24 Burst results for "Sal Marquez"

"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

04:15 min | 3 weeks ago

"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the outcomes rockets Sal Marquez here, , and they have the privilege of hosting for the Second Time Miss Deb Gordon, , she's spent her career trying to level the playing field for health care consumers haven't listened to the first podcasts with DAB. . You've gotta go listen to it. . It's all about the consumer and healthcare. . She's all about you. . She's all about your employees and how you can get the most for your healthcare dollar. . She's the author of the healthcare consumers manifesto how to get the most for your money based on research she conducted as a senior fellow. . At the Harvard Kennedy, , School Center for Business and government she's a former health insurance executive and health care CEO. . She's an aspen. . Institute health innovators fellow and an Eisenhower fellow, , her research and commentaries have appeared in USA Today, , the Harvard Business Review blog, , and on network open. . She holds a B A in bioethics from Brown University and an MBA with distinction from Harvard Business School and I'm excited to dive into her work again around the consumer's manifesto deb such a privilege to have you back on. . Hey, , saw. . Thanks so for having me back. . Yeah, , absolutely. . So you've been busy. . I have been busy. . That's true. . I spent probably a year doing research for this book and another year writing a not exactly that split but I spend a good two years of my life producing this baby and it is exciting to come back and tell you about it because when we first met, , I was just starting to think about it. . I was just starting the research and listening to what consumers had to say. . So I'm excited to be back to talk more about it <hes> the same here and so dab you know obviously. . So listeners goal isn't a DEB's podcast. . This you get a deeper appreciation about her time as an insurance executive and what has inspired her work and focus in the consumer sphere but a little bit about the book. . Dab. . You know what's the focus area? ? What are the takeaways at a high level? ? Sure. . So I wrote the book mainly to expose the human side of healthcare costs like what is really going on for people when we go to the doctor or were phasing an insurance decision and we have to pay. For . it and I was really taken with the fact that so many people of all walks of life come to me and say because I used to work health insurance they know I know something about it and they just say what should I do and you know the most extraordinary people who've accomplished so much in their lives walk into my office at the Kennedy School at Harvard and alike, , what health insurance should I buy and I. . It just dawned on me that if people like that need help and it's Legitimate that they do. . It's very confusing and can be overwhelming like what chance is you know everyone else have of making sense of these decisions. . So that's the motivation that I I brought into the book and then in doing my research for it, , I heard story after story of consumer. . So real people who are trying to get value for their healthcare dollars whether they use those kind of terms or not I say like shopping for healthcare is a thing we could do people don't use those words and they don't even. . Know what I'm talking about. . But you know I interviewed people about their experiences spending money on healthcare and what I learned is that although it feels really foreign to put that into shopping terms or you know we know how to buy things but we don't know how to shop around in healthcare and. . It doesn't mean we're not able to. . That's I think the biggest takeaway is that we do actually have more power than we might even realize and that the first step is to just ask the question, , what if what, , if I could get what I needed? ? What do I need? ? Why do I need this? ? Is there an alternative and just almost like re imagine ourselves as a customer when it comes to healthcare this is Dr is nervous and unhappy by the way, , but it's not a slight against doctors. . It's just you know what I think consumers need for whatever reason we need permission almost to think of ourselves as entitled to get value for our healthcare dollars.

Harvard Kennedy Harvard Business School Harvard Business Review senior fellow executive School Center for Business DEB Brown University Eisenhower USA Today Harvard Kennedy School dot
Shopping for Health Care: How Consumer Can Use Purchasing Power to Get What They Need with Deb Gordon

Outcomes Rocket

04:15 min | 3 weeks ago

Shopping for Health Care: How Consumer Can Use Purchasing Power to Get What They Need with Deb Gordon

"Welcome back to the outcomes rockets Sal Marquez here, and they have the privilege of hosting for the Second Time Miss Deb Gordon, she's spent her career trying to level the playing field for health care consumers haven't listened to the first podcasts with DAB. You've gotta go listen to it. It's all about the consumer and healthcare. She's all about you. She's all about your employees and how you can get the most for your healthcare dollar. She's the author of the healthcare consumers manifesto how to get the most for your money based on research she conducted as a senior fellow. At the Harvard Kennedy, School Center for Business and government she's a former health insurance executive and health care CEO. She's an aspen. Institute health innovators fellow and an Eisenhower fellow, her research and commentaries have appeared in USA Today, the Harvard Business Review blog, and on network open. She holds a B A in bioethics from Brown University and an MBA with distinction from Harvard Business School and I'm excited to dive into her work again around the consumer's manifesto deb such a privilege to have you back on. Hey, saw. Thanks so for having me back. Yeah, absolutely. So you've been busy. I have been busy. That's true. I spent probably a year doing research for this book and another year writing a not exactly that split but I spend a good two years of my life producing this baby and it is exciting to come back and tell you about it because when we first met, I was just starting to think about it. I was just starting the research and listening to what consumers had to say. So I'm excited to be back to talk more about it the same here and so dab you know obviously. So listeners goal isn't a DEB's podcast. This you get a deeper appreciation about her time as an insurance executive and what has inspired her work and focus in the consumer sphere but a little bit about the book. Dab. You know what's the focus area? What are the takeaways at a high level? Sure. So I wrote the book mainly to expose the human side of healthcare costs like what is really going on for people when we go to the doctor or were phasing an insurance decision and we have to pay. For it and I was really taken with the fact that so many people of all walks of life come to me and say because I used to work health insurance they know I know something about it and they just say what should I do and you know the most extraordinary people who've accomplished so much in their lives walk into my office at the Kennedy School at Harvard and alike, what health insurance should I buy and I. It just dawned on me that if people like that need help and it's Legitimate that they do. It's very confusing and can be overwhelming like what chance is you know everyone else have of making sense of these decisions. So that's the motivation that I I brought into the book and then in doing my research for it, I heard story after story of consumer. So real people who are trying to get value for their healthcare dollars whether they use those kind of terms or not I say like shopping for healthcare is a thing we could do people don't use those words and they don't even. Know what I'm talking about. But you know I interviewed people about their experiences spending money on healthcare and what I learned is that although it feels really foreign to put that into shopping terms or you know we know how to buy things but we don't know how to shop around in healthcare and. It doesn't mean we're not able to. That's I think the biggest takeaway is that we do actually have more power than we might even realize and that the first step is to just ask the question, what if what, if I could get what I needed? What do I need? Why do I need this? Is there an alternative and just almost like re imagine ourselves as a customer when it comes to healthcare this is Dr is nervous and unhappy by the way, but it's not a slight against doctors. It's just you know what I think consumers need for whatever reason we need permission almost to think of ourselves as entitled to get value for our healthcare dollars.

Sal Marquez Harvard Kennedy Harvard Business School Harvard Business Review Deb Gordon Executive DEB Senior Fellow Brown University School Center For Business Eisenhower Usa Today Harvard Kennedy School
"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:15 min | 2 months ago

"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket sal. Marquez here today have the privilege of hosting Tom Knight. He's the chairman of the healthcare diversion network that healthcare diversion network aims to reduce drug diversion in healthcare by providing national network for reporting diversion incidents information to raise awareness about past versions as well as education and best practices to prevent future diversion too big problem. I even even You know happening as people go check out. Real estate you know in in the clinic in hospitals, you name it it's a problem that Tom and his team are doing outstanding work to make awareness of and to put to a stop. So with that, I wanNA give Tom a warm welcome. But I also WanNa to tell you that He's also got an incredible superpower of getting to all of the baseball stadiums in the country he's been to all thirty and so. With that I wanNA give Tom a warm welcome Tom Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me and excited to talk with you share with your listeners what what we're doing in healthcare diversion. Absolutely, Tom now tell me something What is it? That got you interested in this problem? It actually dates back about twenty years I'm an entrepreneur in an engineer and we've been using software to track medication inventory across the whole supply chain. And as I've been reading the headlines about our nation's OPIOID crisis, I've been struck that a lot of drugs are being stolen either by people who use them themselves or. Are, selling them to others, and that's leading to an even larger addiction issue. So I realized that the technology that we had for tracking those medications might be useful for preventing those same medications from being stolen. And as I learned more about the problem, I realized it's happening more often than most of us realize and it's not just a technology question. We need as a country better awareness of how many of these cases.

Tom Knight Marquez baseball engineer
"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

05:12 min | 2 months ago

"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Sal Marquez here and today I. Have the privilege of hosting on a totally gave man. He is the CEO and Co founder of Care Avoidance, a healthcare sales enablement solution for life sciences that is doing extraordinary work for drawing out value propositions. Companies Looking to express that clearly anatoly came to work in healthcare early in his career, starting off as the lead engineer on one of the first hip compliant benefits, communication products for enterprises, he continued to work with large healthcare data sets and HR soft before. Before becoming the chief architect at Ambra. Health a cloud based medical imaging company. It was there at Ambra that Anatoly saw the need for high quality data to inform sales execution which germinated. The idea for care voyage were thrilled to have him on the podcast today, and it's such a unique platform that they're using to reach customers and for sales teams to reach their customers in a clear way Donatelli. Thank you so much for joining me today. Thank Salty. Got Be. Yeah. Absolutely. So tons of great stuff being done by your company. And so before we dive into really the meat bones of what you guys do there, I love to first arc and find out more about you and one inspires your work in healthcare. I appreciate it, and so I started working in healthcare actually when I was still in high school. I just happened to luck out and find on an internship working on one of the first hickory maple insisting that for human resources management. So that really <hes> starting my love for working with large data sets and working with privileged data, like that I continue dot read some other gigs on signatory around Maple imaging on, and that's really where I started learning about. About, the difficulty that companies have selling in healthcare. So with my may imaging gig on I, I was the chief architect company called Ambra Health on big digital medic rummaging Bloomberg, and then I switched over to more of a developer evangelists than sales engineering role, and that's where I really started looking at how companies that produce the rate products go to market. And what inspires me a about healthier? Specifically, my little corner of healthcare is helping innovators, take their market big their products to market. I think there's a lot of great innovation that's happening right now. especially with digital innovation machine learning ai off care. But I think that the past to a successful product is still at I. It's still very hard to navigate. So that's what inspires me getting these products so. So, writer audience and getting patients right treatment at the right time, eventually through <hes> through the use of our product and obviously great innovation. Yeah. You know it's <hes>. That's so great, and there's so many opportunities for companies and you know the people leading them, the teams that are representing the great work that you know I mean many of these companies we have on the podcast a totally you know the. Great Work and they have great products and services and the pathway to get there. The go to market strategy isn't always super clear, and then on top of that, it's not easy to sell inside of our healthcare system and it takes forever so. All of those things are true own. Yeah, and I think that there are a lot of products that end up failing because the products and successful and because the greater market strategy is maybe not very well informed their beats not very well executed, and so if I can do anything to help that and that was where I decided to spend, my time is opening entrepreneurs with way to go to market I. Think it's great and in our vertical or our economy or health care economy, it's so necessary. So tell us a little bit about what you guys are doing. Doing at care voyage to add value to the healthcare ecosystem of innovators. Yeah. -solutely. So you know I'll start with a problem I. think the really big problem right now, the REC- at least in our little corner of the healthcare economy is data symmetry <hes>. It's you know everyone makes decisions or everyone strives to make decisions in a data driven way the acquisition of data to make those decisions, your go to market or even your your product strategy is still not democratized Jesus, sometimes available and very regularly available in. Thanks. It's not available at all on companies like care. Where we're trying to do. At least off the for. Right now, we're trying to do is we're trying to democratize access to this information whether it's you know information about who's doing, what types of services takes a physicians practicing the type of and your are devices best for or on that you're pharmaceutical product is best stations for it. I think a lot of like data's available, but traditionally, it's only been available to the wealthiest layers market <hes>, and so our goal is to democratize access to that. So even startups that may not have the backing of the largest feet from on me, not how hundred million dollars in the bay and can't get access to it and really execute a great girl market.

Ambra Anatoly chief architect REC Sal Marquez Ambra Health CEO and Co lead engineer founder writer Bloomberg developer
Empowering Medtech with Anatoly Geyfman

Outcomes Rocket

05:12 min | 2 months ago

Empowering Medtech with Anatoly Geyfman

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Sal Marquez here and today I. Have the privilege of hosting on a totally gave man. He is the CEO and Co founder of Care Avoidance, a healthcare sales enablement solution for life sciences that is doing extraordinary work for drawing out value propositions. Companies Looking to express that clearly anatoly came to work in healthcare early in his career, starting off as the lead engineer on one of the first hip compliant benefits, communication products for enterprises, he continued to work with large healthcare data sets and HR soft before. Before becoming the chief architect at Ambra. Health a cloud based medical imaging company. It was there at Ambra that Anatoly saw the need for high quality data to inform sales execution which germinated. The idea for care voyage were thrilled to have him on the podcast today, and it's such a unique platform that they're using to reach customers and for sales teams to reach their customers in a clear way Donatelli. Thank you so much for joining me today. Thank Salty. Got Be. Yeah. Absolutely. So tons of great stuff being done by your company. And so before we dive into really the meat bones of what you guys do there, I love to first arc and find out more about you and one inspires your work in healthcare. I appreciate it, and so I started working in healthcare actually when I was still in high school. I just happened to luck out and find on an internship working on one of the first hickory maple insisting that for human resources management. So that really starting my love for working with large data sets and working with privileged data, like that I continue dot read some other gigs on signatory around Maple imaging on, and that's really where I started learning about. About, the difficulty that companies have selling in healthcare. So with my may imaging gig on I, I was the chief architect company called Ambra Health on big digital medic rummaging Bloomberg, and then I switched over to more of a developer evangelists than sales engineering role, and that's where I really started looking at how companies that produce the rate products go to market. And what inspires me a about healthier? Specifically, my little corner of healthcare is helping innovators, take their market big their products to market. I think there's a lot of great innovation that's happening right now. especially with digital innovation machine learning ai off care. But I think that the past to a successful product is still at I. It's still very hard to navigate. So that's what inspires me getting these products so. So, writer audience and getting patients right treatment at the right time, eventually through through the use of our product and obviously great innovation. Yeah. You know it's That's so great, and there's so many opportunities for companies and you know the people leading them, the teams that are representing the great work that you know I mean many of these companies we have on the podcast a totally you know the. Great Work and they have great products and services and the pathway to get there. The go to market strategy isn't always super clear, and then on top of that, it's not easy to sell inside of our healthcare system and it takes forever so. All of those things are true own. Yeah, and I think that there are a lot of products that end up failing because the products and successful and because the greater market strategy is maybe not very well informed their beats not very well executed, and so if I can do anything to help that and that was where I decided to spend, my time is opening entrepreneurs with way to go to market I. Think it's great and in our vertical or our economy or health care economy, it's so necessary. So tell us a little bit about what you guys are doing. Doing at care voyage to add value to the healthcare ecosystem of innovators. Yeah. -solutely. So you know I'll start with a problem I. think the really big problem right now, the REC- at least in our little corner of the healthcare economy is data symmetry It's you know everyone makes decisions or everyone strives to make decisions in a data driven way the acquisition of data to make those decisions, your go to market or even your your product strategy is still not democratized Jesus, sometimes available and very regularly available in. Thanks. It's not available at all on companies like care. Where we're trying to do. At least off the for. Right now, we're trying to do is we're trying to democratize access to this information whether it's you know information about who's doing, what types of services takes a physicians practicing the type of and your are devices best for or on that you're pharmaceutical product is best stations for it. I think a lot of like data's available, but traditionally, it's only been available to the wealthiest layers market and so our goal is to democratize access to that. So even startups that may not have the backing of the largest feet from on me, not how hundred million dollars in the bay and can't get access to it and really execute a great girl market.

Anatoly Ambra Chief Architect REC Sal Marquez Ceo And Co Ambra Health Lead Engineer Founder Writer Bloomberg Developer
"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

04:10 min | 2 months ago

"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Sal Marquez here and today I. Have the privilege of hosting on a totally gave man. He is the CEO and Co founder of Care Avoidance, a healthcare sales enablement solution for life sciences that is doing extraordinary work for drawing out value propositions. Companies Looking to express that clearly anatoly came to work in healthcare early in his career, starting off as the lead engineer on one of the first hip compliant benefits, communication products for enterprises, he continued to work with large healthcare data sets and HR soft before. Before becoming the chief architect at Ambra. Health a cloud based medical imaging company. It was there at Ambra that Anatoly saw the need for high quality data to inform sales execution which germinated. The idea for care voyage were thrilled to have him on the podcast today, and it's such a unique platform that they're using to reach customers and for sales teams to reach their customers in a clear way Donatelli. Thank you so much for joining me today. Thank Salty. Got Be. Yeah. Absolutely. So tons of great stuff being done by your company. And so before we dive into really the meat bones of what you guys do there, I love to first arc and find out more about you and one inspires your work in healthcare. I appreciate it, and so I started working in healthcare actually when I was still in high school. I just happened to luck out and find on an internship working on one of the first hickory maple insisting that for human resources management. So that really starting my love for working with large data sets and working with privileged data, like that I continue dot read some other gigs on signatory around Maple imaging on, and that's really where I started learning about. About, the difficulty that companies have selling in healthcare. So with my may imaging gig on I, I was the chief architect company called Ambra Health on big digital medic rummaging Bloomberg, and then I switched over to more of a developer evangelists than sales engineering role, and that's where I really started looking at how companies that produce the rate products go to market. And what inspires me a about healthier? Specifically, my little corner of healthcare is helping innovators, take their market big their products to market. I think there's a lot of great innovation that's happening right now. especially with digital innovation machine learning ai off care. But I think that the past to a successful product is still at I. It's still very hard to navigate. So that's what inspires me getting these products so. So, writer audience and getting patients right treatment at the right time, eventually through through the use of our product and obviously great innovation. Yeah. You know it's That's so great, and there's so many opportunities for companies and you know the people leading them, the teams that are representing the great work that you know I mean many of these companies we have on the podcast a totally you know the. Great Work and they have great products and services and the pathway to get there. The go to market strategy isn't always super clear, and then on top of that, it's not easy to sell inside of our healthcare system and it takes forever so. All of those things are true own. Yeah, and I think that there are a lot of products that end up failing because the products and successful and because the greater market strategy is maybe not very well informed their beats not very well executed, and so if I can do anything to help that and that was where I decided to spend, my time is opening entrepreneurs with way to go to market I. Think it's great and in our vertical or our economy or health care economy, it's so necessary. So tell us a little bit about what you guys are doing. Doing at care voyage to add value to the healthcare ecosystem of innovators. Yeah. -solutely. So you know I'll start with a problem I. think the really big problem right now, the REC- at least in our little corner of the healthcare economy is data symmetry It's you know.

Ambra Anatoly chief architect REC Sal Marquez Ambra Health CEO and Co lead engineer founder writer Bloomberg developer
Delivering on the Promise of Safer, Smarter Surgery with Timothy Lant

Outcomes Rocket

05:24 min | 3 months ago

Delivering on the Promise of Safer, Smarter Surgery with Timothy Lant

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Sal Marquez here and thank you for tuning in. Again I have the privilege of hosting Tim Lance today. He's the president and Chief Operating Officer at Care Syntax before that Tim was also the Senior Vice President and general manager at Sentry Data, systems, and previous to that managing. Director of supply chain. Academy, he's had multiple leadership roles across the healthcare. Industry and today he gonNA be talking to us more about health technology and what they're doing to impact global healthcare markets with their work at Care Syntax Tim such a pleasure to have you here with us today. Thank you. It's great to be here. I appreciate you having me. Absolutely. So before we get into the work that you guys do at Care Syntax me a little. Bit about you and what inspires your work in healthcare. Yeah happy to so you know for me it's a it's been an interesting journey into healthcare. I think a lot of people get into healthcare sometimes because their parents are involved in was no exception to that. So my mother is a clinician she was in healthcare for thirty years and I learned from a very. Early, age how important it was to have a well-functioning high quality, affordable healthcare system in any community that I also got to see how complex it was for my mom both as a clinician as administrator and healthcare I watched a lot of challenges that she faced and so I promised myself that I would never work healthcare and graduated from college I immediately started working in healthcare. And You know I think today you know almost twenty years later now right would. Kinda keeps. ME excited and getting up every morning. Excited about what we're doing is you I experienced firsthand during my time spent several years with with your on healthcare and I worked in the frontline. Saw You know I'm not a clinician but I worked side by side with doctors and nurses and social workers and case managers to try to improve communication and coordination and clinical care inside seen firsthand how complex it is and how difficult it is. But critical it is to you know to our communities into our societies and in some ways I. think it's a it's a little bit how I feel about golf right as you can have A. kind of a a tough rounding Gulf. But you have that one magical shot met keeps coming back for more in healthcare little bit that same way. I think we tend to fixate sometimes on all the problems and healthcare. But then you are on the front lines and you watch how you can save a life writer keep a family together bring somebody back from the brink of death and I think there's no greater thing that that I'd want to spend my time doing than than trying to increase the number of great shots that we have in our healthcare system. So love at your those those winds that keep you in the game for the long haul. And so I, appreciate you sharing that. Plenty of like I'm not GonNa get a nail care you graduate. You're, in. Healthcare. I there's something about something magnetic about the purposeful kind of impact. You could have in health care and I and I share that with yeah and I think a lot of listeners share that with us Tim, and so tell us about care syntax and what you guys are doing add value to the healthcare ecosystem. Yes. So I think care syntax is we're very focused on. Surgery and on the or which I think in some respects especially in the US a little bit is oftentimes I don't WanNa say overlooked. But when we think about population health and a lot of the trends in the last ten years and we tend to hear a lot about chronic disease management and end of life care in these kinds of things and we're very. Focused on surgery, which you know if you take a step back, you know it's a, it's not the majority of cases in our healthcare system, but it is certainly the majority of revenue in the healthcare system for most hospitals comes out of the or and it's also a place where from a quality standpoint you know a lot of quality problems can begin. In the or you know if those surgeries aren't optimal. So this is where we've chosen to focus and you know in our vision as a business is to really enable caregivers to save lives on specifically for us. Kind of Our big vision is millions of lives around the world you know to be saved through use of our technology by by those. Caregivers at the frontline. So that's really really where we're focused and the think You always think about adding value to the ecosystem I, like to look at it in a couple of ways but I think the thing that makes us really unique that we've you know we've chosen to look holistically at the healthcare ecosystem and within that world of of the or. And try to look at stakeholder alignment. So you have kind of your clinical stakeholders, financial stakeholders, stakeholders, and operations, and supply chain, and then obviously the patient. So we really try to look with our technology at how we can bring those key stakeholders together right and drive convergence there, and then we do the same thing around the process side. So looking at kind of that end end process of what it takes to deliver a high quality safe. Surgery and so you've got you know operational components, throughput capacity management logistics supplies, and then you've got quality and safety, and then you have all the analytics learning and Research and development that comes on the back end in that sort of trust creates a continuous cycle. Then that's really where we look to add the most business value is by bringing those stakeholders together and by creating value, not just one small facet but looking at how can create. Value

Tim Lance President And Chief Operating Senior Vice President And Gene Sal Marquez Sentry Data Director United States Golf Administrator Writer
"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

06:38 min | 3 months ago

"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the outcomes racket Sal Marquez is here and today I have the privilege of hosting of San ant- name Mola she's an accomplished healthcare executive and investment banker shows currently an executive in residence at plug and play the world's largest early stage, VC Fund and corporate accelerator. She's also the managing partner of Zen partners an investment banking firm based in Palo, Alto and New York covering the next generation of health TECH COMPANIES OF WE'RE GONNA be diving into innovation and healthcare. Venture. Capital and I'm so privileged to have of Santa here with us of sonnet. Thanks so much for joining pleasure so Asana. You know you do some fascinating work in in healthcare and will dive into that the venture front, but before we do, would love to hear more about what inspires your work and healthcare, you know I've been on investment banker on a strategy advisor for over thirty years on I started my career in technology, so I come to healthcare with A. Fairly deep knowledge of what I call Horizontal Technology on about twenty years ago. Honestly I fell into healthcare. Just doing couple of deals, I'm then longside got you know the dynamics of the industry? was you know no looking back and I got heavily involved. On really started focusing on on the industry, and really for three three main reasons one is. You know, it is the largest industry in our economy. It's eighteen percent of our economy. It's the only industry that directly impacts every human being in our country. I'm probably most him personally an industry that despite his side. Is Social Impact. Is! Probably still to this day way behind. For example Fintech on some other technology, so it's an industry that. Really need. In my opinion innovation and it was really true technology bad. We can bend the cost curve so I said well. I have some good tech background. I love the industry. And it was almost like a calling I said that's how I'm going to get involved with this How Technology and make sure that I focused on. Sectors of the. Industry that could bend the cost curve. I love it. I love it, you you sort of just accidentally through a couple deals guide involved. Then strategically said. This is a good fit and the impacts big. So, let's let's roll up our sleeves. Yeah. I love it, and and so and so now you know your your role as managing partner of Zen Partners and executive in residence at logging play, you're seeing a lot of main stage work happening and so companies coming up with new ideas and businesses succeeding businesses failing you know. What would you say you? Guys are up to and really I. Guess, where should we focus you know? Should we focus on fly, play or Zen partners or more? I can't. We can touch base on both really there come with interchangeable so you know as an Investment Bank banker I've done about fifteen mergers and acquisitions transactions I was raised over twelve billion dollars or capital two. I feel private placement. Offering equity offering. You know when you do so many deals on you. You know I've met fell thousands of CEO's on thousands of companies over my thirty some year career. You've developed what I call an experiential intuition You know a pattern recognition, so what the reason when I moved to Silicon Valley three years ago from New York. Play. Invited me to become an E. R. and I was like okay. I don't have a lot of early stage experience, but I know a lot about healthcare and I know a lot about. Next Generation Technologies, and the opportunity afforded me listening to pitches like twenty thirty pitchers month. Of different companies, addressing different parts of healthcare, and then you know, it's been three and a half years now and when I wouldn't yards do the plug and play. We do really two things one is we help the five different venture funds that we have pick investment. And more importantly we take some of those mid stage for me. It's most of the early to mid stage company. We take it under our wing Ers. We work with founding teams on. From product strategy go to market strategy channel strategy and help them. We articulate their value proposition because especially the first time founders. They are sitting on a great technology, but I would say a good eighty percent of them. Do Not Know How to articulate the value. Proposition and when you know as investment bankers, we have done a ton of pitches ride we. Our job is to package companies on. Tell Story to investors. And Out, so we help them articulate their value proposition, and we're the sharpen their. Heels in like okay now that I can articulate my value preposition, where is the best? which markets aren't the best fit for for more for my company? So you know having been on investment bankers, helping me to be with being Dr and really helping to great early stage mistakes, companies go to the next level. If you will. No, that's that's fascinating, and so you know it's interesting that you feel a lot of a lot of these companies that are really like you know. Knee deep neck deep in their technologies. They struggle with the story. Why why do you think that is i? Think it's just a matter of. You know. It just takes a source on the founder. To be both in the. You know, see the panoramic view as well as being in the we and really being able to see the the ground level story as well as the him back, and saying okay, the grand scheme.

investment banker Zen Partners managing partner executive in residence New York Horizontal Technology Sal Marquez VC Fund Santa San Fintech executive Generation Technologies Silicon Valley Palo founder CEO
Food for Medicine with Afsaneh Naimollah

Outcomes Rocket

05:25 min | 3 months ago

Food for Medicine with Afsaneh Naimollah

"Welcome back to the outcomes racket Sal Marquez is here and today I have the privilege of hosting of San ant- name Mola she's an accomplished healthcare executive and investment banker shows currently an executive in residence at plug and play the world's largest early stage, VC Fund and corporate accelerator. She's also the managing partner of Zen partners an investment banking firm based in Palo, Alto and New York covering the next generation of health TECH COMPANIES OF WE'RE GONNA be diving into innovation and healthcare. Venture. Capital and I'm so privileged to have of Santa here with us of sonnet. Thanks so much for joining pleasure so Asana. You know you do some fascinating work in in healthcare and will dive into that the venture front, but before we do, would love to hear more about what inspires your work and healthcare, you know I've been on investment banker on a strategy advisor for over thirty years on I started my career in technology, so I come to healthcare with A. Fairly deep knowledge of what I call Horizontal Technology on about twenty years ago. Honestly I fell into healthcare. Just doing couple of deals, I'm then longside got you know the dynamics of the industry? was you know no looking back and I got heavily involved. On really started focusing on on the industry, and really for three three main reasons one is. You know, it is the largest industry in our economy. It's eighteen percent of our economy. It's the only industry that directly impacts every human being in our country. I'm probably most him personally an industry that despite his side. Is Social Impact. Is! Probably still to this day way behind. For example Fintech on some other technology, so it's an industry that. Really need. In my opinion innovation and it was really true technology bad. We can bend the cost curve so I said well. I have some good tech background. I love the industry. And it was almost like a calling I said that's how I'm going to get involved with this How Technology and make sure that I focused on. Sectors of the. Industry that could bend the cost curve. I love it. I love it, you you sort of just accidentally through a couple deals guide involved. Then strategically said. This is a good fit and the impacts big. So, let's let's roll up our sleeves. Yeah. I love it, and and so and so now you know your your role as managing partner of Zen Partners and executive in residence at logging play, you're seeing a lot of main stage work happening and so companies coming up with new ideas and businesses succeeding businesses failing you know. What would you say you? Guys are up to and really I. Guess, where should we focus you know? Should we focus on fly, play or Zen partners or more? I can't. We can touch base on both really there come with interchangeable so you know as an Investment Bank banker I've done about fifteen mergers and acquisitions transactions I was raised over twelve billion dollars or capital two. I feel private placement. Offering equity offering. You know when you do so many deals on you. You know I've met fell thousands of CEO's on thousands of companies over my thirty some year career. You've developed what I call an experiential intuition You know a pattern recognition, so what the reason when I moved to Silicon Valley three years ago from New York. Play. Invited me to become an E. R. and I was like okay. I don't have a lot of early stage experience, but I know a lot about healthcare and I know a lot about. Next Generation Technologies, and the opportunity afforded me listening to pitches like twenty thirty pitchers month. Of different companies, addressing different parts of healthcare, and then you know, it's been three and a half years now and when I wouldn't yards do the plug and play. We do really two things one is we help the five different venture funds that we have pick investment. And more importantly we take some of those mid stage for me. It's most of the early to mid stage company. We take it under our wing Ers. We work with founding teams on. From product strategy go to market strategy channel strategy and help them. We articulate their value proposition because especially the first time founders. They are sitting on a great technology, but I would say a good eighty percent of them. Do Not Know How to articulate the value.

Zen Partners Managing Partner Investment Banker Executive In Residence E. R. New York Horizontal Technology Sal Marquez Santa SAN Executive Fintech Palo Silicon Valley Advisor CEO Generation Technologies
"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

04:55 min | 3 months ago

"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the outcomes, rockets, Sal Marquez is here today I have the privilege of hosting Dr Tony Manual Dr Tony. Manual is a practicing anesthesiologist and Austin Texas. He's a partner with the United States anesthesia partners central Texas and has been in practice since two thousand two. He's an assistant professor. In the Department of surgery and Peri, operative care at Bell Medical School Dr Manual received his undergraduate degree from Vanderbilt attended the University of Texas Health Science Center for medical. School, completed his residency in anesthesia at the University of North Carolina or Or. He was recognized as the outstanding resident and fellow cardiovascular anesthesia at Duke, university in two thousand seventeen. He received his masters in medical management degree from Carnegie Mellon University and today he's playing. Multiple Roles <hes> as as he has in in his career and today we're going to be talking about physician innovation, and in particular how physicians can evolve their career to be greater contributors beyond the point of care and so. I WanNa thank you Tony for joining me today to have this very interesting discussion with you saw thanks so much great. Great to be owner podcasts, and I WANNA. Thank you for actually doing this podcast. Because for a lot of people like myself, it's been a great conduit to learn about what other people are doing, and what best practices that are out there, and it's an alternative to sort of the Journal Review articles that we have historically read and I've actually looked up several companies that you've had on and engaged with them. Really appreciate what you're doing I. Love that man now. That's great. I'm glad to hear that you've done that. That's the intention. Intention and so I appreciate you for doing that, so you know we are having a discussion. Folks <hes> Tony and I connected and said you know what the role of the physician is changing, and and so what I wanNA. Do today is just highlight how that's changing through the life of Dr Manual here and so you know I love for you Tony at to just kind of walk us through some of the work that you're doing and how it's changed from just practicing to actually doing more <hes>. You know as we engage this. You know three five trillion dollar industry that call healthcare. Yeah, it's it's been an interesting journey for me and <hes> you know have to credit one of my anesthesia attending when I was in residency, his name's Dave mayor said Gimme, grapevine goes Tony You have to continually strives to maximize your career and <hes>. Let's see well. What does that mean well? You definitely want to start trying to be the best clinician you can be once. You achieve that you should really look at you. Know becoming really strong in other areas, and I always took that to heart in so I think back to when I first started here in Austin <hes> I became the division chief of cardiovascular. Cardiovascular Anesthesia Rochester, saying I helped create division of cardiovascular. Because at that time we were <hes>. Basically, everybody was doing it, and I fell coming out of myself. This'll be really better if we limited number of people at work in that space and <hes> you know put together some protocols and got the team together, and we saw some really good outcomes from that work and I fast forward to what I'm doing today, and that work has changed so much partly because I think every clinician you have to get educated, and I use a rudimentary tools back then, but in after getting that masters degree from Carnegie Mellon I really developed at toolkit that allows me to take on. On much more complex <hes> problems that we face and healthcare today. Yeah, that's so interesting, and so you have that entrepreneurial bug from the beginning right so you kind of re retooled the way that you guys approached cardiovascular anesthesia and I'm sure with with much improvements and outcomes, but then you've taken other steps to. You've been involved in startups, and now you're doing different roles. Can you talk to us a little bit more about that? Yeah I worked my way of the medical staff leadership and ultimately became the president of medical staffing while that was a great experience after I graduated with my master's degree. The entrepreneur apart really was intriguing to me. In more important is the. The interface between the clinicians in technology and so <hes>. The startup is called Dynamic Lights based here in Austin, and it's actually technology out of the University of Texas and <hes>. They had great idea concept. Basically, it's <hes> how to noninvasive map blood flow during Sri will hand you an aneurysm surgery and uses what's called speckled laser technology and I was like honestly Craig. It's continuous. It's noninvasive, but they never really thought about the interaction. How you get it. It's dockers hands. How do you test it? And that was sort of my strength and so I, said well. Let's work together and figure this out and to date. You know we've incorporated. We're FDA approved, and we're. Ducking clinical trial and we're looking to partner with a couple of larger health tech firms,

Dr Tony Carnegie Mellon University FDA Austin partner Dr Tony Manual University of North Carolina Austin Texas Texas Duke Carnegie Mellon Dr Manual United States Sal Marquez assistant professor University of Texas Health Sci Bell Medical School Department of surgery Vanderbilt
How to Become a Change Agent in Your Health System with Tony Manuel

Outcomes Rocket

04:55 min | 3 months ago

How to Become a Change Agent in Your Health System with Tony Manuel

"Welcome back to the outcomes, rockets, Sal Marquez is here today I have the privilege of hosting Dr Tony Manual Dr Tony. Manual is a practicing anesthesiologist and Austin Texas. He's a partner with the United States anesthesia partners central Texas and has been in practice since two thousand two. He's an assistant professor. In the Department of surgery and Peri, operative care at Bell Medical School Dr Manual received his undergraduate degree from Vanderbilt attended the University of Texas Health Science Center for medical. School, completed his residency in anesthesia at the University of North Carolina or Or. He was recognized as the outstanding resident and fellow cardiovascular anesthesia at Duke, university in two thousand seventeen. He received his masters in medical management degree from Carnegie Mellon University and today he's playing. Multiple Roles as as he has in in his career and today we're going to be talking about physician innovation, and in particular how physicians can evolve their career to be greater contributors beyond the point of care and so. I WanNa thank you Tony for joining me today to have this very interesting discussion with you saw thanks so much great. Great to be owner podcasts, and I WANNA. Thank you for actually doing this podcast. Because for a lot of people like myself, it's been a great conduit to learn about what other people are doing, and what best practices that are out there, and it's an alternative to sort of the Journal Review articles that we have historically read and I've actually looked up several companies that you've had on and engaged with them. Really appreciate what you're doing I. Love that man now. That's great. I'm glad to hear that you've done that. That's the intention. Intention and so I appreciate you for doing that, so you know we are having a discussion. Folks Tony and I connected and said you know what the role of the physician is changing, and and so what I wanNA. Do today is just highlight how that's changing through the life of Dr Manual here and so you know I love for you Tony at to just kind of walk us through some of the work that you're doing and how it's changed from just practicing to actually doing more You know as we engage this. You know three five trillion dollar industry that call healthcare. Yeah, it's it's been an interesting journey for me and you know have to credit one of my anesthesia attending when I was in residency, his name's Dave mayor said Gimme, grapevine goes Tony You have to continually strives to maximize your career and Let's see well. What does that mean well? You definitely want to start trying to be the best clinician you can be once. You achieve that you should really look at you. Know becoming really strong in other areas, and I always took that to heart in so I think back to when I first started here in Austin I became the division chief of cardiovascular. Cardiovascular Anesthesia Rochester, saying I helped create division of cardiovascular. Because at that time we were Basically, everybody was doing it, and I fell coming out of myself. This'll be really better if we limited number of people at work in that space and you know put together some protocols and got the team together, and we saw some really good outcomes from that work and I fast forward to what I'm doing today, and that work has changed so much partly because I think every clinician you have to get educated, and I use a rudimentary tools back then, but in after getting that masters degree from Carnegie Mellon I really developed at toolkit that allows me to take on. On much more complex problems that we face and healthcare today. Yeah, that's so interesting, and so you have that entrepreneurial bug from the beginning right so you kind of re retooled the way that you guys approached cardiovascular anesthesia and I'm sure with with much improvements and outcomes, but then you've taken other steps to. You've been involved in startups, and now you're doing different roles. Can you talk to us a little bit more about that? Yeah I worked my way of the medical staff leadership and ultimately became the president of medical staffing while that was a great experience after I graduated with my master's degree. The entrepreneur apart really was intriguing to me. In more important is the. The interface between the clinicians in technology and so The startup is called Dynamic Lights based here in Austin, and it's actually technology out of the University of Texas and They had great idea concept. Basically, it's how to noninvasive map blood flow during Sri will hand you an aneurysm surgery and uses what's called speckled laser technology and I was like honestly Craig. It's continuous. It's noninvasive, but they never really thought about the interaction. How you get it. It's dockers hands. How do you test it? And that was sort of my strength and so I, said well. Let's work together and figure this out and to date. You know we've incorporated. We're FDA approved, and we're. Ducking clinical trial and we're looking to partner with a couple of larger health tech firms,

Dr Tony Dr Tony Manual Peri Assistant Professor Carnegie Mellon University Austin Dr Manual Texas Austin Texas Sal Marquez Dynamic Lights Carnegie Mellon University Of North Carolina University Of Texas Health Sci Bell Medical School United States Department Of Surgery Vanderbilt Duke
"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

06:05 min | 3 months ago

"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the outcomes racket Sal Marquez here and thanks so much for tuning in again today I have the privilege of hosting Jamie paps. She is the founder and CEO of spirit to a music based at that utilizes principles of neuroscience and music therapy to re imagine music for health outcomes, such as stress, reduction, emotional, regulation, productivity, and performance the presence of music in health. Health care and health is something that I'm personally very fascinated by, and we've had a lot of guests on the podcast already talking to us about how it could help in normal therapies, digital therapeutics, and so today I'm really excited to have a conversation with Jamie about what she and her team are up to at spirit tune so so such a pleasure to have you. You here with us today, thank saw It's a pleasure to be here and thank you again for having me for having spirit tune, and highlighting some important topics in healthcare. Really appreciate it. Absolutely, it's my pleasure and so Jamie before we dive into the work that you guys are up to. You know looking at feeling better with music. Tell us a little bit about. About you and what inspires your work in healthcare? Yeah, so I really liked telling my personal story because I think it's really important, and it's pretty unique. Um, so my inspiration around by working music sound in its relevance to health really stems from my birth story of believe it or not. My Mom lost her hearing when she was pregnant with me from a rare. It's a rare condition called oughta sclerosis that can be triggered by hormonal imbalance, and so her pregnancy with me. You know really triggered that, and so it resulted in hearing loss, and so as a result of being raised a mother with hearing loss, I gained the steep appreciation for the sense of sound in a way that most people don't get to experience it so in a way that's related to health that understanding the auditory system at a deeper level and quality of life, and then further, became inspired in music, specifically in auditory perception when my sister went off to college and declared her degree in music therapy, so that's when I not only learned about. Auditory perception, but also music, and how it affects brain, neurologic function, and then kind of thirdly I would say it wasn't until I became really stressed and anxious in my own professional career that I felt firsthand kind of music rediscovered. The therapeutic benefits are the therapeutic than music firsthand. Because I felt like at work, it was the only thing I could turn to. That was kind of right then and right there, and so that's really what the third thing that really drove home. This concept of spirit tuna where it was born on. It could help me could help others, and that's when I started doing some deeper dives myself into the science behind the economic dettori stimuli in how it can be a reliable everyday tool for stress, mental health, and so we're really at a time right now. were some great institutions, and some really talented people are devoting their lives and careers to research in space. So while it was my mother, the inspires my work every day. you know all these other components that make spiritual really relevant right now are further inspiring to me. Jamie that's a an amazing story and you know I. Think it is just one of those things that that It's the fire. You know that keeps you going. It's the fire that gets you going, and you certainly have a very strong strong purpose for this. Absolutely so thanks for asking a question and yeah, and well I mean your mom now, so we just. Everything comes full circle It's really a special time for sure luckily. I didn't lose my hearing nervous, or did you know? Yeah, you don't know that it's you're genetically predisposed to it, but until you have a significant change in. It doesn't it isn't express so yeah I was a little nervous for sure. but so far so good and we have a beautiful little girl, and she's one week into life, and it's pretty awesome. That's amazing. I admire your perseverance and your courage, and so the work at spirit tunes is super cool, so tell us a little bit about how you guys are adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Yeah, so I think it's pretty self evident that these are stressful, anxious times right and pretty much. Everyone has experienced the magnitude of stress. Mental Health is Sierra and even prior to the COVID pandemic. Mental health was already called the health epidemic of the twenty first century, and now in this global pandemic. Let's spin. Persisting mental health has been called. You know the second crisis as a fallout rank of in nineteen and so I think what it's really done is shined a light on mental health and the importance of stress, relief and managing emotion. So what's really? Really significant about stress is that if it's not addressed appropriately, it can be really damaging to our health consequences spanning from everything from headaches to heart, disease, anxiety and depression so but the good news on the positive side. Is that stress? Reduction doesn't have to involve complex solutions, and it's actually very very addressable with on a simple solutions if they're embraced and. And identified or stresses identified early often, and so things like music can be highly effective as know music particular engages powerful brain networks that underlie stress so for us it spiritual in our role and reimagining music for health outcomes like stress, reduction, emotional regulation and mental health becomes really important adding value to the healthcare ecosystem in a pretty unique and novel way because. Because we're taking what's really cool as we're taking a familiar part of someone's.

Jamie paps founder and CEO Sal Marquez depression
The Power of Music for Health

Outcomes Rocket

05:02 min | 3 months ago

The Power of Music for Health

"Welcome back to the outcomes racket Sal Marquez here and thanks so much for tuning in again today I have the privilege of hosting Jamie paps. She is the founder and CEO of spirit to a music based at that utilizes principles of neuroscience and music therapy to re imagine music for health outcomes, such as stress, reduction, emotional, regulation, productivity, and performance the presence of music in health. Health care and health is something that I'm personally very fascinated by, and we've had a lot of guests on the podcast already talking to us about how it could help in normal therapies, digital therapeutics, and so today I'm really excited to have a conversation with Jamie about what she and her team are up to at spirit tune so so such a pleasure to have you. You here with us today, thank saw It's a pleasure to be here and thank you again for having me for having spirit tune, and highlighting some important topics in healthcare. Really appreciate it. Absolutely, it's my pleasure and so Jamie before we dive into the work that you guys are up to. You know looking at feeling better with music. Tell us a little bit about. About you and what inspires your work in healthcare? Yeah, so I really liked telling my personal story because I think it's really important, and it's pretty unique. Um, so my inspiration around by working music sound in its relevance to health really stems from my birth story of believe it or not. My Mom lost her hearing when she was pregnant with me from a rare. It's a rare condition called oughta sclerosis that can be triggered by hormonal imbalance, and so her pregnancy with me. You know really triggered that, and so it resulted in hearing loss, and so as a result of being raised a mother with hearing loss, I gained the steep appreciation for the sense of sound in a way that most people don't get to experience it so in a way that's related to health that understanding the auditory system at a deeper level and quality of life, and then further, became inspired in music, specifically in auditory perception when my sister went off to college and declared her degree in music therapy, so that's when I not only learned about. Auditory perception, but also music, and how it affects brain, neurologic function, and then kind of thirdly I would say it wasn't until I became really stressed and anxious in my own professional career that I felt firsthand kind of music rediscovered. The therapeutic benefits are the therapeutic than music firsthand. Because I felt like at work, it was the only thing I could turn to. That was kind of right then and right there, and so that's really what the third thing that really drove home. This concept of spirit tuna where it was born on. It could help me could help others, and that's when I started doing some deeper dives myself into the science behind the economic dettori stimuli in how it can be a reliable everyday tool for stress, mental health, and so we're really at a time right now. were some great institutions, and some really talented people are devoting their lives and careers to research in space. So while it was my mother, the inspires my work every day. you know all these other components that make spiritual really relevant right now are further inspiring to me. Jamie that's a an amazing story and you know I. Think it is just one of those things that that It's the fire. You know that keeps you going. It's the fire that gets you going, and you certainly have a very strong strong purpose for this. Absolutely so thanks for asking a question and yeah, and well I mean your mom now, so we just. Everything comes full circle It's really a special time for sure luckily. I didn't lose my hearing nervous, or did you know? Yeah, you don't know that it's you're genetically predisposed to it, but until you have a significant change in. It doesn't it isn't express so yeah I was a little nervous for sure. but so far so good and we have a beautiful little girl, and she's one week into life, and it's pretty awesome. That's amazing. I admire your perseverance and your courage, and so the work at spirit tunes is super cool, so tell us a little bit about how you guys are adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Yeah, so I think it's pretty self evident that these are stressful, anxious times right and pretty much. Everyone has experienced the magnitude of stress. Mental Health is Sierra and even prior to the COVID pandemic. Mental health was already called the health epidemic of the twenty first century, and now in this global pandemic. Let's spin. Persisting mental health has been called. You know the second crisis as a fallout rank of in nineteen

Jamie Founder And Ceo Sal Marquez
"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

06:08 min | 4 months ago

"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket Sal Marquez his hair and today I have the privilege of hosting Amy Hayman's. Amy Is the founder and chief experience officer of Mad POW she believes that design can help improve the human condition. It was with that mission and vision that she founded mad POW in two thousand. Matt Powell Leverages Strategic Design and the psychology of motivation to create innovative experiences and compelling digital solutions that are good for people and good for business today's interview. We're going to enjoy a great. Great Conversation about how amy and her team are doing just that to both improve outcomes and business success. Amy's such a privilege to have you here today so much for joining me I'm so excited to talk with you. Thanks for having me yeah, so okay I've been a big fan of the work that you guys. Do you know Behavioral Change Digital Solutions Really? Designing that you know customer focus design thinking is important, and so tell me a little bit about what inspires your work in healthcare. On absolutely so as you may know, the health system can be a bit of a mass at you know. It wasn't like a bunch of Experts Kinda sat down and designed it. You know knowing then what we know now right at it sort of happened by default, and by the nature of the data flow in in the business, relationships and regulations and everything else, but what we have now is. The patient left at the center of a very disconnected ecosystem, and they're trying to figure it out on their own, and we are battling chronic disease where battling. Battling depression and anxiety where we're battling substance use disorder of the the life expectancies on the decline health costs continue to rise, and now or in the midst of a pandemic, so you know no shortage of challenges afoot in health, but so much opportunity and so much opportunity to help people live more vibrant lives, and basically achieve their dreams right that the things that matter most people are the health of themselves and their loved ones, and also their finances as well right so relationship, health and finances are at the top, and we believe in the work we. We do we can accomplish really good things I in positive impact at scale, so we're working with large complex organizations to help them to understand the needs of the people they serve what matters most to them. What is their context? What is their value proposition that what are the tasks they need to get done? And what are their hopes and dreams? And how do we help them to get from Point A to point b? How do we help to motivate them? How do we help to help them to accomplish that which they want most and we shape that. That happened envisioned that with our clients and bring it to market well, you know I appreciate that. Amy and you know it's not easy to do. We get stuck in our business models. We get caught up in how we believe business should go and and healthcare specially. The end consumer has been left out of the picture and so the work that you guys do his critical to really bring it home for all of us, so I'd love to hear from you. How Mad POW is is really adding value to the healthcare ecosystem in helping the consumer? Yes, sure so, I mean you what you're getting into like you know in the health system, it is business right unless amongst the nonprofit. Are you working for a government agent you get the point is that the mission has an organization. There's people there's politics There's all these things to be considered Elliot's complexities, but we tend to look at the data, right. We want one plus one equal to. We want to know exactly what we should do, so we? We do surveys and we look at analytics, and we look at big data, and we hope to get the insight that are going to help drive innovations. Innovations that are going to help improve people's lives, but sometimes you know we can get lost in data and it isn't. You know we can't get the answer from a spreadsheet data tells us what's going on, but it doesn't tell us why and it doesn't tell us how. We might improve the situation, so we're big fans of designing with people as opposed to four people, so we go deep in terms of qualitative research and s Nagasaki. Even now we do ethnography virtually where we're doing. You Know Digital Video, Journal, studies, or being with people in their homes via facetime or zoom. What have you but to? To get a sense of really what are their up struggles? What are their motivations? And what are they hoping to achieve? What is their value proposition because we believe that if we understand the people served by an organization, and we orient that organization in the direction of meeting, those needs satisfying people, or even, in some cases thrilling them at that's the path toward longevity for the business from the organization, so we look to find an intersection between social impact and business results, and that inspiration comes from deep understanding of the people served its research. It's being a student of the problem. It's an again. It's inviting people. People to the table of innovation design with us, so we do participatory design and Co creation where were were, were envisioning solutions with people and they're helping us to design well. Amy I think it's great work, and for many businesses that feel like they know their customer. It may be that they don't and or maybe that they don't know them as well as they could. And so you mentioned you know the different studies that you do interviews as unique things that you do to help understand that the different customer populations. What would you say makes mad POW special and better than I mainly not better. Better is not the word, but special in different in the way that you're able to help companies do that I. Thank you for asking that I mean because a lot of a lot of organizations to research rate and the research that we do. We're trying to get to the actionable insight, and we're trying to develop empathy as well because that's an important motivator, there is a a pathos and logos, and in that can help an organization to move things in the right direction, who what differentiates us is the behavioral research we do and the behavior change.

Amy Hayman Matt Powell Sal Marquez Nagasaki depression founder officer Elliot
"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

06:08 min | 4 months ago

"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket Sal Marquez his hair and today I have the privilege of hosting Amy Hayman's. Amy Is the founder and chief experience officer of Mad POW she believes that design can help improve the human condition. It was with that mission and vision that she founded mad POW in two thousand. Matt Powell Leverages Strategic Design and the psychology of motivation to create innovative experiences and compelling digital solutions that are good for people and good for business today's interview. We're going to enjoy a great. Great Conversation about how amy and her team are doing just that to both improve outcomes and business success. Amy's such a privilege to have you here today so much for joining me I'm so excited to talk with you. Thanks for having me yeah, so okay I've been a big fan of the work that you guys. Do you know Behavioral Change Digital Solutions Really? Designing that you know customer focus design thinking is important, and so tell me a little bit about what inspires your work in healthcare. On absolutely so as you may know, the health system can be a bit of a mass at you know. It wasn't like a bunch of Experts Kinda sat down and designed it. You know knowing then what we know now right at it sort of happened by default, and by the nature of the data flow in in the business, relationships and regulations and everything else, but what we have now is. The patient left at the center of a very disconnected ecosystem, and they're trying to figure it out on their own, and we are battling chronic disease where battling. Battling depression and anxiety where we're battling substance use disorder of the the life expectancies on the decline health costs continue to rise, and now or in the midst of a pandemic, so you know no shortage of challenges afoot in health, but so much opportunity and so much opportunity to help people live more vibrant lives, and basically achieve their dreams right that the things that matter most people are the health of themselves and their loved ones, and also their finances as well right so relationship, health and finances are at the top, and we believe in the work we. We do we can accomplish really good things I in positive impact at scale, so we're working with large complex organizations to help them to understand the needs of the people they serve what matters most to them. What is their context? What is their value proposition that what are the tasks they need to get done? And what are their hopes and dreams? And how do we help them to get from Point A to point b? How do we help to motivate them? How do we help to help them to accomplish that which they want most and we shape that. That happened envisioned that with our clients and bring it to market well, you know I appreciate that. Amy and you know it's not easy to do. We get stuck in our business models. We get caught up in how we believe business should go and and healthcare specially. The end consumer has been left out of the picture and so the work that you guys do his critical to really bring it home for all of us, so I'd love to hear from you. How Mad POW is is really adding value to the healthcare ecosystem in helping the consumer? Yes, sure so, I mean you what you're getting into like you know in the health system, it is business right unless amongst the nonprofit. Are you working for a government agent you get the point is that the mission has an organization. There's people there's politics There's all these things to be considered Elliot's complexities, but we tend to look at the data, right. We want one plus one equal to. We want to know exactly what we should do, so we? We do surveys and we look at analytics, and we look at big data, and we hope to get the insight that are going to help drive innovations. Innovations that are going to help improve people's lives, but sometimes you know we can get lost in data and it isn't. You know we can't get the answer from a spreadsheet data tells us what's going on, but it doesn't tell us why and it doesn't tell us how. We might improve the situation, so we're big fans of designing with people as opposed to four people, so we go deep in terms of qualitative research and s Nagasaki. Even now we do ethnography virtually where we're doing. You Know Digital Video, Journal, studies, or being with people in their homes via facetime or zoom. What have you but to? To get a sense of really what are their up struggles? What are their motivations? And what are they hoping to achieve? What is their value proposition because we believe that if we understand the people served by an organization, and we orient that organization in the direction of meeting, those needs satisfying people, or even, in some cases thrilling them at that's the path toward longevity for the business from the organization, so we look to find an intersection between social impact and business results, and that inspiration comes from deep understanding of the people served its research. It's being a student of the problem. It's an again. It's inviting people. People to the table of innovation design with us, so we do participatory design and Co creation where were were, were envisioning solutions with people and they're helping us to design well. Amy I think it's great work, and for many businesses that feel like they know their customer. It may be that they don't and or maybe that they don't know them as well as they could. And so you mentioned you know the different studies that you do interviews as unique things that you do to help understand that the different customer populations. What would you say makes mad POW special and better than I mainly not better. Better is not the word, but special in different in the way that you're able to help companies do that I. Thank you for asking that I mean because a lot of a lot of organizations to research rate and the research that we do. We're trying to get to the actionable insight, and we're trying to develop empathy as well because that's an important motivator, there is a a pathos and logos, and in that can help an organization to move things in the right direction, who what differentiates us is the behavioral research we do and the behavior change.

Amy Hayman Matt Powell Sal Marquez Nagasaki depression founder officer Elliot
"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:49 min | 4 months ago

"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket Sal Marquez his hair and today have the privilege of hosting Dr Gail Gazelle. She's a faculty. At Harvard Medical School a thirty year, practicing hospice physician and a Master Certified Coach for physicians and physician leaders in addition to publications in the New England Journal of Medicine, O, the Oprah magazine and the Journal of American, Association for Physician Leadership Dr Gazelle is a certified mindfulness teacher, a former consultant for the United States Department of Justice and one of the nation's preeminent physician coaches having coached. Five hundred physicians. She's the author of every day. Resilience slated to release August of twenty twenty, and in these times with a lot of the challenges that we have around the pandemic, but even before the pandemic we've been plagued with issues around physician wellness and burn out the OPIOID epidemic. There's there's there's issues all around that require expertise in and guidance and so today it's just such a privilege to have you here today, gail and and war. We're. We're going to focus in on on the work that you do to help care for the people that care for us such a privilege to have you on the on the podcast today. Thank you saw really a pleasure and a privilege to join you today. Absolutely, and so before we we take a step toward exploring the work. You do the outstanding work that you do I. WanNa learn a little bit more about what inspires your work in healthcare. Great Question I would have to say that. It is making a difference in the lives of vulnerable individuals that has always inspired May. What I stayed back on my career I was drawn to the practice of meddlesome bonded to help individuals at the end of mice and hostess and end of Life Care was not really a field when I finished medical training. In nineteen ninety, there was so much pain and suffering physically emotionally on a psychosocial level, obviously for the individual who was terminally ill, but also for their families, and furthermore for people working with them and care, and so I was drawn to that vulnerable population and wanted to be able to make a difference. As I cared for patients near the end of life. I began to notice that I myself was Burning House I was doubting my judgment experiencing self criticism. I was feeling guilty guilty when I was home that I wasn't working when I was working guilty that I wasn't with my son and my family. And I began checking in with colleagues around the country.

Dr Gail Gazelle Association for Physician Lead Sal Marquez twenty twenty Harvard Medical School New England Journal of Medicin Oprah magazine United States Department of Ju consultant Journal of American
"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

06:52 min | 4 months ago

"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the PODCAST Sal Marquez. Here and today. I have the privilege of hosting Chris Democ and Carlos Arce both are at the outstanding company elation. Chris is the founder and he's been interested in what drives improved human performance since his days in college, a curiosity about developmental psychology expanded into a love for organizational development and the design of technologies that improve organizational performance. He was inspired to start elation after a career the tech industry is passion. Passion for helping people through the use of innovative technologies transition into a calling to help people flourish by applying what they know from neurobiology and mindset research, seeing the transformative benefits of his approach, it's only fueled his enthusiasm, and helped the track, an extraordinary team of people who share in the mission Carlos Arce is the Organization of Development Consultant and facilitator at Elation, and he's been highly successful as a keynote speaker, workshop, presenter and consultant he works. Works directly with many of the clients and organization hired by Elation. He's a coach and teacher, whose purpose is to inspire people to be better. He continually helps leaders. Companies achieve outstanding business results while improving organizational culture and employee engagement. These are these are things that we all strive for in our businesses, and in our in our organizations and today we're going to dive into the work that they're doing at elation to help with the problem physician burnout. burnout and the feeling of lack of community, those things that are so important and primary needs in in <hes>. Even you think of Maslow's hierarchy of needs they're they're getting after it in a big way and have seen a lot of success, and and I'm and I'm privileged to have both of them here with us today to talk about the work that they're doing so Carlos and Chris. Thanks so much for joining me on the podcast today. So, thanks for having a huge absolutely so before we dive into the work of Elation <hes> love to to get a feel for what inspires both of you to to work within healthcare. Well, this is Chris. <hes> I <hes> have looked at the statistics in healthcare over the last several years, and been absolutely sort of amazed at the level at which out has become an issue among physicians and other <hes> medical personnel you know studies been fairly consistent that it's around the fifty percent level of <hes> diagnosis symptoms of burnout, according to the WHO's <hes> diagnosis trim, so it is sort of a burning platform issue for healthcare in the United States <hes>. If you have physicians who are performing at less than their optimum. Ability obviously impact the quality of outcomes or people, yeah, and unsolved. That's a great question. I had the privilege of actually spending thirteen years of my career in healthcare as the. Support percent at a title that some people find a little bit mystical called chief learning officer for a portion of that time where you got I got a chance to really experienced the industry on a daily basis, and to be honest with you. It was an extraordinary privilege to watch the kind of work that's happening daily by nurses and doctors, and in my time there I really got a chance to explore the cultural dynamics of howled interactions. Interactions between professionals how the interactions between administration and clinicians although kind of contributes to the general sense of the support and the affect of daily activity rate, so in my case I wasn't necessarily ride into address burnt out, but I was really focus on. How do you altima optimized performance of both individuals in the group? So I had a passion for healthcare from the very beginning when we started doing work with elation seen the results that we. We, were accomplishing private sector, a lot of different kind of exploratory technologies in the combination of exporatory and proven methodologies. That's thought had something. I think that can contribute to this to this industry that is <hes> as Chris. Put you know dealing with some pretty challenges, free dot, daunting threats that happen on a regular basis. And how do we make sure we we <hes>? We give it to the folks who need it the most love asset so. So fantastic I mean. The problem is clear, and and you know we we talk about the quadruple aim that fourth one being you know clinician satisfaction, right and wellness, and so you guys are tackling it head on, if providers aren't healthy, then it's going to be even harder to provide better outcomes for patients overall, and and so let's let's dive into it, guys. What is it that elation is doing to add value to the provider ecosystem? Yeah I'll I'll take that on <hes> <hes> crystal in. If you want to chime in, feel free to. My. What we're doing is we're looking at the problem. In its most authentic form, we are addressing this as an organizational dynamic. We see that we know the pathway that clinicians have to take to become practitioners in this country is not easy. It is not for the faint of heart, so we actually often referenced the notion that we'd take some of the most resilient humans on the planet and created epidemic burnout, and so if you're honest about that. That statement and you have to acknowledge the systemic implications of that. You know what what's happening when you put those people into this workplace that over time ends up eroding this amazing competency that they bring to the table, so that's an important element because of our approach because of that focus. We see that there isn't. This isn't about fixing physicians <hes> and this isn't about this direct cause and effect relationship that will just one thing is causing. Causing this dynamic for everybody <hes>, there is a local element to this that you've got to pay attention to. And then there's this combination of both the individual and the individual with Indus Group in the system, so we've taken methodologies that are helpful for individuals like executive coaching that we know works and puts people in the right spot. We've taken this approaches. We've learned for organizational development when it comes to creating workplace cultural dynamics that are that. That are healthy, and that are actually what we would call resilient, enough themselves, so this idea of organizational resilience which involves group work and group interactions between the the key players, and we have kind of combine those two ultimately influence not only the individual themselves in a way, and give them informed about what helps them, or what actually contributes or undermines their own resilience, but also best in them as catalyst for change within that Healthcare

Chris Democ Elation Carlos Arce Sal Marquez United States Development Consultant consultant founder officer Maslow
Building Resilience in Your Medical Staff

Outcomes Rocket

06:52 min | 4 months ago

Building Resilience in Your Medical Staff

"Welcome back to the PODCAST Sal Marquez. Here and today. I have the privilege of hosting Chris Democ and Carlos Arce both are at the outstanding company elation. Chris is the founder and he's been interested in what drives improved human performance since his days in college, a curiosity about developmental psychology expanded into a love for organizational development and the design of technologies that improve organizational performance. He was inspired to start elation after a career the tech industry is passion. Passion for helping people through the use of innovative technologies transition into a calling to help people flourish by applying what they know from neurobiology and mindset research, seeing the transformative benefits of his approach, it's only fueled his enthusiasm, and helped the track, an extraordinary team of people who share in the mission Carlos Arce is the Organization of Development Consultant and facilitator at Elation, and he's been highly successful as a keynote speaker, workshop, presenter and consultant he works. Works directly with many of the clients and organization hired by Elation. He's a coach and teacher, whose purpose is to inspire people to be better. He continually helps leaders. Companies achieve outstanding business results while improving organizational culture and employee engagement. These are these are things that we all strive for in our businesses, and in our in our organizations and today we're going to dive into the work that they're doing at elation to help with the problem physician burnout. burnout and the feeling of lack of community, those things that are so important and primary needs in in Even you think of Maslow's hierarchy of needs they're they're getting after it in a big way and have seen a lot of success, and and I'm and I'm privileged to have both of them here with us today to talk about the work that they're doing so Carlos and Chris. Thanks so much for joining me on the podcast today. So, thanks for having a huge absolutely so before we dive into the work of Elation love to to get a feel for what inspires both of you to to work within healthcare. Well, this is Chris. I have looked at the statistics in healthcare over the last several years, and been absolutely sort of amazed at the level at which out has become an issue among physicians and other medical personnel you know studies been fairly consistent that it's around the fifty percent level of diagnosis symptoms of burnout, according to the WHO's diagnosis trim, so it is sort of a burning platform issue for healthcare in the United States If you have physicians who are performing at less than their optimum. Ability obviously impact the quality of outcomes or people, yeah, and unsolved. That's a great question. I had the privilege of actually spending thirteen years of my career in healthcare as the. Support percent at a title that some people find a little bit mystical called chief learning officer for a portion of that time where you got I got a chance to really experienced the industry on a daily basis, and to be honest with you. It was an extraordinary privilege to watch the kind of work that's happening daily by nurses and doctors, and in my time there I really got a chance to explore the cultural dynamics of howled interactions. Interactions between professionals how the interactions between administration and clinicians although kind of contributes to the general sense of the support and the affect of daily activity rate, so in my case I wasn't necessarily ride into address burnt out, but I was really focus on. How do you altima optimized performance of both individuals in the group? So I had a passion for healthcare from the very beginning when we started doing work with elation seen the results that we. We, were accomplishing private sector, a lot of different kind of exploratory technologies in the combination of exporatory and proven methodologies. That's thought had something. I think that can contribute to this to this industry that is as Chris. Put you know dealing with some pretty challenges, free dot, daunting threats that happen on a regular basis. And how do we make sure we we We give it to the folks who need it the most love asset so. So fantastic I mean. The problem is clear, and and you know we we talk about the quadruple aim that fourth one being you know clinician satisfaction, right and wellness, and so you guys are tackling it head on, if providers aren't healthy, then it's going to be even harder to provide better outcomes for patients overall, and and so let's let's dive into it, guys. What is it that elation is doing to add value to the provider ecosystem? Yeah I'll I'll take that on crystal in. If you want to chime in, feel free to. My. What we're doing is we're looking at the problem. In its most authentic form, we are addressing this as an organizational dynamic. We see that we know the pathway that clinicians have to take to become practitioners in this country is not easy. It is not for the faint of heart, so we actually often referenced the notion that we'd take some of the most resilient humans on the planet and created epidemic burnout, and so if you're honest about that. That statement and you have to acknowledge the systemic implications of that. You know what what's happening when you put those people into this workplace that over time ends up eroding this amazing competency that they bring to the table, so that's an important element because of our approach because of that focus. We see that there isn't. This isn't about fixing physicians and this isn't about this direct cause and effect relationship that will just one thing is causing. Causing this dynamic for everybody there is a local element to this that you've got to pay attention to. And then there's this combination of both the individual and the individual with Indus Group in the system, so we've taken methodologies that are helpful for individuals like executive coaching that we know works and puts people in the right spot. We've taken this approaches. We've learned for organizational development when it comes to creating workplace cultural dynamics that are that. That are healthy, and that are actually what we would call resilient, enough themselves, so this idea of organizational resilience which involves group work and group interactions between the the key players, and we have kind of combine those two ultimately influence not only the individual themselves in a way, and give them informed about what helps them, or what actually contributes or undermines their own resilience, but also best in them as catalyst for change within that

Elation Chris Democ Carlos Arce Sal Marquez United States Founder Indus Group Development Consultant Officer Consultant Maslow Executive
"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

04:20 min | 4 months ago

"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the PODCAST Sal Marquez. Here and today. I have the privilege of hosting Chris Democ and Carlos Arce both are at the outstanding company elation. Chris is the founder and he's been interested in what drives improved human performance since his days in college, a curiosity about developmental psychology expanded into a love for organizational development and the design of technologies that improve organizational performance. He was inspired to start elation after a career the tech industry is passion. Passion for helping people through the use of innovative technologies transition into a calling to help people flourish by applying what they know from neurobiology and mindset research, seeing the transformative benefits of his approach, it's only fueled his enthusiasm, and helped the track, an extraordinary team of people who share in the mission Carlos Arce is the Organization of Development Consultant and facilitator at Elation, and he's been highly successful as a keynote speaker, workshop, presenter and consultant he works. Works directly with many of the clients and organization hired by Elation. He's a coach and teacher, whose purpose is to inspire people to be better. He continually helps leaders. Companies achieve outstanding business results while improving organizational culture and employee engagement. These are these are things that we all strive for in our businesses, and in our in our organizations and today we're going to dive into the work that they're doing at elation to help with the problem physician burnout. burnout and the feeling of lack of community, those things that are so important and primary needs in in Even you think of Maslow's hierarchy of needs they're they're getting after it in a big way and have seen a lot of success, and and I'm and I'm privileged to have both of them here with us today to talk about the work that they're doing so Carlos and Chris. Thanks so much for joining me on the podcast today. So, thanks for having a huge absolutely so before we dive into the work of Elation love to to get a feel for what inspires both of you to to work within healthcare. Well, this is Chris. I have looked at the statistics in healthcare over the last several years, and been absolutely sort of amazed at the level at which out has become an issue among physicians and other medical personnel you know studies been fairly consistent that it's around the fifty percent level of diagnosis symptoms of burnout, according to the WHO's diagnosis trim, so it is sort of a burning platform issue for healthcare in the United States If you have physicians who are performing at less than their optimum. Ability obviously impact the quality of outcomes or people, yeah, and unsolved. That's a great question. I had the privilege of actually spending thirteen years of my career in healthcare as the. Support percent at a title that some people find a little bit mystical called chief learning officer for a portion of that time where you got I got a chance to really experienced the industry on a daily basis, and to be honest with you. It was an extraordinary privilege to watch the kind of work that's happening daily by nurses and doctors, and in my time there I really got a chance to explore the cultural dynamics of howled interactions. Interactions between professionals how the interactions between administration and clinicians although kind of contributes to the general sense of the support and the affect of daily activity rate, so in my case I wasn't necessarily ride into address burnt out, but I was really focus on. How do you altima optimized performance of both individuals in the group? So I had a passion for healthcare from the very beginning when we started doing work with elation seen the results that we. We, were accomplishing private sector, a lot of different kind of exploratory technologies in the combination of exporatory and proven methodologies. That's thought had something. I think that can contribute to this to this industry that is as Chris. Put you know dealing with some pretty challenges, free dot, daunting threats that happen on a regular basis. And how do we make sure.

Chris Democ Elation Carlos Arce Sal Marquez United States Development Consultant consultant founder officer Maslow
"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

14:04 min | 5 months ago

"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the Outcomes Rocket Sal Marquez here and today have the privilege of hosting Mark Watson he is the CEO of a wellness marks background as an educator. An Athlete Position Sim. To appreciate an explore the brain's ability to change and recover after brain. Injury is experiences with learning difficulties. Developed his interest in different learning profiles and helping students better understand the nature of their disabilities and their ability to overcome them. Mark has worked in education and cognitive rehabilitation since two thousand two having served as a teacher administrator executive director and CEO with the with the background in human kinetics and educational leadership mark successfully paired his background in both of these areas into his role at Abi Wellness. What he's doing is pairing. His clinical experience and serving students with learning disabilities with his previous experience as a CO founder and Executive Director of the Watson Center for Brain Health Markelle seen firsthand the overwhelmingly positive impact of strengthening specific neurological capacities. What it could have the impact on all aspects of a patient's life he's committed to working with patients so they can lead more fulfilled than independent lives a frequent speaker on the topic of brain injury. Rehabilitation Mark has presented his work to numerous public health. Agencies BBC Cancer Agency the NHL Alumni Association and more mark also serves as a member of the Integrated Health Advisory Board at Quantum Polytechnic University. What we're going to be covering chronic. Tbi and recovery and what we're doing to raise standards to produce better outcomes here and so mark. Thank you so much for joining us today off. Thanks a lot for having me on. I'm looking forward to our conversation likewise mark so you know tons of interesting work being done in in today's field around mental health. You know that that that seems to have gotten more light. I'm excited to dive into the topic of of chronic traumatic brain injury and in the post acute setting But before we dive into that you know the thing that you guys do so well talk to us about what inspires your work in healthcare while I mean like like anything it really starts with the problem and so it it mentioned there and thanks for the by You've mentioned My background's in education. So it started out in working with kids with learning disabilities. I and my journey into that started with me being diagnosed with a learning disability in grade one and as we started to bring this work into working with people with brain injury what came to to our attention. Was that once someone with a brain injury whether it's a fully acquired meaning more like a stroke or a traumatic event meaning T. V. I A. Once someone is discharged from acute care. There seems to be a very difficult ability to get access to good integrated rehabilitation care and this team to be consistent. Everywhere we went there was a lot of different auctions for care and sadly because of that it was difficult for people to get access to the kind of care that they could need especially with cognitive issues. Meaning attention memory planning organizing and so we've continued to see these problems in the school setting and we decided to to try to study people with chronic traumatic brain. Injuries could actually improve their higher order cognitive functions. And when I talk about being inspired this work I have a mentor named Barbara Arrowsmith Young. Who created a cognitive rehabilitation program for kids with learning disabilities? And it was you know. Her programs quite remarkable and it was yielding really good outcomes in education and we were wondering if we could take elements of that program that focused on these higher order cognitive functions and then apply it to really having a significant outcome for those are community with living lower quality of life due to brain injury. While it's a very interesting work mark and in meaningful work. Why do you think that gap exists? You now why do you think that post acute? There's a huge gap. Well I think I think we need to look at the mandates of the organizations that are treating this population so if look at our typical hostile your NBC. Were fortunate I mean. I'm really especially now Cognizant of the impact of the acute care system and the outcomes they're having NBC's a British Columbia Right. Sorry that's British Columbia. Okay I it's. It's the same in the Pacific northwest as well. They're doing a remarkable job and their mandate is to is to give them the kind of acute care that they need and they do that. But with many people with brain injury still a Can Be cognitive issues. Following that brain injury and what we were seeing this once discharged those for for the most part being left untouched if they were there. So who's who's to treat that that that person that population oftentimes it can be. Clinical counselor can be community support worker. It can be an occupational therapist But you can see that depending on your resources and your location There's not really an optimized or standardized approach to treating this population with a keen eye on outcomes and and really capacities. Yeah Yeah. That's the need for a standard and so You know and I guess that's where you guys come in mark. Tell us a little bit about how you guys are adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Within this niche yeah. I mean what we initially did was looked at you know just the higher order cognitive functions. I shouldn't say just that's important but what we did in serving in understanding what was out there was that I'm this was an area for improvement so we got to work and we did a proof of concept study with the University of British Columbia. Look the research question was really can post acute or chronic complex held. Tbi So our concussions aren't healing after the normal window for recovery could that population tax neom improve higher order pug functions by engaging in this kind of program and initially. Many of the people were saying. Well no once. We're kind of in that. That post acute phase your your window for recovery. I've gone and to the credit B C University of British Columbia. They took on research question and we found yes. If people could engage in this kind of program they could get better and you know typically in patient Rehab Kind of engagement rates are quite low because of the nature of chronic. Tbi and what we found. That was really interesting. Was that are engaged. A grades and attendance rates were in high nine percent which was really it was a total at liar talking about Gladwin stuff and So so that people really interested. They're saying on. These people have chronic issues foaling TV. I adhere here. They are engaging in this patient. Rehab program at a very high level and not only. Are we seeing cognitive? Improvements linked with changes in functional connectivity using E. E. G. But they're also some reporting better activities of daily living changes. The desire is there right and and people are just showing up. I think people who think people want the opportunity to get better right and and I guess that's one of the things that I really appreciate about digging into the topic. Said you do is. That's really. What motivates excess. You know we think about the why and the Y. So closely tied at two giving an opportunity in an assistant space opportunity British population to help to get themselves better. Yeah you know it's a it's so interesting you know we spend so much time and resources making the body better and and for some reason the brain is comes as an afterthought you know I mean. I don't want to say that in a bad way but you know to your point I. We need more standards and and It sounds like you guys are on to something here. Mark what makes what. Api does different or better than what's available today. Initially our focused on mid gender earlier was was only looking at the higher order cognitive functions using a one of my key mentors program elements of it and that was terrific and we saw Nice outcomes from that however as I talked to more people in the space especially occupational therapists. They'd been key teachers for me on this road along with physical medicine. Doctors called Wrists and just general. Doxa reeb professionals do what they were helping us understand. Is that if we wanted to have a really significant back. We needed to blend the care model and really focus on the B. Two B. Model. Not just to see and in doing that. We have to get to work on the software program to develop a service platform that could actually reliably kind of Assess and treat this population in a way that could optimize standardized interdisciplinary him. So that's actually what we've done I. That's I think the difference that were making was that our initial assumption was just looking at cognitive Rehab and then blending that it looking at that but axiom reality that could add a further silo in. What is our ready a busy model? So what we had to do was to pivot which is one of those key words right now to software development and then to blend the care model looking at some of the best of evidence based practice that already had good data behind it and blend into one. Bb focused service platform. And that's what. I'm really proud of our team. That's what we've done over the past four years fascinating so a great pivot and I think a lot of entrepreneurs that get into the space ultimately make that shift you know the Abi Model and so you guys have blended software development cognitive rehab with evidence based approaches. That are that are working talked. About how how the system has improved outcomes and maybe walk us through an example of how this works in. How a typical customer gets engaged with with what you offer happy to so what we found in serving market. We did like any most people do when we see a problem. We went out and surveyed at and tried to understand what the what the space look like. And what we were finding in post acute was was a lot of different approaches to treating this population and their symptoms and at you mentioned standards. It didn't seem to be very standardized and it didn't actually seem to be very well. Optimized neater Some other approaches could probably work really well and a one. I'm not saying that that isn't true. I'm sure that can be true. But we seem to think that there needed to be more systematisation to treasonous ovulation. So what we did was. We really got to work in in doing it. Be the programming and then talking with outpatient rehab facilities and how they come on board with. This kind of program is really. They need to already be focused in post acute rehab and really bridging the gap between inpatient to outpatient to community. Because there's a lot of gaps there and we were. We found. We can really help with an eye on the provider as well as the patient a system that can keep those touch points high while keeping costs low. So how how it works is like all of us. We really moved to at whole Programming and really how it works as we partner up with clinics. Okay so It's kind of like a licensing agreement. I'm Laurie specialized in the space. And really what we WANNA do is we WANNA provide provide them the system of care for them to deploy as they need okay so some organizations contact us and say there was one disc not that long ago a out of Texas. Who contacted us? Okay we work in stroke and chronic stroke. We've been impatient word open to community and we are recognizing that we're not really even touching cognition. We look at that and studied that to see what a bill comes could be the other way that people come on board is we would be in conversations with an outpatient Rehab Clinic..

Mark Watson cognitive Rehab NBC Brain Health Markelle CEO executive director Rehab Clinic Sal Marquez University of British Columbia Abi Wellness Texas Pacific northwest Integrated Health Advisory Boa British Columbia credit B C University of Briti Watson Center Quantum Polytechnic University Barbara Arrowsmith Young
"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

05:21 min | 6 months ago

"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"And influencers and now your host so Marquez and welcome back to the podcast Sal Marquez. Here I have an outstanding guests for you today. His name is Dr Jonathan Larson. He's the CEO and founder. At met Spoke Med spoke is a physician. Centric HEALTH TECH COMPANY FOCUSED ON SOLVING HEALTHCARE CREDENTIALING LADDER. Issues going on here. John's going to get into those things that you may find surprising. Or just say yeah. You know what I'm definitely going through that but the cool thing is that and the end of it. There's a great solution. He uses his contemporaneous tech like blockchain to get these things happening. John is a West Point graduate. Who became a board certified emergency medicine physician after service as an army officer so John? Thanks for your service. My friend he then went back to business school to get an MBA and learn the business of healthcare as a medical at Aetna so definitely some education there in the payer. Space is very well rounded from there. John left to devote his entire time and resources to met spoke where he is right now. And it's a pleasure to have John. The podcast tell us about his stories and the great work that he's doing at met spokesman John Welcome. Thanks for having me Song. It's a pleasure sir. So what did I miss in your intro? That maybe you want to share with listeners. It was very complete. I mean I think part of my history and the diversity of my exposure and experience in healthcare really led me to where I am today and gave me the tools and experience to get here so I did my emergency medicine training up at the University of California Davis and took my first job out of residency and there are things that I knew about the industry. I knew there was a shortage of physicians. That's only getting worse. I knew that physicians were burning out so I thought getting my first job would just be seamless and easy but what I found was a marketplace. That didn't make it easy. I mean I was calling around hospitals. I knew there are open positions. I just didn't know where they were. So that was kind of my first exposure to healthcare staffing in how we hired doctors and get them in those positions so I spent my first year as an attending physician at a hospital and then from that point kind of my the entrepreneurial side of me wanted to see what else is out there. And so I basically became a free agent and I- credentialed at six different facilities and made myself available basically to the highest bidder and said if you have a position that you need build in crunch time. I'm happy to do that but this is my price and so I just by doing that. Bring myself up. I triple my income. But the problem in the bottleneck to getting into that job was the problem that we're focused on meds focus. It's the credentialing piece. It's a paper base. Facts base a six month process just to credential to work somewhere so after doing that six times. I was like God. Bless like we gotta do those a better way. There's gotta be a better way. But in the other dynamic of it was everyone was asking for the same information in a different form whether it was the hospital the State Licensing Board or the insurance company. They all wanted my number. My license number. You know where I went to school diploma personal and professional history my my entire personal professional history but they wanted on their form. So it'd take about six eight hours to fill out this forty page credentialing packet in. There's just no no synergies in those systems no overlap not mutation and I wasn't getting paid to spend the sixty eight hours to fill out paperwork for a hospital that needed me desperately so that was my first exposure to help their staffing really wherever there's problems there's opportunities and this was just an area that I saw for the sustainability of healthcare. We've got to do a better job of optimizing the workforce we have now. Because you just can't turn on a spit. Ensure not opposition will takes about seven years to get trained and ready to be an attending so we in my passion to. I'm seeing healthcare. Go in this direction of access you know. Accessible healthcare s and so our mission statement is make health care accessible to all by making healthcare professionals accessible to all when licensing credentialing enrollment event at a time love. It love it. Love the mission. So when you when you shifted from being an emergency physician U. N. to staffing so you basically were helping hospitals find the doctors when they were in a pinch. Yes in the it was more just Kinda my it was just me and then you're offering your services to them when they were yes okay. Yeah so yeah I was. I just wanted to see what else is out there and I knew that in any physician in today's market gets multiple emails. A cold text cold calls from recruiters because especially in this market in Texas. There's such a huge supply. Demand mismatch the supply of physicians is extremely.

John Welcome attending physician Dr Jonathan Larson Sal Marquez Aetna officer University of California Davis Texas U. N. State Licensing Board John I founder
"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:49 min | 6 months ago

"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the PODCAST Sal Marquez. Here and today I have the privilege of hosting Liz deedrick. She is the president and CEO at Deedrick our PM standing for research propelled marketing. Her work is to continue to innovate on behalf of her agency's clients and provide services that quantitatively determine the viability of patient care services including financial demand demographic manage patient satisfaction retention and Mitigate Risk Provide Measurable Marketing Outcomes and Incorporate Decision Science. Many marketing campaigns tend to go by feel and touch and gut but in today's environment where everything's changing. It's important that we do things more from a research based and data driven perspective and for that this is going to dive into they do as a company and how they've added value to the healthcare ecosystem so excited to have you here. Liz thanks so much for joining us. Thank you so much for having me. I really appreciate being included absolutely. Yes and so. What would you say inspires your work and I know you guys work across a lot of different sectors mainly healthcare. What would you say inspires your work in the healthcare space? Great question so for us. I think it's our desire time cover. What's driving patient behavior and for physicians when they're referring patients to different care providers or specialty care centers. We want to understand what their drivers are too. Because sometimes they're not. They're not tied to a specific set of data. It's sometimes lack of knowledge. Sometimes a misconception We did a study for a large idee end for example and they were realizing that they weren't getting as many referrals for the emergency and Aircar to the system and obviously that is a funnel to the rest of the care and we did a study for them. And we learned that there were misconceptions because they had they didn't have a level one trauma three center and one of their competitors was kind of absconding patients so they put the the level. They changed to have the level one trauma capability as part of the the result which obviously had an impact business. Wow that's pretty neat you know and and you think about something like that. Is those things that you don't know that. Really Kinda end up affecting your funnels and year and your your through put your sales and overall I mean as as as a provider that.

president and CEO Sal Marquez Liz
"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:11 min | 10 months ago

"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome welcome back to the outcomes rockets Sal Marquez. Here today I have the privilege of hosting Alan Block. He's the chief executive officer and CO founder of K.. A health along with this role. Alan is a board member and former co CEO of wicks and has served as a CEO of Room Dot Com and my supermarket Allen was a partner at JVP and spent time as a consultant at McKinsey and company. He received his Masters Masters of Business Administration from Columbia Business School and is based out of New York City. He's has a lot of fun with technology and taking a look at uh-huh different areas where let's just say could use innovation to make things fundamentally better it doesn't believe in inner of Innovation. He believes that you got you. GotTa do things right from the beginning. And so that's what started his journey with K.. Health and today we're GONNA be diving into K.. Health and Allen's thoughts on on health care and Just having fun today's podcast so so with that I want to open up the microphone to you. Alan and welcome you. Thanks for joining us. I saw thanks for having me. It's a true privilege my friends so love the the work that you've done Allen but before we move into the meat and bones of the of the podcasts at ad love if you could just give the listeners a bit more on you that you may have that I may have left out of your intro to share. Well I'm originally from Israel. Came here about twenty years ago and I work a lot with is ready technology as well as the comedy and I I look what we do. Very globally so not building great products just for the US we buildings off globally that. That'd be aside from that. I think we covered it all or or it's not the thing that's an important point. We could get pretty myopic as far as what's happening in the US and and miss the broader picture so Why did you decide to get into healthcare? I mean you've not been in healthcare for long. What is it that made you interested in the space? I think always.

Alan Allen chief executive officer Sal Marquez US CEO JVP McKinsey Room Dot Com Columbia Business School New York City CO founder Israel partner consultant
"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"sal marquez" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome to the outcomes rocket podcast where we inspire collaborative thinking improved outcomes and business success with today's most successful end, inspiring healthcare leaders and influencers and now your host so Marquez. Welcome back to the podcast, Sal Marquez here today. I have a returning guest. You guys have all heard and appreciated his work, Dr Stefan? Oh beanie. He is the orthopedic lead at UC S F center for digital health innovation team. So he's a professor of orthopedic surgery, specializing in hip and knee replacement ranked up in the top five percent in the US. He's a founder and chair of the digital orthopedics conference. Doc, S F and the regenerative orthopedic conference both held in San Francisco. So today what I wanna do is since the conference is coming up in January January fifth in San Francisco one or to give Steffano Dr beanie the opportunity to share a little bit more about the conference since it's around the corner. And also give you all an opportunity to have an excuse to get away from the cold. If you're in the midwest, the to California and make it a. Active trip, so Stefan, final welcome back to the podcast. Well, thank you. Awesome. It'd be back yourself. So. Yeah. About the conference has been it's been a great year putting together for this coming January. We do just before JP Morgan is, you know. So what set aside apart from the others is I think are focused. There's oughta wonderful that focus on blue sky thinking and the future, and there's others focus on the latest and greatest companies that are available to work with a we focus on is the last mile Howdy operationalize. These tools, how do you get these new drugs into patients they can be better Heidi make new tools available for patients physicians hospital systems. So they can do a better job delivering care. And we argue that wouldn't you get down to the nuts and bolts of putting something in place. You have to focus you have to get down to k what's the case use? And we argue that orthopedics musculoskeletal care, which broadly is everything from wellness to trauma surgery really does. Provide a perfect place technology to testing knowledge it goes short cycle times. We'll get healthy. Well, they quickly. They're relatively healthy you to begin with a ton of money in this space, a small differences can have a big impact. And so is okay. Let's get down to nuts. And bolts if these are great technologies, how do we work? How do we put him in place within the space over the PD? And we do that during this event in the structure of as we've discussed is really unique. Because we we get companies to bring case studies than up pitch per.

Dr Stefan Sal Marquez San Francisco JP Morgan California US UC S F center Heidi five percent