22 Burst results for "Saint Louis University"

Take back your sexuality at midlife With Dr. Becky Lynn MD

Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

06:01 min | 3 months ago

Take back your sexuality at midlife With Dr. Becky Lynn MD

"All right, guys, welcome back to the show today. I'm really really thrilled. I have doctor Becky Lynn with me. She is the CEO and founder of avory women's health and she's also an adjunct associate professor of Ob-Gyn at Saint Louis University in st. Louis. And today we are talking just kind of having a conversation surrounding midlife took a pass libido and sex what more fun could we have the most fun? So welcome to the show and tell me a little bit about yourself your background and how you got interested in particularly midlife Women's Health. Yeah. So I'm an OBGYN and I sort of knew that I wanted to go into women's healthy before I went to medical school. I did some research in women's health and I loved it, but I went into medical school with an open mind who knows what I'm going to like and ultimately came out the other end wanting to do women's home. And then within OBGYN, you know, I practiced after I finished my residency. I practiced just did routine. Oh be normal, you know GYN stuff for six years and then I ended up finding my niche in sexual medicine and menopause and it's sort of fell into my lap because I'm not afraid to talk about it, especially the sexual aspect, you know, people would come back and ask me questions and I you know, I sort of realized the importance of it and how it was something that a lot of providers either don't feel comfortable discussing or the patients don't feel comfortable discussing but it's a really big important part of a woman's life sexuality. And so it was easy for me to talk about it. I found the time, you know, I took the time at that point to find out which the international Society for the study of women's sexual health, and that's where I really got all of my training in sexual medicine because you don't learn much about it in residency. And so you really dead Fortunately, hopefully that's changing but unfortunately have to go get that information on your own and then I brought that information back to my practice and I could really help my patients. And as far as menopause go, you know, we were saying before we started recording how much sexual issues and women overlap with menopausal problems. Not always twenty-year-olds can have problems with sexuality and 35 year olds and thirty year olds, but at the menopause when your hormones are changing or your you know, you lose your estrogen or testosterone is low that can really really affect sexuality not just Iraq but also lead to painful sex and orgasm difficulties. So they sort of naturally came together for my practice and I feel really strongly about treating these issues and educating women were advocating for women in the space. Yeah. How do you find success in having these conversations with your patients? Do you at this place? They probably know you as the doctor who knows a lot about this but starting out. How did you find success in in Breaking that Gap in midlife care? I think if that I I mean, I think that I'm sort of naturally non-judgmental and easy to talk to and I and I I I say thank you to my mother because my mom has the same way and I think she taught me to live life and and not make people feel bad about the issues that they're having. I tell her all the time. I am who I am cuz her but that I just I feel and I don't think there's any like special truck. It's just and that's probably part of the reason I went into being a physician because I feel that way. So I really, you know, I set up an easy environment for women to talk about because both sexuality and not as you know, menopause are some huge changes in a woman's life, but women don't learn about that, right we talk all about puberty. We talk about don't get pregnant. Don't get STDs, but we don't tell you that, you know dead. Painful sex is going to happen a couple of years after your period stop. So and it's embarrassing. It's very embarrassing sometimes for women to bring up and one thing that I notice and I've heard a couple of times in my practice is I will come in and they're like, oh my gosh, you know sex is painful. I have terrible vaginal dryness. My partner thinks I don't like him anymore and the woman's like that's not the issue. I don't know why it's dry, but they had no idea it had anything to do with the menopause because it happens mostly a couple of years after and so they're terrified and and so it's you know, it's really important to make sure that women know off of the changes that happened during the menopause. I know I certainly couldn't agree with you more listening is such a such a value and I find that patients find it very rare these days off we're doctors to be able to take the time to listen, it's funny when you do what are some of the most common scenarios are common complaints that you here pretty commonly. I know you were touching on them off. So I would say that the two most common issues. Well three now three most common issues that I see are low libido. Painful sex and weight gain, which goes along with the menopause? Yeah. That's just I guess I would lump weight gain with the whole constellation of menopausal symptoms. So hot flashes night sweats mood swings brain fog joint aches painful sex low libido. Like there's a whole constellation of those that go together. In fact, I talked to somebody this morning who she just didn't know where to turn because she just you know could name the list of all the things that were going on. So, I think that whole, you know sort of I want to say metabolic syndrome that doesn't sound very good but you know like that whole constellation of symptoms and then also painful sex and low libido. This would probably be my top three. Yeah. Well, let's jump into bed at treating painful sex. So in my brain and I would love to

Becky Lynn Avory Women International Society For The Saint Louis University Louis ST Iraq Metabolic Syndrome
"saint louis university" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

Scoops with Danny Mac

05:55 min | 7 months ago

"saint louis university" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

"It has been way too long the chance to visit with the head basketball coach at Saint Louis University. That is Travis Ford Win not if but when we get the basketball and the college scene here in Saint Louis his team is loaded we will get to that in just a moment but first of all coach I, hope that you and your family and everybody with the bill akins is safe and healthy and that you're doing well, how are things going? I great has been too long to be on with you. Everybody's you know everybody's good You know obviously during these. Unprecedented. Crazy Times silver lining is to spend time with my family for three months all three kids were home and We get great family time for about three months in Gosh we haven't done and who knows how long but for the most part are my family's been safe our team is As done well and and Ben Healthy for the most part and you know every day you know every day were were concerned everyday we're trying to. Go by all the protocols and guidelines and make sure the first and foremost priority is to try to keep these young men safe the best we can while get an education while practicing. It's a challenge but needless to say it's a challenge in but everybody's going through it. There's no. There's no playbook for this but you know I've been proud of our guys. So for how often are you on the phone with assistance other head coaches it's a close knit fraternity whether it's in football pro college basketball and saying, Hey, how you guys doing this? What are you doing I mean there's no playbook. So how how do you guys try to do this? Are you talking to a lot of other guys that's interesting you bring it up and you're one hundred percent. Correct. that that's what we're relying on is each other because none of us know, but we're trying to use each other's experiences. If I started back, we'll go back three or four months ago where you're hundred percent I was calling football coaches that I knew how's it going as they were already get ready for a season they thought and how how how's it going? I was talking to a dis that I knew throughout the country and ask the football because we all thought. All right football's going to be ahead of Basle. We're all going to see how that goes and we are. We are getting to see how it goes right now So now oh, Gosh Dan I'm probably on the phone with six seven. College. Coaches a day talking about scheduling trying to figure this out talking about what their practices are looking alike. But what's interesting about this whole thing that? A. Lot of people when we start talking about scheduling. Every team..

basketball football Saint Louis University Travis Ford bill akins Saint Louis Ben Healthy
"saint louis university" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:14 min | 7 months ago

"saint louis university" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Pence was always going to find himself in the spotlight the first week of October as he prepared to share a debate stage with Harris. But in the last forty, eight hours, the stakes have risen immeasurably, and now he finds himself at a different pivotal moment, not just for his career, but for the country as a whole. Legally pences empowered to wield presidential authority should trump become incapacitated something that has not happened politically pence is now responsible for relaying a message of calm and stability to an unnerved nation while simultaneously carrying forward trump's campaign message the under study. So used to taking a back seat to the boss now finds himself center stage. Anytime you have a situation that raises the possibility of presidential inability or succession. It raises the visibility of the vice presidency and the consequence of the vice. Presidency says Joel K. Goldstein a law professor at Saint Louis University who studies the vice presidency and constitutional law but Goldstein says there is no historical precedent for the barrage of. Confronting Pence as a vice president right now. I can't think of anything that's comparable where you have a month before the election, the president gets an illness that requires him to go to the hospital and take experimental drugs. Up Pence aide says he and the President of spoken multiple times since trump's diagnosis pence has been an unflinchingly loyal deputy to the man who elevated him from politically unpopular governor of Indiana to an office one heartbeat away from having the nuclear launch codes he does not want to be seen as preparing to step into trump's roll according to a second pence aid and has been looking to dodge and of the chatter about succession plans. Yet. Despite pence's filty trump Goldstein. said the vice president's decision to continue campaigning is both legally and politically irresponsible he ought to be taking action that protects his own safety not simply because he has an interest in his own safety but because he has a constitutional role that's unique and he has a responsibility he said but beyond that, they ought to be modeling behavior for other Americans to follow. Deep in his soul pence who is as buttoned down, and by the book as trump is brash has always sought the Oval Office pence has hardly concealed his own ambition which dates to college and his allies initially started a pack for the twenty twenty contest before downplaying it as merely his contribution to the reelection efforts win or lose this November pence is in a prime position to seek the White House on his own in twenty, twenty four there is almost nothing that pence won't go along with to preserve his standing with the president..

Pence vice president trump Harris Joel K. Goldstein Goldstein. Saint Louis University White House Indiana professor
Professor Ruqaiijah Yearby Discusses Structural Racism in Health Care

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

06:57 min | 10 months ago

Professor Ruqaiijah Yearby Discusses Structural Racism in Health Care

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host David Cosso. During this podcast rookie year be professor and member of the Center for Health Law. Studies at Saint Louis. University School of law. Joins me to discuss the effects of structural racism in healthcare, Professor Year be welcome to the program. Thank you for having me on professor year. Because bio is of course posted on the podcast website briefly on background listeners are likely well aware of the US has had a long history of persistent and substantial disparities in healthcare, access, delivery and outcomes. For example, the black to white infant metality ratio has never dropped below two to one. Over the past two decades, the healthcare research and quality has publishes disparities report. In it, a third of disparity measures have shown no improvement in nearly one in six have worsened. Or largely explains healthcare disparities or health inequities is structural, institutional or systemic racism, though frequently less overt structural racism, the fair to provide equal benefit to racial and ethnic minorities is embedded in healthcare, education, employment, environmental housing, transportation, and numerous other governmental policies as a result, structural or endemic racism, 'cause minority population, suffering far greater disease burden, and has results significantly higher mortality rates. As I've noted recently in previous PODCASTS, due to higher rates of on and under insurance that have led to higher rates of comber biddies covid nineteen related deaths among African Americans and Hispanics are far greater than among Non Hispanic whites. George Floyd before he was killed had recovered from covid nineteen infection. This will recall structural racism was the theme of my January ninth discussion with Andrea Freeman, regarding her recently published book scam, breastfeeding race and injustice with me again and discuss structural racism in healthcare. His professor year be so professor with that. I opened with a brief and I'll admit somewhat blurred definition. Of Structural Racism I know you distinguish between structural. And Institutional. Can you explain this difference? Yes Oh structural racism is about the ways that our systems are structured particularly to advantage the dominant group in disadvantaged minorities. It also includes ways that organizations and institutions work together to create standards and policies that benefit them while harming minority and so we can see an example of this particularly in the healthcare sooner in the healthcare system when we look at access to healthcare, many predominantly African. American neighborhoods, predominantly immigrant neighborhoods do not have access to hospital care and that is so important doing Kobe nineteen, because that's where many people are receiving tests and treatment for covert nineteen and so the fact that we don't. Place hospitals based on need or need for health care rather we structure our system in a way that access to healthcare is based on ability to pay then benefits though who have jobs that have health insurance that can pay for health care, while it disadvantages racial and ethnic minorities who tend to work at low wage jobs, but do not have health insurance and cannot pay off for health care. Thank you I do have a question about hospital locations in. We'll get to that. Let me ask as a follow up question regarding critical race theory, somewhat similar fries actually possibly shocked that a week ago today the health affairs blog. BRIEFLY DISCUSS CRT in a post by Michelle Morrison and others. Can you give us a brief definition of what is critical race theory? for me. Critical race theory is about critiquing how. Has Been used as another means to harm minorities, particularly as I think about it anti-discrimination law when we look at historical articles about this we see they. antidiscrimination law has been set up to facilitate and support the existing social structures. When you look at anti-discrimination law in the area of employment you are looking to prove that an individual or that institution allowed policies that harmed individuals and. And so it never gets to the point where you're challenging the structures or the systems of employment, they can stay the same. We only look at individual perpetrators who have done some harm. So when we think about employment that is so relevant now in covert nineteen, because a lot of the wage, workers are being deemed as essential workers under covid nineteen, but they're not being provided with math. They don't have paid thickly. They do not Count under worker's COMP. They do not receive unemployment compensation because. Those are do not apply to them and so let me give you a specific example so the fair Labor. Standards, act. was passed back during the new deal time in nineteen thirty eight, but that was also the time of Jim Crow, and so it left out. Many workers domestic workers who include home care. Workers agricultural workers as well and so. What the? Standard acted was. Provide for a minimum wage overtime pay and limit the work week to forty hours, So. Most of these workers are not covered We're not covered by this actual act when in two thousand and fifteen. They did actually begin to be covered under fairly. Standard to act Then you see a shift again and the structure of employment, and so no longer are they considered employees companies shifting to independent contractors

Professor Center For Health Law University School Of Law Saint Louis David Cosso United States George Floyd Andrea Freeman Kobe Michelle Morrison Fair Labor Jim Crow
Heat Changes Insect Call, but It Still Works

60-Second Science

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Heat Changes Insect Call, but It Still Works

"Sounds they produce. We can't hear take tiny insects called tree hoppers. They communicate through vibrations when a male tree hopper is hunting for a mate mate. He vibrates his body to produce a special love song. They sound like Ooh Book Casey Fowler. Finn is an assistant professor of biology at Saint Louis University University. She says if a female tree hopper is interested. She'll vibrate back to the Mayo basically her way of saying hey there fowler fin wondered if tree hopper mating songs might change at different temperatures which could affect whether the species survives as the climate changes so she and Grad student Dillwyn Hawks in built custom custom incubators using plywood and Kia shelves plus a special leaser that helps them listen to tree hoppers. The laser receives information about these tiny vibrations actions on the plant stem which we then amplify and process into sounds that we can hear turns out the tree huggers do sound different when the temperature changes. Here's a male singing at sixty five degrees and another at ninety seven degrees but that's not all the team recorded these songs and played them for females to see if they still find them attractive so essentially we're having a conversation with the insect because we can play back a bunch of different signals to females and ask her how much she likes. Each one as male tree hopper love songs changed across temperatures females still recognize ignites them saying Yep. I'm interested in meeting with you hawks and says that was exciting. I think when we saw that we were just like wow this is awesome. The study appeared appeared in the Journal of evolutionary biology. She says this is just one piece of the puzzle but it gives her some hope that tree hoppers and other similar insect species will keep things steamy even as the climate warms for scientific

Casey Fowler Journal Of Evolutionary Biolog Assistant Professor Of Biology Mayo Saint Louis University Univers Finn KIA Ninety Seven Degrees Sixty Five Degrees
Nicholas Hopkins, Saint Louis University Hospital And Illinois discussed on Todd Schnitt

Todd Schnitt

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

Nicholas Hopkins, Saint Louis University Hospital And Illinois discussed on Todd Schnitt

"Illinois state trooper has died from gunshot wounds after executing a search warrant Holman east Saint Louis thirty three year old trooper Nicholas Hopkins of ten year veteran died at Saint Louis University hospital the trooper was married and the father of four year old twins and an infant

Nicholas Hopkins Saint Louis University Hospita Illinois Saint Louis Thirty Three Year Four Year Ten Year
Marijuana Lollipop May Have Triggered Man's Heart Attack

Live and Local 4 Lunch with Chelsea, Ellen and Steve

06:01 min | 2 years ago

Marijuana Lollipop May Have Triggered Man's Heart Attack

"So the authors do believe that this large dose of THC, which is the second component of marijuana. Put a sudden unexpected strain on the heart. It then increases heart rate cause hallucinations anxiety, therefore, causing blood pressure to rise at more heart rate, going up stress hormone catch a cold Amine got released all of that could affect on Now. This new case is one of many reports two thousand fourteen there was a young man in the UK at a heart attack after smoking marijuana. We've also talked about I've had this on my show. I've thought about this where there was a link between cardiomyopathy and heart failure. The younger the patients the word risk. They are two sudden, death and heart failure to marijuana. There was a study a couple years ago Lincoln wanted to transient ventricular regional ballooning. TV are be which is a ballooning part of the heart muscle. Not allowing it to pump right, hence heart failure. So this isn't the first time in two thousand sixteen. There was a study out of Saint Louis university hospital and found bear wanted to cause stress. Cardiomyopathy that is also a ballooning. And drugs can do that as well being sorrowful during a death? And being in grieving could also cause that, but unfortunately, this TV Rb is something that we are seeing more and more times linked to marijuana. Now, the reason why people, you know, people will not believe this height because adopted I hope wait a sec marijuana's been around for decades. And now that is legal is were hearing it could cause heart problems. I don't buy it. We should have heard about a decades ago. Well, yes, I agree. If there was a link we should have heard about it in the sixties and seventies. But think about me when I was an ER dog I asked about drug use. But if I had a guy with a heart attack or you couldn't speak too much. And he said no to that answer really quickly. I'm not really gonna go that much farther. I'm going to address his heart attack. Then I'm going to get him admitted. The transfer him some more, and then that's the end of that. And I don't go into the marijuana history. So before the legalisation of marijuana if I was in an acute care setting. I didn't really spend that much time on oh you smoke marijuana. There was a link because again, I had to get the guy stabilize again transferred. So it wasn't me. Now, what about the cardiologists could the cardiologists done it? He got the cardiologists all these years could have done it. But again their job is the heart. You know, if somebody denies that they smoke marijuana. Not everybody's going to get a drug test. They have a right to privacy. So I'm sure the average person when marijuana was illegal said no last thing, they want is the police coming because they admitted to have done something illegal. So my guess is many of the heart attacks that we have had. You know that might have occurred in pot smokers. There was always the leak it just it wasn't really publicized. So the interrelation of smoke. Maybe worse that edible. We're still trying to figure that out. People are asking me is safer to eat it than smoke. It. For the most part. I'd say yes, I don't like people bothering the lungs and making the lungs do things that that they weren't designed to do like filtering out cannabis antiques. However, people who smoke could get away with less dose that edible. And so what this lollipop they're making more. They're having multiple servings of THC, I don't understand why they would do that with the lollipop because I mean, you lick a lollipop it's already kind of dirty. You're supposed to throw it out. But apparently a lot of these lollipops are designed for multiple licks just doesn't make sense. So the history of the lollipop. This is interesting. They say the oldest precursor of today's lollipop this been reported by groovy candies dot com. Was from ancient Africa in Asia. Archaeologists believe that Chinese eras any all produce fruits and not confections that they candied in Honey, which serves as a preservative and inserted stakes into making it to make it easier to eat during the middle ages. They said the nobility would often eat boiled sugar with the aid of sticks or handles in the seventeenth century sugar became more available in Europe. And so the English enjoyed boiled sugar candy treats and inserted sticks into them. So in America, they think maybe maybe before the civil war, but this is George Smith of New Haven, Connecticut. Claim to be the first one vent the modern style lollipop and that was nineteen o eight. He used the idea of putting candy on a stick to make it easier to eat initially lollipops were soft rather than hard candy. Oh, I would prefer a soft candy. And then with automation they were able make multiple lollipops. Apparently in one thousand nine hundred they can make twenty four hundred lollipops per hour. And then in nineteen twelve of Russian immigrants Samuel born invented a machine that inserted six county. So then they can make a lot now lollipop beans tongue slap. Apparently, that's according to linguists, and they believe that one Dan street vendors were the ones that coined the name. Some suggest lollipop maybe a word of Roman or Roman origin related to the Roma tradition of selling coffee apples on a stick. I guess red. Apple is called lolly father. That's really

Marijuana Cardiomyopathy UK Saint Louis University Hospita Lincoln Apple Europe Bear Cannabis Asia New Haven Connecticut Africa America George Smith
"saint louis university" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"saint louis university" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"They're five and they've struggled a little bit on the road dropped one at southern Illinois the other night, so that that's that's gonna be eaten at them a little bit. And we know that they're gonna come out swinging. So a big test for our guys. But like we're telling just like you said, it's a great opportunity for us to find a way to get another road win and keep the momentum going coach when you know that you know, Travis boards gotten into them. They lose Carbondale after some of those big ones that they had. So when they come out swinging and you're going to try to absorb their best shot. How did you observe that? At the beginning from your own guys. You expect them to be ready for that? Well, you know, we all we can do is talk about. Our guys fired up, obviously with our preparation both before we left Korolev's then again yesterday last nine today in film, showing them where they pressure how they gamble where they get physical. How they crashed the glass just challenge. Our guys to be ready for that. Now, they have to take it to the court, and you know, we'll be willing to make some adjustments. And and you know, we've got all the media timeouts and everything, but what we what we really tried to exemplify. There are put put a real focus on is coming out with ready for the physical battle. We can't wait and try to play catch up. And if we go toe to toe with them out of the gate. I think in time, you know, their team that's that starting to wonder a little bit because of that last laws that that we can cause more frustration. And then we got to continue to build will break and finish things up with head coach, Wayne tinkle, the beavers in billions from Saint Louis university the beavers first trip here since nineteen twenty seven neither way Noor I were part of that. When we got more coming up with coach ankle after this on the beaver sports network from learfield. In three two. Mcwilliams three pointer good. Shady McCoy up Oregon St. women's basketball has returned to Gill Coliseum after an impressive elite eight run last season..

Gill Coliseum Wayne tinkle Carbondale Illinois Korolev Mcwilliams Travis Saint Louis university learfield McCoy Oregon Noor
"saint louis university" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

12:56 min | 2 years ago

"saint louis university" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Six seven three thirty seven hundred. So glad to have on the program. Stephen smith. His great work and research into the exorcist to the movie, and of course, the true story since nineteen forty nine rolling. Joe excerpted from Maryland is Saint Louis heard exclusive accounts. Mark Gary was on this show earlier. And of course, we heard some excerpts from brother Greider, and what he had to say broke his silence, and we were able to exclusively get that point tonight. And glad to have Stephen on the program to so Stephen I don't know if you've heard what brother Greider had to say. But he said that he didn't see the film. He said that a number of his colleagues did see it. He said that it's very authentic knowing what you know about the accounts knowing what you knew about the history. How do you feel about the book in the movie and how it measures up to what really happened with Rolando? I also I tend to agree, you know, from what I've seen them when I heard that it is relatively are actually quite authentic, you know, and an accurate account of, you know, the notes and interviews that were conducted. I do also just with respect to being on the a student at Saint Louis university. And I'm having the chance to see one of the the priest who was actually at the time, you know, assisted father powder and father Halloran, and when I was a student there he was on campus. And but he was a very very serious. Very quiet reserved a man, and he wouldn't be again wouldn't really speak about that. And then finally years later, you know, once I had had finished and gone on. He had opened up a little bit. And I think there's some interviews out there out him. But I know that they were reluctant to you know, to see. The movie and really had no interest in it. And I and I remember father Halloran being interviewed and just stating that he just want people to understand again that it is real Nevil, Israel, and the double Israel, and and again, essentially the same message that was shared with me. You know when your earlier interview? Yeah. I'm I'm I'm still I I don't know if you don't Stephen. But I I'm very grateful for you being there. I'm grateful for you filling in all the gaps. But I think in the time we did in the first interview. I was completely humbled in a lot of ways and a lot of respects hearing brother, greater speak, knowing that we had him speaking to us knowing that you know, we had that to play for the listeners tonight. And and to hear what you have to say, and you and your valuable research and your valuable work, you don-, you know, of course, being there in Saint Louis being a student documenting a lot of this stuff. I've been reading is just remarkable that, you know, just firsthand accounts in what we may do is. I would like to have your permission to use the the PDF reference. If I if I may we're we're gathering together. A lot of information about this case. And I would like to use that information if I could and and put it somewhere where people can do the research if that's okay with you because it's so well done. A lot of the research you've provided this show. Well, done about what happened in that. You know, going from the permission given by Archbishop Joseph Ritter father that father Bowden and others were able to father Halloran and others to do this exercise and how it took a long time. And you were talking about what they call. It was Durham I can't even say dermagraph is that what they call it dermagraph Germany during. Geography. Go ahead dermagraph the writing on the skin and again in one important point is, you know, some may suspect while the you know, that may be the child had had written, and, you know, as a ruse by the witnesses again family were there there were priests there, and they would appear without him being anywhere near you know, touching a part of his body. And also they were they were on the parts of his body. They couldn't even talk touch. This imprint from I understand it. And I don't want to get too graphic. But I guess, you know, we're on late night radio. And if you're listening to this program, so far, you know, we're dealing with we're dealing with demons were dealing with how they rack and tear up the human body, and how most of the priests were involved here aged quite a bit when they were working on this and trying to get this boy back to normal one of the things I've heard this. It was show bad. They had to basically hog tied him to the bed and they had to keep him from levitating. And the problem was that the demon whatever it was would spell on his body things like. Devil and hell and a lot of sacrilegious references to Jesus Christ. And at the time they were done the priest would say we command Christ Christ commands you or we command the devil. Demon name your name yourself and leave the body of the boy and every time the demon would speak to them in Latin. And then what did he move? And and we're lucky always what's pea soup in the exorcist before I understand the void defecate and urinate all over the priests. It wasn't it wasn't just taking a regular was like projectiles. What it was the eliminated. The gross disavow that and replaced it with vomiting in the movie. But the truth was the demon would literally say to them that they're gonna leave the body of the boy, and every time he did it the boy either urinate or defecate on the priest and so they were covered in in in all of that while they were doing the extra system. Well, and if you don't mind that I share quickly just from the from the journal, first of all I I do want to clarify that the the PDF is available online. And so it's open it's available to the public, and I will share. I can't say that, you know, it's it's my, you know, my documentary or any of that means so, you know, from my standpoint, I certainly, you know, please to share it. But again, the library that we're developing a library of of files, and we're going to announce people why we're developing a library of files, and I just wanna make sure that I could use that as the put the link inter library of files. So people can do the research if they wish to that's all I was asking. Certainly, certainly, and and you know, from my point. Yes, most definitely, but I just wanted to clarify that. And if you don't mind reading quickly just from the journal, just the most distinct markings on the body where the picture of the devil on ours right leg in the word. Hell imprinted on ours. Chest in such a way that aren't could look down upon his check to read the letters cleanly. So this horrific for, you know, for for Roland is experiencing if I can just quickly add it just said that there were also, you know, the arrows pointing down towards, you know, his his male part in it. And they said that they feel that in further answer to the prayer because they would constantly prayer. There were two letters go NS third pointed away from the crotch and indication that might have meant that the devil would leave by way of urination or excrements though, it just shows, you know, the level of corn. And and that, you know, this poor boy, you know, underwent and then also the poor family. That's that's you know, at this point in time. I don't believe they were there. They were already in the. The they went from the health to actually college church directory on campus. So the famous university campus they actually did put part of the extra in there as well. No, I'm an upper little known fact, but. Early. Here's here's another thing. John Greider had said that one of the things that was most terrifying was him constantly sounding like Woody woodpecker. He would click his tongue and he would laugh like Woody woodpecker. So we go. And he laughed like that. And it was so bizarre because they said it was perfect. And it sounded like it was a it was it was just satanic. Woody woodpecker laughter. But what was interesting is is that there was a time where he doubled over and they woke up crying, and he says my throat hurts my throat hurts in the for the boy. And then as soon as he said, my throat hurts all of a sudden, his voice cleared, and they heard him sing or or LA LA LA the blue Danube. And then of course, he's saying the old rugged cross. And I even heard I even heard from somebody else. Oh, I think it was actually Mark telling me he also sang the also saying this song old man river, and what was funny is that he was performing these songs. And and is he preformed them the priests felt like, oh, well, obviously, you know, nothing evil could do this. You know, they're they're getting closer closer closer. And as soon as as soon as they got closer to see if the boy was okay, it happened again that the boy would, you know, release everything out to them. And and and he would say to them, you know, in Latin some horrible thing about the preach about the priests or father, you this, you know, and so all the stuff we saw in the movie the exorcist was nothing compared to what was going on with that boy in those priests. Well, yes, and actually he broke father Halloran knows. And it's reference in the PDF. And so they any any hit another another father that was there in the nose bleed severely, but he actually broke. Father halloween's knows. And and he's he's the I feel more connected. Even though I never really had a official relationship with him or anything never really knew him. But, you know, just seeing them around campus and just knowing just knowing, you know, seeing them interact, you know, a couple of times that I did I just a very serious, man. And and again, just really horrific, but he wouldn't play talk about it. But just to know the double documented in there. And and the other thing if I may add quickly that I do wanna share during my time in the archives. There was a professor that will come in. And they had a an old middle aged manuscript collection. So you know, they they collected. So the professional going to the archives and do his research. Well, he he knew father Halloran, quite well, and he shared a story that there that there was always a sense of dread and foreboding when he would prepare to go to stub Alexia brothers hostile to assist. Father Bowden, and it was just a negative like Forrester energy that you know. Just a feeling of dread. Well, one time he used to back in at that time they had streetcars when he took the streetcar and to the electing brothers hospital stopped and was about to exit the streetcar when he put his foot from the streetcar down to step foot on the ground a four stopped him is stopped his air. And he could not he could not place the down. So and he said a prayer and then it released, and he was able to, you know, put it down planet split into gold carry on assisting in the exercise on. But that was you know, that's not I came from father Halloran, but it was from a very trusted source that you know, that I got to know doing my time there on and I trust them, either, honest, honest people, and you know, again, but it was just a story that has always fascinated me. And I'm just pleased to be able to share it want to read an excerpt from this. And we'll go to the phones it says at midnight the father's plan to give Roland holy communion. But Satan would have no part of it. While the institution of the blessed sacrament was explained to Roland his body was badly scratched. In branded the word hell was printed on his chest and tie upon the explanation of the apostles becoming priests receiving our Lord of the last supper, scratches appeared on Rowland's hips to his ankles and heavy lines seemingly as a protest to the holy communion. When father a boater and attempted to give role in his small particle, the sacred host the boy was taken off by a quick seizure, and the devil said that he would not allow rolling to receive after four or five attempts. It was thought that he spiritual communion would have no suffice or would have to suffice. But even the expression of the words, I want to receive you in holy communion was cut off by seizure at the word communion. All further indications during the evening. It seemed to be attempts to administer the sacrament of the Eucharist rouse the devil more than ordinarily. He went through as usual routine of fighting barking like a dog, cursing, spitting. And of course, everything else. He kept on longer than usual. There was no quiet sleep nothing, but constant prayer for the child, and he continued through the night. I mean, this is how tiring and how brutal this extra system was in nineteen forty nine. And they just yes just today did they attempted and they tried for several days to administer communion, and and they just unsuccessful, and again, just as you said he'd go into trance, and I do recollect also the, you know, how you physically exhausting. You say they weren't just from holding them down and just from battling muscle aches.

father Halloran Stephen smith Father Bowden John Greider Roland Mark Gary Saint Louis university Woody woodpecker Maryland Rolando Saint Louis Joe Durham Israel Archbishop Joseph Ritter don Rowland LA LA
"saint louis university" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

13:35 min | 2 years ago

"saint louis university" Discussed on WTVN

"Eight six seven three thirty seven hundred. So glad to have on the program. Stephen smith. His great work and research into the exorcist to the movie, and of course, true story beyond the actresses nineteen forty nine rolling. Joe extra from Maryland. The Saint Louis tonight, you've heard exclusive accounts. Mark who's on the show earlier? And of course, we heard some extra from brother Greider, and what he had to say broke his vow. Silence. And we able to exclusively get that for you tonight. And glad to have Stephen on the program to so Stephen, I don't know if you heard what brother had to say. But he said that he didn't see the film. He said that. A number of his colleagues did see it. He said that it's very authentic knowing what you know about the accounts knowing what you knew about the history. How do you feel about the book and the movie and how it measures up to what really happened with Rowland? Oh. I also tend to agree, you know, from what I've seen and what I've heard that. It is relatively are actually quite authentic and an accurate account of, you know, the notes and interviews that were conducted. I do also just with respect to being on the student Saint Louis university and having the chance to see one of the the priest who was actually at the time, you know, assisted father powder and father Halloran, and when I was a student there he was still on campus. And but he was a very very serious. Very quiet reserved a man, and he wouldn't be again wouldn't really speak about that. And then finally years later, you know, once I had had finished and gone on. He had opened up a little bit. And I think there's some. Interviews out there of him. But I know that they were reluctant to you know, to see the movie and really had no interest in it. And I and I remember father Halloran being interviewed and just stating that he just wants people to understand again that it is real naval Israel, and the double Israel, and and again, essentially, the same message that was shared to see me, you know, in your earlier interview. Yeah. I'm I'm I'm still I I don't know if you don't Stephen. But I am very grateful for you being there. I'm grateful for you filling in all the gaps. But I think in the time we did in the first interview. I was completely humbled in a lot of ways and a lot of respects hearing brother, Greider speak knowing that we had him speaking to us knowing that, you know, we had that to play for the listeners tonight and to hear what you have to say, and and your valuable research, and your valuable work you've done, you know, of course, being there in Saint Louis being a student documenting a lot of this stuff. I've been reading is just remarkable that, you know, just firsthand accounts in what we may do is. I would like to have your permission to use the the PDF reference. If I if I may we're we're gathering together. A lot of information about this case. And I would like to use that information if I could and put it somewhere where people can do the research, if that's okay with you. Because it's so well done a lot of research you've provided for us. So well done about what happened in that. You know, going from the permission was given by Archbishop Joseph, you Ritter father that father Bowden and others would were able to father hollering and others to do this exercise them and how it took a long time. And you were talking about what they call it germ. I can't even say during graffiti is that what they call it dermagraph Germany during. Go ahead dermagraph. He just, you know, just the the writing on the skin, and again, one important point is, you know, some may suspect. Oh, while the you know that maybe the child had had written, and, you know, as as a ruse, but the witnesses again, the family were there there were priests there, and they would appear without him being anywhere near you know, touching a part of his body. And also there were they were on the parts of his body. They couldn't even possibly touch. This imprint from understand this and I don't want to get too graphic. But I guess, you know, we're on late night radio. And if you're listening to this program, so far, you know, we're dealing with we're dealing with demons were dealing with how they they rack and tear up the human body, and how most of the priests were involved here aged quite a bit when they were working on this and try to this boy back to normal one of the things I've heard is it was so bad. They had to basically hog tied him to the bed and they had to keep him from levitating. And the problem was. That that the demon whatever it was would spell on his body things like devil and hell and a lot of sacrilegious references to Jesus Christ. And at the time they were done. The priests would say we command Christ Christ commands you or we command the devil. Demon name name yourself and leave the body of the boy and every time the demon would speak to them in Latin and then with the D move doing. And you know, we're lucky always saw what's pea soup. And the exorcist before I understand the void would defecate and urinate all over the priests. It wasn't wasn't just taking a regular. It was like projectiles. What it was? So you know, they eliminated the grossness of that and replaced it with vomiting in the movie. But the truth was is the demon would literally say to them that he's going gonna leave the body of the boy and every time he did it the boy would either urinate or he would defecate on the priests. And so they were covered in in in all of that while they were doing the extra schism. Well, and if you don't mind that share quickly just from the from the journal, oh when first of all, I I do want to clarify that the the the PDF is available online. And so it's open it's available to the public, and I will share I can't say that. It's my, you know, my documentary or any of that means so, you know, from my standpoint on certainly, you know, pleased to share it. But again, the library that we're developing a library of of files, and we're going to announce to people why we're developing a library of files, and I just wanted to make sure that I could use that as as put the link in our library of files. So people can do the research if they wished to that's all I was asking, you, certainly certainly, and and you know, from my standpoint. Yes, most definitely, but I just wanted to clarify that. And if you don't mind reading quickly just from the the journal just says the most distinct markings on the body where the picture of the devil on ours right leg in the word. Hell imprinted on ours. Chest in such a way that arm could look. Look down upon his chest and read the letters plainly. So it was horrific for you know, for for Roland is. Experience in the if I can just quickly add it just said that there were also, you know, the arrows pointing down towards, you know, his his male part in and they said that they feel that in further answer to the prayer because they would you know, constantly prayer. There were two letters go in the third pointed away from the crotch and indication that might have meant that the devil would leave by way of urination or excrements though, it just shows, you know, the level of corn. And and that, you know, this poor boy, you know, underwent and then also the poor family. That's that's you know, at this point in time. I don't believe they were there. They were already in the they went from the house to actually the college church directory on campus, the university campus, they actually did put of the extra in there as well. No, not the little known fact. But here's a fact, it's another thing. John greider. Had said that one of the things was most terrifying was him constantly sounding like wood pecker. He would click his tongue and he would laugh like Woody woodpecker. So we go. And he'd laugh like that. And it was so bizarre because they said it was perfect. And it sounded like it was a it was it was just satanic. Woody woodpecker laughter. But what was interesting is is that there was a time where he doubled over and they woke up crying, and he says by throat hurts my throat hurts. And he didn't know what to do for the boy. And then as soon as he said, my throat hurts all of a sudden, his voice cleared, and they heard him seeing or or LA LA LA the blue Danube. And then of course, he's saying the old rugged cross, and I even heard even heard from. Someone else. I think it was actually Mark telling me that he also sang the also saying this song old man river, and what was funny is that he was performing these songs. And and is he preformed them the the priests felt like, oh, well, obviously, you know, nothing evil could do this. You know, they're they're getting closer closer closer. And then as soon as soon as they got closer to see if the boy was okay it happened. Again, did the boy would you know, release everything out to them? And and he would say to them, you know, in Latin some horrible thing about the priests about the priests or father, you this father, you know, and so law the stuff we saw in the movie the exorcist was nothing compared to what was going on with that boy in those priests. Well, yes, and actually he broke father Halloran knows and it's reference than the PDF. And so they many any hit another. Another father that was there in the nose bleed severely. But he actually broke father Halloran knows. And and he's he's I feel more connected. Even though I never really had a official relationship with him or anything never really knew him. But, you know, just seeing them around campus and just knowing, you know, just knowing, you know, seeing them interact, you know, a couple of times that I did I just a very serious, man. And and again, just really horrific, but he wouldn't really talk about it. But just to know that that was documented in there. And and the other thing if I may add quickly that I do wanna share during my time in the archives. There was a professor that will come in. And they had a an old middle age manuscript collection. So you know, they they collected. So the professor would go going to the archives and do his research. Well, he he knew father Halloran, quite well, and he shared a story that there that there was always a sense of dread. And. Foreboding when he would prepare to go to stub election brothers hospital to assist. Father Bowden, and it was just I in a negative like force or energy that you know, just a feeling of dread. Well, one time he used to back at that time, they had the streetcars, and he took a streetcar named to the election brothers hospital stopped and was about to exit the streetcar when he put his foot from the streetcars down to sex put on the ground a four stopped him is stopped his ear, and he could not he could not place it down. So and he said a prayer, and then it released, and he was able to, you know, put it down plants split into skull carry on, you know, assisting in the exorcist, I'm, but that was you know, that's not I came from father Halloran, but it was from a very trusted source that you know, that I got to know during my time there, and I trust them, either, honest, honest people, and you know, again, but it was just a story that just always fascinated me. And I'm just pleased to be able to share it want to read an excerpt from. This. And we'll go to the phones it says at midnight the father's plan to give Roland holy communion. But Satan would have no part of it. While the institution of the blessed sacrament was explained to Roland his body was badly scratched. In branded the word hell was printed on his chest and thi- upon the explanation of the apostles becoming priests receiving our Lord of the last supper, scratches appeared on Rowland's hips to his ankles and heavy lines seemingly as a protest to the holy communion. When father voter and attempted to give role in his small particle, the sacred host the boy was taken off by a quick seizure, and the devil said that he would not allow rolling to receive after four or five attempts. It was thought that he spiritual communion would have no suffice or would have to suffice. But even the expression of the words, I want to receive you in holy communion was cut off by seizure at the word communion from all further indications during the evening. It seemed to be attempts to administer the sacrament of the Eucharist rouse the devil more than ordinarily. He went through his usual routine of fighting barking like a dog, cursing, spitting. And of course, everything else. But he kept on longer than usual. There was no quiet sleep nothing, but constant prayer for the child, and he continued through the night. I mean, this this is how tiring and how brutal this. Sexism was in nineteen forty nine. And they just yes. Just today they attempted and they tried for several days to administer does eucharistic communion, and and they just unsuccessful, and again, just as you said he'd go into trance, and I do recollect also the, you know, how physically.

father Halloran Stephen smith John greider father Bowden Roland Rowland Mark Maryland Saint Louis university Saint Louis Woody woodpecker Joe Israel professor Germany LA LA Archbishop Joseph official
"saint louis university" Discussed on Pocket Now Weekly

Pocket Now Weekly

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"saint louis university" Discussed on Pocket Now Weekly

"I dunno it. His problem. He's old enough to lake. It's one of those things where you know whether I would event, it's just one of the things that I've learned about parenting is if they don't do it in front of you, they'll do it behind your back. So it's one of those things where I don't know if I want something to monitor him or not because I wouldn't wanna know. But then again, I would rather him not be doing shady areas or stuff like that. So that's, that's I guess, the tradeoff where I don't know what's worse is the question. It's gonna get done. It's gonna get a love that. Okay. Well, I feel like I interrupted Brandon earlier Brennan couple of your thoughts, and then we're going to go ahead and call it on this one. He read frizz. Oh, right. Oh, okay. Well, there you stuck for it and then we lost them there. It's just, I don't know, man, you again, you don't have kids, but from your experience in college, like how was it? It was fine, and I actually. Okay. Maybe the reason why maybe the reason why I'm bringing up the whole RA thing is because I was a good Choo choos I was and I was I was friends with my RA. So. My college days were crazy. I mean, I obviously things that their stories that I have from my college days I went to, I went to a Catholic school though, so you know, you can. You can take that with a grain of salt. But the the thing is that I actually was friends with I. I was the guy as a freshman who would leave the door open so that anyone can come in hang with me and hang with us. I'll leave the door open and on any given weekend, I would probably be cooking and the entire dorm would smell like Filipino food. So everyone was free to come by and hang out with me. So yeah, so I was just chill. Like I got along with anybody. I was actually called not like there was any award or anything. But like a lot of people that I lived with in college called me the easiest roommate ever. So I'm really chill. I don't care Mike as we had a college bar like right beside the buildings. Those that didn't happen until until after I left, they actually opened up a bar in my college. And yeah, things happened after that. That was crazy like for me. So you know, it's it's one of those things where and we've had this conversation with my son where it's like, you know, you only get to college once or, you know it's up to you on that one. But you know, these are there is particular time in life for everything. And so this is the time for you enjoy a ton of things just, you know, be smart about it. Don't be stupid about it, but I can't just sit here and tell you not to do a lot of things that I did like. It doesn't work that way. You know, for sure. I'm just asking you to be smart about it, like, don't be stupid. Obviously, there are consequences everything you do, and so it's really hard like I feel I feel that we're like drifting away from, we're probably over thinking what this echo dot is going to do, and I agree. I agree with that. Probably they're going to be those parents though, who are like, so you're monitoring my good like they're going to be those parents who are going to feel skittish about is one thing. And I wonder if this service will allow parents to monitor their kids as the Dow. No, I di- I, I don't think they would ever allow that to happen personally. That's just going to be. A huge amount of red tape. Good. It's it's, I feel it's a difficult topic regardless. Yeah, exactly. But it's interesting that they're doing it. I love that the echo dots are so branded with the Saint Louis university. Yeah, they're purple and they have the insignia on the side. So by the way, do you have an Amazon echo? I don't. I stick with Google home and saying, heard that things..

Mike Saint Louis university Choo Google Amazon Brandon Brennan
"saint louis university" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"saint louis university" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"Doctrine yeah fighting fighting the great battle against four skins what a fucking hero in facts and asians what a fucking hero good quack sits eighty would be i'll tell you what pisses me off please study some science on something and then come back with something don't just listen to fuck and jenny mccarthy about vaccinations drives me nuts and where's our policies when do they ever come forth and go i'm wrong they ever do generate carts gonna oprah she's going to get a lot of people not to vaccinate their kids and then she's gonna go blow donnie wahlberg okay great dome women to listen to you fantastic and now they're doing something potentially dangerous for their kids great job do a lot more people like you idiots why would you listen to these people that's the whole thing but this guy's a doctor telling you all right thirty whereas i want more all right well speaking of vaccines researchers at saint louis university are paying volunteers thirty five hundred bucks and a free stay at a hotel for twelve days with catered meals what what could the catch possibly be well you have to be willing to be exposed to the flu in order to test a new flu vaccine volunteers will be will get a vaccine shot or a placebo and then get exposed to the virus nasal spray one time you're hoping for the placebo if you don't mind possibly suffering through a bad bout of the flu this seems like it could be a good deal according to reports quote the university spent about three hundred thousand dollars have a dvr t vo.

donnie wahlberg saint louis university jenny mccarthy flu vaccine three hundred thousand dollars twelve days
"saint louis university" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

News Talk KOKC 1520

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"saint louis university" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

"For you to get the flu i'll take it okay what are all the details with this this is a saint louis university research team they are testing out the effectiveness of flu vaccines what they're doing is they're paying volunteers to stay at a hotel and you're going to be giving a flu shot or placebo and then given a dose of a flu virus through a nasal spray you may not get the flu you're going to stay there for what twelve days and they'll pay you thirty five hundred dollars to just hang out there you're gonna have catered meals all you have to do is be willing to catch the flu if you get it you may not get it okay no i'm not signing up really no that's crazy man thirty five hundred i've had the flu several times for free okay am i going to have to give up like vacation time for that you might that's three hundred dollars a day less than that i'll take it you're at a hotel but you can't leave there you're hanging out at hotel you can catch up on reading you can watch television you have meals catered for you i bet they bring you some great chicken noodle soup i bet it's hospital food no catch up on reading and watch tv that's the biggest sellers i'm i'm writing this down to figure it out if i'm not snow i'd be bored out of my mind man that sounds like a great vacation are you kidding you can't do anything you can't leave exactly gold digital detox you know but it's not you're watching tv maybe i don't know i just sounds like a lot of fun to me you just hang out in a hotel room for thirty five hundred bucks for up to twelve days you might get sick that's it that sounds like a great deal to me okay are you going to sign up i might can you do the show from there get double paid i could ask that would be interesting we have a remote idea you would you would actually believe you're sick though don't you think whether you truly had it or not.

flu saint louis university twelve days thirty five hundred dollars three hundred dollars
"saint louis university" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"saint louis university" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Let me give you a couple of minutes talk about two things zeka i was at saint louis university during the zinc crisis where they were working and felt like they were coming to conclusion so are we going to have something available next time and flew universal flu or whatever you wanna talk about on your research on those two topics thank you mr chairman i we'll take zeka as you know as i reported to this committee on more than one occasion we have progressed in our vaccine trial from the phase one trial that we originally did it the nih to now deploying a phase two trial to beaming relatively advanced to not only ask is it safe but does it induce the kind of response that you would predict would be effective and i'm pleased to report to you that today we have ongoing now a face to be trial in several countries in south america in mexico and the caribbean puerto rico in texas and florida to determine if the vaccine is safe and if it doesn't do that response it is scheduled to have between two thousand four hundred and five thousand people in the study we're recruiting very rapidly we anticipate and i and i'm pretty cautiously optimistic about that that we will have it fully accrued by the end of two thousand eighteen and then if in fact there is an outbreak we could get an efficacy signal and if there is not then we are working very closely with the fda if we can get enough what we call immunogenetics data namely shows that it doesn't do the kind of response that you want and bridge that to the animal data which are very convincing that this is a vaccine that can induce a good response we're working with the fda to determine if in fact we can get an accelerated approval you never anticipate what their decision will be but they're being very cooperative next universal flu vaccine again we've we're very grateful to the committee for supporting the addition of the forty million dollars in the two thousand eighteen omnibus for a universal influenza vaccine so let me report where we all with that we had a meeting in rockville in.

saint louis university chairman nih south america mexico caribbean puerto rico texas flu vaccine rockville florida forty million dollars
"saint louis university" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

02:47 min | 4 years ago

"saint louis university" Discussed on KKAT

"Six nine zero seven three three three nine eight six six ninety red eye let us go to eric in fairfax virginia eric welcome you're on red eye radio welcome to the show hi eric hi guys thanks for taking my call you're welcome uh i guess the scope of what on i want to say is that america right now engaged and cultural warfare i come from a perspective of uh my test career was as an under army intelligence analyst and i went back to school at saint louis university during the riots which is just a five miles south of ferguson and go the school completely computerrelated q older demand go black lives matter of revved com of uh all all these different factions that had taken over the school just like they did you are a year later sharing people actually um but ninety percent of the people that were on the streets of ferguson were millennials and they were they were pushed by the teachers to go up there in protest so these lola nieto we we we've grown up with the mentality of everybody gets a trophy everybody is always validated and in the cultural context you have to look at the the music the movie the bar culture it's all geared towards the left and so my question is how do we fight back against that you know i i i think a lot of that is ultimately harmless and goes nowhere in terms of that kind of behavior or or what may be in pop culture or culturally in general might be geared toward a someone who is on the left or not i think it's really geared toward young people a generation who tend to be on the left and it's it's more about a generation more generational than it is uh anything else and and and i think the again the responses to keep having the discussion and the debates but keep in mind this elevates to a point because they have lost the debate when you have lost the debate the only thing you can do is take some kind of physical action you can take action and that's what they do believing that will win versailles and remember the punishment did come from the university of missouri when it came to enrollment students didn't wanna go so they're young students same this isn't were i want to be so you keep that debate going.

virginia america intelligence analyst saint louis university ferguson lola nieto fairfax university of missouri ninety percent
"saint louis university" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:33 min | 4 years ago

"saint louis university" Discussed on WTMA

"Gary mcnamara eight six six nine zero seven three three three nine eight six six ninety red eye let us go to eric in fairfax virginia eric welcome you're on red eye radio welcome to the show hi eric hi guys thanks for taking my call you're welcome uh i guess the scope of what on i want to say is that america right now engaged and cultural warfare um i come from a perspective of uh my test career was as an and army intelligence analyst and i went back to school at saint louis university dern the the riots which is just a five miles south of ferguson and uh the school completely compatriot later q all demands go black lives matter of revved com of uh all all these different factions that had taken over the school uh just like they did you a year later i think people actually um but uh ninety percent of b these people that were on the streets of ferguson were a new millennials and they were they were pushed by the teachers to go up there in protest so leave lola niels uh we we viewed grown up with the mentality of everybody gets a trophy everybody is always validated and in the cultural context you have to look at the the music the movie uh the bar culture it's all geared towards the left and so my question is how do we fight back against that you know i i i think of a lot of that is ultimately harmless and goes nowhere in terms of that kind of behavior or or what may be in pop culture or culturally in general might be geared toward a someone who is on the left or not i think it's really geared toward your aung people a generation who tend to be on the left and it's it's more about a generation more generational than it is uh anything else and and and i think the again the responses to keep having the discussion and the debates but keep in mind this elevates to appoint because they have lost the debate when you have lost the debate the only thing you can do is take some kind of physical action you can take action.

virginia america saint louis university ferguson Gary mcnamara fairfax intelligence analyst ninety percent
"saint louis university" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:38 min | 4 years ago

"saint louis university" Discussed on WCTC

"It's red eye radio he's eric harley i'm gary mcnamara eight six six nine zero seven three three three nine eight six six ninety red eye let us go to eric in fairfax virginia eric welcome you're on red eye radio welcome to the show hi eric hi guys thanks for taking my call you're welcome uh i guess the scope of what on i want to say is that america right now engaged in cultural warfare um i come from a perspective of uh my test career was as an under army intelligence analyst and i went back to school at saint louis university during in the riots which is just a five miles south of ferguson and go the school completely computeraided queue older demands all black lives matter of revved com of uh all all these different factions that had taken over the school uh just like they did komo you a year later i shrink equal actually um but ninety percent of b these people that are on streets of ferguson were millennials and they were they were pushed by the teachers to go up there in protest so leaves lola neil uh we we we had grown up with a mentality of everybody gets a trophy everybody is always validated and in the cultural context it you have to look at the the music the movie the bar culture it's all geared towards the left and so my question is how do we fight back against that you know i i i think a lot of that is ultimately harmless and goes nowhere in terms of that kind of behavior or or what may be in pop culture or culturally in general might be geared toward a someone who is on the left bernama think it's really geared toward your aung people generation who tend to be on the left and it's it's more about a generation more generational than it is uh anything else and and and i think the again the responses to keep having the discussion and the debates but keep in mind this elevates to appoint because they have lost the debate when you have lost the debate the only thing you can do is take some kind of physical action you can take action.

eric harley gary mcnamara virginia america intelligence analyst saint louis university ferguson fairfax ninety percent
"saint louis university" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:43 min | 4 years ago

"saint louis university" Discussed on WJR 760

"Six nine zero seven three three three nine eight six six ninety red eye let us go to eric in fairfax virginia eric welcome you're on red eye radio welcome to the show hi eric guys thanks for taking my call you're welcome uh i guess the scope of what on i want to say is that america right now engaged in cultural warfare um i come from a perspective of uh my test career was as an under army intelligence analyst and i went back to school at saint louis university during the riots which is just a five miles south of ferguson and go the school completely computeraided q all the demand go black lives matter of revved com of uh all all these different factions that had taken over the school uh just like they get you a a year later i see people actually on but uh ninety percent of b these people that were on the streets of ferguson where millennials and they were they were pushed by the teachers to go up there in protest so these lola neil uh we we will be grown up with the mentality of everybody gets a trophy everybody is always did and in the cultural context you have to look at the the music the movie are the bar culture it's all geared towards the left and so my question is how do we fight back against that you know i i i think a lot of that is ultimately harmless and goes nowhere in terms of that kind of behavior or or what may be in pop culture or culturally in general might be geared toward a someone who is on the left or not i think it's really geared toward your aung people generation who tend to be on the left and it's it's more about a generation more generational than it is uh anything else and and and i think the again the responses to keep having the discussion and the debates but heap in mind this elevates to a point because they have lost the debate when you have lost the debate the only thing you can do is take some kind of physical action you can take action in that and what they do believing that will win versailles and remember the punishment did come from the university of missouri when it came to enrollment students didn't want a goal so the yesterday in saint.

virginia america intelligence analyst saint louis university ferguson fairfax university of missouri ninety percent
"saint louis university" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:43 min | 4 years ago

"saint louis university" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Six six nine zero seven three three three nine eight six six ninety red eye let us go to eric in fairfax virginia eric welcome you're on red eye radio welcome to the show hi eric right guys thanks for taking my call you're welcome uh i guess the scope of what on i want to say is that america right now engaged in cultural warfare um i come from a perspective of uh my test career was as an into army intelligence analyst and i went back to school at saint louis university during the riots which is just a five miles south of kirghizan and go the school completely computeraided queue older demands all black lives matter of revved com of uh all all these different factions that had taken over the school uh just like they did you a year later i shame kukal actually um but ninety percent of b these people that were on the streets of ferguson were uh millennials and they were they were pushed by the teachers to go up there in protest so leave lola neil uh we we read grown up with a mentality of everybody gets a trophy everybody is always validated and in the cultural context you you have to look at the the music the movie uh the bar culture it's all geared towards the left and so my question is how do we fight back against back you know i i i think a lot of that is ultimately harmless and goes nowhere in terms of that kind of behavior or what may be in pop culture or culturally in general might be geared toward a someone who is on the left bernama think it's really geared toward y young people a generation who tend to be on the left and it's it's more about a generation more generational than it is uh anything else and and and i think the again the responses to keep having the discussion and the debates but keep in mind this elevates to appoint because they have i've lost the debate when you have lost the debate the only thing you can do is take some kind of physical action you can take action in that that's what they do believing that will win their saw and remember the punishment did come from the university of missouri when it came to enrollment students didn't wanna go so they're yes putin saint this is where.

virginia america intelligence analyst saint louis university kirghizan fairfax university of missouri putin ninety percent
"saint louis university" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:33 min | 4 years ago

"saint louis university" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Eric harley i'm gary mcnamara eight six six nine zero seven three three three nine eight six six ninety red eye let us go to eric in fairfax virginia eric welcome you're on red eye radio welcome to the show hi eric hi guys thanks for taking my call you're welcome uh i guess the scope of what i and i want to say is that america right now engaged in cultural warfare um i come from a perspective of uh my test career was as an under army intelligence analyst and i went back to school at saint louis university during the riots which is just a five miles south of ferguson and uh the school completely compatriot waited q all demands though black lives matter of revved com of uh uh all all these different factions that had taken over the school uh just like they did you a year later ashamed people actually um but ninety percent of b these people that were on the streets of ferguson where millennials and they were are they were pushed by the teachers your go up there in protest so leave lola niels uh we we we've grown up with the mentality of everybody gets a trophy everybody is always validated and in the cultural context you have to look at the the music read movies uh the bar culture it's all geared towards the less and so my question is how do we fight back against that you know i i i think of a lot of that is ultimately harmless and goes nowhere in terms of that kind of behavior or or what may be in pop culture or culturally in general might be geared toward uh someone who is on the left bernama think it's really geared toward y young people generation who tend to be on the left and it's it's more about a generation more generational than it is uh anything else and and and i think the again the responses to keep having the discussion and the debates but keep in mind this elevates to appoint because they i have lost the debate when you have lost the debate the only thing you can do is take some kind of physical action you can take.

gary mcnamara virginia america intelligence analyst saint louis university ferguson Eric harley fairfax ninety percent
"saint louis university" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:24 min | 4 years ago

"saint louis university" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Zero seven three three three nine eight six six ninety red eye let us go to eric in fairfax virginia eric welcome you're on red eye radio welcome to the show higher guy spicer taking my call you're welcome uh i guess the scope of what on i want to say is bad america right now engaged and cultural warfare i come from a perspective of uh my test career was into army intelligence analyst and i went back to school at saint louis university during the riots which is just a five miles south of ferguson and uh liu school completely can get your later q all do demand go black lives matter of revved com of uh all all these different factions that had taken over the school i just like they did you a year later ashamed people actually um but ninety percent of the people around the streets the ferguson where millennials and they were they were pushed by the teachers to go up there in protest so leave little lineal we we we've grown up with the mentality of everybody gets a trophy everybody is always power and in the cultural context you have to look at the music the little res the bar culture it's all geared towards the last and so my question is how do we fight back against that you know i i i think a lot of that is ultimately harmless and goes nowhere in terms of that kind of behavior or what may be in pop culture or culturally in general might be geared toward a someone who is on the left bernama i think it's really geared toward your people a generation who tend to be on the left and it's it's more about a generation more generational than it is anything else and and and i think the again the responses to keep having the discussion and the debates but keep in mind this elevates to appoint because they have lost the debate when you have lost.

virginia spicer america intelligence analyst saint louis university fairfax ninety percent
"saint louis university" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:45 min | 4 years ago

"saint louis university" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Eye radio he's eric harley i'm gary mcnamara eight six six nine zero seven three three three nine eight six six ninety red eye let us go to eric in fairfax virginia eric welcome you're on red eye radio welcome to the show hi eric hi guys thanks for taking my call you're welcome i guess the scope of what are and i want to say is that america right now engaged in cultural warfare i come from a perspective of light past career was into army intelligence analyst and i went back to school at saint louis university during the riots which is just a five miles south of ferguson and go the school completely compatriot waited q all demand go black lives matter of revved com uh all all these different factions that had taken over the school uh just like they did you a year later saying equal actually on mm but uh ninety percent of the jewish people that were on the streets of ferguson where millennials and they were they were pushed by the teachers go up there in protest so leave the lineal we we we've grown up with the mentality of everybody gets a trophy everybody is always validated and in the cultural context you have to look at the the music the movies uh the bar culture it's all geared towards the left and so my question is how do we fight back against that you know i i i think a lot of that is ultimately harmless and goes nowhere in terms of that kind of behavior or what may be in pop culture or culturally in general might be geared toward someone who is on the left or not i think it's really geared toward young people a generation who tend to be on the left and it's it's more about a generation more generational than it is uh anything else and and and i think the again the responses to keep having the discussion and the debates but keep in mind this elevates to appoint the because they have lost the debate when you have lost the debate the only thing you can do is take some kind of physical action you can take action in that and what they do believing that will win their song and remember the punishment did come from the university of missouri when it came to enrollment students didn't wanna go so the students saint this is.

eric harley gary mcnamara virginia america intelligence analyst saint louis university ferguson fairfax university of missouri ninety percent