar been solid would become acting head of state, pending an election within ninety

Algeria Army President Trump President Abdelaziz Yousef Taha Acting Head General Saleh Lifton Affleck Sala BBC Senate Algieria Two Decades
Cardiff, Nantes And David Davidson discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

00:18 sec | 2 years ago

Cardiff, Nantes And David Davidson discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

"The body recovered from the wreckage of a crush plane has been formally identified as that of Cardiff City football player Emiliano Sala Dorset place have said the twenty eight year old was travelling to Cardiff from the French city of Nantes on January twenty first when the aircraft flown by pilot David Davidson went missing

Cardiff Nantes David Davidson Cardiff City Emiliano Sala Dorset Twenty Eight Year
Body recovered from plane wreckage is Argentine soccer player

BBC World Service

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

Body recovered from plane wreckage is Argentine soccer player

"There has been an outpouring of sympathy from the football world after it was confirmed that the body pulled from the wreckage of a plane in the English channel is that of the Cardiff City striker Emiliano Sala Cardiff's Ivory Coast defender, salt Bamba, posted a black and white image on social media of a teammate. He would never get to play alongside the body of the pilot. David Ibbotson has still yet to be found despite the development Cardiff's relegated battle away to Southampton is scheduled to go ahead as planned on Saturday of the other end of the table Liverpool. Go back top if they get even a point at home to

Emiliano Sala Cardiff Cardiff Salt Bamba David Ibbotson Southampton Football Liverpool
Body Is Recovered From Wreckage of Soccer Star Emiliano Sala’s Plane

BBC World Service

00:21 sec | 2 years ago

Body Is Recovered From Wreckage of Soccer Star Emiliano Sala’s Plane

"Care. Accident. Investigators say they've successfully recovered a body from the wreckage of a plane went down in the sea between France and Britain carrying the Argentine international footballer Emiliano Saleh and his pilot. The body has not yet been identified. Saleh had just moved from the French club Nantes to Cardiff City in the

Emiliano Saleh French Club Nantes Cardiff City France Britain
"sala" Discussed on Puty's World Cup Podcast

Puty's World Cup Podcast

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"sala" Discussed on Puty's World Cup Podcast

"And I run through all the ways we could lose it. And then it's like what your final score out three now. Then that's not what I do. It all come out, you know loss. Yeah. No. I mean, prediction wise. I think. Yeah. I just assume. Yeah. Can talk all this shit I want, but I do think with the better side, we should get three at home. That home Everett. So so he's talking about liberal, and I'm being, you know, out of sync speak, even though they've been playing pretty well to their winning that winning a lot of games here. They just haven't hit that next level that I'm looking for them to. And there's only one way to get back on track the best way. Anyway, that's coming up against full defense, which is what they're about to do here. That sounds like a small BUSTER this one. I feel like this one could get ugly now. I think so I think liberal win four nothing. So bad. They wanna say shockers. Do it. Do it so bad area an early much of its goal or some shit like that. I think that lost a Redstar probably what if kicking. Okay. So what all the shit. I've been talking all year about Sala celebrating and all this crap. All this propaganda bullshit. I've been spewing what if there's that slight slimmer of hope that it's actually I'm onto something. And there is something wrong and the arsenal game made the players feel a little weird the red star game made them feel like shit..

Sala
"sala" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"sala" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Paris. I'm Juliet Sala. You're listening to Bloomberg daybreak Europe live from London. Well, it is looking like we are going to have a bit of a risk off sentiment across European markets. Today, similar to what you saw in the US session, overnight and weakness coming through in Asia today, you've seen quite substantial weakness in fact, coming through in the China CSI three hundred in late trade down one point eight percent, three thousand sixty two points hours, of course, off to the treasury department stopped short of declaring China occurrences manipulator, and he saw the one break pass this year's low to its weakest level since January twenty. Seventeen also seeing some weakness coming through in Korean Stokes today. The Bank of Korea leaving rates on hold and we saw markets. Elsewhere across Asia being sold off as well. The oil price falling below seventy dollars a barrel on the WTI contract. That's quite a bit of negativity coming through in energy plays in Asia. You could expect the same from a lot of these energy plays in Europe today. WTI crude sixty nine Eighty-one. Brent crude is just slightly higher. Still about eighty dollars handle eighty dollars. Ten having a look at the futures the deck suggesting a sell off about a third of one percent in Germany footsie. One hundred features pretty flat when we were talking about half an hour ago. There are actually in positive territory. But now looking like a flat to negative day in London and the cat forty futures down by around a tenth of one percent. Having a look at the bond yields after of course, we saw the US treasury yield clam back towards that seven year high on the back of the fed minutes. You are seeing yields in German bonds. Boone's I should say just a slightly lower down by about two tenths of one percent them. All right. Let's get to the top stories of the day. And of course, the did fall to its lowest level since the start of last year after the US stopped short of declaring China, a currency manipulator, but said it will keep watching closely after its recent slide Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said he's particularly concerned China's lack of transparency of it. He wants full. The report also said the US is disappointed that Beijing didn't disclose currency intervention. Well, the post office is the latest battleground in President Trump's trade war with China. The US is threatening to pull out of an international treaty that allows China to ship packages on the shape. Bloomberg's Sean Donner says the Trump administration doesn't think the deal is one of the points that Peter Navarro the the White House trade advisor made monop-, Ed. Was that it's cheaper to ship product one pound package from Beijing to New York than it is to ship the same package from LA to New York, and that doesn't seem fair if you're the Trump administration White House officials say they're willing to negotiate, but we'll leave the one hundred and forty four year old universal postal union next year, if the terms don't improve well, the UK is said to be considering staying tied to European Union rules for longer to break the brakes at deadlock sources say Prime Minister Theresa may is considering a proposal to extend the transition period beyond the twenty one months from March. Twenty nine may reportedly made the announcement when meeting with European leaders in Brussels last night. Yes, there were differences remaining backstop.

US China Asia Europe London Beijing WTI Bloomberg Paris. Steven Mnuchin Brent crude Bank of Korea treasury department Juliet Sala Korean Stokes European Union White House Brussels
"sala" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"sala" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Any roads speeco dirt sand, sagebrush Sala wasn't these black tar paper, barracks, spotted all over the place and. That's it that was our home Looked desolate look dusty to me in one. Thousand nine forty two Frank Kukuchi and, his family were living behind barbed wire at men's and are a prison camp in the California desert. At the beginning of World War Two the United States government forced nearly one, hundred and twenty thousand Japanese Americans into ten camps like, Manzana our government intelligence said. The Japanese Americans didn't pose a threat to national security but the Roosevelt, administration went ahead. With the camps anyway From American public media and the Smithsonian's national museum of American history this. Is order nine zero six six documentary about the incarceration of Japanese Americans during, World War Two this is part two fighting for freedom I wanted to fight. For the United States famous my classmates When there I lived or not make any difference everybody was to fight the war and I wanted to be a part of thousands of Japanese American, men from the camps signed up. To fight in, the, war but thousands of others were reluctant some even said no how can I go, and fight for democracy when I'm in a concentration camp today we'll hear from some of the Japanese Americans who fought in Europe in the Pacific for their. Country and for their relatives in the prison camps back home and we'll hear from some of the Japanese Americans who. Protested their imprisonment and resisted the pressure to, prove their patriotism Sobbed Shimono and his. Family were taken from their.

United States sagebrush Sala national museum of American Frank Kukuchi Shimono Roosevelt California desert Europe Pacific