28 Burst results for "Sajjan"

Bill Rogio Describes ISIS-K's Role Within the Terrorism Community

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:46 min | 3 weeks ago

Bill Rogio Describes ISIS-K's Role Within the Terrorism Community

"We are back with the editor of a superlative publication. The long war journal long war journal dot. Org bill roggio army veteran national guard veteran. He's been to afghanistan. He's been to iraq and he's telling us what we need to know about the recent withdrawal from kabul in may. He just sent me the article in may he predicted while the taliban would to build help on millions of listeners who now have to prepare for the twentieth anniversary of september. The eleventh. what you discussed the taliban you've discussed al qaeda where it is isis fit into this constellation of jihadi organisations and especially isis k. Who allegedly were behind the murderer marines coleman on that Army he stuff sajjan. Sure and the islamic state is an al-qaeda of course So al qaeda and the taliban host jihadist groups are in one camp these state is the bastard child of al qaeda they share the same ideology to restore the the calvet and impose islamic state. They just have different ways of doing it. The islamic speech way is basically my way or the highway they wanna declare the california now and go for it. Al qaeda's way is look. We build our emirates. Do this arab. Believe you don't declare until we protect it we build our state is like the The leninist versus. Trotskyite i i. It's the perfect analogy so That's what we have. The islamic state in afghanistan is There is an opposition time because it's opposes. The caliban primarily be a job her however there are reports and some of this comes from the united nations. And i'm not going to be very clear not saying this attacker. Those attack happened recently in kabul. Were related to this. However i suspect they were united. Nations has reported that the islamic state which has been largely defeated by the taliban now operates cellular moving small control. Small territory The reports that at work which is a part of the powerful group within the taliban uses islamic state sometimes to carry out attacks. Use them as a cut out for hang on this. This is getting deep dive. So let's just reiterate i. I love that phrase. Boston child of al-qaeda once the caliphate wants the world revolution now like trotsky did for the communists. I this karna son. Isis in afghanistan is small They're week but there are elements in the taleban like the connie's that use or exploit isis as some kind of cut out for their own personal

Taliban Al Qaeda Sajjan Bill Roggio Calvet Kabul Afghanistan Qaeda Coleman Iraq AL Army California United Nations Boston
"sajjan" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

07:49 min | Last month

"sajjan" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Thank you ready greg. Now's gonna ask the real in depth questions you come up with. Don't i will never ask that question to see eddie veteran. We're back stage of eddie veteran on the first thing he said to him like pearl jam. Edgy come up with that. i should say. Don't worry about that. Man come on eddie. You don't have the guys on the road twenty five years. Cut him some slack. Come on man who want to give a school to your friends just like the proper etiquette of like you know how to be backstage and stuff like that. It's like you can bring and they don't know there's get so nervous and they asked probably the first thing that comes with their. He's he was my plus one never again spot the plus one. They comebacks idea. Oh never heard of you band. Don't even really look music. The gig and it was pretty good. If you bring in some friends can strumming guitar like it becomes their show you ten bucks to get some. Cd's out the back. I steal the show greg corner in the studio today with wolf mother from australia. Now when you were first come on there. I mean you were signed to mazar which was like a dance label and a lot of the bands coming out of australia but a lot of time. We're like all like indie dance dance kind of like. How was it. You know getting out of australia. During the time. With the influx of that the band's that's on nothing like you Well it's funny. I was on. We just played in Nashville and our member. Loss time we did a showcase in south by southwest austin armando whore. I had fifteen bucks in my pocket. And so that's how it was being signed a module and i went Oh i'll i'll tell you i'll tell you. The story i went. I said to my my girlfriend was pregnant at the time at fifteen bucks in my pocket and She was staying in a sister's bedroom in brisbane. I'll tell the story. It's not a co my manager. I said he's like all these record deals on the table. We got this. We got that in a scoop. Had people coming up to the gun. I want to give you a million dollars a it. Let's go back around the corner. You got your credit card. Yeah but So went into the hotel on and he's got all these deals innocent. Have fifteen bucks. Because i spent my I spent my advance on guitar. That got smashed into five pieces on the first flight to la. My aunt blew up on the first gig in adelaide. Still got that still go to put back together and then the other five grand or put on a credit card credit card debt. You let alone how much it costs from australia to get this up. I thought so we're out here with fifteen bucks or something and had fifteen bucks. i said. hey can you let me some money. john. I'm really excited it because yeah sure. How much do you need your much. Money gave you one hundred dollars fifty bucks. Thank you kind saw. Thank you for fifty dollars. Overhaul and then. I'm because i spent my last fifteen bucks getting the cab into the full seasons hotel to meet him And then i had to get the cab back out to the crappy motel that we're in which is like a twenty dollars thirty dollars cap then. Six months later i got my first royalty statement. Says you guys are already signed a record this is the management royalty statement says advanced andrew stockdale fifty dollars so Back in the early days. All these dance acts that you know we signed. I mean we made that record label. I mean that's the first time. I made that record label. I mean they saw like if you want wolf mother you have to buy fifty percent a modular. The five million dollars and i was in. I was down fifteen bucks in my pocket banal. I'm here ten years later. I'm off that record label and they can sell much dance. Electro pop say one. I'm really happy for them. They get there. Md ama and stick it up each other's you tell me how you really feel but now here we are no record label we go. We got the you know. Put the record out on this thing. Called song cost tells me fifteen dollars top fifty. Us june's album charts spent fifteen dollars marketing. It and touring is your marketing. God would've concept. Good people like yourself and jerry like supporting bands independent bands or whatever. Yeah i j. Tv cab captures independence fear. I mean jerry's been doing this for thirty years independently. No sponsors really at all. Yeah that's great. That's great offer. The love music at signed a jerry record. Yeah yeah yeah yeah. Yeah it's good to have your independence. You don't get yourself into something that you don't want to do. Because he was someone who gave you this so did that and then they want this banner here and that banner what it's still it's all part of the current climate. I guess. diy really back again. Yes i mean and and the reality is all record labels really ours a bank loan you know like as you said. They barred fifty dollars just to take a cab. Guess he's going to pay that at the time. Overdo it where it's like you know like if you need something they'll rush it and it had to pay a hundred dollars charge. When you're i could have just brought that to my manager. We didn't get that overnight. It i everything everything. Yeah yeah. I heard something that the beatles when they made sajjan peppers like there was a lock on the fridge when they like made tea or something and they had to like write something tonight make a cup of tea and some is just. But it's it's. That's the old god everything's changing now. I you know what i hope is like everyone. That's doing music like jerry and everyone else is doing it for the love of it now because it's a way to make money like back in the ninety s and early two thousands of you know people having jobs that record labels that could've might as well get on marketing job at like craft your. Oh they got to label. It didn't make a difference to them. Yeah yeah but now the money starting to get less and less however that old guard is still staying at the four seasons during south by south west and the banner saying out by the airport which is like twenty miles away. Yeah yeah yeah yeah. Yeah it's like the you know. The the record labels like these castles know the gatekeepers in the game of thrones and dropping dropping crumbs tool the devotees and they just.

eddie australia greg corner mazar andrew stockdale jerry greg Nashville brisbane austin adelaide la sajjan
"sajjan" Discussed on Happy Mum Happy Baby

Happy Mum Happy Baby

05:57 min | Last month

"sajjan" Discussed on Happy Mum Happy Baby

"We're not scared and to think that thank isn't it with those harmony testings like that. It's a thing you you were saying earlier like. What are we looking for. An is it not kind of knowing what you're walking into with your eyes open is because what would you change and see one thing that the down syndrome communities here with all the awareness actually wouldn't change anything because there's so much beauty to be found in something that is so wrongly fade and i don't why so fed. I mean you know like i mentioned. I thought he'd he'd be rejected by the family. He is the glue to the phone. He literally walks into a room. And everybody's sajjan you know. And he's he's just got this zest for life. He's just very in the moment. He teaches me that he does not care. What on earth is gang around him. Which i wish i could do. More of Him an odd. That bond is just pray to god. It stays this way arch. I worry about arch. Because some of the thoughts he has are quite deep for little boy around his brother. You know the other day at school. The fire alarm went off on august came. He was really tainted. And i was like what is ruined. You like come on. You know what's wrong. And then he told me like twenty twenty-seven mommy the fire alarm went off at school. And i was really scared that sergeant wouldn't get out and i just thought my. Gosh that's such a like a deep thought for for somebody that's quite little you know. He'll think about sergeant in everything that he does because he knows sajjan is a little bit of extra help but their bond is beautiful. They fight like typical. But they're just they're just amazing together. I think you know he thought continues to change those around him. So i mentioned deny you know she is just so embracing change that perception. My sister hav she's completely changed hackery pasta. She's now working with children with additional needs. She's supporting them yet on. She is everything that i could wish for in ta for sajjan is my sister. She's incredible She never she probably wouldn't have done knife. It wasn't because of sajjan united yet. I thought that we'd never go on holiday again. We've done over twelve countries with sajjan sued the maasai mara gonna lie. I was scared. So i'd he was amazing he. He wasn't phased by lions coming up close. Yeah he was an incredible. I'm excited at what the future holds for him..

sajjan lions
"sajjan" Discussed on Happy Mum Happy Baby

Happy Mum Happy Baby

04:09 min | Last month

"sajjan" Discussed on Happy Mum Happy Baby

"It was odd Stopped from doing anything really bought I think he was my strength on. He didn't even know it. What ching him love. His brother unconditionally was just beautiful. I used to look into surgeons is and i used to think you've done nothing on. How can i feel like this about you. And because because children were down syndrome develop into orbit later. The smiles came a bit later. The personality came a bit later. Which made it even harder and it was kind of longed and we eat them. We very differently to me. He became very introverted. Twenty four seven. We had the secret playing just to pump plus some year positive something Parents were here my mom and dad. They handed out sweets to everyone the same way they did with. Rg they are amazing. They were like so what if he's got down syndrome. You know my dad's quite religious and we've actually done kid story conger non-active g which is the fast the guru and my dad always used to say to me that you know what was going on veggies. Fast teaching them like that. We're all equal. We're all god's children you know. Regardless of race color ability gender orbits. Like exactly and sajjan is god's child and he is the of being just like you and i and that really stuck with me really helped me as well but yeah there was also a friend called dina. She's much she's read them. Good friends wife right. She met sergeant for the fast time. And i don't know what it was but they had some instant connection. I'm not go from about the age of six months for about a year came to my house every single day and she did physique with him. She shower him with love. She did some of the things. I didn't feel that. I could do. And i can never repay the people that have you know. Walked this journey with us. Come so grateful for the network and the support that we've got but it was Fuel worry about how sergeant would be accepted walking through life and if and if so was the acceptance and that showering of love from the people around you. Was that power of you. Kind of just seeing that happen. Was that confidence somewhere. Even if you were kind of questioning what are you doing you know. How can you do that. In some way is that is what you fear so seeing. Actually the opposite happened. Is that a comfort one hundred you hit the nail on the head. That's what i was looking for. I i still gauge people's reactions to sajjan. It still rightly or wrongly still influences apart of my acceptance journey. I scan for people's reactions. I whether it's going to know. I don't know soft place and tell all on holiday wherever you are right and you see and you saw muslims go down syndrome and some people might be like oh a camp sorry or some people might be like okay like that's cool like whatever on it's the yeah cool will ever archie. Make me feel okay. This is this is fine. This is good and even when we first had him in the messages we were getting. That was a real mix of you know. I'm sorry this the the i'm sorry is one as as as bad as i thought they'd be to be as many but the message is i remember one of my friends. She must congratulations to can't wait to meet the man. And i replied and i said you know he's got down syndrome and she said yeah like so. Walk now psycho. You haven't mentioned it. But then for her shes why twenty. Two mention it as a fact. It doesn't need to be a part of him and it was really interesting. It's really funny. How my mind was and is very different to them..

sajjan ching dina archie
Social Justice for Young Learners

The Teachers Impact

02:05 min | 2 months ago

Social Justice for Young Learners

"I shall be. I'm so happy you're here on the podcast today. I'm so happy that you've reached out so we can learn a little bit more about you. Know your thoughts on social justice and a little bit about your company and Some practical tapes that you might have for teachers so if you wanna just go ahead and introduce yourself to us please. Absolutely i'm so excited to be here and chat with you. Talk about all things social justice and education. My name is shelby kratz. I am the founder of little justice leaders subscription box that helps educators integrate social justice into their curriculum with kids And i'm also phd candidate at ucla Working on my degree in education And i've spent about a decade now working and various roles in education so i really You know love working with teachers. And i'm excited to talk about social justice education today. Wonderful wonderful so you have a very varied background in education very yes. So what experiences made you believe in social justice and social justice teaching. And what made you want to start your company like what were some of the things the catalyst for that. Yeah absolutely so Around the time of the two thousand sixteen election I was spending a lot of times in schools working on my research. And i had just been working In the school for a few years before that so i was hearing a lot from teachers and parents that they didn't quite know how to talk to other students to their kids about what was going on in the media and the news at that time it was a lot of xenophobia. A lot of racism. Sexism sajjan coming up in the in the news all over the media and you know these parents and teachers were just like. I have no idea how to purchase with you know. Let's say kindergartner. Or a third grader. and so a lot of what i heard was okay so i'm just not going to talk about it at all

Shelby Kratz Ucla Sajjan
Foreign and Defence Ministers Meet Ahead of NATO Summit

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:43 min | 4 months ago

Foreign and Defence Ministers Meet Ahead of NATO Summit

"The preparatory teleconferencing ahead of this year's nato summit which begins in brussels on june fourteenth has begun and so it seems has the preliminary staking of claims on the alliance's post trump leadership. The largely unlamented. Us president was fond of beating up on nato chiding its members for failing to meet their theoretical spending commitments and france for one appears to believe trump was not entirely wrong francis. Defense minister florence. Polly has bracingly reiterated. The listen that europe needs to be less reliant on the united states for its own defence lasalle. John go hill is visiting teacher at the london. School of economics and political science He's also an advisor to nato's defence education enhancement program and he joins us now sajjan first of all. It's a couple of years. I guess since president emmanuel macron's johnny belt nato being brain dead is. Is there a pattern of french irritation with the alliance well. It is historical that sometimes member nations have expressed the concerns. Their exasperation that differences of what the alliance's purpose is being franz in particular historically Go back to a the goal and his a opposition to sun aspects of nato and it's specific task. But what you do find. Ironically is that events around europe especially russia's activities have actually helped unify the nato membership more so than ever before and there is a sense of purpose now for nato speaking in one voice Which perhaps that wasn't a few years. Ago

Nato John Go Hill School Of Economics And Politi Sajjan Emmanuel Macron Brussels Polly Donald Trump United States Francis France Europe London Franz Russia
"sajjan" Discussed on Plastic Surgeon

Plastic Surgeon

05:00 min | 7 months ago

"sajjan" Discussed on Plastic Surgeon

"Everyone knew what motivates people to get plastic surgery. Did they regret it. What can we learn from the weird well-staffed that happens at all surgery clinic. We're going to tell stories. Get some laughs and learn on clinic. Talk with sabrina. Sajjan on the plastic surgeon podcasts. Walmart friends on doctor devout sajjan and of course i'm here with my lovely wife and ceo belur aesthetic. Sabrina sajjan welcome back and thanks for listening. Please rate in review us on apple. Podcasts support the channel on clinic. Talk we tell real stories of fun strange hopeful in educational things that happened at our clinics from day to day. We get a lot of weird in hilarious happenings in the clinic. Guys you can find the clinic at allure ascetic dot com for more information so john. What clinic stories. Are we going to talk about today..

Sabrina sabrina Sajjan Walmart today john sajjan devout apple com ascetic dot allure
Jeff Bezos to step down as Amazon CEO, Andy Jassy to take over in Q3

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:17 min | 8 months ago

Jeff Bezos to step down as Amazon CEO, Andy Jassy to take over in Q3

"Earlier. This week amazon said that. Andy jesse would be taking over as ceo from founder. Jeff bezos jazz. He's been the chief architect evangelist for the company's cloud computing arm amazon web service says ever since it launched in two thousand six. He helped build. Aws from an untested idea to a multibillion dollar business. Jesse's promotion is a sign that the company will be continuing. Its focus on. The cloud while amazon has strong position in the market are reporter. Aaron says cloud computing is becoming more competitive for many years. Amazon was really the only game in town. They pioneered this model of a cloud infrastructure platform player and there have been other players that tried to jump on board and lots of failed and really over the past few years. I'd say past four or five. We've seen microsoft really starting to grow quickly in that regard under sajjan adela. When he took over in two thousand fourteen he really refocused and put the company into serve cloud i mode and has really started paid dividends over the past few years and is now catching up to amazon. Quite a bed. We also see google nut growing as rapidly as as microsoft but certainly a viable player. Here

Amazon Andy Jesse Jeff Bezos Jesse Sajjan Adela Aaron Microsoft Google
"sajjan" Discussed on The Bad Boys

The Bad Boys

04:24 min | 10 months ago

"sajjan" Discussed on The Bad Boys

"The show. We have cathy richardson from jefferson. Starship let's play a one of the tracks from the id starship. Nothing's gonna stop us now. One of the base of the best would lure stay. Sajjan wrong risi Boundaries crazy. that was. Nothing's gonna stop us now. This is the.

cathy richardson jefferson Sajjan
"sajjan" Discussed on Plastic Surgeon

Plastic Surgeon

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"sajjan" Discussed on Plastic Surgeon

"More chiseled features, which is Kinda cool and that happened for me to, and of course, the best part of the deep voice. Yeah. So and what led and going through all of this, and then you run home homes for awhile and then the first gender affirming surgery you decided it was your chest, is that right? Oh? Yes. That's usually the first step and how did you decide you need a chest surgery and how did you hear about me learn about me? So I actually followed you on instagram and snapchat for a year a little over a year before. I even knew that I could have top surgery with you. How did you hear about me an INSTA-. I. Really. Don't remember. I'd just came across you one day and. I was like, this is Kinda cool He's showing surgeries, and then I showed shared you with some friends and I'm like Oh my God. You see everything and snap going through and I. I would look everyday for your videos and I'm like this is really cool. Dr Sajjan I gotTa remember that name will then I. started working for an insurance company. A one of the big ones out here was that by the way insurance company Oh Kaiser Permanente. Absolutely love them. They've been amazing through my entire transition, my name change with. that. Actually came by year two of my employment I, kind of waited. And they were from day one. They're like, yes, you can be Jack 'cause. Obviously, this voice does not sound feminine on the phone at all. So. I looked through my resources on who we were contracted with for top surgery because they are very transgender. Friendly. I saw your name and I about what myself? I, was like, oh. My Gosh. He does top surgery. There's a couple like about three surgeons that were contracted with unlike, nope. I don't want surgery from anybody else period because I mean I've experienced seeing your work. Here's the funny thing. I'd never had experienced senior work on a bigger patience, but I knew. That you strive for. Perfection and I knew. There would be no way I would ever come out with anything but protection. Thank you. So I was likely kind I was like, okay, I, gotta go see him. No matter what it. Then when you came from consoles, I. Remember you had a lot of history of medical problems from your weight loss and gain. The The Other doctors? I don't, if you call them sounds like you didn't, but did they have any restrictions? Do you hear about that kind of thing before you even thought about them like were, they would with other providers, I can't see you unless you lose this much weight or things like that. Are you talking about like other surgeon? Yes. Other surgeons for top Sir. Do they have any restrictions or you didn't look much more into it than me? I. Kind of looked into another surgeon He he did do I'll leave him named. he did do bigger patients, but more on just the thick side, maybe slightly overweight or Chubby me. Technically, I'm still obese a at about the three hundred pound range, which is when you did my surgery I was about that wait. Give or take They're like, you know what? You? WanNa be about that thirty five am..

Jack Dr Sajjan
"sajjan" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

10:11 min | 1 year ago

"sajjan" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Little son Jay and would you rather high hold not buddy I'm doing well I guess you gave up on that a little part yeah I mean I I one I had a six week run yet not calling you little but I mean listen get the there's a less of you to love I don't know I'm trying to think of a you just you're more compact love that's what it is yeah yeah your amazing anyway so Sajjan case you are not familiar with would you rather Sunday's gonna ask us impossible questions and we'll answer here in the studio please feel free to play along in your car or at home it's always a good time so what's the first question tonight Sunday all right number one would you rather switch bodies with someone of the opposite sex for eight days or switch bodies with someone that has the same effect for a week you get to choose the person there was a rash of movies in the eighties do you member like I thought the body swap movies Fred savage was in one easy swap with bodies with his dad and then there was one with Jimmy Smits and he swapped their they the Jimmy Smits was that made actor and then Ellen Barkin was the main actress and like base which are something she wanted to work it was there's like there's a whole run of eighties movies where there's body switching going ons apparently Sunday was watching Showtime this weekend on demand or something I live women have a tough I have no desire to see with like to be a woman for a day so I'm going to pick up Bobby another dude for a day and that dude would be Brian James it is a leather it's another of the opposite sex for a day or same sex for a week but I get your point Ron during the week of the finals correct yeah work and we're going to be the off season so you wouldn't have to do anything yeah that's true that's why yeah I'll I'll figure out what do that I don't wanna be a woman for a day I feel the same way I don't want to be a dude I'll be a woman but I'll be like a woman with a perfect body so some supermodel or whatever for a week I could take that so you were you were gone I would have thought you would have been like I wanna be Joan Jett for a week or something like that enjoy that get that rock star experience for me yeah maybe now I'll be a supermodel okay low T'Chaka very curious about your answer on this one I for fear of it do I get a pic on trading places with yes well then I'm not a fearful okay I'm still I can pick a woman but I was thinking the chances that I pick a what I'm going to be a woman for a day and I end up as a pregnant lady I've been with my wife yeah now I don't do that and there's a three thirty chance you're gonna you're gonna pick a day that they will not be good anyway yeah yeah right the odds about right there one to ten three thirty club yeah so you're going to you're going to do I. idea what to do if you want to be Erickson who you want to be right now of course Mike pence titling new dynasty guy I mean maybe we talk about the duck dynasty god did you hear about that yeah he vowed to own reminded everyone to talk about that I'm sorry I have to think about I can write anybody Clint Eastwood yeah maybe ninety yeah Jason buyers in the US at the take out window so I'm gonna make it unanimous and I'll pick do Jack I guess any any idea not long or not you'll be on your yes I can and for a whole week excellent hi I was a great question side he was an excellent all right we're gonna get deep here would you rather the world instantly goes back to the way it was before all of this started happening politically economically socially or endure six more months of escalating madness with the major positive permanent changes in all three categories six more months of this crap everything starts to actually get better see here's the quick here's the deal is it what are these positive changes those are positive in my eyes or in someone else's eyes deposited in Europe because the positive changes that I think you're I think you're read very very exceptionally smart and reasonable person I'm gonna stay in Europe did you not say like what what is a positive step forward in my eyes might not be that for everybody right Hobart signaling once of collated protest in all my goodness the I'm gonna be glass half full guy go six more months of this and then immaculate turn around yeah I so they're basically almost a full year right yeah this crack I mean yeah I hate the idea of six more months of protests and everything but I like not having co workers in the building for so there's like six more months six more months of hell loti Chuck six more months and then up everything's rosy so Jason buyers yeah let's make all this work something else that's more months well said make it all worth something all right next to it was the good jobs are the next question all right back the easy would you rather have a photographic memory or the ability to forget anything photographic memory I know there's nothing I really want to forget I mean a couple of never mind no yeah I I don't want to forget anything I will get the photographic memory I think they'll be very useful yeah I think a photographic memory I think a couple concussion so there's a lot of stuff that I can remember yeah so I was a related yes well I will go with photograph autocratic memory low teacher of photographic yeah I tend to forget everything anyway so give them yeah you better memory yes you know merry you know who Mary Lou Harris right she was the red headed taxi yeah Johnny dangerously so she at I forgot what kind of memory she has it's not call photographic but it's like eidetic memory that's it yeah like what were you doing on June twelfth nineteen eighty one and she's like what a grilled cheese sandwich for lunch and then I went to Walmart and like that my I think I mean I would like to have that kind of that that would be great you say noticing it I wanna tell you what I had for lunch yesterday I know probably something unhealthy yeah probably help all right next question Sergej all right would you rather live next to a beat the motocross track or the smelly as part of the sewage treatment plant let's get that done terrible listen in on this gun terrible I'm gonna adjust this for you Doug would you rather live next to NASCAR I'll say let a motor speedway or what was the second question Sunday or the milli it's part of a sewage plant or the smell is part of a sewage plant a terrible to live by land owners I know what the other choice exactly double pay money to do that good job yeah great real estate dogs always there I would be lived here that motor cross track or whatever you just said Sunday yeah there is a clear track where in my home town and it's annoying for a little bit but then it goes away we are small night or something smell is always there yeah the racetrack low T. Chuck the fear of that smells following you yeah you know like it's in your clothes in your car I'll deal with the noise off all figured out I don't beyond that Jason yeah the smells too much all right four hours when I went to school in Poughkeepsie New York there is that there is a definite older right near my school yeah and like when you first it was so weird they must schedule the the college tours on days where they know the smell is not gonna be there because windows right yeah something because it's right on the Hudson River but it's not the Hudson River that stinks there's something there like a garbage burning plant there's no I mean I was there for five years and I've never pinpointed the location of the order but there's a definite odor and you eventually get used to it right I'm not saying that's a good thing but then when you have like I friends come from other colleges back what the hell six seven eighty talking about the KFC so I don't know the origin but I don't want to get used to a smell again so yeah I'll I'll stick with that next questions Sandra lysis okay all right it's a little long but it's worth it all right which way would you rather get served by in a restaurant the one who's friendly talkative compliment you recommend favorite Rudy tells a funny joke when taking the order or the one who's polite but speak only when asked in common nothing greet you politely take shorter in the lead why why is it appealing to that a waiter's complementing Sunday I'm just curious how that if it's important to you now that I'm a waiter compliments me I mean like well you look nice today the Sunday's linked into I I don't know I I never I used to hang out with I yeah I don't know I mean I was aware ruby Tuesdays a lot definitely yes get the chicken CRISPR they're delicious all right I'm going to choose the second one yes I'm gonna give you some reasons one the guy the Eddie Haskell waiter that you described in the first half is just looking for a bigger tip is I up Mr Aaron you nose look smaller today he just wants a bigger tip I was not that later I was I was that I would you crack a joke once in awhile but just the facts Jack what do you want the level below so I'm going with that second waiter yeah I don't need a big conversation you know just take my order bring it correctly it that's fine I'd like the salad no dressing and a glass of water exactly what exactly right degree her amazing order at chili's is that we said ruby Tuesdays what did you say all the salad they have a salad bar Debbie lonely not anymore yeah you're right loti witch waiter you gonna go home with I had what I would punch the first one I can go over the second one Jason buyers there's a fast food restaurant by me were they insist on chatting with you while they get your food fast food really yeah and it's so uncomfortable and annoying leave me alone yes be polite and leave me alone I learned that very on in my waiting career that don't be a Harvard MBA helicopter parent waiter like don't check into often because people hate that and now is a diner I I agree Sonjay is the official account of the market and show through the protester the call of it through the.

Jay Sajjan
ContraPoints with Natalie Wynn

Unladylike

06:30 min | 1 year ago

ContraPoints with Natalie Wynn

"I've always kind of liked YouTube. I like the chaos of it. I don't even mostly watch politics. I watch a lot of makeup videos. I watch cooking videos. I WATCH VIDEOS OF COMPETITIVE EATING. I just I. I like the kind of like the way that it's so. Diy in the way that these personalities that would never make it not not any chance of making it in conventional media to cut millions of followers on Youtube. Natalie is joked that she failed her way into youtube stardom after dabbling as a musician dropping out of philosophy. Phd Program and attempting to make it as a fiction writer. Natalie pivoted to video this was in two thousand fifteen soon after she moved to Baltimore and the same year. The city's black lives matter. Movement rose up in response to police killing Freddie Gray and online gamer gate. Trolling and harassment was in full. Swing watching that situation and the black lives matter movement also just incredibly ignorant response from most people on the Internet. That kind of sparks. I think my early interest in trying to talk about these topics on Youtube especially once I saw that a lot of the politics that was going on youtube was like ignorant at best and like Senator Fascist propaganda at worst no things to the power of algorithms the more videos Natalie watched on youtube about things like feminism racism et Cetera. The more crazy shit she saw and the deeper she got into the radicalized rabbit holes of Youtube. My recommended videos feed on Youtube was suddenly full of these videos. Titles like feminism is cancer. Black lives matter is a racist terrorist organization. You know Like these are the talking points that were sort of growing on Youtube in two thousand fifteen. I knew enough to know that was bad. Natalie decided to launch her own YouTube channel. Contra points as a new wants to entertain encounter to all the right wing propaganda. She was seeing on the Internet and as a way to understand why these movements were bubbling up in the first place. Her first video was on in. Cells Aka involuntary celebrates and it's been watched more than three million times and this video. I don't WanNa mock insoles or lecture them or even sympathize with them. I just want to understand who they are. And why they're like this to start with. Sometimes the over thirty five minutes Natalie. Deconstructs in Selma Sajjan step by step grappling with their ideas and even offering some empathy. And that's the key to our videos and a real part of her success. So in your videos you confront a lot of toxic ideas around things. Like in sells for instance. So what is your goal? And how do you approach? Debunking these arguments while it is anthropological. I guess in some sense that is. I'm making a video to inform like a general public about this unusual online subculture. Most very aware that the people from that subculture are going to watch the video. So I I TRY TO MAKE VIDEO. That has like an escape hatch or like a life. Preserver a rope thrown whatever metaphor. I WANNA use that basically allows someone who's watching videos as an incentive to not feel like I'm simply just antagonizing them but also the at least making the effort to understand where they're coming from but my natural inclination when I'm reading this stuff is to be like. Oh Wow this is like these. People are horrible. Impossible to get along with their credit misogynistic but they're also like really really lonely and unhappy and I can try to make a video that doesn't just caricature them but 'cause that's pointless to me so. I try to give people three dimensions what I'm describing them when I'm describing these toxic online subcultures. Do you get the kinds of comments along the lines of like Yeah I mean Natalie. One's pretty liberal. But she's not like all those other liberals like I feel like that's a common trope among lake. I don't know in my conservative comment culture. Oh definitely like that's not not like other liberals is definitely kind of part of the brands like the one I hear the most actually is people say they don't feel judged by me They don't feel like I got a call from someone who said like I was only like transgender person. Could stand to watch Because I didn't make feel a dirty word during that. They would claim that about myself. But I'm glad they feel that way because that is exactly what I sort of go for. I guess WanNa make the videos. I mean I noticed early on that. If you're gonNA talk about especially the social justice kinds of issues. People are so defensive about it. And if you'RE GONNA get through to them you have to make a lot of rhetorical concessions. That might seem totally unreasonable. Like you just can't say the word transphobia most of the time it's just it's just people hate it. People hate accused of anything phobia. Just shut their brains. Doubted Shits shut their ears down. They stop listening to you and same with like calling calling. People Racist Sexist misogynist. There's a turn the time and a place for life using these words But it's not when you're trying to persuade general audience. In my opinion it just causes people to shut down. I think that's such a interesting in really important point in terms of like making the rhetorical concessions and it comes up a lot even just in terms of like you know questions we get of like. Should I call myself a feminist? Well that'd be to alienate. I mean just like basic is that. Is it more valuable to make some rhetorical concessions? If you are going to get through to a person versus using the kinds of words that will to use a term trigger trigger a lot of like hybrid conservative or like. Red Pill types. Well it's always it's always a give and take it's a question of. I mean you lose something when you make the rhetorical concessions often but for me it's about I guess I tried to start a strategize. I'm writing a script like how I can make rhetorical concessions without making ideological concessions to of my own

Youtube Natalie Baltimore Selma Sajjan Harassment Freddie Gray Writer Senator Shits
Kim Kardashian Goes on Tweet Storm Against Taylor Swift

Celeb News Ride Home

05:11 min | 1 year ago

Kim Kardashian Goes on Tweet Storm Against Taylor Swift

"Oh my God. It's only been one day since I reported on the Kanye West Taylor swift phone call situation and I'm already like Oh fatigued by like it was fun yesterday and now. I'm just like really. We're still talking about this. Maybe it's because they didn't have coffee today. Maybe it's because we're in the middle of a pandemic but yesterday it was fun today. It is emotional. Labor and I will be invoicing Kim Kardashian and Taylor swift and Kanye West for my countless hours. Spent thinking about phone call gate anyway. Kim Kardashians like freaking out on twitter. She's like posting up a tweet storm about this Why is tweeting about it? I think she she's like upset. That Taylor posted an instagram story. So let me I tell you Taylor Swift's instagram post Taylor posted on her story writing quote instead of answering those who are asking how I feel about video footage that was leaked proving that I was telling the truth the whole time about that call. You know the one that was illegally recorded that somebody edited and manipulated in order to frame me and put me my family and fans through hell for four years. Swipe up to see what really matters. And then if you swiped up you were sent to a link to donate to corona virus relief. I mean I don't have a major problem with this. I don't know Taylor's has barely like correct in what she's saying but she's capitalizing off of a major celebrity news story in order to give money to people who need it right now which listen. I don't hate. I totally support that. I think honestly more celebrities. Should we doing that right now? Anyway clearly this ticked Kim Kardashian off Kim went on a tweet rant after she saw Taylor doing mostly like an act of good and before I get into Kim's tweet storms have to speculate. Is Kim Jealous? That Taylor swift is like raising more money from her. Fans for Corona virus than Kim is like Kim Kardashian. As we all know famously is generously donating twenty percent of her shape. Wear line profits to corona virus relief but like my personal conspiracy theory. Is that not a single person has purchased shape. Wear so in my personal opinion. I think no one's buying shaper at where right now which means no one's giving money for him to donate to corona relief anyway. That's my long winded way of saying Kim was not happy with Taylor's post. She took to twitter and she tweeted a bunch of tweets. Let's see how many tweets Kim posted it six tweets in a row. I feel like for Kim. That's a lot for Kim. That's a lot okay. She wrote at Taylor. Swift Thirteen has chosen to reignite an old exchange that at this point in time feels very self serving given the suffering. Millions of real victims are facing right now. I didn't feel the need to comment a few days ago and I'm actually really embarrassed and mortified to be doing it right now but because she continues to speak on it I feel. I'm left without a choice but to respond because she is actually lying to be clear. The only issue I ever had around the situation was that Taylor lied through her. Publicist who stated that? Connie never called to ask for permission. They clearly spoke so I let you all see that nobody ever. The word was used without her permission at the time when they spoke the song had not been fully written yet but as everyone can see in the video she manipulated the truth of their actual conversation in her statement when her team she said she declined and cautioned him about releasing a song with such strong with Sajjan his stick message. The lie was never about the word. Bit was always whether there is a call or not and the tone of the conversation. I never edited the footage and never lie only posted a few clips on snapchat to make my point and the full video. That recently leaked doesn't change the narrative and quote. Okay so like technically I think none of these people are in the right and I think that this is all weird and like I think they're all wrong they're all It's semantics game at this point at least Taylor shift is is getting donations for corona virus off of it. I don't know what Kim is getting out of speaking on this right now. Kim is just like making herself kind of look bad right now even though I don't even think Kim is wrong. She's just like she should have just said no ping like now. Everyone's kind of making fun of Kim Kardashian. But like hey if there's anything crash. Ian Doesn't mind it's when people are talking about her so I guess can you? Oh this whole thing has aged between probably ten years. I think I'm GONNA start sprouting. Some grey hairs from this. This is a this feud this futures fund but now it's now the fun is over and I'm getting old. I'm getting old

Taylor Swift KIM Kim Kardashian Kim Kardashians Kim Jealous West Taylor Twitter Kanye West Instagram IAN Connie Sajjan
Exposing a War Crime with Justin Watt

Casefile True Crime

08:16 min | 1 year ago

Exposing a War Crime with Justin Watt

"On March. Twelve two thousand six during the height of the Iraq. War full members of the Janabi Family forty-five-year-old forty-five-year-old Qasim. He's thirty four year old wife Factoria and two daughters six year old at deal and fourteen year old. A B were murdered in their home in the Iraqi village. Village of USA fail south of Baghdad. Be had also been right and her remains set a lot. It was widely accepted. The attack had been carried out by local insurgents as such violence was common in the area that was referred to by occupying. Foreign Military is the triangle of death. The American soldier Private First Class Justin. What was stationed in Iraq? At the Thanh months off that Janabi family slaying. Ajayi sajjan confided that one of their fellow soldiers was responsible for the brutal crime. Justin pussies friendships Corre- and David. He's lot but risk but conducting talking. He's uncovered investigation into the matter. He discovered several of the soldiers were involved to varying degrees and made the difficult decision to expose posed them for the American soldiers. Sergeant Paul Cortez Specialist James Baca Private First Class Jesse spillman private first this class Brian Howard and Private First Class Steven Green with band to of planned carried out and covered up the ripened murder of be as well as the massacre of her family. Ole Five individuals faced charges by their involvement and received varying convictions. Green had been discharged from the US army mental instability prior to the crime's coming to lot and was consequently trod in civilian court while the other four perpetrators is faced the US army general courts Martial Green. Who was responsible for carrying out? The Med is sentenced to life imprisonment with no possibility. PF parole he took his life shortly after the remaining perpetrators was sent to military prison to serve a varying sentences. You just what's actions led to mixed opinions from the American public some viewed as a hero while others accused him of being a traitor data and sent him death threats. His decision also impacted the Iraqi paypal creating hostilities. Between the locals insurgents and touring military three Justin has since been medically discharged from the army and has spoken with US candidly about military experience including the Janabi family family murders adding additional context to our episode on the crime. Justin started by telling us how he came to join the military before nine. Eleven by buddy names all and we're GONNA do the steel challenge together. They had a program in the navy. That dead allowed you to join with a friend. She going at the same time in guaranteed you a selection slot to go to buds went through got qualified for that. What I was seventeen at the time and I showed up to maps like the process for joining the military? Here in America's like you'll go through talk to a recruiter you'll do. There's some preliminary testing then you have to go up to maps for you know. Some physical batteries stuff apt to batteries. Stuff like that on the day that I was supposed go to maps. And that's where you sign your contract. My buddy bailed on me completely so I went up there on my own and as it turns out the job it was like a crypto does slash networking like computer type position. That wasn't available anymore and so I was like okay. I'm not going to do this because I was seventeen. you can't join into your eighteen hours in what was called the delayed entry program so you get all your stuff done when you're seventeen and then basically as soon as you're eighteen you ship out. I basically dumpstered the idea. Nine nine eleven happened and like in a serious relationship. You know I had a pretty decent job I was a blackjack dealer. Casino pit boss. The relationship ended and I remember just being in a position where I was just Kinda like okay. Like what am I gonNa do now because like all of my plans kind of like based around future with that person listen and you know. I had no idea what I was going to be doing. And I was like cleaning out my room and I found my body and my original ship date was supposed to be on September eleven and at that point I was just like while somebody else's probably like in my place. I just watched band of brothers. Zoom may be sound like the biggest cliche ever. But you literally after watching that I was like you know I want the hundred and first airborne infantry and if you're not going to give him I'm not going and at at that time the Iraq war kicked off this is like two thousand four. I want to say so it. It just really kicked off in Iraq. Ans- dance they couldn't find people join just as Iraq was a lot bloodier then Afghanistan. And so I got like a twenty thousand dollar bonus for joining the infantry which is unheard of because it's a it's a low like agr- apartment job. Yeah twelve days later from that data I found that I D I was on a plane for Benning to get into training so went through that then Amelie after that the air assault school school has learned a robot of the jobbers which is a big part of the hundred and first does and then got on my unit you know and it was. It was a very different thing to go through all the training knowing that. You're going to war like everybody. They're sergeants that were teaching. Just got back. It was their first combat deployment. mm-hmm there's people that were in the logistical infrastructure of basic training. They were headed down to the hundred. I with me so I know there was a lot of camaraderie. I I think apprehension everyone. Everyone knew with certainty that they were going. Everyone knew that it was popping off over there. So yeah yeah I mean it was. It was a crazy time for sure when we sent in Iraq so the way it worked out is I got down to one hundred I I I. And that's where I linked up with my unit and you get assigned to accompany and everything and that's how I ended up in First Striker Bravo Company the unit that the book was based not got down there on the mmu pre-deployment spin ups. you go out and do more training. You know out in the field and like these stimulated urban combat villages at the National Training C. C. Out in Louisiana we see Anna and you do training pull unit and then as smaller elements. Then you go. I mean usually get stood down a couple of times just because they don't like people knowing exactly when you're going to be leaving with how many people you're going and everything like that just operational security stuff so I wanna say so. From the day that we're seagoing. There is like a couple of week variation we went and we stopped in Germany on the way there and then landed in Saudi Arabia. You did our last combat zero before getting down into into theater which is like make. Sure Weapons Still dialed in. And then yeah. We're down to Iraq doc. We landed in Baghdad. It just a different world. I mean you land there and the war machine is is pretty pretty sophisticated so like by the time we got down there. We'd only been in Iraq in that kicked off two thousand. Three's basically the end of two thousand and four early two thousand and five. They already had this. Main kind of super base built up in in Baghdad. was called striker at the time and there was like a Pizza Hut and green bean copy. It's just weird but then you're like walking around in this area. That feels kind of like you know a military base and then you'll be talking with your friend and then all of a sudden you hear like a a huge explosion. A few hundred meters outside the perimeter. Then you'll hear a bunch of machine gun fire and from a couple of different areas and then you it'll just go silent right and you're like somebody has died at their like. That's crazy I it was just a a weird transition.

Iraq USA Baghdad Justin Janabi Family Factoria Ajayi Sajjan Private First Thanh Janabi America Green Steven Green Martial Green Sergeant Paul Cortez Saudi Arabia Murder Army Pizza Hut
Antisocial: Online Extremists, Techno-Utopians and the High-Jacking of the American Conversation

The Book Review

09:19 min | 2 years ago

Antisocial: Online Extremists, Techno-Utopians and the High-Jacking of the American Conversation

"Andrew Marantz joins us now from Chicago. He is a staff writer at the New Yorker occur and the author of a new book called Antisocial Online Extremists Techno Utopians and the hijacking of the American conversation enter. Thanks thanks for being here. Thanks for having me these pretty not nice people that you research for this book. I don't want to bum people out too much with the subject matter and I and I don't think of it as purely just trying to dunk people's heads in the scary toilet bowl of the Internet. You know my goal is not to just sort of tore people through who the badness and show it and say hey look at all these bad people. There is an element of that and I was spending three years hanging out in person primarily and also online with some pretty odious people. But it's really a kind of test case for what the Internet can do to us and kind of how we can understand it well enough to to pull ourselves out of it so so it's not merely just gawking. Seal injected teeny bit of hope. Perhaps into this world some hope some some diagnosis of where we're at and also I thought of it to use a kind of nerdy philosophical term. I thought of the whole thing as a kind of reductio AD absurdum that if we had a functional informational landscape this is not where we would have ended up so it's really sort of about how information in in technology and media have led us to the place where we're at now and how we got here all right before we get into the topic which is very serious on a lighter note. Perhaps I couldn't help. But I don't know if you've seen this movie on an airplane Longshot. With Seth Rogan. And Charlie's Theon have you heard about this or seen it. I haven't seen it okay. So it opens up with a journalist is sort of Gonzo journalist embedding himself with Neo Nazis and white nationalists and that whole world to write about them so I couldn't help it but picture that but in all seriousness. What was it like meeting people in person? And how hard was it to break into this world. The people I was going to as a whole range that we it wasn't doesn't purely neo Nazis. There were some Neo Nazis. who were very not thrilled about me? Being Jewish and that really became an issue with them way more than I expected. I didn't expect the antisemitism to be so front and center with some people that the Jews are really kind of at the center of their dark cosmology and with them that was really an issue issue. I mean there were people who would talk to me for hours and hours and then sort of halt in the middle of an interview and go wait. You're not a Jew are you and it'd be like come on man if you're your professional antisemites for a living and you can't figure me out your your job so that became awkward. What happened when you said yes? They would kind of get flustered and one guy in particular he had a podcast called the daily show which was his very funny. About the Holocaust he was a real true dyed-in-the-wool Anti Semite right and he would brag to his followers about how he had such good Jew Dr as he called it because they're obsessed with how Jews can pass as white even though by their lights. They're not really early white so he would constantly warn his listeners. You know you guys don't get it but I do. Because I grew up in the northeast. He actually was from this. Very very multicultural. Bucolic Golic New Jersey suburb where his father taught Beowulf at college. I mean he was really like Kinda. The Progressive Dream turned progressive nightmare and his parents ended up disowning in him. And I it was a whole thing and he actually as a sidebar was married to a Jewish woman which was complicated for him so he was his own kind of little Phillip Roth novel all of a person this is just sort of like one chapter of the book but when I start going down that rabbit hole with him and then he finally finds out that I'm Jewish in the middle of an interview. He he gets very flustered. He says you had red hair so that really threw me off. You know and I'm like again. You should have had that on your list of things to watch out for happens. Yeah yeah it does happen but then we kept talking for hours. I suggested that we meet up in person. And he picked a German beer hall for us to meet at and you know they they were constantly trying to throw thrown me off my game and sometimes it worked. I mean I I have to say sometimes. They're they're trolling was effective. Even at the level of kind of unnerving me other times they really didn't and I found it kind of clownish and silly like when I showed up at a German beer hall I was like okay. You know I'm just GonNa sit here and let you do your thing and try to you. Know he tried to have an argument with me about Israel which I did not indulge him in but for the most part the earlier parts of the book I really Kinda turned to the deeper Nazi. Not Stuff after Charlottesville. When it became clear that that was a national issue that I couldn't look away from the earlier stuff was more about what they call the light? As opposed is to the outright people who are misogynist people who are Islam phobic but they fall on the correct side of what they call the J Q which is the Jewish question and these are people who were fine with my being Jewish and they really are more motivated I would say by Sajjan xenophobia and other things and when I was in those spaces I never felt unsafe. I just had to hold my tongue you know and not object to everything I found objectionable or I would never. I wouldn't have been able to fly on the wall for three years. I would have left after five minutes and I just sort of Said Okay my job here as a New Yorker style reporter is to see people up close really get a feel for who they are when they're on their own when they're mask starts to slip and I can't do my the job if I am constantly showing my hands knowing that felt weird and conflict but I felt like I would get better I better servicing the reader by putting putting it in the book than by just doing it in the moment. We're not there to Gawk because you said it just merely to do a late cecile logical observation of these people. So what was your goal with the questions that were driving you and exploring the subject. I was worried about the purely ethnographic. I mean I like a lot of books that are pretty purely ethnographic and just sort of showing what a subculture is or does as you say that the more Gonzo thing. I wanted to stay away from that particularly in our charged moment. I wanted to do something that had a little bit. More Synthesis and analysis in it and so the questions will really one of the basic questions was just okay. The reason techno utopianism is in the subtitle of the book is we had this moment in the early twenty first century when a bunch of young guys. He's like a handful of young men uprooted everything we knew about how information was was disseminated in our society. -ociety they disrupted they innovated. They moved fast and broke things they had no plan for. What would supplant those thing? Even when they were asked they didn't have a clear vision of what this Utopian future would be like. They just assumed will topple. Everything will clear out all the cobwebs of traditional hierarchical means of communication in and then something better will automatically take its place and that to me was the underlying question of the book that the this this tacit and even sometimes explicit faith in American exceptionalism in the arc of history always Kinda automatically inevitably bending toward justice that leads people to have really dangerously naive politics and dangerously naive plans for their technological future. You know I mean. We don't think of things like facebook and twitter and read it as being inherently political. But you know I spent a lot of time reconstructing how those things came into being and I spent a Lotta time physically immersing myself in the offices of read it in particular and watching how they do have a test. Ideology that motivates them and the ideology was the marketplace of ideas will sort it all out and this book was really trying trying to prove demonstratively. That is not the case. The marketplace of ideas has failed to sort it out libertarian approach to the Internet yeah. They were proudly techno libertarian. They were very into you know Liz affair above all and you know it sounds really nice to say as twitter always said we're the free speech wing of the Free Speech Party that obviously obviously in a vacuum all things being equal being pro. Free speech is Great. It's just when you don't hold that intention with other things and when you don't imagine in your mind's eye hi how dark and weird and bad things can get not that they will automatically. I mean I don't WanNa replace the arc of history bending toward justice with an equally sure. Sure faith at the arc of history will bend toward terror. And I mean I'm not that much of a pessimist I'm just trying to replace our faith in inevitability with one of what I call them. The book contingency where lots of different things can happen. You kind of have to have guardrails in place. In case something weird happened and who would have thought given that motto for twitter they would have put a ban on political advertising. Yeah I mean we've come so far away farther than even when I was shopping. This book proposal around things have changed so much in terms of you know to use another kind of stock phrase the the way the overton window on these issues has moved. It has been really surprising to me and look. It's not naturally you can't expect people to anticipate everything but you know one of the analogies. I drive to hosting a party when you start a social media company any. They like to think of themselves as a town square. Or you know public criers or

Twitter German Beer Hall Seth Rogan Andrew Marantz Chicago Staff Writer Phillip Roth Israel Charlie Golic New Jersey Charlottesville Facebook LIZ Reporter Three Years Five Minutes
"sajjan" Discussed on The Reboot Podcast

The Reboot Podcast

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"sajjan" Discussed on The Reboot Podcast

"This question of inclusivity. And you're helping me see that. If if there's a company or someone knows listening to this podcast who's thinking about training if they step into the training mode. We're going to train her executives in diversity if they are thinking of doing that without stepping into the work that your cohort stepped into. Then it's then. What would you say? Is it it's important, but it's not enough. I think that. I think it's it's critical. I think that is different levels. Right. If there's van date level, and there's the real level as far as I'm concerned, the deep level bad is systemic because what you find out first of all is that this whole thing is is not necessarily we think of racism and racist as this individual characteristic, and yes, people can't be racist. Absolutely. They are right. But the bigger issue, and what will really talk about this stemming nature of racism in America. And how the entire structure is built built create it. On that notion on that principle and bass, the kind of learning that one gets when you and you start seeing. It opens your eyes in a whole way. So my first reaction to your to what you just said is that is really buydell that the people who are asking for this do that kind of work. So that they could see something different. They really get there really asking because then they'll start asking for something more than what they're asking for because there's more than just wanted throughout the word that equity. Okay. They versity is bringing more people into your space that are. LGBT pokes color, whatever it is. Equity has to do with power. Is about power-sharing. Okay. Because if we really want to get the work done that we need to do to make this planet tick the way that's going to be whole. And well, it's about sharing power is about folks women folks of color, whatever it is having equal power and power in organizations. So as opposed to I did my diversity quota. You know, I've got a bunch of people on the floor who now women of color, whatever it might be. And yet the entire cease week. His wife now. It's about power equity. So I have to throw in the notion of diversity inclusion equity, which we call right now. I'm so proud of I'm on the board of spirit rock as we have this really would encourage people to go to the website spirit rock things blew up morale race. Okay. Just put it bluntly quickly. And it has been a place at always said, you know, we, you know, we, of course, when everybody here and yet everybody is not there. And so we went through an amazing inner still going through an amazing process, and they put up on their website, the DA I which is diversity inclusion in equity plan and really speaking to the public about what they didn't do claiming it with humility, not Shane just honesty and what we're doing. Doing about it. And we're doing deep work there. This is not a bad day. Is not abandoned in. It's been a process, and they have put me sources behind that process. In order to write any kind of long said that has happened on this planet is not your fault. If not your fault. That's the other thing if not your fault now response done. To learn. It's not your fault. This is a systemic issue. That affects every single institution in America every institution and it trickled downs. Just like heard written Romney said. Met said. Trickled down the Sajjan. Whoa. So this is just get on. I don't know. Trumpet. But what he is done. But good thing that I think he has done is that I have never seen Republicans say those kinds of things and really come out against racism the way that they are..

Romney America Shane Sajjan
"sajjan" Discussed on iMore

iMore

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"sajjan" Discussed on iMore

"And that I think that's fantastic. Because that is not only saying like, hey, we care about this thing. But hey, we care about this thing I want you to know about. It that's gonna make you pay more attention to it as well. And on top of that, we're the earning company, and you know, in all of land, or however, you know, I'm sure there are plenty of qualifiers for that. But the point is they make a crapload of money. They make a reindeer ton of money. And because of that. Other companies can go, you know, maybe there's something to this whole user privacy and protection thing. And I think that's what's that's what's particularly important. Now, it is your turn Mr. Sajjan. Okay. So I I'm going to talk about something that as opposed to story that that we put up it's more a look back at a theme from apple health has been. It's continued to be a big thing for apple. But with the launch of the series for apple watch. Nice watchman. Oh, thank you. Yes. That is a patent quill and favorite watchband. And it's okay. So I know this is off topic. But like it used to be a different color when I first got it. And now it's got that nice Indiana Jones patina going anyway, very good. And now that that advertisement is over and getting. I faced a whole lot of a lot of health scares in in this in the past year and a little bit. And at the end of two thousand seventeen and I've talked about on different podcasts..

apple Mr. Sajjan
Princeton a cappella group won't sing 'Kiss the Girl' from 'The Little Mermaid' over misogyny complaints

Drew Garabo Live

00:26 sec | 3 years ago

Princeton a cappella group won't sing 'Kiss the Girl' from 'The Little Mermaid' over misogyny complaints

"But you die. Now what I found very interesting. And I and I wonder if we could pull this off guys, the it's a Princeton acapella group that won't sing it because of misogyny complaints Sajjan complaints, talking crab encourages as smitten prints to smart Smoot J mermaid without

Smoot J Princeton
"sajjan" Discussed on Pod Save the People

Pod Save the People

04:25 min | 3 years ago

"sajjan" Discussed on Pod Save the People

"And then he threatened to go to her job, and cause a scene women are at the highest risk of being killed when they leave the partners, according to experts in this field, and for many women their workplaces, then become a place of heightened danger because their partners know when and where they work so all this is to say, it is a tragedy that multiple people were killed, but the stories become so focused on the officer in some circles that that we are not paying enough attention to the domestic violence element of the story, and how it speaks to a much broader and more frightening phenomenon about how patriarchy sexism Sajjan and toxic masculinity at this sort of fatal manifestations that they have their sort of two things that I'm thinking about in response to this. The first is yet another example of clearly identifiable signs of domestic violence culminating in a. Another mass shooting that speaks to the need to buy these warning signs at take them. Seriously. When women come forward to report experiencing domestic violence, and to make sure they're folks don't have access to a gun who are exhibiting this behavior before it gets to this point. And then the second thing that I'm thinking about is as you said Clint, the centering of the police officer in the narrative when really what needed to be said was more about domestic violence than any particular threat to police, but a reminder that police often are threatened to by the fact that people who are violent that have patterns of violence can get access to guns, and can sort of engage in these mass shootings, you know, one of the ways in which patriarchy functions that is particularly insidious is that we just aren't believed. Right. So I especially had to learn very early and very quickly as a woman that unless we use certain words or show certain signs of. Damage harm trauma that are visible to others. And that can be rationalized by people who have never been through it that we will not be believed that the idea that verbal abuse can lead to more drastic kinds of abuse. The idea that psychological and financial abuse are signs that people should be paying attention to are often just things that are not discussed in society because patriarchy functions in such a way that we treat those things as minor to the point where when a woman has been able to break up with a violent partner, and or an abusive partner, we assume to your point Clint that the dangerous over the anything that they could be scared about their after it's probably a figment of their imagination because they're safe now when in fact, it can actually escalate things as we unfortunately have seen in this case, I'm frustrated by the kind of report. Eating that. We're seeing in this. I'm frustrated at the dots are not being connected properly. And yet the fact that the dots are not being connected to this domestic violence situation. Are unfortunately, par for the chorus and very reflective of exactly how patriarchy functions especially when it comes to domestic intimate partner violence. So what I realize that I knew a lot of the things that have been reported in the news about intimate partner violence or domestic violence. I didn't know some of the some of the subtext is that sixty to eighty percent of intimate partner homicides. No matter which partner was killed the may physically abused the woman before the murder like we think about the gender aspect of this is that the majority of intimate partner homicides. There was some abuse before the homicide actually happened that half of all homeless women and children in the US are fleeing from domestic violence, and that to me like such a different way to think about homelessness or how system the country which is when half of the women and children actually, leaving abusive household or homes one of the. Found interesting to you is research that talks about domestic violence is most likely to take place between six pm and six AM. So like the after work hours, the report also there's another report that analyzed the method of homicide, and this is a new report that came out demo CD that more than half involved firearms and twenty percent involve some sort of blade. So some of the laws around giving people who have been accused mastic abuse, like restricting their access to guns like there's had eventual impact, but knives are still in shoot..

partner Clint officer US Sajjan murder eighty percent twenty percent
Many Brazilians worry that their country is heading toward a military dictatorship

All Things Considered

01:19 min | 3 years ago

Many Brazilians worry that their country is heading toward a military dictatorship

"Although this country seems to be swinging far to the right polls show that Brazilians strongly favor keeping their democracy and don't want to return to the dark years of the nineteen sixty four to nineteen five military dictatorship. So given that polling are these worries about Boston are well-founded. Well, both says that he's going to respect to constitute. He wants a government. He says a thority, but not an authoritarian government. And then he says he he doesn't want a military takeover. Annoy says does the army, and he has distanced himself from his son's comments about the supreme court characterizing really as a mistake. We've been talking about political divisions here in the US. But I understand that campaign has been fairly nasty. Can you talk about what that looks like it's it started out being nasty, right? From the beginning. I'm in Boston auto himself was stabbed and severely injured in early September. And since then we have seen a brawl on what's app, which has been a wash with fake news and abuse, of course, people have been recalled in Boston out his past record of making the Sajjan est and racist and homophobic remarks, and that has been out there. People have been reminded of all

Boston United States
Brazil Set To Vote In Presidential Run-Off Election That Has Polarized The Nation

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:24 min | 3 years ago

Brazil Set To Vote In Presidential Run-Off Election That Has Polarized The Nation

"This podcast. And the following message is brought to you by jet dot com. Your one stop shopping destination. The jet experience provides a unique and relevant Dortmund with no membership fees. Start shopping conveniently at jet dot com or on the jet app today on Sunday, the people of Brazil will choose their next president the favourite to win is a retired army captain from the far right Zaire Bill scenario, and he openly admires that country's pass military dictatorship. This elections a second round run-off between Bolsonaro and a candidate from the leftist Workers Party racist, bitterly, polarized, Latin America's largest democracy. We're joined now by NPR's Philip Reeves, he's envio deja narrow. Hey there Philip. So is this election essentially a done deal as he that far ahead. Will it certainly look that way of the last couple of weeks giant Bolsonaro has had an eighteen point lead in the polls. Thanks to his ability to capitalize on deep public, contempt and anger in Brazil's towards establishment politicians. He's done that despite being a congressman himself for many years, and he's channeled that anger at his rival from the Workers Party blaming that party for the recent recession, which was the worst in Brazil's history and for a huge corruption scandal because that party was in power win. Those two crisis began to play out. However, the latest poll from yesterday shows the Workers Party candidate phenomena Adagi has narrowed has made some ground and that the lead of Bolsonaro has narrowed to twelve points. A why are we seeing this late swing away from Boston are what's driving it? Eight hundred be certain. The a couple of incidents this week that might have been factors. Boston outta made a speech in which he talked about his leftist opponents as red bandits and said he wanted to drive them off the map and amount of never before seen in the history of Brazil and also a video emerged from July in which one of his sons who's also congressman is heard talking about how easy would be to shut down the supreme court. That's Tim rebuke from the chief Justice of Brazil and analysts here think that this has set alarm bells ringing about whether both now does a threat to democracy because although this country seems to be swinging fought to the right poll show that Brazilians strongly favor keeping their democracy and don't want to return to the dark years of the nineteen sixty four ninety ninety five military dictatorship. So given that polling or these worries of both are well-founded. Well, Bolsonaro says that he's going to respect the constitution. He wants government. He says. Authority, but not an authoritarian government. And that he says he he doesn't want a military takeover annoys as does the army, and he has distanced himself from his son's comments about the supreme court characterizing those really as a mistake. We've been talking about political divisions here in the US. But I understand that campaign has been fairly nasty. Can you talk about what that looks like it started out being nasty, right? From the beginning. I mean Bolsonaro himself was stabbed and severely injured a newly September. And since then we have seen a brawl on what's up, which has been awash with fake, news and abuse. Of course, people have been recalling Boston does pass record of making the Sajjan est and racist and homophobic remarks and that has been out there. And people have been reminded of all that that's been a big scandal about a report that emerge showing that businesses have been Bank rolling. Mass message. Ages are what's up targeting both hours opponent, financial dashiki? And also the have been attacks on the street, which are related to the election and attacks and threats against journalists. So it has been a pretty nasty campaign. That's NPR's Philip Reeve's Philip. Thank you. You're welcome. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from internet essentials from Comcast. Connecting more than six million low income people to low cost high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class

Brazil Workers Party Bolsonaro Philip Boston Philip Reeves Leftist Workers Party Supreme Court NPR Congressman Dortmund Philip Reeve Comcast President Trump United States Latin America Adagi TIM
"sajjan" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

This Is Only A Test

03:50 min | 3 years ago

"sajjan" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

"And I don't think I know arguing that, but it puts onto screed manifest the you the fan fiction of what it would look like for? Yes, young young Harrison Ford, because some people really clean so idea that they wanted the the want their actors, they want their character. So look like the original actors more so than no one does this for Spock and we talked about Spock in the past couple of weeks. Of course it's going to come to start discovery and there's been, you know, spark kind of character is now gonna be portrayed by an adult form. I three actors, but no one's going. Give me a deep fake young letter nimoy onto the spot face in Star Trek j.j Abrams Star Trek, but people really care about Harrison Ford being. Do you think. This is gonna naval that fan behavior. I think the act of creating pop culture. That's the stole Joe base enables bad fan behavior, and it may doesn't necessarily courage it, but the bad fan favorites that come out no matter what. And that's just rather unfortunate. I think as technological exercise, I think it's super interesting, and it's a very real example of just how powerful these deep learning is. Deep fake technologies can be, why is this so positive? When we just came off of. Rogue one where we had Princess lay at the very end of it, and everyone was up in arms about it because it didn't look good. Well, look better than this, I think were as good. The ones giving the thumbs up thumbs up. The people are giving. This is the novelty of said, this being some guy and to this being algorithm generated as opposed to hand massage and case like the Hammet Sajjan part is kind of essential even with formats capture, like all the enemy captured by face that's still tweet by artists, and maybe that's helped to a higher standard, which is why the critical feedback in in. Rogue one. Was a little harsh. I wonder if what's the actress name? Who played Hansel anyone? All era. Ehrenreich ehrenreich your brains. Amazing. It's really amazing. Not if you listen to this pass up soda title stressed out for five minutes with felt like fifty minutes. So remember the name of one actor. I wonder if he knew it like if they had, if they did this in the film and if he knew that they were going to do the film, how that would affect his acting. If you knew all, then you're not hire. Eventually what you're hired to do that would maybe because they capture all the same expressions. It's like an anti circus performance. Uses voice. Sure. I don't know like they used and I just wonder if that frees him up. If he's that kind of actor, that would be free to a moat better or act differently. If you knew that your face was going to be seeing. I think that there's a stigma still for performance acting and that the surely the burden of responsibility would be shared by the effects artists and technicians who are would work on that post processing. I think the procedural, yes, the answer is yes, I think you'd be you'd feel less pressure, but it would also be less of he would feel like you'll be less of his performance. And so I, I'm glad they didn't go that way. I don't wanna see films go that way. They're places where I think it makes sense. For example, Arnold Schwarzenegger the Terminator Genesis was a, they had a young Arnold Schwarzenegger and they just imposed superimpose the face of young Arnold's purely with on a bodybuilder..

Arnold Schwarzenegger Harrison Ford Spock Hammet Sajjan Ehrenreich nimoy Joe base fifty minutes five minutes
"sajjan" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"sajjan" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

"Let's go read a book. Or you can. You can go deal with that and I'll just leave and it'll be fine. But were you and your books I? Well, I packed for camping. I may tried four books, so I'm good how many things. Two. There little book not only eight hundred as a piece. Those are little two hundred. I can read like four of those weekend reasonably and like two of them are behind line. And I don't know if I really wanna read him so I might get to pages in and be like, Sajjan. I can't read this. The thing that happens. I think I've been reading the same book for three years by him, so I'm gonna do, but anyways, totally got derailed. But I think for some people, it's genuinely hard to have that discussion. I was having a conversation with a friend the other day, and like I was talking to this person and she was talking about how I have some challenges. Other people's boundaries and kinda came to well, you're, you're kinda pretty. So it's easy to give you what you want. And I was like, I don't know what that means like, how do you adjust to that? If if you don't understand like, I don't know, that sounds terrible. So I think it can be it can be challenging to negotiate consent at times in the gray area because two people with two different understandings of what's going on. Well, and I think like we say often when we talk about almost every topic you have to be willing to just almost over communicate because you cannot make a sumptious about where people's heads are people. But you know, if you're really diligent in communication and asking more questions than you think you need to. I think that you at least have a chance at having a communication that allows you to understand the knowledge behind the decisions, maybe not, but at least you're giving it your best shot, but let's get back on consent. I know. No, I'm sorry. I got us dissected. So I'm, I'm wondering, kinda in follow up to last question. Do you defined consent differently when you're talking about sex versus personal contact, personal space, even property. That's a great question. I don't know the answer, but I'm thinking, no, I don't define it differently. I, it's still about being informed empowered to use that information to have agency and my choices and to show and receive care and to participate in a greater culture.

Sajjan three years
"sajjan" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"sajjan" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Yes, just go out there, but you know, the worst thing though about yesterday was this happened to us all of course and John's in New York, and now the the riddles of broken up and tell mokes into like a bar on the bar pianist, cesium and goes to do do do do, do these go. It's not my song. That was the one to be that one. Yeah, but no, he's a cool thing that the generational thing I remember being with a guy once and I was going on about Sajjan Pepe saying, well, you know, assuming he'd like me to give them a bit of history one on one. So. Well, Saudi beverly's gotta I'm sorry. Mom gotta have made. He said band on the run was my sergeant pepper. I was just a generational thing that was record. He thought it was. That's great. Wanguo I don't know if the the ban on the run markered like I had one very young and for some reason, I just thought Picasso's last words was like, like the greatest song ever heard is a child like you know, drink two major. Yeah, I just and then nine thousand nine hundred and eighty five on there. Like I'm not gonna just do a Chris Farley here, but when. When when you did that one, like when was that for you? The did that really make was the best of wings? Were it was on that record, you think? Yeah, I think so. At the time he was, yeah, because we we, we did a crazy thing with wings because I finished with the Beatles. I had now the the question of what am I going to do now. So the first thing I did was the mccown Iraq a which was literally just plug it into the back of Studer four track recording. Anything came. After that, then I started to get a little bit more sophisticated, but. Yeah, you know it just good nowadays. The come round. Yeah, you know when people seem to think that what we did then is good, but it's interesting too because with all the experimentation you did, which I think it was certainly with the McCartney record ram and and even like, you know, some of the earlier wing stuff wildlife, right? Is that like, you know, it was kind of all over the place and you were taking chances at all the way through it. You're making hits right about dozen or so wings hits. So I did, you know when you were recording those records, were you like, well, this one's this one's the hit and that's going to sell the record and the rest we can just fuck around with and have a good time. I didn't always know that it's not everyone in inbounds. They don't always know which the hit is. Yeah, you can make a hit. Sometimes you just think, okay. Get back was one with the Beatles for me. I didn't recognize at all. Now I just thought it was doing to tune to. To do board..

Chris Farley Beatles Sajjan Pepe Iraq New York Studer John Picasso McCartney
"sajjan" Discussed on Forever35

Forever35

03:47 min | 3 years ago

"sajjan" Discussed on Forever35

"And so I think you know something like that might happen to you. It might not. I don't really believe in quote, unquote, dressing your age, don't either. I don't think that's like a thing. I think it just sort of happens. And if it doesn't happen, that's fine too. But like I think it happens because of your lifestyle, kind of like, I don't know. I like I just sort of stopped wearing skinny jeans because they were tight. Yeah. Do that for so long. Really wanna wear these anymore, but it wasn't I. It wasn't like I was like, oh my God, I'm forty. I can't were skinny jeans anymore. Yeah, I wouldn't. I wouldn't put any pressure on yourself to change who you are, unless you're, you know, your style might evolve over time for me. My style is evolving in that, like I want to be more comfortable and I give less FOX. Yep, that's it. And that that happens because I'm aging and I think I'm kind of becoming more confident and comfortable and myself, but it wasn't like I woke up and was like today's the day. I go to lean Fisher. I mean one because I only fishers very expensive so I can't go in there that much. But boy, do I like it so I wouldn't put any pressure on yourself. I would just dress. However you feel like you want to express yourself in terms of like those voices that make women afraid of this age? I feel are the episode would with Glenis mcnicoll. I feel like it's a really good episode. Listen to read her book. I mean, I think so much of this is stuff that it's like internalized misogyny because we live in a patriarchy and external massage externalize Sajjan. Yeah. And so I think it's worth kind of examining why you have these thoughts and what they mean. And overcoming them? Yes. And it's not that it isn't hard to age or to deal with those the the pressure and expectations that come along with aging, the cultural expectations, which I think we've talked about, like having kids being partnered or having a certain job or being a certain place in your career or whatever it is. But I would say like if you can get clear about like, what are your goals and intentions and how you wanna live your life without trying trying to. Nor, but just look into yourself and see what's important, what your values are then say, like f it to all the other. Bullshit. Just enjoy your life. Yeah, I don't know if that answers your question listener, but I also think don't one thing I hate to say, don't do this, but one thing that's becoming more clear to me as I get older is that I'm less afraid of aging, not. I don't know if I've ever been afraid of aging, but certainly you have this feeling like when I turned twenty five and I was still like an intern. I didn't feel like I had accomplished all the things I wanted to accomplish. And if we are lucky, hopefully our lives are long and. There's so many opportunities for us to discover ourselves and connect with other people and have new experiences. And so I was saying in embrace it, yeah. I mean, we happen to live in a culture that venerates youth. There are so many other cultures that venerate are their elders. Yes, think if we lived in a culture where elders were really respected, imagine just imagine by elders. We mean people older than we are not elders, although we are made to feel that way. Right. And just like the thought, like you were saying the thought that getting old is itself a privilege and a and a blessing hopefully not something to be fearful of. Yeah, enjoy it. We're going to take a quick break. This episode is brought to you by fabrics..

Glenis mcnicoll Sajjan intern Fisher
"sajjan" Discussed on Pod Save the World

Pod Save the World

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"sajjan" Discussed on Pod Save the World

"With his lama forbes i don't see the members of the muslim majority well to the our world coming together to condemn trump for his bigotry or the appointment of biggest and that's what's so depressing there was literally next question i mean i hear knife imagine the phone calls to the saudis or to the uae or to pakistan or to any muslim majority country we're asking them to do something hard to help the united states with a policy priority how is that call received when you know these people are whispering and trump's year making major decisions and pushing things in a bad direction for an entire religion of people yeah unless i say i think assad ly anyone who thinks that some of these governments have the interests of the broader mosleh world interest the fighting bigotry at the full front of the mines is misled they don't care right now most of those arab governments gulf governments are obsessed with their own they're full they will do whatever deal needs to be done whether it's with benjamin netanyahu whether it's john bolton they will do evidence is to be done because they number one threat iran that they perceive to be they don't give a damn about islamophobia they don't give a damn about the rise of the fall right in your of the us that's not that concerned why would they give them obviously on the ground people here and see this stuff and that has a huge has huge ramifications when you you know when trump is saying islam hates us oh yeah everybody in the muslim world knows about that and zo coincidence that even during the election campaign tommy alshabaab the somali terror group will putting out recruitment videos using trump clips we know that isis and other groups have done some of the things when i interviewed general hate in the format of the couple of years ago during the campaign he said it clearly there is no doubt if you're a muslim yovany us donald trump is a recruiting sajjan and that's fundamentally that's what i was say to kind of you know people in the in the political world just forget the morality of it for a second i don't expect you to give a damn about you know bigotry all muslim communities oman people but even from a national security perspective this phobia is bunkers yes it really is that something that obama tried to address in his cairo speech and.

uae united states benjamin netanyahu john bolton iran obama pakistan assad tommy alshabaab donald trump oman cairo
"sajjan" Discussed on Car Talk

Car Talk

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"sajjan" Discussed on Car Talk

"Talk that's eight eight eight doubled to seventy eight 255 a lawyer on car talk this is luckily calling from douglas alaska leslie with an idea at the end oh no within eu why a proper english way oh is that right douglas alaskan i i must confess that i have never heard of douglas alaska was just dickerson's near fairbanks now it's those of you desist a city the fairbanks douglas fairbanks alaska i go it was us loop it of may the didn't what's his name sajjan preston always go to dunk well known all point barrow no we didn't go to any sticking point barrow the appoint barrel is that me douglas not really maybe ever heard of point from here a thousand with will ask as big as an it isn't it eddie anyway leslie what's up well it's cold up here and i need a freeze in my car but i want to have a safe antifreeze for the animals that are around here i keep hearing about the kind that is not going to be toxic to animals if they drink at like the ethylene glycol ethylene glycol is talks it there is easy is made from probe lean glycol which is nontoxic there are a few companies that have this uh antifreeze on the market i can't think of any of the names off he was it rings of polar does one called sierra and i don't know who makes it but somebody who has already freeze company vairon monthly conscientious and presumably poohpoohing glycol although it it is still not good if animals should drink it is not as deadly poison as ethyleneglycol which is really.

dickerson fairbanks fairbanks douglas fairbanks sajjan preston barrow sierra douglas alaska leslie douglas alaska alaska douglas eddie
"sajjan" Discussed on Casefile True Crime

Casefile True Crime

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"sajjan" Discussed on Casefile True Crime

"All nice the month after the modus destruct force received information that an arrest at bay might impair madam which they believed was linked to a number of fallen hamad car robberies these reveries took place around epping and surrounding suburbs early in the morning while beans run their hands to fuel up atms why this was of interest is because on may twenty eight only two months before the met his main lane witnessed one of these armed robberies the robbery occurred at the epping club a local lara so which was directly across the ride from means newsagency police started investigating that angle to safe that good fond of wink the pressure on investigators to fund the killer or killers was immense the case was one of the largest single homicides in new south rows history it had shocked the entire country the investigation was led by sajjan josephmarie marais was nine for his very quiet the main ah and an approach to his work that was calm he was never hurried to a stressed a fellow senior officers set of him quote he's very very quiet of never seen him or heard of anyone saying him getting stressed the worried oh concerned by anything he's got a buddhist monk thing of adding he's an enigma is alleged they identified several persons of interest but one by one now across stuff the list there were also i would really at any connection between mean witnessing the robbery indy's murdoch that line of inquiry was looked at charlie but it was determined to be nothing more than a coincidence.

robbery epping club lara sajjan josephmarie marais murdoch charlie epping newsagency two months