35 Burst results for "Saito"

"saito" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

05:29 min | 3 months ago

"saito" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Treatment program, right? So we treat everyone more as an individual now, than how it is, right? Okay. So if some person might come in and say, well, I only believe that I need two months of residential. I'd like to do the rest of the time on outpatient. We allow them to do that. Now it's still overseen by a clinical staff, whether that's they feel that's appropriate or not. But it's just like if you have cancer and you say, I no longer want to do chemo. The doctor will allow you to say, I no longer want to do that. So that's the major difference. And the way it's built and all of that, it's been a really rough on a lot of us old school treatment programs, you know? You can imagine. We had to put everything online. We have to build each level of services. The counselors have to type in every statement. We kind of lost a lot of the other program stuff that you did. You remember, can we use to take people camping and manzanar and it's I did a sweat lodge. And these are American sweat lodges. Yeah. So it's harder for us to do those programs because they're not here on a long-term state. It's hard to develop and plan for those items. So the old school people that were here would say, oh man, there's nothing like when I was there, right? So yeah, yeah. But we still approach the client at the same way. Residential for us were full. Like our beds are hidden demand. There isn't a lot of 24 hour residential programs that are facilitating like we are. But we're also trying to add another one specifically for women and children right now to expand that a bit. Because we believe in 24 hour care, we believe it's important to get the attic outside the family into an environment. And then slowly put them back into society. We have a very large workforce. We try to get everybody a job and try to get them back. So that's the hard part about the medical model. It doesn't give us the time to sometimes gently put them back into society. Talking about some of your graduates who are out there working and clean. Remember that name, construction, and he's done several projects on our house. We only knew each other because he was just getting out, as I was coming in, but we've always kind of maintained a friendship and we both trust each other and then he actually did the termite work on our House. You know, if I could throw a bone, I have to spend some money anyway, but if there's someone out there doing the work every day of staying clean and sober and contributing to society, hey, we got to be behind that, you know? I think that's really important. One of the things that I also learned as Mike congregation back when I was serving a church when they learned I was talking about addiction all the time and recovery, almost probably to the point where they want to hear anymore. But then people would approach me on the QT because their son or daughter, their husband, was dealing with this. And they knew that they could approach me and that I might introduce them to adapt. But one of the things I learned very quickly was if the addict doesn't want to go into treatment, no matter how much their family is desperate for them to get help, adap would basically turn them away and initially I'll be honest on a date. What are you turning them away for? We did an intervention. We got in their face, right? Finally, it started making sense. It's like, no, they have to want to be here. If they don't want to be here, we're wasting everybody's time and somebody's money. Yeah, they won't last long unless they really, really want to be in this program with 30 other people. Being in this daily structure, yeah, they have to want to be there. They have to feel they need it. So even with the adjustment with the ACA, are you finding that that is still primary that the addict themselves still has to have the motivation to be there? That's right. They still have to. You know, how I always approach families and parents. They call me all the time. You know, John was here when we were working on the book and I get parents calling me. And I always tell them that give them my card, give them my number and when they're ready, have them call me and I'll talk to them anytime they're ready. And it was interesting when John was here, the person called, and we got them to come in. The person was said I'm ready. But after about three, four days, the person left. We had high hopes that the person was ready. He said he was reaching that one ready. But once he got here, it was overwhelming for the person. It takes a lot of work for that exact moment when a person is ready. So I always say like when that person says they're ready, you have to embrace it and jump all over it because that moment might be gone, right? Yeah. To the listeners, you know, I would say it's important to watch for that and when the person is ready, you got to jump on it right at that moment. Let me give you my own example. This is how I even got involved with adap. There was a guy coming to our church all of a sudden, his older brother was already there. He was the leader in the church. And I didn't know this guy's name was he starts joining my little small group and his brother calls me up one day and goes, so I need to warn you that my brother is an active crack addict and he basically stole money from the grocery store. He was assistant manager at, and he smoked his townhouse, and he's back living with our mom, has he brought up the fact that he has lost everything because he's an active crack addict in your small group. I go, no. And

adap Mike congregation cancer ACA John
"saito" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:38 min | 3 months ago

"saito" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"So South Asian, Southeast Asian. I mean, have you seen that kind of demographic, diversification, sadly, even as we see it in other places? Well, I have to say that our ability to serve a particular Asian population really depends on the staff. And our ability to have a bilingual staff makes the numbers go up or down for us. And so if anybody's out there and wants to move into the drug treatment world, give us a call, we'll teach you how to do it because we need different languages to serve these families. It'll usually start with the parents calling us first. And if they're monolingual and we can not communicate with them appropriately, it's very difficult to get the client or the person into recovery with us. But when we have a Vietnamese staff, we use that staff as the primary contact. And they have the ability to work with those families. So the more diverse we have, like for a while, we had Armenian counselor and she was impacting the Armenian population just her alone because she was the only counselor speaking in this community. And LA is so diverse. I mean, you have every language in the book, right? Right now we're working with this translator for a Mandarin speaking client that's trying to enter treatment. And sometimes it takes years to get a family to move on an individual that's having help. I talked to this one parent for ten years, client the person has been coming on and off of drugs. And they still not willing to enter treatment. But there must be an issue if she continuously follows up and calls, right? So it takes a lot of massaging to sometimes get an individual come in. Our staff will say right away that unless there's some kind of legal issue or there's some kind of health reason that's super urgent, the API clients will then eventually come into our programs. And so it takes a lot of work for us to bring those specific Asian populations into our program. No, if I'm hearing you correctly, dean, when you have staff leave so this person who speaks Vietnamese or someone who speaks tagalog or what have you, that directly impacts your ability to serve a diverse AAPI or just diverse population. Is that true? That's true. So do you have any kind of stipulation that before a death can leave who speaks one of those missing languages that they have to find a replacement? Yeah, I mean, we're constantly recruiting, you know, a lot of our staff are either from our programs or we've worked in a particular social group and we have contacts with those groups where they apply for our positions. So we're very tight in this Vietnamese community in the south bay. We've been in Cambodia town for quite some time. So we have a Cambodia speaking staff. We have several Korean speaking counselors because we're close to K town. But like you're in the San Gabriel valley, we rarely get Chinese speaking staff here. We've had a few and then they've moved on in the O three to four years and they've moved on and we haven't been able to replace some of them. So Mandarin is very important for us. Every time I see a Mandarin name come up in a resume, you know, and that's a very key language to have for us. Cantonese is another. You'll see families and parents with monolingual Cantonese speaking parents that come up. So yeah, it's still an issue. Even Japanese, we get first generation Japanese kids that parents that will call us and it's very helpful to have a Japanese speaking staff to speak to those parents. I mean, there's just so much more comfortable talking to somebody in their own language. It's just a little different. We have several to golic speaking staff, and so we're able to serve that community pretty good. John, let me ask you this question. You're part of the Japanese American community. You're very involved. You used to be the editor of the roughly shampoo newspaper. From my distant perch, it seems like the JA community has kind of moved past the whole substance abuse, but it's like, well, you know, that was maybe the 60s and said, maybe the 80s, but it's these other API groups. I don't know, that's just the sense I get. There doesn't seem to be anything close to the original urgency from 50 years ago. What are you seeing? Yeah. Well, I think because we're so spread out now that there's no concentration of our community that may have we could easily identify a problem like that. But the more I learn about adapting the more I learned that there's opioid crisis. There's math and all these drugs are real powerful and it takes longer to detox from it. It takes up to a year just to get clean. So if it affects somebody, yeah, it's a long-term issue as far as treatment. It's a problem. Now, speaking of long-term treatment, when I was there, that was also when they learned about this TC, the therapeutic community, which I ultimately learned was it had been kind of more popular in the 60s or 70s synanon and but then by the time I got there in the 90s, it was one of the only therapeutic community approaches. Tell people what the TC approach was in the beginning and how, if at all, it has evolved over time. And if it has evolved what? So like we talked about the beginning of the show how adap was about a self help program and we call it a social model basically. Where the individuals helped each other to get clean. And so we create a space and we create a structure where people self help each other to get clean and move forward and rebuild their self esteem. So that was adaps model from the beginning and we've been doing that ever since. And we still follow that same structure into our treatment program. Now, we're a change is where the ACA act came in. Otherwise you'll notice ObamaCare. That really shifted the way the funding was coming in for us. And the good thing about ObamaCare was that it made drug treatment a mandatory part of the healthcare system. It had to be in every healthcare system. They had to offer mental health and substance use treatment. So that was a really good thing. It combined all of that. However, the system has been evolving to make treatment more of a medical model. And so we build things on an individual service level. We have to have treatment approved by a medical director or a clinical staff to say that this person needs treatment. So the days that you were here, Ken is when we would say you're here, we tell you when you can leave. And how long you can be here. Absolutely. And it was like a 12 month to 18 month program. And people could stay if they felt they needed to help. Yeah. Now it's more it's approved, whether it's approved or not whether they can stay here longer or not. So that's one part of it. The other philosophy is that we are part of what's called the continuum of care. Okay? So if you look at treatment as part of a continuum of care, you may only need residential for two months or three months. Not necessarily our 6 months, 12 month treatment program, right? So we treat everyone more as an individual now, than how it is, right? Okay. So if some person might come in and

Cambodia golic San Gabriel valley south bay dean LA adap John ACA Ken
"saito" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

05:53 min | 3 months ago

"saito" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"We do HIV, aids outreach, and we have a great use and family programs. That's our impact on the community. And I don't think everyone's aware of that. So, yeah. That's part of the book was as part of why when we over go out here and talk to the community, that's what we want to share. I'm going to share those stories. Dovetailing off what you just said, John. Those services beyond drug treatment. I mean, it sounds like it's for people in the Crenshaw area. It's not limited to AAPI people. This question is to both of you with the original mission, the whole impetus that got adap going, what the drug overdoses among Japanese American Asian Americans, you know, that fateful summer, even when I was there, I would say 40 to 50% sometimes of the residents were not AAPI, explain how that evolution of audience has taken place and at the same time how you still are this unique agency, both in your origin and still with your emphasis that you don't want to lose that Asian part because there's not really too many other places where they can go. Yeah, that's a great question, Ken. I mean, we've had board discussions about this and with the staff. And we always identified itself as a multicultural organization. And our roots are our strength. And the name is consistent with our core values. And we've had discussions about our mission. is to be a service to everyone. But also we're looking at our branding, you know, the culture and spirit of family and ohana in what we do. So, you know, these are all discussions we've been having about how we can get ourselves out in the community. Yeah, at one point, we were thinking about changing our name completely, but when it came down to at the end of the discussion with the board and the managers, we felt that it was important to acknowledge that there is an Asian American drug abuse issue. And so we felt it was important to keep our name that way. And the opportunity to explain it to people. So no, we've been always, you know, we were housed, we got our original building here in the Crenshaw district. So our funding is in this catchment area, so you deal with the people that are in your service area. The Crenshaw district is an interesting area because it had a high volume with Japanese Americans living here after the war. They had came back to this area and there's a high African American group that lives here in Los Angeles in this Crenshaw corridor built. This community has been melding together for many years. So 8 app is just kind of, you know, our roots were right here in this community. Now, in the original funding and when we were interviewing some of the original folks with where they wanted adap, was I guess in high contention with everybody because there was pockets of API having issues all over. Some folks wanted us in the south bay. The west LA JCL folks wanted us on the west side. And then there was the Boyle heights, Japanese Americans had issues in that area. So there's always been a kind of a contention on where we're at and what we're serving in our ability to reach out into those pockets. So we do our best to do that. We're pretty close to the K town. It's right down the block. So we have several Korean speaking staff. We have some facilities set up in south bay, and we set up one facility in lobby where there's a Cambodian town. We have one office specifically in that area. So we do our best to try to reach out into the different Asian areas. Yeah, I used to laughingly tell my congregation that my first multi ethnic congregation was a date app. Right? It was like, yeah, there's this good sizable chunk of APIs, but then I got black, white, Hispanic, right? But the one thing that brought everybody to ground zero was their inability to do what their addiction to substances. Right. Right. And so I go, wow, that was interesting for me to even have to do I have to do kind of cultural translation of things that I don't really say at church. But I found that if I was grounded in just what basically people are struggling with, it's kind of universal language. Is it true that current congresswoman Judy Chu, also used to work for adap 'cause if I remember correctly, she has a doctorate in clinical psychology. And, you know, when I was on the board dean, I mean, she appeared at a number of our show times and another kind of stuff. And I think I remember it part of the reason not just because she's in Congress and these issues matter to her, but it's more basic than that. She actually used to work for adap. Am I remember that correctly? That's correct. She was a prevention employee for us where a short period of time. And she was educating the community about drug addiction. So that was very cool. We always share that when we can pitch that out. That she worked here at one time. Hopefully you've got a listening ear in Congress. To these kind of issues. I'm one of her constituents, so, you know, maybe I have a more of a direct line to her. Have you seen even within the diversifying of the API community over the decades? So when adap started, it was primarily Chinese and Japanese. I don't even remember going to school with Koreans. Back in the 60s and the 70s, yeah, when I was there, there was a lot more Koreans than even Chinese in Japanese in the program. But since then, I mean, you mentioned Cambodia town, okay? Have you guys as an agency as a board, have you seen some evidence of that coming in in other words, you know, the longer these different immigrant Asian communities are here, the more some of their young people and others get involved in substance abuse.

Crenshaw west LA south bay ohana HIV aids Ken adap Judy Chu John Los Angeles Congress Cambodia
"saito" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

05:32 min | 3 months ago

"saito" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"That made zero sense to me at the time. I'm like, what? Why would you want people to relapse, right? And as I was talking to some of the counselors, they would go, well, a lot of us are recovering addicts ourselves and so it's just always kind of way to stay humble. That you can get prideful and you can start to think, oh yeah, I'm X druggy, I'm on top of this, and relapse is just a bad choice in the errant thought away, right? And they said, but because we understand that we don't judge when people relapse and we say you can always come back, but you got to start the program, which was two years residential. You got to start it from zero. And the more I sat in the program and the more I hung out with the counselors and the residents, I started thinking, this is how the local Christian church should be, but it's not. I mean, you get like one chance you mess up and then you mess up again. It's like, well, you don't come here anymore. And I thought, okay, that's not enabling. That's not enabling addiction. But there's an empathic understanding of how hard this bad Liz, if you're willing to come back and understand there's consequences, which is you got to start over all the time you put in all the phases you used to successfully navigate it. Well, it's shoots and ladders. You're back here. Over the years that I was there, I saw several people come in and out and I saw 8 I put this into practice and I saw the difference it made in their lives. Yeah, so, you know, it's important because there's a lot of shame when it comes to coming back to a program. And sometimes it's so difficult for them they don't make it back. And so we kind of say both, like, you know, this might be your only chance to get clean. But that same time that if you do relapse, it is part of the process. And we want you to continue to stand up and come back. And so we try to make people feel as good as possible for when they need to come back. I mean, it's very hard to admit that you tried to quit and you couldn't do it. It's very humbling. There was this one Asian American young man that, I mean, I was so snooker dean and even though the counselors would tell me, like, hey, everyone here is really good at pulling the wool over your eyes. I'm like, no, no, I'm not that naive, right? And so when I was dating my Bible study and stuff, he was like my little chaplain. He was always there. He was in the passage. He would have me do stuff. Then he graduated, and then like 6 months later, he was back. And he had passed out like drunk. And I'm like, what happened? And he said, yeah, so after about 5 months, I started hanging out with my old crowd, and then they started offering me beers. And he says, I'll tell you one thing reverend fong. When you come back again and as you said, the not everybody does for different reasons. You're much more teachable than you were before. He goes, I didn't even realize how much I was lying to myself, how much I was blocking the program until I messed up this bad. And ended up in the hospital. And again, I think that's just kind of a life lesson for all human beings. That's right. Right. Sometimes if you are willing to pay attention or life forces you onto your back, maybe now you're going to be more teachable than you were before when you're standing up. Now, there is something called the model minority myth, which we have dealt with with various guests on my program, but I think the mono minority myth is at play, not just from non Asians putting it on us, like Asians don't have drug problems, Asians aren't alcoholics. But I think in the work of adap, there's a special inside modern minority problem that I would think is very frustrating to deal with. At least it was back in the 90s and the early 20s, you know, when I was, can either both of you speak to that. How was it back then? Has it improved or not today? So actually, you know, when you think about who started adap, those people were actually misfits and outcasts in Asians that weren't really accepted in the mainstream in the first place. And they were willing to put themselves out there to stand up and say, hey, you know, this thing doesn't just go after one creed or something like that. It goes after everybody. So that's kind of just how we got started. But for Asians and drug abuse, it's like to admit that with your mom or your dad, I mean, it's another level to admit that you have a problem that you can't stop. And so that is the biggest difficulty for us to overcome in the drug treatment world for APIs. The denial is to me is very strong in the API community to admit that you need help with this. And we have a lot of experiences with that here in media. Now, John, you're coming in now as a board member, but is this news to you? Is this shocking to you? Or no, I mean, I'm hearing more specifics now, but no, this is par for the course. Yeah, I've grown up in the Crenshaw area, my entire life. And I have to know what the adaps work. So I've had actually Friends growing up that went through the program. But I haven't really been intimately involved with data up until the past couple of years, and I think the one thing that I realize is that adapt just doesn't do drug treatment. It does all these other services in the community. And it's why we serve 20,000 people every year. We have employment

reverend fong Christian church Liz adap snooker John
"saito" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

05:55 min | 3 months ago

"saito" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"It began and how it's been serving the community, especially the AAPI community for the last half century, I think you'll want to go check this out. Dean, can you start us off? You and John work together on a nearly 90 page book that's going to be passed out at this gala. You both learned so much about the history and John, I know you're new to the organization, but dean, you've been part of this forever, but even you learned some stuff. So take us back. What were the conditions in the city of Los Angeles back before a dep again? So, you know, when I've explained this in the past, I used to say that adap started out of the civil rights movement. But with all these interviews that we did, it was so much more than that. And we were able to learn and hear from the specific people that were a part of that past. And so we actually put those stories in the book, and we also talk about it in our video. But there was the civil rights movement happening at the time, and there was many revolutionary people. There were many youngsters and Asians or Japanese kids that were overdosing in the Los Angeles area. And it was kind of hush hush news and it was not really well spoken about, but they found out that a lot of these deaths were being covered up by the coroner's office. Oh, really? With that, once they kind of started publicizing this death was from an overdose. The news kind of spread and people started to work on it. And so you had different people from the Asian community standing up and creating coalitions to try to make a difference. And they were kind of working in different factions in the mix of all that adap got started. Now, as one of those community organizations, the yellow brotherhood? Yeah, so there was many organization yellow brotherhood was one that was also doing services for kids at that time. They had their own house that they had were bringing in kids to try to give them an alternative lifestyle. There was the Japanese American committee services in little Tokyo services that was taking this head on Ron walka by ashi that was at the JCL was one of the ones who started to put the information out in the community. And then there was also folks from the Gardena that were standing up and trying to do some work as well. So John as someone new to the adap family, what were some things about the beginning of a depth that really also stood out to you in addition to what dean is just shared. Yeah, it was really interesting. We went way back and we looked at some of the roots of adap started even before this to a Japanese orphanage in the 19 tens. Wow, really? All right, yeah. It was called the shogun house, and it was an orphanage in the silver Lake area. And it was the predecessor to the jacks, the Japanese American community services. Jackson was formed in 19 around the 1960s and until then there was this orphanage before the war and after the war to help out these Japanese American orphans. John, how did Jack then evolve or lead to the starting of adap? Jack's, they were focused on 5 different services and dean helped me out if I remember all of them. It was housing, employment, food, education. In healthcare. Yeah. Okay. So that last piece, the healthcare, that seems to dovetail naturally with substance abuse problems. That's right. So they had a program called Asian joint communication and it was ex felons that were directly working with Asians that were coming out of the jails and institutions. But most of those guys were dope beans. They were hooked on drugs. And so they were servicing them out of the program. So later, when 8 app go out there 501c3 and they received their initial funding, AJC and adap joined together to create the residential drug treatment services. See, I'd never heard that part of the story. So what's key about that is the culture of adap because the staff that join adap was those folks that were working at jacks, the JCL office, the yellow brotherhood folks, were part of that Asian joint communication that became heat at. And so the culture and a lot of the things how we do things here at adap grew out of those folks. Those revolutionary minds about how we do things here today. And a lot of that you'll see it in our stories and how we still, we talk about ohana a lot and family. And how we've dealt with the court systems all those years, you'll see the blending of that in our history. Was this also the time when the motto people need people, got coined because that seems to grow right out of the ohana spirit. So yeah, so that people meet people actually the, what is it? The logo came from AJC, agent joint communication. So that person in the box was a person in prison. And they were reaching in to help the person out of prison. So that was the original concept. And then over time, we've developed it, it's been more about a person that's suffering an addiction. Yeah. But we use the concept people need people to do the services. So we believe in self help, people helping me each other, the community helping each other to get somebody clean. When I started there in 1991, volunteering every month, one of the other, it wasn't anywhere on stationary, but one of the sayings that I quickly was schooled in was relapse is part of recovery. And I got to

adap John dean AAPI Japanese American committee Ron walka Los Angeles shogun house Japanese American community se little Tokyo JCL Dean ashi Jack silver Lake Jackson ohana
"saito" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

01:45 min | 3 months ago

"saito" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"And John Saito is the John Sato junior junior is fine. Yeah, I mean, both of these guys are connected to a community agency serving the Asian American community and beyond located in Crenshaw where I volunteered for 20 years and I also served on the board where John is currently serving. I am so excited that this marks the 50th year of the existence of the Asian American drug abuse program. So first, let me just welcome dean U and John to our show. Hi, Kim. Hi, Ken. Glad to be here. Thank you. You're welcome. You're welcome. Hey, let's get this out of the way. There is a big shindig happening on September 17th, the social hour starts at 5 at the Westin bonaventure, one of the iconic downtown LA locations for anything important. You want to say any more details about what can happen there because I think there's still some room if people want to buy some tickets. Yep, we still got up about, I don't know, 50 to 80 tickets left. We already had over a 400 guests right now. It's going to be a terrific event. We're going to do a video on adap and we're going to show the history of adap created this nice 50th commemorative book. A lot of the people from our past are going to be there. It's going to be a reunion for us. But we're going to be sharing how you have got started. And I think it will be very interesting for folks to see how we've grown over the last 50 years. And for those of you who are thinking about going, but like, man, I don't want to dust off my suit and tie. Good news is it's Hawaiian, dress up a tire. If I can say that. No shorts. Or flip flops, not necessarily suit and tie. We call it island formal. That's what it is. Island formal. Very

John Saito John Sato dean U adap Westin bonaventure Crenshaw John Ken Kim LA
"saito" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

03:20 min | 3 months ago

"saito" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"And welcome to Asian America they can find podcasts where my mission has always been to spotlight Asian American culture makers and shapers by having them share the remarkable journeys and stories with us. As of 2022, I've proudly partnered with UCLA's Asian American study center, which will eventually archive all of my episodes so that future listeners will be able to access them. And of course, as always, I'm your host, Ken fong. Welcome to episode 386. I'm bringing two guests to you this week to mark the 50th anniversary of the Asian American drug abuse program, also known as adap, and to help promote their upcoming golden anniversary gala. More on that, in a moment. Dean nakanishi served as adaps administrative directors since 1997, and in August of 2021, the board chose him to be this legendary agency's CEO. Following former president and CEO Mike watanabe's retirement. I've known and worked with dean for years, and I'm not surprised one bit that he was chosen to take the baton from Mike. John Saito junior is one of the newer members of the edap board, joining in January 2021. He is a project manager for murakawa communications and prior to that served as a program director for the YMCA, and before that was the former editor and a writer for LA's Japanese American newspaper, the rafu shimpo. As mentioned earlier, adap will be celebrating its 50th anniversary on Saturday September 17th, 2022, with a dinner gala at the Westin bonaventure. This milestone event will celebrate the many decades of growth, services, and people that have brought adap to where it is today as one of the largest treatment and prevention providers in LA county. The galo include a dinner awards and a silent auction, and more than that, bring together old and new graduates, staff, and supporters for one of a kind reunion celebration. Attendees can look forward to a night of transformative stories and history telling that pay homage to the deep activist roots of the organization and the vision for the future ahead. The night's honorees will be Congress member Karen Bass, currently running for mayor of Los Angeles, the R tiny foundation, and Marlene Lee. This is a celebration that you won't want to miss. Join the hashtag adap ohana in commemorating 50 years of changing lives and saving families. If you've been listening to my podcast for a while, you should already know that my two decades with the diverse recovering drug addicts living in the TC in the Crenshaw district was where I grew the most as a spiritual person. For the last 9 of those years, I also was honored to serve on the adap board. So of course, when I was approached to do a special episode to mark this milestone, I agreed. I think you'll really enjoy hearing what dean and John have to say, seasoned here and there with some of my own recollections. Thanks so much for tuning into my podcast. A very warm end

adap Asian America Asian American study center Ken fong Asian American drug abuse prog Dean nakanishi Mike watanabe John Saito murakawa communications Westin bonaventure LA county UCLA dean YMCA R tiny foundation Marlene Lee Mike Karen Bass LA
Japan eases foreign tourism ban, allows guided package tours

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 6 months ago

Japan eases foreign tourism ban, allows guided package tours

"Japan's easing its borders for foreign tourists and now accepting Visa applications Tourism minister setsuo Saito says he expects the resumption of inbound tourism will help stimulate the local economy but we'll need to be balanced alongside anti COVID measures So far the borders only been eased for tourists on guided package tools who are willing to follow mask wearing and other antivirus measures as the country cautiously

Setsuo Saito Covid Japan
"saito" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

The Pomp Podcast

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"saito" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

"And it's going to lower that production costs and it's gonna limit That that cell pressure on the market and so. It's just kind of beautiful almost like it's. It's an engineer discovery. Almost i would say not. Even invention saito saito she discovered. Bitcoin is centralized monetary network that runs just on economic incentives. And nothing else. And it's you know when you when you dig into it. It's one of the most beautiful engineering machines ever. So when we go and we look at this chart around the liquid liquid supply. We've had Will i know you will are very close in almost daily from what i understand We've had him talking bunch about this illiquid supply and supply shocks the chart that you've got here around the liquid and ill-equipped supply. Explain kind of how you look at this. And what are you looking for in the chart as you look at it on a daily basis. Yeah so Most of this you know mostly starts covering like broad trends so this is a big one liquid liquid supply and so the total supply bitcoin. It's i think it's like eighteen point eight million But over time. What you see isn't increasingly. Large amount of bitcoin is becoming illiquid basically being locked away and not hitting the market again. Not free flow despite the issuance kind of increasing Will or the amount of bitcoin circulation increasing while while the issuance on a percentage basis is decreasing That free float of bitcoin available to the market continues to kinda chip away. Especially since microcosmic twenty. We've seen that liquid supply hockey stick upwards when you're looking at like in a ratio set so overtime what's the trend rate. There's manipulated cost capital global. Everybody more and more people are waking up to say..

saito saito Bitcoin bitcoin hockey
"saito" Discussed on Sincerely Fortune

Sincerely Fortune

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"saito" Discussed on Sincerely Fortune

"I and i think it's best if you never contact them again and then walk through my sponsor saito and it was just like the like i would go down the list and be like well. I did this to this person. She'd be like okay. Yeah we're gonna leave that personal loan on. Because i wanted this chance to be like redan like redeemed. I wanted this. It was really. She was right because it was all for me. I wanted a chance to be like look at me now. And it's like nobody wants to see that when you've ruined their lives like right they don't wanna see you better. They just want you go away. Happy married to here with respect. I feel you know. There's an mad. So i just had to leave people alone and that was way harder for may cause Making a policy. I was like oh. I got this i can make policy i can. I can really turn it on and like make myself charming and i think my sponsor saw that right away and was like no. We're not going to let her do this manipulative drug addict thing. Where she you know lets people know that. She's better now and sponsor yeah. Yeah she relies but man. I laugh on this podcast about uncomfortable. Things broken clock is right twice today. You know man well. At least she helped you. I'm sorry i'm not saying that. And then i was like now. It's funnier if i do the i mean. They made me laugh. Even though i felt really bad for her she probably find now. That's good i hope so. I hope she's okay. Did so was that the next like significant shift in your life getting sober. Is that when it feels like another lifetime right has now passed and was that the was that when you started doing comedy. Wouldn't you know i got. I got sober. And i continued to make really. I mean it did feel like a new lifetime getting sober..

saito
"saito" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

06:13 min | 1 year ago

"saito" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Everybody. The Crystal Saito show Congressman Ronnie Jackson, representing the 13th Congressional district in the Great State of Texas. He's a former White House position. And a rear admiral in the United States. Navy Congressman Welcome Back to Sell Saito show. Thank you, Chris. I appreciate you having me sir, before we get to the nitty gritty of the fallout from Afghanistan that we're still dealing with today. 130 admirals and generals have went on record saying that it is time for Lloyd Austin and Mr White Rage himself The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Mark Milley, to resign. Where are you on that, sir? Well, I find that letter. I'm one of those. So I'm a signature on that letter, and I agree. I think that it's time. I you know, I think that the State Department really messed this up. Pretty bad Secretary of State and the president's national security advisor. They They really drove this in the wrong direction, and they were driving the boat on there. They were calling the shots. They were running the military operation in the state Department, but that does not relieve Our senior officials in the Department of Defense for their responsibility, You know, for their part in this and you know, it's just it's common in the military and the lower ranks. Obviously, we've seen over the last few years that if you make it to the rank of about Four star You become secretary of defense or whatever. You're somewhat untouchable. You can do whatever you know, It doesn't matter what happens. You can grateful you leave your food post and go to work for some, You know, huge defense contractor make millions of dollars. And you know the defense contractors don't really care about. You know how well you did your job from an operational standpoint, whether or not you Accomplished. Your military missions right now they care about is how woke you are and that's all these guys care about. They're just falling all over themselves to see you can be the most work and in the process, they're ignoring what's going on in the world around them, And that's what led to this. So I think that just as a Navy captain were to run a ship aground and immediately be relieved, because ultimately that is your responsibility. And you, you hear you're accountable for that. Whether you were on the bridge of that ship or not, the same thing holds for these guys they have they have overseen the most disastrous military operation. That I have ever seen that most people have ever seen. It was. It was unbelievably poor plan. It was poorly executed, and it cost American lives, and it's resulted in American hostage just trapped. Inside of Afghanistan as we speak. These people need to be held accountable. They need to do the right thing. And they need to resign and walk away from this and let somebody else take the helm and let somebody else leave this. The worst, most humiliating defeat for the United States and foreign policy in the modern era. That is true. Now, let's let's get to Afghanistan. How many of your constituents did Biden leave behind? Well, I know seven for sure they were left behind and And I got some great news because I just found out literally about 20 minutes ago that four of those seven the woman and a woman and three Children, I had a team that was on the ground that actually snuck into Afghanistan and got them across the border last night. And they are now out of Afghanistan. I still had at least three that I know of their left behind the four that got out. Finally, I mean, they tried everything. They started in Kabul and they went to the gate. Every single day they hit the Taliban checkpoints The Taliban beat beat their son beat their uncle put a gun to the woman's had threatened to kill her. You know, they were on the phone with the State Department back in the State Department to help them figure out how to get past this state Department is basically just like Tell the Taliban your American citizens showing your passport. The Taliban said. I don't care who you are. I don't care what kind of passport you have. If you come back here again, I'll kill you and and that the four days in a row they went back there and try to get through. At one point they got through and they were 200 ft from the gate and they could not get the State Department to facilitate their entry into the airport. And then the American forces. Pull out it was the Taliban was going through Kabul and hunting. You know, American citizens trying to find out who all these people were. So they knew where they're at. You know, who knows what they were going to ultimately do with them. God helping Isis gets ahold of them because we know what they're going to do. They're gonna put him in orange jumpsuits to cut their head off. They fled Kabul and they went up north. My Marissa Sharif, the area north where it was started to be more likely they could get out. They got up there. There were planes up there. There were these humanitarian flights. This contract the humanitarian fight through on the ground. There were six planes on the ground and ranking member McCall from our from Foreign affairs, talked about this yesterday on Fox News Sunday, but there were six planes are on the ground. My four citizens were manifested on all six planes I notice for effect. We manifested them. The people that we're helping they were helping on the other side of the border. And as you can stand, we're helping Take care of all this. The volunteers, the people that used to being former state Department of Special Forces. People were working this whole thing. Yeah, they manifested them on all six flights, and every day they went to the airport every day. They were told that they couldn't leave the last time they were told. 30 minutes before they're supposed to board. The plane was there the crew was there was still that was ready to go. Apparently there were third. There were third party countries that were willing directing land and refuel. There's nothing stopping the planes and leading except for the Taliban. The Taliban would not let them leave. The Taliban told him to leave. I had reached out to the State Department. The State Department told me that they had no situational awareness of what was going on on the ground. But that The Taliban was refusing to let planes leave, and the reason they were giving was that they wanted their government established and fully set up before they authorized those trains to leave. So they are holding Americans hostage and you know what they're going to do. The next step they're going to do is they're going to say Okay, we got our government set up in completely organized Now you United States are going to recognize as informed, as is the formal government. We are not going to let your citizens leave. That's what's coming next. They are essentially hostages over there. Yes, Biden has overseen the biggest hostage situation has created the biggest hostage situation in American history. Congressman Ronnie Jackson is our guest right now, folks at the 13th congressional district here in the Great State of Texas before we move on, I just wanted to get your quick reaction. American taxpayers through Biden are Paying to secure the border between Tajikistan which you mentioned and and Afghanistan while our own southern border remains wide open..

Chris United States Kabul Ronnie Jackson Lloyd Austin 200 ft 130 admirals Mark Milley three six planes McCall Isis Marissa Sharif third Department of Defense yesterday Tajikistan White House last night four days
"saito" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"saito" Discussed on The Bio Report

"Spontaneous network activity neurons electrically discharging communicating with each other and producing spatial temporal patterns of activity. That really really resemble in vivo. Recordings is quite profound. If you're a neuroscientist you see one of these cultures for the first time How realistic they look and they just. They really are a step up from from the kind of electrical network activity. You can induce in a in a two dimensional culture but in addition in our activity. You replicate Quite a bit of the other sort of large obvious biological features such as gene expression. And i think quite profoundly to saito architecture of tissue so when you look at these under microscope These cultures they really resemble the emergence of what you see when you when you when you watch embryonic emergence of tissue the neurons order they layer. They form They farm kind of classical for in the case of cortex article structures that you expect to see in a developing brain. Walk me through the platform. What's the process. How do you take a sample run experiments. And end up with actionable data at the other end so everything starts with With a patient sample in our case this is again blood or Blasts from skin biopsy mostly were. Were starting with patient blood. It's easier to to get We reprogram those following on a fairly standardized protocol to generate induced pluripotent stem cells. Ipsec's and then there's a sequence of culture steps to go for my pc's To organize to these Growing brain cultures and once we have The brain cultures We then Subject them to a battery of biological assays to read out fina typic- data the cultures. And this is before You know doing anything With regard to discovering drugs we are developing a model of disease so we profile The all of the funeral typic- characteristics of organs that come from patients with genetic background of disease and we compare that to healthy controls. Once we've built up that multifaceted profile which we call a deep phenotype we then have A set of biological criteria to screen Therapeutics against and. Then we start it starts. The process starts resemble of things from from the current mainstay of drug discovery. High throughput screening. For example We will generally extract some aspects of the deep phenotype into something. That's scalable called primary ailments screen against that And then follow up when we have a set of therapeutic.

saito
"saito" Discussed on Horror Soup

Horror Soup

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"saito" Discussed on Horror Soup

"Imdb it'll say thirty three and there's like nine off screen or something like that so that would also imply or i think it's thirty four or maybe did say thirty three now but i think it's thirty. No no okay okay. I think it's at thirty three but then it said nine offscreen so that would imply that there's twenty four kills and then nine weren't seen but i counted twenty three that i saw i am i am one hundred percent like i. I guess at least ninety nine percent. But dude i am a hundred percent positive my mind right now that i got this outright unless you know maybe the ejecta saito was wrong. So maybe that's a different person. So maybe maybe that's what they're counting so maybe that is different. And if so maybe it's twenty four but i'm not i don't even know what the offscreen kills would be or what they're talking about because i don't fucking know what we're nine offscreen calls don't know 'cause i could maybe name like one or two because i- i specifically didn't count a couple that were offscreen but like but there were a few offscreen kills that i did count like the girlfriend. You know disappearing and going back like that's definitely a kill the tattooed girlfriend that they that's a kill for sure even though it's offscreen but besides that like i don't know what else there was. Maybe the i don't know. I definitely gonna name nine now by name. A couple but Yeah those are the kills. There was a lot of boobs. So i don't have a boob cow because it was just pretty much all the all. The girls are naked with tits out. So i mean and then there is a dick. We didn't see all one hundred masturbating but we did see do you know what's so fucking weird. When i i watched the movie. I could've sworn when the hundred masturbating that you could see it. I thought so too the first or the first two or no actually. I only watched as once before..

saito
Maxine Bdat's Denim Odyssey

American Fashion Podcast

03:14 min | 1 year ago

Maxine Bdat's Denim Odyssey

"Maxine. Beta welcome to american fashion. Podcast for having well thanks Let's start with zedi what is ad. And where did the idea for that. Come from so Xavi was a fashion company and we got started in Which is no longer. I should probably make that housing shutdowns eighty to start the new standard institute. Which is the organization. I run now. I can kind of just walk through that. Trajectory also explains the the book but basically zedi was. It was meant to be at the outset. Kind of the whole foods of fashion. It was supposed to be before hosted by amazon. Of course it was supposed to tell the story behind. Beautiful product in. What ended up happening is as we tried to tell the story behind beautiful product which is why like you. I was asking a trade shows where the product team from I quickly realized the quickly realized on eighty team that there wasn't a company that we could turn to that really knew its entire supply chain And so that then adds eighty led us to start down this path of creating our own products our own garments and we went on to the actual supply chain and understood what it meant to farm what it meant to ranch what it meant to die to spin to we to cut into so And through that process at eighty we would put out these kind of vary like hid pick super user friendly diagrams about the impact of the industry. And we would get brands much much larger than ours reaching out to say like thank you so much. This information is so helpful for me in my tea. Not that saito's like what you don't you don't know this stuff And it shouldn't like now of course. In retrospect they shouldn't have been surprised. But i wasn't the time and what i really realized is If i really wanted to make an impact in the industry it wasn't going to be through the creation of more clothing as low as much as we were working to reduce the impact on. If i really wanted to create impact it was gonna be through clear information and education And really bringing the scientists that i was getting to engage with on bring bring them kind of front and center in the conversation because you know up until very recently And i would still argue today. That sustainability has really been a conversation led by brands. And so that's meant something very specific and hasn't necessarily meant You know he been in line with planetary boundaries in which people are parody fit fairly

Xavi Maxine Amazon Saito
"saito" Discussed on The Manic Pixie Weirdo

The Manic Pixie Weirdo

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"saito" Discussed on The Manic Pixie Weirdo

"Is a new indie podcast. It's a new. Were independent podcast. Excuse me reached out over Reached out over the instagram's newer. It's a it's it's a newer podcast. It's fine it's actually really interesting Some roads are kind of sporadic manic. And you know. We love the manic Over here at our manic pixie weirdo podcast So shout out to they sam blunt. Podcast what is they do. They highlight entertainment sports music and all the other things Links in the description follow on the instruments on all the other social. Media's do that check that out obviously. I have to shot up my girl. So von miller and saw little lerin saito's.

von miller instagram sam blunt saito
Tornadoes Cause Damage in Mississippi; Tupelo Hit at Night

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Tornadoes Cause Damage in Mississippi; Tupelo Hit at Night

"Multiple tornadoes cause damage across Mississippi Sunday destroying homes and uprooting trees and meteorologists say the region is in store for more severe weather tornadoes up behind significant damage in Pontotoc county gallon city and tupelo where residents have gone Wilford told WTVA he was home at the time mmhm Saito's into NATO give a con to that date they all I heard was wooded tomato siren going off and in that day I did who who who would man I doubt her bone bone bone bone figures of elves brand new home was lifted off its foundation and destroyed National Weather Service meteorologist Mike Edmonds did in Mississippi says they probably had more tornado damage than they anticipated and teams are out assessing me mom more severe weather is forecast we're looking for another potent upper level disturbance to move across the area I'm Julie Walker

Pontotoc County Gallon City Wtva Mmhm Saito Mississippi Wilford Tupelo Mike Edmonds Nato National Weather Service Julie Walker
The Bakery AI Being Used For Cancer Research

Kottke Ride Home

07:25 min | 1 year ago

The Bakery AI Being Used For Cancer Research

"There's a bakery chain in japan that offers dozens of different kinds of pastries danishes. Donuts croissants sandwiches you go down a cafeteria style line. Pick what you want. Put it on a tray and when you get to the register to pain you put your tray on top of a backlit rectangle screen shows an injury of your train with bright green lines around each item it recognizes each item from among the dozens of pastries on offer at the bakery and then correctly charges. You how does it do that. You'd imagine some kind of relatively recent developments in deep learning neural networks. But in fact it's a more grown technology that got its start. In two thousand seven led by a man named hisashi kombi the new yorker recently profiled combine work with the bakery and how the technology he developed is now being deployed in many other sectors including cancer research. So let's start with the bread problem. Japanese consumers like lots of options and bread is no exception market. Research in japan showed that a bakery that offered a hundred different options sold twice as much as a bakery that offered only thirty and that unwrapped baked goods sold better because people perceived them as fresh but without the wrapping. You don't have labels or barcodes on the pastries so then you've got employees who have to memorize hundred different pastries and this slowdown lines. Because workers would often mix things up or have to take time remembering which peachtree was which not to mention. They handled each unwrapped pastry individually. So it wasn't exactly the most sanitary so this chain wanted to automate the process somehow and they turned to comedies company. Brain to help them out. Rain had already been working for twenty years on finding ways for computers to see something that was long one of the biggest challenges of artificial intelligence. The new yorker explains it really. Well quote as i write. This can look up at my shelves. They contain books and skin of yarn and a tangled cable. All inside a cabinet whose glass enclosure is reflecting leaves in the trees outside my window. I can't help. But parse the scene about a third of the neurons and my cerebral cortex are implicated in processing visual information but to a computer. It's a mess of color and brightness in shadow. A computer has never untangled. A cable doesn't get that glasses. Reflective doesn't know that trees sway in the wind. Ai researchers used to think that without some kind of model of how the world works in that was in it. A computer might never be able to distinguish the parts of complex scenes. The field of computer vision was zoo of algorithms that may do in the meantime and quotes over the last decade this has changed as deep learning and neural networks have been applied and tweaked in real world scenarios. Siri google translate and alpha. Go all rely on deep learning with layers of simulated neurons and their honed by things like tagging people in photos on social media and picking out street lights in those prove. You're not a robot tests on website forms but especially without that kind of passively crowd sourced assistance quoting again. The drawback of deep learning is that it requires large amounts of specialized data the deep learning system for recognizing faces might have to be trained on tens of thousands of portraits. And it won't recognize address unless it's also been shown. Thousands of dresses deep learning researchers therefore have learned to collect labeled data on an industrial scale and quotes and for brain the bakery chain not only with the frequency with which the bakery chain changed their offerings. Make such data required for learning. The new pastries be untenable. They were also several years too early to even consider using deep learning so they built their own system using lots and lots of algorithms by two thousand ten. They built a system with ninety nine percent. Accuracy across fifty types of bread tackling problems like different pastries that look remarkably similar and the same pastries that look different when one is baked. More or one got squished. As developing the back light the pastries have to be placed on to keep the lighting consistent even though they did have to also build a mathematical model to account for inconsistencies in color when it comes to bake times rather than showing assistant thousands of photos of each pastry as one would with a deep learning system they manually tweaked and honed the algorithms on each doughnut and danish until they got it right but their system learns to win. The system isn't sure instead of those green lines around each item. It shows yellow or red lines and prompts the user to select from some suggestions or manually input the product quoting again show bakery scan a pastry never seen on earth and it'll recognize the next one of its kind about forty percent of the time according to brain after just five examples it is ninety percent accurate and after twenty. It's nearly perfect. Moreover whereas deep learning systems are relatively inscrutable. You can't look at a neural network and say exactly why a decision emerged from it bakery scans judgments based as they are on hand engineered system or more particularly if the system. Miss identifies something. You can figure out why these days. It's unusual to develop in the way that brain developed bakery scan. The approach requires a mastery of fine details. It is in spirit artisanal. It takes years during which parameters must be tuned. Special cases accounted for deep learning relieves. You from having to understand how the seasons affect shadows in a donut hole you merely plug enough examples and the network figures it out and with deep learning. The same brain can accomplish different tasks when you feel different. Data deep mind. The alphabet subsidiary used data sets to train a single neural network to beat humans at chess shoghi and go systems that depend on domain specific knowledge as bakery scandal need not just new data but new filters new features in new algorithms before they can be used elsewhere and quotes nonetheless. The technology behind bakery scan now housed under the umbrella. Name of ai scan has gone on to be used in applications as far flung as distinguishing pills in hospitals to counting the number of people in eighteenth century woodblock prints and even spotting incorrectly wired bolts in jet engine parts but the most impressive application came in two thousand seventeen when quoting again. Dr louis pasteur's center for medical research in kyoto saw a television segment about bakery scan. He realized that cancer cells under a microscope looked kind of like bread and quotes. I love that observation but he was right. Ai scan has now been working for a few years on fine tuning their cancer cell detector. Saito a scan now. Being tested at two hospitals is able to look at an entire microscope slide and identify potentially cancerous cells with ninety nine percent accuracy based on features like the color tone size and texture of the nucleus and all round -ness of the cell as they continue to grow and build on their original system. Brain has had to bring in deep learning once recently when covid nineteen pushed bakery owners to start wrapping their pastries and individual packaging. Brain used a deep learning to help their bakery scan system still be able to identify the pastries behind the reflective plastic

Hisashi Kombi Japan The New Yorker Cancer Cabinet Google Dr Louis Pasteur Center For Medical Research Chess Kyoto Saito
Atlantic Ocean circulation weakens, sparking climate worries

WBZ Morning News

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Atlantic Ocean circulation weakens, sparking climate worries

"Change underway in the Atlantic Ocean circulation pattern. War from reporter Really in cough. Scientists in Europe say the system of currents in the Atlantic Ocean is in its weakest state in over a millennium. Those currents include the Gulf Stream, which carries warm water to Europe, helping to moderate the climate there. Climate change is making the ocean's water less salty, which makes currents more sluggish, also threatened rising sea levels along the eastern Seaboard of the United States. Saito seven. Now

Atlantic Ocean Europe Cough Gulf Stream Saito United States
Bitcoin Investing Is ESG Investing

The Breakdown with NLW

04:21 min | 1 year ago

Bitcoin Investing Is ESG Investing

"Today we are talking about wipe bitcoin investing is e s g. Investing before i start i want to give their two sources of inspiration for this particular podcast. The first is kind of general. When we start new bull market cycles there is inevitably a new wave of fear uncertainty and doubt. That happens the cynical side of this. Is that people who have been against bitcoin and crypto for perpetuity are re upping and doubling down on their entrenched transpositions because otherwise. They look stupid for having missed it. Visit absolutely a thing. I've mentioned in a number of times. But the non cynical take which is much more important i think is that there are by definition a lot of new people discovering bitcoin. The price rises. It's not at all dismissive of all bitcoins. Nonfinancial properties to recognize that number go up is just about the best marketing to get people to pay attention. Certainly i believe saito. She recognized this. So if we take it from that angle. We have to assume that every new cycle brings new people. Many of whom will naturally have been scepticisms reservations that they want to address. That's a good faith conversation. And i'm here for it. So that's the general context. The more specific inspiration is a set of tweets from row. Paul this morning. He wrote bitcoin twitter. A bit of help needed. It appears that bitcoin is not yes g. Friendly is the narrative that i think was started at the c. Be to slow institutional adoption and is now spreading to the media. I have a few institutional asset allocation committees reach out for clarification as they are concerned with espn mandates versus their desire to own bitcoin. I want to set them at ease that this is a false narrative. I know a few of you have looked at this. But is there a definitive article on the true cost relative. Cost outside of the cost is very low to secure the blockchain which doesn't really help the institutions. I'm sure someone has done some great deeper analysis. Can you point me in the right direction to something that uses factual data references and analysis etc. Something that will work for these institutions. As i've got an inbox full now i've been thinking about this topic basically forever so i figured why not do the show last thing to note before we start is that i am not actually a bitcoin person coming to. Es g environmental social and governance in many ways. I'm an ese person. That came to bitcoin in college. I started a series of programs to help students learn how to make an effective impact abroad. Reason just make an impact that made them feel good. That ended up leading me to think. About systems of impact in general and notice that charity and philanthropy while often very necessary tend to be the cleanup of extra analyses of whatever the dominant economic power system is is started to think why not focus that on changing the system that creates the extra analyses in the first place that got me to start working with a company called change dot org when it was just five people and i was entirely focused on this emerging area of social entrepreneurship. Dublin triple bottom line. Investing basically things that would become. Es g later on. When i was first introduced to bitcoin it was actually exclusively in the context of a payment system. A competitor ironically to square and in fact wasn't until i stopped thinking about it like that and instead started thinking about it as a tool for sovereign empowerment of communities that it really clicked for me. All of this is not to say that. I'm some big. Espn expert but simply to make it clear that this isn't a topic. I've come to recently in some big desire to justify bitcoin with that said of course feel free to disagree as you will but now let's discuss why bitcoin investing is. Es g investing to do so. I want to go through each of these initials the s. and the g in that order. I do think before we do that. However that we have to address the most commonly repeated critique of bitcoin which is that it's used for drugs terrorism financing and crimes of all types for someone who is in. Es in believes this to be the case perhaps because it keeps being repeated by folks like janet yellen. It's going to get hard to get past this. So let's first address it head on. I have two key arguments on this front. The first is that. Us dollars are used in far more crime than bitcoin. And that doesn't make us want to reject us dollars. And the second is that. We actually know far more about bitcoin dan. Us dollars and the evidence shows clearly that not only are illicit transactions at minimum amount. They are declining.

Bitcoin Saito Espn Twitter Paul Dublin Janet Yellen United States
Tesla Buys $1.5 Billion in Bitcoin

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:45 min | 1 year ago

Tesla Buys $1.5 Billion in Bitcoin

"I i figured we would mention what seems to be taking over the internet. As far as fans of crypto currency anyway and that is that tesla has purchased one point. Five billion dollars worth of bitcoin and plans to accept bitcoin for its products. And this is bitcoin legs. -i it this says. Btc specifically this is from bitcoin dot com. And that's it says plans to accept. Btc for products. I would have to imagine at some point. He will expand that. But i think i would guess for something like a tesla vehicle that you know the amount you're gonna pay for one of those makes things like the The fees sort of it. Oh okay that's reasonable. If you're going to spend forty thousand on up on a vehicle you know the network fee the transaction fees. You know as high as they get. Sometimes when bill clinton's flying it what is it today. Forty thousand dollars thirty eight. I think it went up to forty four thousand dollars today setting a new record high bounce. It came back down. It was at thirty eight now. It's i think it's back up around. Forty three forty fives has spent. I think forty three most of the day which of course means that the transaction fees are higher. It's gonna cost you more than network is busier now because you more but i would imagine buying something like a tesla vehicle a little bit of extra fee for that type of a purchase. Is it gonna make much of a difference to somebody in that market. But i don't know. I mean play things for the rich. Don't hurt but i don't think it was saito she's primary

Tesla Bitcoin Bill Clinton Saito
"saito" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"saito" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"How about that eye looks look atyou. Thank you very much for finding that midnight plane to Houston, where he says l the word is actually this stupid. The wording is, uh L A proved too much for the girl. The girl? Yes. L A proved too much for the girl. Yeah, Jim woman wouldn't make the meter. Right? Right. Exactly. That's right. That's right. Krystle. Saito's coming up writing? Yes. That's a great riding The Friday shows coming up with South Saito to Speaking of heavyweight. What do you got today, man? Yeah. Put a put a little Found here in there. Look, I I Was watching a report yesterday. Maybe you guys know about this or you don't. Uh, catch and release is back. At the border, then what? Like, But it's the right thing ever. I don't thank you. Barb was and I'd encourage marvelous too. Yes. Try the veal. Um no. It it is catching release of the border illegal aliens because The Trump Administration is no longer with us. Illegal aliens are now being released back into the country after they're stopped at the border. And they're being given a slip to appear. And we'll see up now. Yep. They're a couple of issues with this, Um Number one Those We've been down this road before. We know where this all leads Number two. We're in the middle of a pandemic. And those individuals who were coming in or not being screened? No, unless they show symptoms now, if if, if you happen to be asymptomatic And you're coming across that border and you're not being straight. But you're carrying the China virus. I'm just curious to all of the folks. Who have been in the press have been hyperventilating about the China virus. Why this isn't more of a concern to them. Maybe it should be well getting to coming up. All right, Chris South Saito's coming.

Chris South Saito China Houston asymptomatic Jim Barb
"saito" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"saito" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Nicole have the news. Brad's weekend forecast Steve Lab Sports and Money. Good traffic on the ones Brian and held tomorrow morning at five. Or W B, a. P and North Texas Mother Nature is full of surprises and our homes. Take a beating here around save herself Attendant time with one company that can knock out your entire home improvement punch list. New spray Everybody. It's Crystal Saito. New spray is always on time, and they're available. No matter what our weather brings, even during storms, and all the work they do was on the outside of your house. New spray will inspect and replace reciting and then seal it forever with their exclusive. Never paint your home again. Cool wall paint needed. New roof for insulation. How about the most durable, secure energy official windows on the market? They do that to get spring ready and ask about their burglars, patio covers and sun rooms. They will help you with an array of custom configurations, colors and surfaces that are available, asked for the jump start to spring offer and take 15% off any new spray service. Through February 28th Tell him Crystal Saito sentia 877 new spray 877639777 to 877639 77 72 or go to new spray dot com. Smelly water Scalea water that builds up in your faucets and shower head. Well, not anymore. Hi, I'm Brad Barton. And we're now part of the nation's pure family, and we just love it. Every drop of water in our home now passes through a chlorine filter and a sentiment filter and we now have bottled water purity right of the kitchen, sink, cleaner dishes and laundry with less soap. To couldn't be better Nations Piers helped thousands of Texas homeowners get rid of the smell on the scale of water from any water source, including any well and.

"saito" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"saito" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"This is this is the Crystal Saito Show on W B. A P. I never said that. The AP reported that this morning. Mm. You mean, the news Department reported this morning? Yes, sir. The only the only the only thing I can confirm to you. I don't know that it's an outright lie or not. I don't know whether it's a lie or not. I say that they suspect and I have seen the reporting on this. It is suspected that a fire extinguisher hit that Capitol police officer in the head, though it has not been confirmed because they Because an investigation has not been conducted yet. Well, how about other? How about other things that we can do for you As an example on your station? We were talking about the Viking man and that you say you have a source that says you're not Antifa. He's a trump supporter. I have a source who I trust who was on the ground who has had interactions with this individual not on Lee in the nation's capital. But also in Arizona, where he originated. And has been has been with him for months and can and can attest that the man at least with the Viking hat, this person who I trust said to me that he is not antifa. When the Liberals were going after Trump over the phone call. And they said they had a source they had a source. Your station, including you said If you have a source, then you need to sell it. So why won't you tell the Americans? You're not going to know the name? You're not gonna know the name. And you know, and you know what? Again their own research. I beg your pardon? So you're saying the American people cannot do their own research? No, I mean, all I know is I know somebody who knows this guy personally. That's all. That's all I'm saying to you and and they testified to me that he's not antifa Now. Could that person be wrong? Could a Viking man have put one over on my friend? Absolutely. Absolutely all I'm telling you is what I know Del. I'm not telling you what? I don't I don't talk to you about what I can. What? I can't prove all I'm telling you is what happened as straightforwardly and forthrightly as I possibly can. That's all. Telephone numbers 800 to 80 w B A P, and that's the honest truth. That's the honest truth. And I also said Deli, maybe you missed it. But if somebody comes up with proof that this guy is antifa, I'll put that out, too. See, we don't suppress the truth on the Crystal Saito show back in a minute news talking 20 w B a page..

Trump Lee Crystal Saito AP news Department Arizona officer Deli
"saito" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"saito" Discussed on WTOP

"Saito eight. Get a $59 precision furnace tuna by calling 809 48 Mike traffic and weather on the H two Jo Conway in the traffic center. John will start off in Maryland, where they were out with the crash on to 95 North bound north of Route 100. The rollover crash was reported along the right side. You're under police direction there lots of fire and rescue water to check things out. It's a bit of a distraction in this light volume. New Year's morning we were able to get by under police direction South bend not affected and not even slowing to look driving elsewhere in Maryland. No reports of any problems on the capital Beltway. You're to 70 quarter or good at last report. Same goes for 95, as well as route 50, Maryland good between the Bay Bridge in the capital Beltway. Virginia side Nothing complicated on 95 or 3 95 the EZ Pass things remain south down all day. Today, the turnaround they are scheduling for tomorrow afternoon. I 66 complication free inside and outside the capital Beltway. Currently same goes for the Beltway itself. Better face Candy Parkway had reported the oven. A medical emergency. It was north and your poetic road district. The earlier problem was reported as a disabled vehicle. 6 25 East. After the 3 95 Tunnel exit, and it was along the right starting January 4th tune in weekdays to meet the new Congress. Mitchell Miller, W. Tapie's Capitol Hill correspondent, Will you profiling new members Meet the new Congress is sponsored by the American Bankers Association. I'm Jo Conway. Wtp traffic, not a storm Team four meteorologist Matt Ritter, cloudy and chilly today, with some light rain arriving around mid day, but it's going to start off with some sleeping some freezing rain in the far Western and northern suburbs, especially out towards the mountains..

Maryland Jo Conway Congress Saito Matt Ritter Candy Parkway Bay Bridge Mitchell Miller John American Bankers Association Virginia W. Tapie
Sherwin Williams Fires Tik-Tok Sensation, Painting a Cautionary Tale

Business Wars Daily

04:28 min | 2 years ago

Sherwin Williams Fires Tik-Tok Sensation, Painting a Cautionary Tale

"Listen up. It's a great lesson for any business leader or marketer and a whole lot of schadenfreude of fun. well sherwin williams america's biggest paint company. Just got its comeuppance from a tiny florida rival and tiktok loving college kid and embarrassing. Faux pas by sherwin williams is the very example of a culture clash between behind the times corporate america and gen z creativity. Now perhaps like millions of us stuck at home. You've been on a painting. Bench come on admitted. Maybe you've even seen tony. Pilo pilarcitos tiktok channel tone. Stir paints until. Recently the ohio university business student worked at an athens. Ohio sherwin williams store a job loved in fact he so excited about paint that he started a tiktok channel on which he simply mixes paint typically with hip hop music playing in the background watching pillow saito. Mix paint whether it's a gray for sherwin williams shopper or the viral video in which he tints paint by mixing in real. Blueberries has proven to be oddly mesmerizing and incredibly popular. The paint mixing artists has more than one point. Two million tiktok followers. His short videos routinely receive half a million likes even more in fact it took pilarcitos tone stir paints virtually no time to go viral. According to buzzfeed the sixth video asano ever posted got more than a million views. So pilo saint did what any enterprising college senior might do. He whipped up a presentation for sherwin williams marketing department with such a huge following. Figured he could show the eighteen billion dollar company a thing or two about using tiktok to attract younger gen z shoppers. Alas his plan backfired for a while. Anyway rather than using enthusiasm about the million plus followers sherwin williams could have for free. The company fired him according to peel asano. The student told his story. On where else tiktok. He says sherwin williams marketing department. I ignored him but later they called the loss prevention department. Which accused peeler say no of stealing paint and making the videos on company time. He admitted to making some videos. While on the job at says he purchased the paint. He used no matter. Sherwin williams accused him of gross misconduct including quote seriously embarrassing. The company or its products at age reported one could easily argue that sherwin williams has its marketing covered and doesn't need any rogue creatives on its payroll. The paint giant suffered a bit during the early pandemic lockdowns but since then has surged with home sales renovations and diy decorating projects on the upswing. We all seem to be buying paint along with flour booze and toilet paper the today show points out. That's pushed sherwin williams sales up about five percent. The companies also persuading more and more customers to purchase premium paints as a result profits soared twenty one percent in the third quarter according to the motley fool. But this sort of publicity. Well that's not something. Any company would want news appeal. Santos firing elicited disdain on social media on twitter. One observer said some not so nice things about the presumed age of the marketing department. Staffers hello baby boomers and added that they quote missed out on a cutting edge marketing campaign for your products. That's why bear painting. Kelly moore paint or going to outsell. Y'all close quote an industry publication at age quoted. Pr executive andrew cross of agency walker sands cross said sherwin williams sent a signal as loud as it was unintentional that employees. Who do what they're told or more valuable than employees who think outside the box out cross added that the company had quote stifled ingenuity sherwin. Williams are the biggest beneficiaries of the outrage. And they were quick to take advantage of an opportunity. Lost pilo says he received job offers from bear. Benjamin moore and other major paint brands but he chose a role with regional chain. Florida paints the ohio university senior plans to finish studies online provided. He's not too busy. Establishing what will be his very own custom line of paint colors. Oh and keeping that tiktok channel up featuring colors only from florida paints saint story is now a marketing. Fabled should be repeated in entrepreneurship classes at business schools everywhere and perhaps quickly forgotten on purpose the boardroom sherwin williams

Sherwin Williams Tiktok Pilo Pilarcitos Pilo Peel Asano Ohio University America Saito Athens Tony Peeler Florida Ohio Andrew Cross Walker Sands Cross Kelly Moore
In Marketing Misstep, Sherwin Williams Fires TikTok Paint Sensation

Business Wars Daily

04:21 min | 2 years ago

In Marketing Misstep, Sherwin Williams Fires TikTok Paint Sensation

"Well sherwin williams america's biggest paint company. Just got its comeuppance from a tiny florida rival and tiktok loving college kid and embarrassing. Faux pas by sherwin williams is very example of a culture clash between behind the times corporate america and gen z creativity. Now perhaps like millions of us stuck at home. You've been on a painting bench. Come on admitted. Maybe you've even seen tony pilarcitos. Tiktok channel tone stir paints until recently the ohio university business student worked at an athens. Ohio sherwin williams store a job. He loved in fact he so excited about paint that he started a tiktok channel on which he simply mixes paint typically with hip hop music playing in the background watching pilo saito. Mix paint whether it's a custom gray for sherwin williams shopper or the viral video in which he tents paint by mixing in real. Blueberries has proven to be oddly mesmerizing and incredibly popular. The paint mixing artist has more than one point. Two million tick tock followers. His short videos routinely receive half a million likes or even more. In fact it took pilarcitos knows. Tone stir paints virtually no time to go viral. According to buzzfeed the sixth video peterson ever posted got more than a million views. So pilo oh did what any enterprise in college senior might do. He whipped up a presentation for sherwin williams marketing department with such a huge following. Figured he could show the eighteen billion dollar company. A thing or two about using tiktok to attract younger jen's e shoppers alas. His plan backfired for a while. Anyway rather than using enthusiasm about the million plus followers sherwin williams could have for free. The company fired him according to peel asano. The student told his story. On where else tiktok. He says sherwin williams marketing department. I ignored him but later they call the loss prevention department which accused lozano of stealing paint and making the videos on company time. He admitted to making some videos while on the job but says he purchased the paint. He used no matter. Sherwin williams accused him of gross misconduct including quote seriously embarrassing the company or its products at age reported One could easily argue that sherwin. Williams has its marketing covered and doesn't need any rogue creatives on its payroll. The paint giant suffered a bit during the early pandemic lockdowns but since then has surged with home sales renovations and diy decorating projects on the upswing. We all seem to be buying paint along with flour booze and toilet paper the today show points out. That's pushed sherwin williams sales up about five percent. The companies also persuading more and more customers to purchase premium paints as a result profits soared twenty one percent in the third quarter according to the motley fool. But this sort of publicity. Well that's not something. Any company would want news. Appeal san hose firing elicited disdain on social media on twitter. One observer said some not so nice things about the presumed age of the marketing department. Staffers hello baby boomers and added that they quote missed out on cutting edge marketing campaign for your products. That's why bear painting. Kelly moore paint or going to outsell. Y'all close quote and industry publication adage pr executive andrew cross of agency walker sands cross said sherwin williams sent a signal as loud as it was unintentional that employees. Who do what they're told or more valuable than employees who think outside the box out cross added that the company had quote stifled ingenuity sherwin. Williams rivals are the biggest beneficiaries of the outrage. And they were quick to take advantage of an opportunity. Lost piano says he received job offers from bear. Benjamin moore and other major paint brands but he chose a role with regional chain. Florida paints the ohio university senior plans to finish his studies online provided he's not too busy. Establishing what will be his very own custom line of paint colors. Oh and uh keeping that tiktok channel up featuring colors only from florida paints. Saint story is now a marketing fables. Sure to be repeated in entrepreneurship classes at business schools everywhere and perhaps quickly forgotten on purpose in the boardroom and sherwin williams

Sherwin Williams Tony Pilarcitos Tiktok Pilo Saito Peel Asano Ohio University Athens Sherwin Lozano Peterson Florida Ohio JEN America Andrew Cross
Exciting Prospects on show as Jumps Racing really starts!

The Final Furlong Podcast

02:14 min | 2 years ago

Exciting Prospects on show as Jumps Racing really starts!

"Pencil full of lead so there would have been arguing that the potato race was the race of cheltenham but latest exhibition gets beaten I'm very biased. Here i love this source and Therefore i need to get your unbiased opinion on him. I will just say this before you start off. He jumped impeccably. Know that my say say i totally agree that yeah definitely teach face confidence for this. Wholesomeness performance He finished the ground. Didn't they eat junk so much. Snicker down we in his chasing debut. Galway which he wants a clearly. He's improved again here and he saito the way to the line and he was always going to make off into shape as so fall proved to be the case in. Rachel always looks so much. More comfortable bar included relates exhibition. She had a hands buried in the back of the hoses. Next down the back straight. Whereas brian kupa had his obeys benson this half themes ads late his exhibition long strides. Just even hold his position. Say you need from quite out late. Sex addition wasn't going as well as pencil leads and pencil full alleged. Got in a little tight to the side. Lives but rachel game squeeze after that and he found plenty as we so she knew she had plenty left and upstream malls. This should be more to come. Still and maestra too. I think you've been irish national coming in on this. Spring could be the prophet race the missiles they season with the records and offices have in the race. So that was the instant soul to the law. On that got. You know he likes. The heavy grounds. Knows what he's gonna need to spring ground but he just has kind of profiling father thank oxley long way away even further away than the bench. Come onto the bridge that animates exhibition as he. Just he just didn't look entirely fee down the back straight Debrecen kuprin eludes as he needs. Plenty father as well as we know. But i just think he's been beaten by rainy. Nice little sarah. She don't think he's going to go down as beaten. Eight to eleven favourite. He was actually that disgrace. I do think pennsylvania is really nice.

Brian Kupa Cheltenham Saito Galway Benson Rachel Kuprin Oxley Sarah Pennsylvania
Let's Encrypt's Cross-Signed Root Expires Next Year

Security Now

03:45 min | 2 years ago

Let's Encrypt's Cross-Signed Root Expires Next Year

"Something interesting has happened with. Let's encrypt on friday. They blog d- standing on our own two feet and the issue. That's come up is so interesting on fundamental that i decided to share what they've said With some inline editorializing of course About that you know the situation. They find themselves in so so they wrote what a new certificate authority comes on. the scene. Which i'll note does not happen very often. They said it faces a conundrum. In order to be useful to people it needs its roots certificate to be trusted by a wide variety of operating systems and browsers however it can take years for the oh s.'s and browsers to accept the new root certificate and even longer for people to upgrade their devices to the newer versions that include that change the common solution. A new ca will often ask an existing trusted certificate authority for a cross signature to quickly get it into being trusted by lots of devices. You know we talked about this in the beginning of of let's encrypt And we looked at their the certificate that they were producing was cross. Signed by ident- trust. I think it was anyway. So they said five years ago when let's encrypt launched. That's exactly what we did. We got a cross saito. Yeah the across signature from identity. Just their dst route x three have been around for long time and all the major software platforms trusted. It already windows. Fire fox mac. Os android irs and a variety of distributions. That cross signature allowed us. They wrote to start issuing certificates away and have them be used by a lot of people. Without ident- trust let's encrypt may have never happened. And we are grateful to them for their partnership. Meanwhile we issued our own root certificate. I s r g route x one and applied for it to be trusted by the major software platforms now. Those software platforms have trusted our root certificate. Meaning the let's encrypt root certificate for years and the s. t. route x three routes or ticket that we relied on to get us off. The ground is going to expire on september. First twenty twenty one. they said. Fortunately we're ready to stand on our own and rely solely on our own root certificate. However they wrote this does introduce some compatibility woes some software that has not been updated since two thousand and sixteen. They said approximately when our route was accepted to many root programs still doesn't trust our root certificate. Is rg route. X one most notably this includes versions of android prior to seven point. One point one that means those older versions of android will no longer trusts. Certificates issued by. Let's encrypt

Fox Mac CA
The Yosemite Sightseer Murders

Casefile True Crime

04:45 min | 2 years ago

The Yosemite Sightseer Murders

"In the nineteen ninety s the say to lodge. No portal was owned and operated by a man named gerald fisher like hey did on highway one forty. The lodge was a popular rest for visitors to yosemite national park. It's grand stretched across twenty seven eight at the base of a tree covid hill hillside. With the miss said a river flowing nearby hole up there were two hundred and eleven ruins in the hotel which were divided between several buildings. The lodge had all the amenities one would expect including a restaurant and a swimming pool in the summer of nineteen ninety seven and gerald hired a young man to carry out general maintenance. Judy's and upkeep at the state lodge like other employees then you come live don side in a studio apartment above the restaurant friendly dependable and seemingly normal. He established a good rapport with his boss and co workers. He was an unremarkable average. Joe top of god who nicely kept to himself yet. He did have one noteworthy feature he surname in february nineteen ninety nine. Carole sund her teenage daughter. Julie and sylvain apollo an exchange student. Staying with the pat were murdered in proximity of yosemite. The trio had been visiting the region for a brief holiday that disappeared from the say to lodge. After two nights daiei. The hotel's employees were questioned and although several raised suspicions. The facilities maintenance man did not want his reputation as an unassuming boy next door coupled with an unblemished police record kept him off. Investigators raid is hey remained calm and collected when answering questions and was ruled out off the providing alibi. Carol lend sylvania's buddies were discovered in the charred remains of their rental car. Hours drive north west. The kill then taunted police by sending them a map. That led to julie son's buddy thirty miles from where her mother was found. The triple massad came to be known as the yosemite sought say muddies. Investigators returned the saito lodge on the lookout for the source of doc. Pink fathers found on julie's body the hotels maintenance man or detectives across the grounds using he said of mazda case to let them into way to room he happily chatted about his life and family specifically his younger brother stephen. It was a peculiar and intriguing topic. But the interaction didn't raise any red flags demands. Willingness to hope was appreciated and the detectives left the sun peluso case inevitably hit a roadblock. The trio's kill remained a mystery though. Investigators were certain that a group of local men all of whom had a history of violence were responsible but the tawny di was spot lauded as suspects. The men were in police custody for a litany of reasons. None of which related to carol julie or so vinas murdered his five months later. Joey armstrong was killed in fereshta. The crime scene was about a thirty minute. Drive from the cedar lodge along route. That branched off to wet carol julie and silvana with downed. The fbi were quick to establish there was no connection between the crimes they told the public. There was no reason to believe there was a continuing threat in the area or that a killer or killers planned to wacked again. The evening before. Joey armstrong's remains were found in the forest behind her son. A us park service. Firefighter was visiting the area. As hey dr along forest road. He noticed familiar car parked on the edge of the woods.

Gerald Fisher Carole Sund Sylvain Apollo Daiei Yosemite National Park Saito Lodge Gerald Julie Carol Julie Judy Yosemite Peluso Swimming Sylvania Joey Armstrong JOE Carol Vinas Fereshta
The Yosemite Sightseer Murders

Casefile True Crime

04:51 min | 2 years ago

The Yosemite Sightseer Murders

"In December nineteen, ninety-eight, Sylvana, Polo left her home city of Cordova Argentina banned for the United States. The, sixteen year old had inherited her mother's spirit for travel and had signed up to bay a Foreign Exchange Juden. For the next three months, Silvana would be living with the six member to family in the northern Californian port city, of Eureka. The pelos Os and sons were longtime friends through mother's Ricco and Cairo. The two women met in the seventies when Carol traveled to Argentina has an exchange student herself. Carol Ray visited the country used laid off with her two year old daughter Juliana better known as Julie. But this stage the Palacios had two daughters with Sylvana the younger of the Pan. Into Julie Juliane to a similar in age but opposite in personality. Sylvana was an introvert unlock Julie more outgoing. Despite that differences, the girls formed a lifelong friendship of their own. Silvino was Jud to return home from the US in light. March nineteen ninety nine. As she was very interested in American culture, the sons had endeavoured to give her a memorable experience of their homeland. They had taken Sylvana old across the state to visit landmarks such as Disneyland Tint Fisherman's wharf. The Grand Canyon in Arizona was next on the list as was Yosemite. National Park. It took Cairo son a month to meticulously planned the perfect to road trip to Yosemite. Carol schedule was typically fool with family work and other commitments. So she made the most of every minute of her vacations. They Yosemite troop revolved around one of Julie's leading competitions and would be taking place over four days that encompassed the long weekend. Only carroo Julie, and Sylvana would be going. It was set to bay a you naked fanshawe as winter had brought snow to the region. The trip began on Friday February twelve. Carol Julie and Seven A- flew to San Francisco. From there they ha- Attica, and of two hours northeast to Stockton. City was home to the University of the Pacific where Julie's cheerleading competition took place on Saturday February. Thirteen. Julie was impressed by the campus and considered enrolling their after graduating high school. She had ambitions to become either a chef for an architect while maintaining her. For Violin and piano. Julie Caroline Sylvana, organized to return to the university for a proper tool in three days time. From Stockton the trio drove to the small farming town of Moore said known as the gateway to Yosemite. They spent the nod at the Ramada Rin before continuing on to Yosemite National. Park on the Sunday. Selena was particularly excited to see Yosemite granite cliffs waterfalls, lakes, meadows, and mountains. Shay was inactive person by nature who enjoyed our skating skiing and roller skating. She'll say loved the outdoors and hoped to study in the environmental field in the future. Carol. Julie and Venus spent death first day at Yosemite exploring pod of the pox seven hundred and fifty thousand acres of. Rugged. Wilderness. Before and they drove through the dense and far raging forests along highway one forty to the nearby town of. El Porto. There they checked in at the Saito Lodge. An affordable hotel on the banks of the mess said reveal. On the evening of Monday February fifteen, yen sund received a phone call from his wife Carol. Shea. Happily spoke of her time away with the Julie and Silvy Narine Yosemite. They had spent the previous two days exploring the park and was settling in for their phone or gnawed at the hotel.

Sylvana Julie Carol Ray Juliana Better Julie Juliane Argentina Silvino Carol Cairo Disneyland Tint Fisherman's Wh Silvana Carroo Julie Yosemite Cordova Palacios Carol Julie JUD Eureka
Democrats, and the Latino vote

In The Thick

06:16 min | 2 years ago

Democrats, and the Latino vote

"Yesterday I had to make to DECAF coffee so To DECAF. This week it's been that way. Hey, welcome to think. And it's Friday and it's Friday before Election Day. And I'd. Giddy or something like that or depressed. I don't know I'm like. I'm. Not. Really. In should sometimes but anyway no, but I've been really focused. Well, I'm really happy to hear that because he knows our first topic is. Oh my God five days away from the election is when we are recording this Friday before the election. So, it's a matter of. Funny how much attention to the Latino vote to the black vote and you know I'm thinking a lot about the particular groups that are not being polled. Yeah. So you and I have been really talking about Nitty Gritty subsets like, for example, the Cuban Venezuelan Americans in Florida who are tending to vote Republican. But again, what's happening to their kids? You know if you throw religion into the mix as you know this is something I've been reporting about this week. Let the next event Jellicoe, yes. Complicated Yes fascinating fast-growing group that people were like who cares about them. The Small Black Conservative movement in Twenty nineteen forty percent of black. Democrat self identified is moderate Yeah Right now it appears that support for trump among black men who? Could be on the increase and that of course is compared to twenty sixteen. And let's talk about. The Asian. American Community Twenty Sixteen Bangladeshi and Pakistani Americans voted for Hillary Clinton at higher rates than Indian. Americans, are we geeking out? Yeah. But we are because actually who you this is the message if you are a political player if you are campaign manager yes you to hyper target. These community because these are the ones that you know I didn't know what t w stood for, but that's for the win. That you said that I had to ask my son that's so adorable. I was like sweet. Please tell me what t w yours we speaking something else for the win who are you and I are not. Political campaign managers but we can see that if you target hyper target Oh. Yeah. Let's four the win but let me give you one very clear example and I'm going. EQUA- I'm watching morning. Joe I. Love it earlier this week and Joe Scarborough for the first time I think said the Puerto Rican vote in Florida and I'm simple they're going to you even know what that means and why the Democrats are still struggling to get some of the most important voters in America. You know I have done so much reporting with Puerto, Rican organizers on the ground in central Florida since two, thousand, sixteen every one of them to a T. tells me one of the Democrats GonNa get us. They don't understand that realities between the diaspora and the island have changed politically. Issues about the debt issues about our place as a colony it's okay to say colonialism. That's why I give AOL see all the credit in the world back during the DNC when she said colonialism. That's where that new voter is thinking about that relationship with being in the United States and to get Joe Biden and the Democrats are just be like, oh, we are. We're showing up here's least fancy and Ricky Martin. That's the part where I feel is being missed. I am just going to say this right now. If anyone comes after me Tuesday and says, what about the Puerto Rican voters I'm going to be like Democrats did not do a good job getting them enthused look where are the best political campaigns run in this country including Puerto Rico? Fucking Puerto Rico. Okay. So whatever it is, it's political show. Let me ask you this question about Latino. Jealous because you talked to Reverend Saito who was featured in America by the numbers. and. He's president of the National Latino Evangelical Organization that has a lot of influence with both political parties. You talked him this week about the Gel goes in two thousand twenty. Where'd you find out? Well, you know. Trump folk have been reaching out for awhile. It's been like three years. That they have been working and working and working on Latino. Evangelical interesting. So Reverend Saudi, that's what he told me. He said this is been their understanding that if you get a slice of the Latino Latina Evangelical vote that can help you in Florida. And I'm just like Donald. Trump is not that smart? We know that. So the fact that he has people in his team that understand this Florida vote. Is just like okay. Well, this is the Democrats to lose. They talk a lot about this thing that you and I never mentioned which is quote unquote religious liberty. And Evangelical Community there is a perception that religious liberties are under attack. I know we're like what really they feel that the state is increasingly encroaching under freedom of religion in this country, and then the final thing is abortion. You know that was my big lesson. Don't underestimate it. Yeah. My big MAC quarterback for years ago was I did not understand the Puerto. Rican. Vote. In central Florida could swing on the issue of abortion and because they're evangelical. But here's the other side of that one. We don't know about younger evangelical whether or not. They will just say I can't do this anymore Donald Trump and the other big state and play were Latino evangelicals. This geeky Geeky can I guess tell me Pennsylvania? You're so smart and where in Pennsylvania O.. EILL. Lehigh valley have. Latino. Evangelical vote there is more heavily towards

Jellicoe Florida Equa Joe I. Love Joe Scarborough America Hillary Clinton Reverend Saito Puerto Rico National Latino Evangelical Or Reverend Saudi Ricky Martin DNC Joe Biden AOL Donald Trump
Leslie Blodgett, former CEO and founder, bareMinerals

Skimm'd from The Couch

07:13 min | 2 years ago

Leslie Blodgett, former CEO and founder, bareMinerals

"Hey everyone this show might sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches. This is still working from home for the time being because of covid nineteen today Leslie Logic joins us on skimmed from the couch. She is a trail blazer of the beauty industry leslie founded bare minerals, which she grew into a global empire by tapping into the power of marketing and community. And in two thousand ten, she saito acquired it for almost two billion dollars while her new best selling book. Pretty good advice. Give some pretty great advice and is available now leslie were except to have you welcomed skin from the couch. Thank you so much for having me looking forward to hanging with you guys. We have been very excited to do this. We met Leslie at a conference that we were at about almost two years ago year and a half ago we. Didn't know who it was like we knew her name, but we didn't know that she was the Leslie blodget. We just saw this like friendly looking who was wearing this very cool hat and standing outside getting coffee and she came up to us in and you're a huge fan of the scam and when we realized it was you I think we both like didn't even know what to. stadio. So I think it goes to show like you have such a friendly personality and. That makes everyone feel comfortable in talking to you and is also harshly how you are able to talk yourself into any room in in your early days of your career, which we're GONNA get into. So let's start off with our standard first question, which is Skim your resume for us our. Newspaper Out McDonnell's what did you do at McDonalds? Everything. I started with like cleaning toilets and sweeping the parking lot and then moved up to making burgers it Max then at fit. Two years of fit graduated in turned beauty companies. Always wore is shadow since I'm little kid went to work in the industry or selling makeup behind the counter spritzing fragrance bloomingdales in New York City in macy's met my husband at macy's while I was working behind. The counter is part of my resume I know it's a career thing is he's he's important. Did he keep coming back or did he like ask you on a date while you were working at the counter? All right. So I worked in macy's and part time because I was going to school and his girlfriend who's really cute. Girlfriend had the same shifts that I did like. He they lived in Brooklyn together and he would come in. So she didn't have to take the subway by herself at nights. and. That's how we met. We I I never knew the story Oh my God. So he would he would come. He was so sweet I kept asking do you have a brother friend and he did hook me up with friend once that didn't work out but it wasn't until they broke up a couple of years. Later he got a number and called me so what I didn't break any relationship. Okay. That's a good story though. Okay. So keep keep going macy's macy's then got a job at Halston Orelon you guys probably don't know a Halston, the fashion design end ud line I worked there for a little while then the big job was working at Max factor and then we were acquired by Revlon and moved to La? The company Max factor acquired by PNG and moved to Hunt Valley Maryland Maryland Baltimore had a baby in Maryland that was the best part. Of Maryland then we moved back to la because Keith wasn't digging Maryland so much whatever, and then he became the state Dad didn't have a career anymore after that I ended up being the breadwinner starting the kid was born and then were worked neutrogena. And then San Francisco in here we are what is something that people can't Google about you that we should now. Aren't. So here's the thing to that I. Don't have a Wikipedia page. My team for years wanted me to build one, but I had this issue with being. Out there. So I don't know what's out there and I'm very uncomfortable with what's out there. So what would people not know about me? That I can play the harmonica and hula-hoop at the same time. Did you do that growing up? On hula-hoop for sure the Harmonica, I learned as an adult. So I have a hula-hoop now as an adult that I use regularly. So then I just combined two gifts that I have. You write about a quote kind of stuck out at me. The quotas get desperate I wanna dig into what that means because I think you know when in reading about your story like we've gotten to know you a little bit over the last year or so and I knew the high level part of your story. But in researching for this, it don't think I really could appreciate her understood how you really got your foot in the door and so I want to understand what get desperate meant for you. Yeah I think for me. I always had to work hard to get noticed it in everything I did and I think number one is my parents were divorced when I was nine and we were left with her mom not that there was a bad vanishes that she was the the strict one the tough one. So I was always like driven to please her with I think a lot of kids have that too. She was never quite one hundred percent. Happy. So I was always trying to please her. So I was always going above and beyond to get the grades and to get on the teams and that type of thing because I wasn't. We didn't have a ton of money growing up I had to be creative. So by the time I went to two years of college and I. My first two years. It was rough because it was my first time being outside of my mother's like grip. So kind of had a little bit too much fun when I realized that I had to. GET DOWN TO BUSINESS. My mother helped me figure out what my passion was. I UNI but couldn't get in to fit I couldn't get a job behind the beauty counter, which is what I need to do to get into the cosmetic program and I had to so learned that when I'm desperate when I can't seem to find my way is when I get most creative by when I'm at the bottom feeling down instead of being depressed for long periods of time I just started thinking what would I do in little steps to get there the story I have in The book is about Bloomingdale's I. wanted to work there really did but they would not give me the time of day because I had no experience on mcadoo, you have it if you don't get it the only solution to that was to just be in their face and I thought without being too annoying I'm GonNa go to the buying office. I'm going to go there every day every morning I know when they come in because the first time I went and it was a very narrow hallway. And I would smile and they would have to brush past. We had to literally touch audience for them to get by, and they just saw me every day and I think you don't persist Internet way just. So dedicated to your personal 'cause I had no choice for sleeping on couches I didn't have a place to live. They said. Why don't you come in? We'll find something

Macy Leslie Maryland Leslie Logic Leslie Blodget LA Saito Out Mcdonnell Brooklyn Mcdonalds New York City Mcadoo Halston Orelon Google Hunt Valley Maryland MAX Baltimore San Francisco Revlon
How To Get Kids To Drink Water

Healthy Eating For Kids

06:36 min | 2 years ago

How To Get Kids To Drink Water

"Hello and welcome back everybody. I hope you're having a lovely summer willing to do this. Probably lots of bad days I certainly had mine yesterday and I hope that you've had a chance to tune into last week's episode where I will a lovely client of mine came on the PODCAST, share her journey of working through a special diet to manage jars, persistent constipation, and of course, the biggest transformation and I still not saying this to her. I couldn't believe you know watching her son on the screen and. and seeing how much he had grown, he was quite quite slim when I met him any his weight center of it sort of caught up with his length. Santana was really nice to see that he had such a lovely transformation from working with me now I'm sure you're wondering whether my Holly Street. Clinic will be reopening I've just holding fire on that I. will be watching with interest everything that we'll be developing in the news and the guidelines that things are that, but until there are more clear. Guidelines on the safety aspects and things like that I will continue to work with you. As video consultations, I use a video conferencing platform called zoo, and that's been working really well. It means that I've been able to offer you evening appointments and of goes Saturday morning appointments and I think you'll agree. That has worked really well. It has been that you could. We could share screens. We share resources. It's been a really nice way a working. Together. The only thing I'd say is that you know e-. I've had to rely on you to do the growth measurements for me, but apart from that the video conferencing has no in really really well, so if you have been thinking about working with me, then I've got a few programs now and these programs have been tested and tries and sort over the years not being. For fifteen years I'd say my private practice. Really launched when my first child was born, and so it's around five years old now, and during that time always offered video connotations, and it's my services have certainly evolved over the years and the programs that are currently offer inclusive course of Fussy eating solutions of the vegan nutrition program and I also have the milk allergy program, and these specifically for if you suspect your child may have delays cosmopolitan allergy and it lied to work with someone like me. Who has years of experience working with children? And of course twelve of those years were at the world, renowned gretel mystery children's hospital where we've seen children from. Loads and notes of backgrounds, different backgrounds so without further ado, let's get started with this week's podcast episode all about fluids, but before I forget always forget to let you know that you can book a free fifteen minute call with navy to know all the different ways of working with me whether that's as part of my programs that are specific for the different. Nutrition problems that you'd want me. Media Help you solve or navigate and manage all if he just offer one of consultation on a very very specific nutrient problem that did not discuss it me then I do have a variety of ways that you can work with me. So I was watching the news this morning and I was so excited. That is going to get really hot next week. What my husband said Oh my goodness. That's too hot for me. Temperatures getting up to the D. degrees that Sina. He finds that really really hot, but I'm excited. I love hot weather so. But of course I'm sure you're thinking I've got to make sure that the kids drink plenty of liquids and absolutely rise have got seven tried and tested ways to get toddler Dettori water and this blog post that have for you has been really really popular Saito. This is the perfect time to shine these tips with you as a podcast episode, and of course, the first most obvious is to run through, and that goes without saying just like you would for picky eating. We know that children mimic behavior, so make sure that your drinking regularly as well especially the type of fluids that you choose would be really important now I. Have a confession to make. I am not the biggest fan of Water I. Know you're probably thinking what sort of Dietitian doesn't drink water well. When we moved, I was around thirteen years when we moved from. Oman's ice live in mind when we moved to. New Zealand, the water in New Zealand Israeli men wrote tasting. It has really. which actually is maybe lovely in hindsight, but you can't say that water doesn't have it taste. I obviously have very high on hypersensitive to taste and I found the taste of water. It just didn't appeal to me at the time and so I. Would you drink flavored water? Are they confess I did drink things like dont trains as a teenager and things like that I swipe. Not Great Choices, but of course because I was also very active in love. Running quite early on I think started running around sixteen years. Dittrich Water I. Probably could have drunk more often than say things like cups of tea, which I drink at the moment or coffee in the morning so. Luckily eight my girls do drink water my new. My husband drinks always as a water bottle in the fridge and he's always drinking from that. As the girls you know, they look up to their dad quite a bit, and they always make sure that they drink with sometimes. They noticed that I do need to remind them

New Zealand Santana Sina Oman Private Practice Navy
Ely Parker | Part 2 | The Civil War

Iroquois History and Legends

06:15 min | 2 years ago

Ely Parker | Part 2 | The Civil War

"Hello and welcome to Iroquois history and legends. I'm Caleb. I am Andrew we are continuing with our series on the lustrous Mr L. E. S. Parker last episode we talked about his early life is education his diplomacy with the United States and his job as a civil engineer, and where he finds himself, now is in between jobs, and at the brink of the civil war in the United States breaking out, and I'm GonNa sum this up. Up What had happened was we saw all these native American peoples being removed from their land and forced to move west across the Mississippi and into the Oklahoma territory with all these native peoples depopulated from the eastern United States that left all kinds of area that opened up for agriculture and farming, and this led to more tension between the northern and southern states, because you had people joining to rush into the southern and western states. And, they wanted to make sure that slavery was instituted these places because then they could keep their balance of power higher in the US Congress were they could get more senators or members of the House of Representatives to make policies that would guarantee the rights of the southern territories and states, so that's where we find ourselves in and states are rushing around to be declared slave or free, and then a Abraham Lincoln gets elected president, and all heck breaks loose now you may think hey, Parker. He became a captain in the New York. State militia right so he's probably getting ready for war to. But no, he wasn't called upon for his services in engineering in the military or anything so after he finished his contracts in. Illinois he moved back to the tunnel, Wanda reservation and began farming. He quickly became very bored Andrew farming was not the life for a man like him. Many of the Seneca were gearing up for war, looking to join the United States Army Parker went and spoke to his father. Who as you recall from last episode was a veteran from the war of eighteen twelve, and he received his blessing to take up the war, Pat, but Parker. He wasn't. GonNa go as grunt. He wanted to go as a commission soldier. You'd already been. been a captain in the New York militia, so he asked the governor of New York for a commission like a real commission is apparently the militia commissions didn't really count the governor of New York declined so then what did he do when things fail in New York do what everybody else does. Go to a different state. I'm just kidding, but he did. bypass New York state and try to go directly to the federal government. You know. He had some friends in high places in Washington at this point, so he said Hey. Captain in the New York State militia civil engineer. How about a commission? declined. He got a letter from the Secretary of war Edwin Stanton. Quote. Parker this is a quarrel between white men, in which you Indians are not concerned, unquote. Another federal official that he wrote to told him quote. Unquote and I'm sure. They said it just as condescendingly. Some people may have made departure that his lack of US citizenship. Maybe what's holding him back from getting this commission? Because this is the same time that we see, he actually applied for citizenship. Oh, how'd that work out for him? Mile had a lot like everything else to the government. He was turned it down again. So from eighteen, sixty, one to eighteen, sixty two, he worked on his farm, and he also worked for the Indians on the reservation. He penned one letter to an old militia General John Martindale where he jokes about being a bad farmer and eating a wife, he asked the general quote. If, he knew any strong, healthy, double breasted woman that would want to be a farmer's wife. Can you say that again? That strong. HOW DOUBLE BREASTED WOMAN! So I thought you said? Did you think double breasted? Okay then we're just. This is a family home to show after all so. We'll just leave it at that. I don't know it seems like pretty good things to look for in a woman. Was His. With a lot of single I'm. You were saying. Parker has been farming for about two years now any starting to think that he's never gonNA. Get his chance. But he did still have a few friends looking out for me and you. And they were a couple of friends that were becoming pretty influential in the war, and Parker didn't even think the contact them. One of them was the jeweler in Gallina, and the other was the grocer. They are now being known as General John. Smith and General Ulysses S grant. They actually said to themselves. You know who we could use right now is parker. Parker was joined to the General Staff with the rank of captain in May twenty, fifth, eighteen, sixty three, but you'll never guess Andrew. He found another complication and this one is coming from a different. Place than you would think. If you remember Parker was made a what. Saito in say tim was a life appointment. Holding has shown checks and balances aspect of the government. Say Chimps were the political leaders. And they could not go to war right? You would have a war chief appointed, and you would have your say. And you'll have your clan. Mothers Each end so now he wants to go to war, but he's a saint shown so Ariza. Wait a minute. Can you legally legally from the? WHO NEEDS schone standpoint? Can you legally go to war? So a meeting was held, and they decided that sense he would be a captain fighting in the war of the whites. You would not be violating the checks and balances protocol.

Mr L. E. S. Parker United States New York New York State Militia Andrew United States Army Engineer Mississippi Abraham Lincoln House Of Representatives Congress John Martindale Illinois Edwin Stanton Washington Oklahoma Ariza President Trump General John
What is Patoshi?

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

07:05 min | 2 years ago

What is Patoshi?

"This week's episode relates to some events regarding some bitcoins that were mind very early on in bitcoins. Lifetime in fact it was so early that it was a time when there weren't that many miners besides the Toshi but before we get to the recent events let's talk about something else called Potosi which you discovered. Can you explain what Pluto she is? Yes to cry Potosi. I just would like to go back in time to to the time. I I did this search and this was two thousand and thirteen and I have been working like a year. A strengthening the security of the beacon core working with the the the quarterback trying to find vulnerabilities. And I didn't know anybody going in between those times so I I wanted to make sure that you know what happened on the first years of Bitcoin That were transparent and it was very very few information about that so I just thought that what would Sadashiv have done? I mean he would have used CAS computer to mind bitcoins. And he would HAP- kept his computer on for. You know the time it needs until the network was Maastricht and if you take a look at the very few first hours of the bitcoin network and and you say okay this might be Satochi Right. Because he just launch network. He wants everyone to join so he's running note to enable all the other people to connect but if if you take the hash rate in the very first hours of Bitcoin and you extrapolate that for the whole first year you realize that it's highly probable that Toshi collected twenty two thousand coins right and I said these. Bitcoin Talk Forum and I was heavily criticized because the and rarity of Bitcoin. A it's like kind of says at Cisco she was kind of a fully Trista Guy. He didn't want money for because money's rated with bags and bugs are related with power and we are trying to be completely new centralized system financial system so I was heavily criticised. And say say okay. Let's try to find proof of this. Let's try to find some evidence of this because for me it was something very you know what she would have done. And so I. I went to the first Version of their bitcoin. Core CISCO DID Dot Thuan and I found out there was the floor and to explain this flow. I have to explain a little bit. About the technical part of beacon combining so there is when you implement announced value. And when you run out of space when when these Knows wraps around you have to increments something else and is something else called the extra notes so the speed of this extra nuns and the speed of the nuns is related to the computer using for mining. If you are a fuss computer you get a foster increment. The extra and what I found was that the astronauts counter was not reset Atari block so it was running a counter to kept running so in a sense every block a minor produces it stamped with are kind of a real time clock that identifies the speed of his computer. So I plotted this on a very simple graph like having the x axis the block numbers and the access the extra NHS and a very very interesting pardon papa and despite perfectly separates the differ minors at a different times. Because each of these miners Casa Clear. Line a clear slope on this graph so. I said okay. This is all I mean this. This graph describes everything so I published decent my blog and I had like thirty thousand visits in a couple of days. And so I I those times The whole community was about thirty thousand people so I think that looked at graph and the other interesting discovery of this graph is that Satochi spent almost no none of discounts like spent like forty bitcoins in the whole first year Probably in time and the amount of money the the value of those because whereas of five dollars so clearly there was two discoveries. One was this pattern that I try to correlate with Sushi and the other was that this person or group of the mining Had A complete confidence in the system he had never sold. He never sold Discount after a few tries a few tries so this was kind of a shock for the market and and the price of bitcoin actually went top because of this like fifteen percent. So I think that's a very very good for the community and and showed some transparency that was missing and I call this Potosi because we don't know if xactly set Oshii we can argue we can have our guest that this was socially but really we don't really know for sure that if this minor was social and at one thing that I wanted to understand because I wasn't fully sure I understood it. From looking at the graph. It essentially looks almost like Saito or Potosi was mining faster but is that possible or simply just that those Potosi minor was renting the extra nonce more quickly between blocks or something is that what was going on. I wasn't sure exactly why the that's correct. A it turns out when I saw the graph of the same you. Did you realize that seems to be faster on any other computer and that is kind of suspicious so I try to dig deeper into this and I found that what was triggering was making these Dismounts extra knows England foster. It was that the nonce was being incremented in a shorter space. Like about one fifth of the space that any other mining minor was was using. So if you reduce the range that you Increment in the nonce. Then you will end up increment index foster so what we see in the graph East essentially a probably a normal computer and he just stand this up because other watermark in these blocks and the exist of this other watermark is in fact a confirmation that the first potter is actually something very very particular for for a very specific minor.

Bitcoins Potosi Bitcoin HAP Maastricht Casa Clear NHS Toshi Atari Cisco Trista Guy Satochi Dismounts Sadashiv Dot Thuan England