18 Burst results for "Saini"

"saini" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

06:29 min | 3 months ago

"saini" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"Can't have it all on your own or you really ask so. You need pajamas. Who recognize women have rights to careers support you and then you have to get on it and you have to believe that you'll the equal of olas other men. Whatever they think will say. I think that the way we structure things needs to be we on society parents to raise the next generation. So wasting structured copy for the nineteen fifties where the mongo's out knows the money and the woman stays home all the time we need to rethink and restructure alexandra. Newton says i lead science at a primary school in london. How can i talk goals and children from disadvantaged backgrounds to boost interest confidence. How did the panel know. That science was for you How did you know. Science was fi angela. Well i was quite lucky that I grew up in a really galateri and family. My dad was an engineer. And i never had any sense that there was anything that i couldn't do the toys that they were or anything like that. I think one of the most important things we can do is give children all the same toys and a wide range of toys. And because these you know depending on what you play with really does exercise the parts your brain and the skills that you need to develop stew you need to do. I loved mcconaughey when i was growing up. I absolutely was obsessed with it. Whether that's why became an engineer or not. i don't know. But certainly as i grew older started tinkering with things fixing things I do all the diy at home. now instantly. because i i know how to announce vic stuff and that's because my mom and dad taught me and simple things like that. We need to kind of have big role models all big inspirational stories just as simple as getting goals to do the same things that boys doing is off the coast jamming boys adult but giving both to both both houses and doctors equally important and we need more maleness as well. How did you know that you want to do such a scienc- degree is not saying. Well i think it was probably remind mom because my mom was just not like other people's mountains she wasn't you know i i boy nineteen fifteen and at school i can remember lots of girls sort of talking about mom's doing by Things that have where it was. My mum was never like that. I remember one day going into schools. Eight or nine and we were talking about what it what we were talking about yesterday when you have taken some of the single. My mom is to address with making mallock Away with about if you had a gun during the second world war. John which you shoot hitler and they were kind of my mom about stuff mama's Just wasn't mummy ish. Save at the time obselete leash. She really got to do a couple of quick questions now. Just so we get more people's questions asked philip cat neck says how have women's bodies often without consent advanced medicine. Well i think ghulam boat is adults med. Some food the learning of individuals by working with patients and a actually women's bodies of melted multiples into much as men. The things i find very irritate isn't most clinical trials have more men and women and they usually don't have pregnant women They say for safety but you know when now having to do the vaccine trials again in pregnant women they usually have old people either so women need to be more. They're excellent answer. Somebody else tau to feel confident returning to the profession after break in practice due to paternity leave or the circumstances. How do you feel confident coming back in as anybody here had a baby or taking a break for other reasons than going back in. I haven't i think the says too. Failing coat Is pretending your confidence. Yes i'm glad when i was when i was sitting that guessing not sitting signing guessing. Some of the most appalling hatching that you could ever believe from these repulsive drunken men. Some nights i would just look at them like i could not give less of a toss and once you stop doing that. They actually genuinely believe new. Can't once they believe that you've one and i think that's half the battle if you don't worry about it you don't look nervous. You don't look subservient acts that you don't and then eventually you won't be and also don't feel guilt of women who go back to work after having kids feel guilty about their kids with someone else but we have to remember that right through human history. Children have not just been raised by mothers if been raised by communities and it's good for children tablets eighties and in fact that was the last night got for my mother-in-law because she did a lot of babysitting for me when i went back to work and she never. She was a doctor herself. Should just retired and she never let me feel guilty about going to work hooton. it takes well. She probably need that. The only reason she was still alive was to take care of the grandchildren. Very reason the that she'd been allowed postmenopausal she understood the purpose. Thank you so very much for joining us angela. Say thank you very much for joining us. Same sally aa throughout twenty twenty one. The science museum group is hosting a series of climate talks panel discussions q. Days and events connecting you with leaders experts activists and campaigners as they discuss how to tackle the problems facing communities due to climate change. Choose to you. By which i mean you enjoy living appliances for more information and how to book brooklyn the science museum's websites and Now it only feels safe. Thank you so much for coming to the guilty feminists. A science museum livestream. Thank you so much to the science museum for. Having us everyone is. What's so hard behind the scenes to make this happen. I want you.

london yesterday John Newton alexandra nine nineteen fifteen hitler Eight second world war both eighties one twenty twenty one single last night brooklyn mcconaughey both houses nineteen fifties
"saini" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

08:28 min | 3 months ago

"saini" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"What have you and chris of cv. You have to still like his about though. I mean dr either but someone offered me one of those honorary doctorates and make people. Call me doctor all the time. They should be called doctor. So i guessed is a second guessed the uk special envoy on antimicrobial resistance monster trinity college cambridge and former chief medical officer for england in the twenty twenty years on his she became the second woman and the fourth outside the royal family to be appointed dame grand across the order of the bath. Gb for services to public health and research she has also been awarded more than thirty honorary doctorate degrees. So she's i'm thirty. I dream of the date. Please welcome dame sally davies. Sally thank you for joining us. I'm c. glittering. I would say yes. It's quite good. Look back at it. But i didn't set out to do that. It just kind of how i believe that. I'm not saying he didn't set out to do it. But i'm saying it didn't just happen. There's a lot of hard work there. you may not have set out to have a pink fashion. The queen bops. Yeah you really tell a lot of work you haven't you didn't fall out of bed onto it either so we are talking to you today about women in medicine and angelie. Your first book seems like a great place to start inferior. How science women wrong. Can you tell us a little bit about what's in that. Well i had just given birth to my son and it might not is an engineering so used to write about engineering and physical sciences. But when i went back to work. And i'm sure lots of people can empathize with this. Had to take what i could get and editor set me. Can you to story on the menopause. Which was something. I knew nothing about. You know either academically or through personal experience but had to say yes. Because i needed the work and Just coincidentally at that time. A paper had been published in canada by three mile scientists hog arguing the reason that evolution reason that women experienced the menopause might be because right through our evolutionary history so right throughout human history from the beginning men did not find older women attractive enough to have sex with him. No man of any age and This was wig because There was accounta- theory. In fact the prevailing towns theory that says the reason that women live so long into the insert all years which is more accurate way of thinking about menopause because most animals around the world die around the same time that they stability facility and this grandmother hypothesis states that the reason that women experience menopause long is because just so useful to the kids and the grandkids to help. Keep them alive and a lot of women who worked on this theory now. I had been trained up in a system that said that science is objective. It's rational that whatever ideas we have about the world Through empirical observation and understand. Then why men and women were coming up with theories about the same thing and of course there is there is you know we're we're affected by not just what we taught what we about the world so what we wanted to be true and that's where inferior came off. It's really an investigation into how scientists think about women's minds and bodies and why they think about us that way and all the mistakes that i've made through history and how those mistakes are slowly encrypted. And what did you discover about menopause. Do we know why. But i tell eleven i why because when we talking about why we all the way we all what is human nature and history will never know unless we get a time machine and go back and in and see it for ourselves which will never happen. But the grandmother hypothesis is the one with the most data and Rational behind it. And certainly if you look at the data we can see through studies and observations around the world that the presence of grandmother does increase the lifespan of and grandchildren so there is an evolutionary mechanism. At least there is a possibility that that could be true. So that's the one on sticking with rather than the. I am honestly disappointed. That the only reason i'm going to live beyond menopause to care for children. I want it to be more feminist than that. I wanted to be because women are meant to come together and take leadership one day. Take over the world i want. I want to be more than not enough hanged. Anything's possible. Okay yeah evolutionary biology an evolutionary theory. You can come up a chevy. We like he can look on that. If you like in the case through history that women have been looked at a certain way. Haven't they example at roman times women's private bits for cold hugh denda which means things to be ashamed of and also if we hysterical that men's our way was off wondering rounds out both a Wind could get on the shelves who get something. East villa denied. But i'm so i think from that. You know women have always been severely innocent. Weigh-in might never thought that in some ways maybe the cool part of sciences objective but scientists. Very much guided by who you are on what the sort of i love this word and people find annoying but what Paradigm is in terms of how people view particular scientific theories so it's never totally objective. Is it would be. Scientists tend that they are imagine that they are not least because it makes them feel authoritive and more important than every shaw sally. You went from being a doctor to being in public health. So a role like chris witty. How was that how. How does it go for being a doctor to somebody who has to comment on the health and the health practices and guided a whole nation's health. Well it is quite scary all the way through actually because so many different things come. A strength is in being able to interrogate people literature. Angela and i share. That will look at the literature and two assimilated to a view and the differences. You'll going from an individual in front of you and so the balance shifts because you'll think about populations but everyone wants to help and we're all born with brain. Some of i say you learn about it. People give advice then you come to a conclusion for me. The biggest journey worlds to learn about the health impacts of deprivation. I knew from my work. In brenta was a doctor working on sickle cells. About how difficult it was. But i hadn't understood the broad aside deprivations impact on health. And if you look now the fact that we're having one of the worst outcomes in terms of deaths per population from kovin eighties related to deprivation. Am i i got there but it took me a euro two to learn that understand it. So you've got to look at the sort of societal factors. That might make up a health crisis. What do you think is one of the greatest global health now. We've had this global health challenge. I acutely aware we all want species all trying to put borders and keep these people out. You know prioritize also whatever. We're one species. The virus doesn't care. What our flag football team. We support whether or not. We're trying to put up borders to keep refugees out the viruses the virus and it sees us all as human beings. What's one of the greatest global health challenges. The future i think it is he work as a globe. And how are we fair to old parts of it and that plays out through kobe. Not safe to the rest of the world is vaccinated but.

Angela Sally twenty twenty years today thirty fourth canada first book second woman one species three mile second chris hugh denda both one dame eleven sally davies monster trinity college cambri
"saini" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

04:43 min | 7 months ago

"saini" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Note. I do think that we need to reform the way. The internet works auditor. Curb them. because i think it's played a huge part in fermenting division and polarization among ordinary people. Yeah i agree. I completely agree. What about about on the positive note is there that you can point to that. You actually are hopeful about even in light of all of this well. It's very easy to be pessimistic. When you look at the direction of the world but have to say like i said of given lots of university talk this year and i see so many people young and old have to say responding in such positive ways to movements like black lives matter to feminist too feminist movements to social justice movements all over the world fighting for freedom and fighting for rights in places like hong kong and elsewhere Pushing for the lives that they want futures more equal and inclusive united features for themselves. And it's very difficult. I think to be pessimistic. When they're when. I think the number of people in the world fighting for a more inclusive feature i think outweighs those who want something else. So i'm i am. I agree and i think almost a perfect example because of the timing of our interview is that you know you were mentioning spending time in hungary and the the horrors of seeing this kind of governmental draconian blocking of a sort of free thought an intellectual curiosity when it comes to things like feminism and and You know the of of gender relations and then you know just what was it yesterday or the day before your next door. Neighbors in scotland became the first nation who make sanitary products to audio. It's amazing yeah really really impressive ivc so it is true we can. We can find examples of these strongmen governments in these rise and populist movements where individuals really cling to a totalitarian leader who you know Purports to be the only answer to their problems which is obviously not proven very successful directly but if we do keep our eyes open we see these incredibly democratic incredibly Beautiful policy changes occurring to across the world to reduce the impacts of global climate. Change to lift people out of poverty to to bring opportunity equal opportunity to to individuals. And i think that those things you know passing of national healthcare movements across democratic countries. We don't have that here. We started to make some progress but seeing how well it does in so many nations to make gives me You know a lot of hope. These basic human rights movements. That actually have just immeasurable incalculable. Incalculable kabul god. I can't say that. Were impacts for people who have historically been oppressed or disenfranchised Those gains to mir just beautiful. They they bring a lot of emotion and my. I'm not saying that history has one direction. I'm not necessarily sure that it does. But i do think that There is a lot of. I think in this point in history in particular individuals have so much agency in how things turn out. We really do as individuals have such a huge impact on the direction of our governments on The kind of future that we want to have an that has to be celebrated and we have to grow splat. We have to exercise the agency as much as possible. Absolutely what angela. Thank you so much for taking the time. I knew i know we went. We went over a bit. I was just having such a with you jay. I'm recording this on the day before thanksgiving and i know that you guys don't thanksgiving's tomorrow that's right. Well yeah. I day when it's a day of giving thanks as they say and it's all about gratitude and i just wanted to share my gratitude with you for spending this time with me today. Thank you so much pleasure course. Everybody listening thank you as well for coming back a week after week. I'm really looking forward to the next time we all get together to talk nerdy..

hong kong hungary scotland kabul angela jay
"saini" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

07:58 min | 7 months ago

"saini" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"The psychological evidence that we have an racist a social construct is very difficult to get biological evidence there but even on gender there is not good psychological evidence to suggest that there are profound differences in the way that men and women fundamentally think or intellectual capacities. You really have to. You know exhaust every other avenue before you go that and if you really feel you've exhausted every other avenue then fine but you try that first. But yet don't go there for you know it. So i remember. When i was talking to adam rutherford on the show several months ago and it was kind of right at the beginning of the pandemic or may be halfway through has gotten Gotten over it Because he had co ed and we were talking about how it was sort of what you opened that. That explanation with this idea that by and large We were seeing poorer outcomes for kind of black and brown people in both the us and the uk and that there are a million explanations institutional and systemic explanations for that yet so many people you would see all of these papers and all of these news articles that are like could it be a d. thing. It's probably vitamin d. vitamin d. And i remember talking to talking about okay when we talk about sort of a scientific explanations for things that are multifaceted. There's there's variance. there's one hundred percent of the variance within some sort of explanation is accounted for by different things zero-some game right so if this percentage has to do with Being low s this percentage has to do with access to medical care. This percentage has to do with bias. If when you do get the medical care blah blah blah wide is it that so many people want to go to. It's one hundred percent because of their genes or even fifty percent genes really the very last explanation. You should go to. It's the first explanation so many people went to when it came to black people are faring poorer in kovic. It must be because there's something about being black that makes them more susceptible about their their biological blackness. When it's like. Why would you even think that i when the other the vast majority of the variance that would lead to that. We already have good evidence on because it's the same reason. Black people are more likely to have diabetes and black people are more likely to have lower infant mortality and this is just another example on the oil. So it's like we already have the evidence of the systemic problems the racism that underlies this yet each new disease. But maybe this one. Maybe this time we can come up with a biological explanation. It's just fascinating. Yeah but i think that's because science isn't just about fads. These facts about race being a social construct about the fact that we are one human species that we are genetically more similar to each other more homogeneous than any other primate. All of those facts. We have nine for a very long time man. They've been clear clearly. There wise the narrative not different and that's because signs isn't just about these simple biological facts is also about the stories that we tell around those spots and the story we've told her about race for so long. Is this something innate to at this something visceral about it if you're going to dismantle narrative and install different one that we need to start treating race thinking about race and ethnicity as not not as a biological quantity but as a social one in the same way that we think about clause the social quantity and that requires quite a big change in mindset in the way that a lot of scientists work actually and especially in medical research You know to fundamentally just move out of one scheme of thinking into another to build a different set of narratives around the data that we have is really very very difficult. Yeah it's almost. I mean it. It does require like one of these cunene type of show right this like almost an se points to in the structure of scientific revolutions like it means people usually have to get old and they have to die and a new group of people who have a new worldview. Have to come in and reconceptualise these things and and you know it may take multiple generations. It may never completely change. But but i. I do agree with you as you pointed to earlier in the show that we are seeing a different mentality in in younger and more globally connected technologically proficient scholars and that was really prominent thing. Yeah i do see that happening but at the same time. One of the forces militating against that among the young as well as in the scholars is Identity politics which i think is necessary. We need see politics with you. Know we can't fight for our rights s we recognize identity social identity But the problem is it so especially in the social media age it's so easily becomes weaponized in In ways that mislead people about what these identities at she made you know these. All social identities were talking about. They have a visceral impact on our bodies. They can haven't visceral impact on health outcomes as a result but that doesn't mean that Now anymore biological than they ever were. And sometimes the narratives within politics movements can lean towards that can lead lean towards imagining that. There's something there is something visceral about us that that you know there is something deep down that makes you who you all belonging to a certain group when actually that was never the case. It's it's about experience it's about cultural experience. It's about history. It's about ola things. But it's not about biology. And i think even now for a lot of people that's a hard thing to let go is especially for example in my case on the child of immigrants is especially hot. Let go for us because our of generations are connections to our You know our heritage or cultural heritage in other countries becomes weaker and weaker. And all we have left is society's perception that we are different based on our skin. Color or terrance and so we want to believe there's something deep down that connects us to our heritage. Achy is just. Racism is forcing us to do that. Sometimes the is denying us the opportunity to feel as british's any other british person as any other white british person And it creates this kind of It hardens identities in ways that issue. They shouldn't be harder so it works in the other direction and that happens within the sciences to see very well meaning. Scientists have color sometimes and women scientists talking about a gender difference or ratio difference in inappropriate ways not talking about it as though these associated with that. They're saying but talking about them as though you know we need to include black people in clinical trials because drugs tested on white. People were black people. That is nonsense. I mean it's really dangerous to make those kind of statements plus people doing not and we have to be very mindful about right. We need to include black people in clinical trials because their lived experiences significantly different and so their outcomes might be different and not just that we're all different individuals. Clinical trials need to be broader for lots of different reasons. Not least with age. I mean covid. Nineteen the biggest discrepancy. That we see is around age and clinical trials agenda done on younger people. So you know this is a big big issue now in this current pandemic that.

adam rutherford ed diabetes uk us
"saini" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

07:33 min | 7 months ago

"saini" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Racism herself while a saints too shabby of police racism herself. She was stopped. I think when she was a harvard graduate or postgraduate student She was stopped in her car. And and You know quite brutally stops and what is remarkable about Jennifer is that she looks at this and asks not she doesn't assign blame to one group or the other. What she does is the slight assign blame to the system that makes victims of us all the white supremacist is also a victim here as well as being a perpetrator they also victim because how horrible to have to live your life with his warped worldview that damages you by making you so hateful allowing you to live in harmony with other people are seeing the beauty in other people but you know this kind of deep seated hatred where the only joy you can get in being yourself is by believing that you belong to some kind of superior racial group that is that is a that is a damage in itself that is a psychological physical damage to and what is what is great about the way jennifer works is by seeing recognizing that an and drawing people out of these ways of thinking by engaging with a deep down misery or depression or whatever it is that they feel in themselves that leads them down that path of wanting to hate other people. Yes gosh that's so important so important a for the the attempt and really the movement to effecting change. I think it's also important just in the academic literature like when we're doing quality research in this area and publishing in this area really trying to learn about these systemic problems to be able to sort of do it in. I don't want to say a dispassionate way. But in a way that is like truly empathetic for pardons involved. I think the aren't that. I struggle with and i can say this point blank. My growing edge is that there are times as a woman for example. Especially like when. I'm working on the issue as the only women on the show. Where you get these just overtly sexist comments and emails and you want to explain away. That's a little bit like more passive or that's a little bit more like understanding to say. Hey have you thought about looking at it this way or let me show you. I didn't make that off the cuff comment that there's actually a a real literature Supporting what i was saying the other day. And and let me share that with you. But there's also a part of you inside this like no. But i'm angry and i'm a little tired of having like where kid gloves and and navigate around the fragile egos of the sexist mall constantly. You know who. I'm constantly being affronted with like. That's the part that i struggle with a little 'cause there are days when i'm like okay. I can do this and their days. Where i'm like you know what. Fu like a company. That i completely get it. And that was part of the reason that i wrote inferior and especially wrote at the way that i did. I didn't have in my mind. Although it's the book that's widely read by women. And i and for me personally as a woman it change the way i think about myself and an about womanhood is important but i wrote it largely with those people in my head though sexist. You know those people who have these entrenched ideas in need to be drawn out to them. Because i was tired. I mean as you say you just get tired of having to engage in these arguments all the time you know being forced being driven to give evidence to support what you're saying it should be self evident which should become knowledge to everybody and i just felt fine the i could get it all down in book out and just say i don't need to explain myself because it's all written down here and if you don't want to read it then that's on you know you don't have to if you're acknowledges your choice but i don't have to argue with you about this and we shouldn't have to argue. I mean how long fed that we have to justify our equality our capacity our humanity every single day to people who don't believe it. If you're not willing to take the frankly the scientific approach to understanding inequality then you can call yourself a rationalist. You just can't And i struggle with that within the scientific. Skeptical community you know. I work a lot within skeptical circles and of course we know that skepticism has a woman problem and we know that skepticism has raised problem. And i think part of it comes down to sort of libertarian. Ideological bent that a lot of skeptics seemed to have And i think some of it comes down to a fundamental misunderstanding of phenomenology and of science. And of like you know. How do we know what we know. well You know i think a lot of skeptics will would argue that we can really only know what we know if there's been a double blind randomized control trial and it's not the only way to achieve knowledge. We care to not reduce everything to if i can't prove it in a in a study it doesn't even exist or it's not even meaningful. Yeah in the real world doesn't work that way human being not run the you know we're not you cannot randomize us in that way. You can't study racism through trials in that way. Those you just can't you might be able to unst on the psychology of racism or aspects of it. But you need history here. What you need is an understanding of social history of culture of politics going all the way back. That is the only thing that can explain the world as we see it now this assumption that signs you know these kind of hard science can explain. Everything is just not true when it comes to human relations is i mean. It's just it's ridiculous to think that's possible completely agree at or that like if it's not scientific we shouldn't be asserting ourselves or we shouldn't be arguments because they're you know. Oh that's obviously tinged by your bias that's obviously tinged by your ideology unless you can point to a publication like it ignores two things number one that everything is biased and everything in my ideology and number two that the only way to know what we know is again through those kinds of trials. But i think that's why. I love your book so much because they sort of take this approach and tell me if i'm if i'm sort of misinterpreting may be the center of the journey but the take this approach of saying like this is where we are now and let's try and unpack how we got to where we are now. And what were the driving forces. What were the motivations. What were the ideologies Throughout again throughout science your science writer and this is really taking that lens of race science of gender science or really specifically how women have been sort of mistreated not just in positions of scientific authority like training education. You know Professorships things like that but also the research are women have been systematically ignored in like biological research for example. Yeah and i think you know you can. You can actually take a scientific approach to history. I mean as you say you can look at some social phenomenon and you can say okay. What different ways to a half of explaining what i see so for example. Let's take women in physics. We don't see as many.

saints harvard Jennifer jennifer depression Fu
"saini" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

08:06 min | 7 months ago

"saini" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Of strength and have a sense of power. And unfortunately what i'm seeing over and over again is a misunderstanding of what privileges that when you privilege has almost become a weaponized words that when you try to say it's a privilege for you to not have had to thought about these things because these things simply don't affect you that is very different than saying your life has been amazing enough. That's a very difficult distinction for people to absorb when you hear that word because privileges usually what that we associate with very wealthy people. The top one percent. Who have everything they could ever want for for. You know working class white person who slogs every day to hear that they are. Privileged is a difficult thing to here and i understand. I understand that. Because powell works in very complex ways. It's not a simple for example simple case at all men dominate all women in a in a patriarchal or melnea but is not the case that all white people have power over all black people. There are many very well educated. Very affluent black americans who have a great deal of power but that doesn't mean that if they go to a hospital room They may not be treated differently. They may face racism in unexpected ways. That less advantaged and And less affluent white person will not meet so there were always different. Layers here that coincide in any one individual And i think. I feel sometimes the rhetoric of privilege and white supremacy and race and identity politics while it's important because it kind of gives a language to the dynamics that we see out there in the world can also be quite reductionist and damaging ways an alienating ways because ultimately a quality is good for everyone if we can if a society can accept that at an embrace. The black-americans are as capable and as beautiful as any other american. Then that is a sign that that society can accept that anyone is capable of anything can and beautiful in every way that we not that you know when you break down one of those ways of dehumanizing a group than breakdown down other ways of dehumanizing groups including the rich and the poor men and women old all the different other power dynamics than come into question and i think sometimes i worry that that gets lost and that's the way to appeal to everyone i think ultimately what the ordinary white trump voter say. That's the way to appeal to them to remind them that you want to live in a society where everyone truly has equal opportunities and has an equal chance of becoming president one day or do you want to continue with this system in which only a very very tiny elite of people get do what they want and then i guess the question becomes what happens if somebody does look deep inside of theirselves and they give themselves an honest appraisal and their answer comes to be you know based on all sorts of influences whether it be how they were raised by their family their faith their community society as a whole what if they look inward and they say no. I do think that there are people who deserve this more. They're people who are more capable. Because i'm wondering how i i think that is actually truly a prevalent view. There are a fair amount of people in the world who still have deep-seated them deep seated racism that may be isn't like as overt like you said we like to say when we go that guy such a misogynist or wow that person is like an over white supremacist but this idea of rank ordering this idea of categorization or these. These stereotypes that people hold onto a. I'm reminded of sort. Of like the that jared kushner interview recently. I don't know if you saw it on the news where he was trying to make some sort of wild claim that trump had done more for black americans than any president and he was going on and digging himself deeper hole and eventually he said the thing. That's like wow. What year is it where he goes. We want help. You know those who are less. fortunate. I'm paraphrasing here. You know have all the opportunities but we can't want it more than they want. It themselves soon icy. I see you truly believe that. Black people are lazy or that black. People really don't want social mobility and that's why they're not getting it. That's where i your. What happens when that undercurrent just it's so prevalent and it hasn't gone away via it is still there but i think we have to accept its in every single one of us these by seasons stereotypes we raised with because of the societies that we live in. I mean i. I know from my own life my experience. I'm very fortunate to have grown up in a very galateri -tarian family. We didn't have any distinction between men and women's work in my family. When i was growing up but when i went to school and because of the subject choices that i made i was the only goal in a lot of my classes in my physics and in chemistry musk losses and i was the only goal in a lot of my classes at university studied engineering and i did internalized despite my upbringing. This idea that. Perhaps i was different from other women that men may be better at this subject than i was and not signaling the fact that when i was at school at least i can talk in the least of my subjects and there were a lot of boys in my class. Who not academically brilliant they. Would you know make different choices from the goals. But that's because they were particularly better. These subjects in the goals were the leaving that aside. I think this internalisation based on what we observe in society is so it's it's so common and it's so easy to you. we see. You cannot blame people for doing this because every single one of us does it if the only if if every board chairman that you see looks like a white man then you're going to start to think to yourself. Well maybe white men do this better if a pilot that you see when you when you fly. Airplane is a white man or man. Then you're gonna start saying well. Maybe you know men or veteran flying this these planes and than the women are. It's just a not troll. I'm not saying it's logical because so many other explanations for what you're seeing but it's a very natural trap to fall into an scientists have fallen into even the best scientists the full intuit dalwin for into its goodness sake. He looked at victorian society around him and he just thought that women were less evolved than men because if they weren't than they would be doing the same jobs's ignoring of course that. How are they supposed to do the same jobs as and when they didn't have the same level of education or even to university the professions. So we kind of. It's the lazy person's explanation. Full the wall durham. But we all do it. You know this is how stereotypes foam. Yeah and i wonder. I wonder sometimes about the psychology kind of once. I admit because it's like you said look around you see patterns see structures and they're reinforced to end it. You kind of the easy or or the lazy approaches to say this is the natural order of things and as you said yourself ignoring the fact that there were barriers right so the big thing that's being ignored in the algorithm here is oppression and i wonder sometimes if the psychology of ignoring oppression is such that. It's like a guilt. Avoidance thing like if i can pretend like it's not because of oppression. I know that i don't have to admit that i had a hand in it A nobody wants to. Nobody wants to think that they got.

jared kushner galateri tarian powell trump durham
"saini" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

01:44 min | 7 months ago

"saini" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"We need.

"saini" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

07:53 min | 7 months ago

"saini" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"That's december twenty first and december twenty eighth. We won't have a new episode. But hopefully they're still a lot of good stuff and if you're behind on episodes they'll they'll be able to carry you through. And we'll post them some oldies but goodies. Some best that you can make sure to to listen to if you haven't come across them yet this week show though. Oh my gosh. I'm so excited. I don't know how to tell you. How excited i am. This is one of those rare experiences where i had the opportunity to interview an author that i just profoundly respect whose work i absolutely love. I've read both of her kind of newer books. That have been really influential on my work so so let me tell you a little bit more about her. Her name's angela. Seyni and she's an independent british science journalist and author. She does a lot of radio and tv presenting and she's also written For all sorts of different outlets sunday times nature new scientist nat geo and wired. She's won a ton of awards. She did a two part documentary series for bbc. Four all about the history and science of eugenics which aired last autumn and. She wrote to stunning books. Which have won a ton of awards the first one inferior how science got women wrong and the second one superior the return of race science. This is a really important chat. it's one that means an awful lot me And i was just thrilled to have the opportunity to sit down with her so without any further ado here. She is angela. Saney well angela. Thank you so much for joining me today. Welcome it's a pleasure to be. I'm super excited to finally be sitting down with you. One one to one obviously virtually not in person To talk about your books which Have just been really influential for me and i think are so so so important for literally everybody on this planet. Thank you and so. I i know superior and i know inferior. I've read them both cover to cover But i'm not sure that. I know whether or not are these. Your only books are written before these two came out. No i did try one A longtime before both of those came out. It was called geek nation. It was kind of travelogue through indian science Looking at the ways in which science technology was changing the way india worked and the kind of rise of this scientific superpower. I didn't know how in dated it is these days. But the fact that india's taken such a of leading role in in vaccine development and production. Particularly i think just shows that many asian countries have come into their own now signed to a. Oh yeah. that's yeah that's fascinating and also it's kind of like here in the us and and where you are in the u k. I can imagine that there is sort of this very Centric and of western centric view of the world especially the sort of science technology world. There is but i think it's shifted. wrote keith nation. Something like a decade ago more than a decade ago and at that time there's no doubt india and china were ascendant in the scientific universe but china i think has without a doubt leaped ahead so much and you can see it when you read any scientific journal. These days is just so much prolific output and not just that you get scientists from china working all over the world now. so it's. it's an exciting time. i think to look at science outside the west because yeah everything's changing absolutely and of course everything is becoming so much more global It's you not only can. We no longer operate sort of in this isolationist vacuum but i i think from a moral perspective and really a practical perspective perspective no longer should we operate in a very isolated way. Yeah but i just think it's possible now. The from countries like china is just so immense that you'd have to be sitting in a silo to miss what's going on there and you would suffer scientifically didn't notice what was going on right right so you know Speaking to the the two books that i think have just been so instrumental. And i know that you've been interviewed by like a million people at this point Superior the return of ray science and inferior science. Got women wrong and the new research. That's writing the story You know they have obviously a compelling and very kind of shocking titles and of course the titles are meant to be ironic in the sense that this is what the science has been trying to tell us it. When it's by s and obviously women are not inferior. Obviously whites are not superior but there have been long scientific arguments in that direction. Have you had to. I guess battle or like defend yourself when when people against the titles of your books you mean people. Misinterpreting the hills saying ironic. I'm brian of not not in the uk. But i have noticed a couple of people. For example a reader in the us got in touch to say that she was nervous about reading superior on a train in case someday misinterpreted twenty one three. Maybe she was reading this white supremacy manual or something but No not so much shot. She is gonna come up as a question to the possibility for for that sesame. It's i remember when talking about like booking you. I can't remember if it was for for the interview on the skeptics guide to the universe. Four maybe we were talking about a conference back in the day and I do remember there being some some concern from some people in the sort of The decision making panel saying are people going to misinterpret that kind of science. This should receive race pseudoscience and stabbed misunder. And i think they'll get it because of who we are but okay. Yeah i guess escape for that. But i think the reason. I didn't call rayson pseudoscience while why don't you know kind of put it in quotation marks or anything because historically Thinking about races in this way or even even having the concept of the human beings could be divided into races was was part of mainstream science. Were very long time. It was considered that way. We have to confront that because if we can sign it to kind of pseudoscientific paused a something that doesn't affect us anymore. Then we really absolve ourselves of the current need to address the ways in which these ideas to live on in modern day research. Oh absolutely you know. This is a big topic. But it's a topic that's been sort of in the forefront of my mind for quite some time now for for several reasons of just last week. I i'm taking a course right now. It's one of my last courses for for my phd called integrative assessment. So it's a class where we take you know clinical psychological interview plus all these different psychological assessments. Look at the outcomes of them and then write a big integrative report and we were writing about you know ethnic diversity race of country of origin and Just multiculturalism in assessment and kind.

angela Seyni Saney china keith nation india bbc rayson us uk
"saini" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"saini" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Will Saini interview that she met him when he was nine my check and also I think you told us well it gets too needed to tune in at nine thirty five you can hear Dionne Warwick it's gonna be great so now here's the bad this is fine we're just trying to lighten up here have a good time I loved as a kid Siskel and Ebert at the movies member gene Siskel and Roger Ebert thumbs up thumbs down guys lan well let's let's give the background of how this came up okay we're talking about Hempstead where I live there gonna have some drive in movies and the the first one's going to be in port Washington isn't it's Goonies which I don't ever remember seeing from the eighties but you went on online and saw the Siskel and Ebert both gave it three out of four stars right right and that's what brought up the name Cisco neighbors I'm just doing your set up of what why you were talking about him off Mike today well they're managing lands on top of something credible had nine o'clock that's the amazing thing he was taken to Joe Biden drug okay kids if they just get on with your Cisco the academy so Siskel and Ebert they and there is some outtakes okay when they would do promos you know and they have to say coming up at the movies is we do you know and sometimes the chatter you know in between our segments is funnier than some of the stuff we put on the air so I found a couple of these out take them Natalie has one I found another one too that we can use a little later in the program but here Siskel and Ebert and they're just yet they're taping promos for the show so that just kind of goofing off now I if you listen closely where they got right Genesys gene Siskel as drunk here he is totally drunk sounds like you yeah right here's the clip the forecast is for members of the movie is the science fiction adventure robocop.

Dionne Warwick gene Siskel Roger Ebert Hempstead Mike Natalie Saini port Washington Joe Biden Genesys
"saini" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"saini" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"It'll drain clean out one night down there and cleared out quicker than a hound dog after a rabbit what's his name it's a thirty foot long cable that you could sneak down into a sewer line and clear the blockage doesn't work every time nine times out of ten what about the tenth time well it could be a grease trap our toilet clog or maybe they don't have a ground level that's a whole different deal but nine times out of ten it's just eighty dollars nine out of ten eighty dollars what made you decide to do it for free the customer has seen guard dog protection Saini talked me into it you can talk to dogs you heard what I said about the hound dog and rabbit didn't sack there's not another company in America this offering all the air conditioning and heating and plumbing benefits that were offered for just fourteen ninety five a month and nobody else got a dog like Sadie you make a good point G. O. E. T. Teo are plumbers are handsome and they don't smile from the treason will studio your local fiduciary dot com this is A. N. S. T. E. M. seven nine and I art radio station Wall Street is sick again Lisa Brady fox news the coronavirus roller coaster continues for financial markets as the number of cases keeps climbing the vice president traveling to some key areas fox's John decker is live at the White House vice president Mike pence during a three M. plant in Minnesota which is ramping up production of surgical masks aimed at preventing the spread of the corona virus this is an all hands on deck effort president trump said that we would have a whole of government approach that means government at every level hence the head of the White House coronavirus task force telling reporters at three AM is poised to meet the demand for masks and medical equipment for those affected by corona virus and for dedicated healthcare workers the Senate passes poised to pass a roughly eight billion dollars emergency funding bill to fight the spreading corona virus Lisa John pence heads next to Washington state where ten people have died around Seattle most in a nursing home California is under a state of emergency cruise ship passengers returning to San Francisco or being tested on the ship after one recent passenger died Elizabeth Warren's run for president is over but unlike other recent drop out she's not endorsing anyone yet fox's Rachel Sutherland live in Washington please listen to Warren says she wants more time to think about endorsement has she told reporters outside her Massachusetts home that running for the White House has been the honor of a lifetime she also promised to keep fighting for working families hard.

San Francisco Massachusetts Washington fox Lisa John pence president Lisa Brady A. N. S. T. E. M. fiduciary White House Rachel Sutherland Elizabeth Warren Saini California Seattle Senate trump Minnesota
"saini" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

Point of Inquiry

12:56 min | 1 year ago

"saini" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

"The intellectuals Winston Churchill Virginia Woolf D. H. Lawrence so some of the leading thinkers and intellectuals of the day bought into this idea that we could improve the population through the selective give breeding program and that some people better now of course the people who are really behind it with the ones who are who considered themselves superior ones the ones who would want more or of and this is a recurrent feature of both Ray signs on eugenics that he's always somehow the scientists themselves that place themselves at the top the hierarchy every single time. I don't know how that happens. If scientists find so completely with that happened but somehow it's always the white. European scientists scientists telling us that White Europeans are the superior race and that it's always kind of the wealthy white men male you genesis female eugenicist for that matter in the early twentieth century telling people that the poor were out breeding the rich and the poor should be stopped from having so many babies the criminal type of kind of taking over and this is a kind of logic. You still see I think you still see hints of it today. In the way that we think about poor people and immigrants and you know people at the margins of society right although maybe the terminology has changed the the essence of it is more or less less what it once was now so when we get to World War Two of course there's this idea that ray science. It's and eugenics is no longer conscionable. It seems at least from the outside that race science dissipated shortly after World World War Two but according to the book this this is a myth so what happens after World War Two well of course in Nazi Nazi Germany is where we see the kind of logical conclusion of eugenics play out so we have to remember eugenics said was very popular in Britain later and although it never made it into government see it did make it into policy in certain states in the US so there were sterilization programs in certain states in the US in in fact even up until the middle of the twentieth century in the Second World War in Japan and in India there were sterilization in huge huge muster legislation programs so eugenics was popular all over the world as a kind of like you said it kind of way of making the population healthy the by getting rid of the negative what were perceived to be negative elements within it but in Nazi Germany of course we see it play out through the policy of if racial hygiene and then in conclusion the Holocaust and when not happened of course when the world kind of came to grips with what had happened at the same time time scientists were also starting to realize and figure out that actually eugenics wasn't implementable that it wouldn't work in the way that they imagined it once word and because of the way traits are inherited and because of the randomness and luck involved in how such traits pass down there was everybody turned their back on it so after the Second World War there was this huge consensus around the world in fact enshrined by the United Nations nations that eugenics was pseudoscience that race was a social construct and that race science had no place in biology origine mall so the investigation of human difference what it meant to be different went from biology into fields like anthropology in the social sciences so it went from kind of the hard study of what makes us different physically into how does difference player culturally literally what are the effects of racism and discrimination on the body on the mind and this is the this is the kind of race research is still to this day of of course and rightly so you know the study racism and discrimination. There's a huge body of literature within the social sciences investigating this and sometimes really surprised geneticists say to me. Oh you know because of the greater boo as they have is when I was writing the book one one Genesis said to me you know this is great to boo stopping us from researching racial differences and I think to myself not much social scientists doing it for seventy years and the literature is enormous. Go and study it. It's all there it wasn't done in genetics because it was thought ought to be no longer worthwhile doing genetics but it has been done elsewhere even though this people turn their backs on this after World War Two as you say hey it's shifted away from biology to the social sciences and you talk quite a bit about this journal Manned Mankind quarterly that accepts steps these ideas and even though it's sort of on the fringes there are still people in within respected people within academia sort of dabbling or having relationships with with this journal and with people publishing in this journal and it still exists tests right yeah so even though there was this kind of global consensus that ray science race had no place within biology anymore. Not all scientists were you're on board with that consensus and you can imagine that of course they must have been people many people who had built entire careers out of studying being racial difference before the Second World War and during the Second World War to suddenly be told us the Second World War. No you can't do this anymore. While many people were on board with that the political reasons and for scientific reasons some people just couldn't let go and they included Nazi ray scientists for obvious reasons. There are some that thought that you know we there was even one. Otmar von Virtue who I write about in superior who had conducted experiments on the bodies of Auschwitz victims and he along with a number of other scientists some of them in the UK UK some of them in the US but scattered all over the world decided well if mainstream journals don't want US anymore if they don't want to hear about the work that we're doing and then we'll just create our own journal not what they did they invented the mankind quarterly they were funded by a very wealthy segregationists in the US textile heir who is committed to maintaining segregation in the US and wanted to build a kind of intellectual case for it so he funded the scientists funded this journal and really the mankind quarterly became a mouthpiece for these kind of us and the mankind quarterly still in publication education today in fact the current editor. I interviewed the previous editor who was the edge to when I was writing my book for superior there there is since the new editor this year and he has been trolling me incessantly online since my book came out t t shirt making fun of your he tried to imitate me yeah tried to imitate me cheap video and he warned body and shirt to pretend that he was mean probably he put on a voice and everything and and because of complaints are video has since taken down but now. I understand you posted elsewhere so these are people who are still committed to this idea that race ace is firmly real that they were found not just superficial differences superficial physical differences between racial groups but profound intellectual differences between green groups and these differences define the parts of history that these differences are the reason the West was successful for instance as though history is over and the West is a success and nobody else will ever be a success ever again or you know. The rest of history was just leading up to what Europeans Sean's winning everything but there are committed to this idea that the way history has worked is a reflection of the racial differences senses between us and it's a deeply political idea of course it's a deeply white supremacist idea and it has its roots firmly firmly in the scientific racism and Eugenics of the past but it hasn't completely left us mankind quarterly of course sounds and is very fringy but scientific racism is as you say manifesting in really tangible ways throughout society from academia to medicine to the workplace so that brings me to a bit that you wrote in the afterward of the book and that what is that you believe that intellectual racism is quote a toxic little seed at the heart of academia so can you share how this is currently at the heart of academia outside of mankind quarterly say because most skeptics are science enthusiasts and I understand why but they would believe that surely no reputable scientists let alone a reputable science journal would give credence to these ideas well. I as an engineering student as I once was and as a humanist would have also believe that at one point before superior that these are ideas on the fringes that they have no place in mainstream science but the argument or make in superior is that it is the persistence of these ways of thinking in every every single one of us that has allowed these ideas to flourish at the margins so at the fringes the reason that publications that mankind quarterly exist list and that its followers believe what they do is because they feel they have enough in mainstream science to give them sucker so when they when geneticists equivocate over race as they do and when popular population geneticists use the old fashioned racial categories in appropriately as they very often do when doctors and medical researchers use racial categories as though they're biologically real which they do routinely then it feels as though racist real and it feels like that to everybody so for example when I give talks. People people often say to me well if racism real. Why does my doctor tell me that because I'm black. I should be given this drug or why am I told that I am much more prone to diabetes because I'm South Asian or this because I'm black hole this big some white or this big Hispanic and the answer is this muddiness of thinking that never really went away so like I said off the Second World War there was this consensus but science never really confronted its history in moving on it really just kind of put everything in a box and said had this horrible Nazi Racial Hygiene Happen. This horrible eugenic happened but we are better than this now. We know better so they just moved on like before population. Collation genetics was a field that emerged out of eugenics. The genesis of the past became the population genetics this of the future even that they may have been averted anti-racist or many of them were very well intentioned. These ways of thinking still permeated them. They still used racial categories. We know they were they were telling us they had no meaning they were still using them in their work and in fact today ancestry testing which so many scientists tell us is a load of bunker kerm. They tell us that ancestry tell you anything is a load of rubbish. Why would you have this turn well. Ancestry testing came out of population genetics in fact they were population and genetic sitting on the boards of many of these street testing companies so if it was complete bunker then why would that be the case now the reason this has happened is not because races real it happened because scientists have not grappled fully with a history of their field they have not fully dismantled this this way of thinking and started again what they did was just continue and this is Alexi that we live with now this. This brings question to mind. Do you have thoughts then on say the all of US genome sequencing project. It's still important to study the diverse diverse groups of people when it comes to sage nomex is that effort kind of haunted. Maybe by not a scientists not having having grappled with this past. Do it can be done well without grappling with us every amuses me when I see scientists very well intentioned well-meaning inning scientists told me how important it is.

mankind quarterly US us mankind quarterly Manned Mankind quarterly Winston Churchill Virginia Woo Ray editor Germany United Nations Japan UK Auschwitz Britain Alexi India seventy years
"saini" Discussed on Stacey's Pop Culture Parlour

Stacey's Pop Culture Parlour

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"saini" Discussed on Stacey's Pop Culture Parlour

"Mcevoy's doing like the world's way it stacks, and it's not even the Siamese and he's done in previous X men movies about. Think. Da da da know what he's doing is very weird. But I think it says a lot of the film that even like, even fast bend is, like me, normally, you would say he was the best thing about film. I guess he sort of walls in these, but he was still very clearly phone in and not not doing an awful law. Gates role is to snow suffering interesting. I don't think it helped that we went to see on the same day that we'd already seen Toy Story fool, which was really fucking good. Possibly did those those two films the wrong way rain should've should've had the pallet cleanser Toy Story fool. But we decided to go see that early in the morning to avoid the potential for, like lots of small, children, being present, which which turned it to court. Well, toy socials great. I haven't intended talk will say it's very good. All I've gotta wear opinion on the in the I think it might be as good as possibly even better them. I would need to rewatch the original Toy Story. And I say that because I've got quite a few problems with both to I'm three this like, they're still both ways in picks off films. Don't get me wrong. But this year, there's some stuff that happens in both of them. That I'm just sort of on three in particular, whistle bother me a little bit, because I don't think he gave would be a very good ending. But thankfully, that's, that's pretty much entirely to a story full addresses and I want Saini mocks, definitely don't want to spoil that the, it's a top top notch Toy Story movie all enjoyed it a lot. One of the things I did definitely want to talk to you all obey walls. You might have heard me binding on a t to blue are pay in the past at took away, remix party are rebound. I think actually put their album from last year. More top ten top five of the, in the Christmas episode absolutely amazing sort of, like, electro funk since pop electric rock. Awesome band. It's really, really selling list is just throwing a Elision of the will. But the guitarist from the band Lord Phobos released an EP. Say kit was last month setting four tracks on it. But he is absolutely amazing. I think the best way, I could describe it and take says you will in terms of whether or not you go it to listen to it, but the best way, I can describe east as being like the soundtrack to Icees movie montage, like he can very Ican pretty much imagine somebody like other no beefing the GM or like just that kind of sort of soaking up, you know, learning hey, to do something kind of a montage. It's very, there's no there's no lyrics to any of it. It's very Yelm. Hey, it's, it's a very retro survey tease kind of look funk. Pop scenes auto. No, give it a listen. Only four tracks. So it's not gonna psycho to which it'd be time. All loved it. I absolutely loved it. But then all of that sort of music, anyway, all of a lot of coins of music. But Louis yet that, that to me was dislike very fun album to, to listen to a mockery..

Mcevoy Louis Saini Gates GM
"saini" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"saini" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"Saini to with me. Ninety two five. For that. In other. You think you? You think I'm crying. And I didn't want over. Didn't want anyone thinking still care. Don't you still a phone and baby? Something I don't wanna back maybe. My mama. One and then. I was wrong is so caught up and. Going home. Oh. If you. You look baby enough. Diffusing. Still hold. Should go. When you. The only. Breath in every. Me my. China made me came from. I didn't want. Didn't want anyone thinking still care don't but you still hit a phone and baby having moving. Something I don't wanna go back. Maybe you should know bed mama. Share like seventy one and I was wrong. And I was so caught up in. Going on. If you. You. Baby enough. Few? Still hold. In you should go. Feel. Felon. Never. Was I? Two..

Saini China
"saini" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

06:00 min | 2 years ago

"saini" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"You something just between you and me. When? Finally, free. Every single vote is. Saini ju- hill with me. Jubal's second date update. There's that old saying nothing says love, like GRE a- or a bad case of worms Jubal in the morning. And that's why feel good about today's second date update because Emma is on the phone and today she wants to call guy named Kevin. And I guess they met at the vet. She had worms. Well, maybe she does. I don't know Emma. Have you been checked forms? I did not have worm. Okay. I think that the rumor mill is already working. Yeah. Bharti posted a blog about it about it. Got some damage control as far as that goes. But tell us a little bit about the dude you wanna call today. His name's Kevin Kevin, we met in the waiting room to vet. That's really cute. It was really sweet. Actually, you know, we're both air with our dog. I have a German shepherd my box. We the sweetest, and he has like a little like a little poodle. Okay. A little thing reversal on those dogs. He's got I. Yeah, just a little tiny thing. Okay. But it was funny because, you know, his dog came up and was just like sitting around box laying there, totally chill and they were just getting along and because they were getting along, and we were kind of catching each other up, and, you know, laughing a little bit. He was like, I'm going to dog park leader if you wanna come, we should totally go. Oh like played eight. Yeah. Like a little dog playmate. I was just for later on that day. Yeah. He was just like this was my plan. Like, yeah. Sure. You know, everything goes, well here we can meet you up at the dog park. Okay. So how long were you guys at the dog park together we were there for like a little over a half an hour. Okay. Well, we're there, there was this guy it didn't look like he had a dog there. We're pretty sure that he didn't have a dog. That's weird. It was so weird. But then we noticed him like going around to all the women that were there and he was like going in, like hitting on them. At the dog park. Trolling for dates. One too many like dating blogs. It was so weird. It was really uncomfortable. Like, at least if you're going to do that, like have a dog. Yeah. Ruined for the day. If you need to find a dog if you're going to go to the dog park, and hit on people. But I mean wasn't it just kind of funny to watch? Why would it be so uncomfortable for you? You could see that the women were okay was persistent like if one girl was like, hey, you know, walked away. He kind of went towards them again and started talking. You could see that people did not want him near them. Okay. Your day was with Kevin or does this guy pick you up in the new left there? This guy is that we're actually calling today. The creepy dog park guy. No. Kevin. Okay. So how did things like end with Kevin? So at the park, Kevin went up to this guy. So Kevin went out with him. Weird guy. Hit it off. He confronted him came. You're just kind, make everyone comfortable like if you don't have a dog, you really shouldn't be here. It was really brave and ground. And I was worried that they were going to get into a fight. Like that's what it looks like. And I was like, oh my God. T's not on this. Like I. So they didn't fight which was great the weird guy left and then all of a sudden, like everyone in the dog park was clapping for him. Hearing him on, like, yeah. Whole area. But awesome. It's so great to see, like, he has a moral high ground, and he'll stand up for other people, but he won't resort violins. Like all awesome things that you wanna see in a person that you want to date. It was very much turn on for me. So after the part, we went and got coffee as a little celebration. And after coffee, we just had this really nice long hug appropriately long or way too long. I think appropriately long, okay. It was really sweet. It felt really comfortable. I felt like we were both have this attraction. But we were like oh, we should have another date before and being oh, and you haven't heard from him since I haven't heard from him since desert, anything that happened other than the weird guy that you think might have ruined your chances at a second date. Honestly, the only thing that I can think of is when we were getting coffee, I had asked him, I was like, oh, you know, how did you get like what's that story? Like, did you adopt him or, you know, some people get dogs different ways like I have a friend who found her dog on the street and took it to the vet. Nobody claimed her. So then she was like, okay if the dog Hobie and I'll keep her last couple from backyard's dogs roaming around backyard's all over the place. Yes. Some of them are gonna like sniff the security wires and stuff or you can just take. It's crazy. How he got his dog, and he said it was his ex girlfriend, and she wasn't taking care of him. I just I don't know if I was prying a little too much about him that, but I feel like that's a normal question for a dog owner. Right. I mean totally, but I got that feeling he was like, okay, I don't wanna talk about this. So I don't know. I just know that he had called me back. All right. Play song. Then come back and get your second date update. Right. Okay. Hang on..

Kevin Kevin Emma Saini ju- hill Jubal Bharti mill
"saini" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"saini" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"But it sent sent a bunch of giants dive and out of the way. Wanted to. Sends a Tele holding now pitches and he throws a slider. The bell takes low to Antonio sends a teller has ground this game do all halt as soon as there's been a runner in scoring position. He is just taking forever. Now. He gets the baseball walks around off the backs global amount climbs back on top rubs it up. Takes his hat off flips the ball up in the air after he puts his hat back on takes a deep breath. Now finally looks into get the sign for my Annetta. And once again, he's not getting the Saini Watson he steps off again. Good grief. They go through the signs again. Now, he gets ready to do the pitch is low three and two. I mean all of this and the last three pitches have not been anywhere close to the strike zone. He's gonna take again takes his glove off walks back to that little bit cleaner. Kick some mud out of his cleats. I don't understand why that's allowed what possible reason. Does he have from going off the mound entirely? What can you accomplish by walking off the mound? You couldn't accomplish by stepping back from the slab and collecting your thoughts taking a deep breath, actually, ailing whatever. He's done it again. Now walked off the he stepped off again. Now, he's back on top. Three.

Saini Watson baseball Antonio
Patriots Release WR Jordan Matthews After Significant Hamstring Injury, sign 1-year deal with Erick Decker

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

04:39 min | 3 years ago

Patriots Release WR Jordan Matthews After Significant Hamstring Injury, sign 1-year deal with Erick Decker

"What does he go play outside in a different sport now? Oh, yeah. Yeah. I mean six. Nine, whatever you gonna play when he gets blasted over the middle, is he gonna come back to the bra, took you seem stitching. His nose play with a mass drop sixty one on on on on the Hornets as broken. No, but he. Loved asked, and he'd be going around with a different mentality. That's a whole different ball football and basketball player. The why differently? Enough, realize it always comes back to this guy at some point. Thank you for being here. It's always good to get. Tom Brady is wide receiver group seems to constantly change and the patriots Jordan Mathews yesterday after he signed a one year deal this off season, but he reportedly suffered a significant hamstring injury on Sunday, the patriots maybe adding former titans wide receiver, Eric decker who worked out for the team this week. And yes, remember they will be without Jillian men for the first four games of the season. Shannon, what does this tell you. Kills me that a coach Bela checks. You gonna pull some weight or you guys to go. He was, I guess he was practicing whale playing well, and then he got Nick hamstring and coach Bela check says, you know what? You're not going to be doing this any good rehabbing on our dime. So we'll let you go ahead and go bring air Dicker and it looks like they're gonna sign deck, Jordan Mathews skip. I mean he really hasn't played well since he's left chip Kelly. I mean close to nine hundred yards. I two years, but he's always had this injury almost half thousand. Yeah, he's always had this injury bug that just popped up and I'm sure that factor the coach Bela checks decision of, yeah, you know, I was kinda hoping you're over this bug. Now, the last couple years deck has also suffered the injury bug, but I do believe that Eric decker is an upgrade over Jordan Mathews. He had his best years playing who skip pate, Manny. So you have a guy in Tom Brady that knows what he's doing with the football knows where to go with the ball is in complete command of this offense. And so I expect him to is big debt comes in this offense. I can see him catching. Forty fifty balls especially with Ellerman being the first the first four gay. Hell gronk it's still there not. He's still look at Tom Brady, Tom Brady can win without grunk, but you look at his numbers when gronk on the field. And you look at his numbers when gronk and on the field, this ubstantially different and plus decades. The mole grant Etima you know, they got Gatica got all all the Gallic, a guy. He likes to kind of look, Chris HOGAN. Now. L. look like. Thing shattered shock. I've been trying to tell you for two years Bill. Bella check can get away with near murder when it comes to the white outs this because it just doesn't matter. He has the greatest quarterback in the history of pro football who's also to use your term the greatest makeup artist ever because he can just cover up all the blemishes. It just doesn't matter. Just giving that guy, Joe Smith investors. Investors as the greatest ever. You know what Joe said that under. So. Look what just happened. Jordan Mathews was sort of the off season Saini by the New England Patriots because June Matty's dot, some ability. He played at my school Vanderbilt, and he is still the SEC all time career leader in catches and yards caught. That's pretty great, Nancy. See, it's a pretty good. It's right. And he's still the all time. Career leader is Jordan. Mathews those three years in Philadelphia were they were great, but they were pretty good, right. And guess who fell in love with Jordan Mathews who loved him like a brother was walk into your got Carson Wentz. He loved him some Jordan Mathews and they traded Jordan Mathews straight up for Ronald Darby who's a really good player so that that shows you that buffalo really valued Jordan Mathews that he He was. was. That's that's pretty. That's eighty. Trae they needed receiver they had let wilder would grow in said, we walk and go market Goodwin was gong. Yeah, so they need. They need Darby's a first round talent. Yeah, he's a, he's a playmaking top to your cornerback and so they value Jordan. He's in buffalo, right? And Carson Wentz was devastated and told the Philadelphia media..

Jordan Mathews Tom Brady Bela New England Patriots Eric Decker Chip Kelly Shannon Hornets Ronald Darby Football Basketball Carson Wentz Chris Hogan Patriots Jillian Dicker Philadelphia Joe Smith Murder Trae
"saini" Discussed on The Joe Budden Podcast

The Joe Budden Podcast

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"saini" Discussed on The Joe Budden Podcast

"No no good you know hey we do it i was hey we already but it was is is crazy now come closer it's a podcast i pause pause pause posed everything about singh saini was given an egghead like it's dick stink they she really want to do it by either i needed to lays balls is low musty is on yeah but that's a common thing now what muslim nazis carter has particular party which left two dead our africa more i've i've lived with malls are no more takes nine showers a day even in the winter noble with his long as long as well is a little to clean for no reason all of us in a lamar so let me let me of social eggers so negus a straddle the chicks out the washer yes that's crazy you deserve to be on death row to us of shit like they're not i you got to see what this is about what it wants you asked before you pull that move that move right is by having a dirty air small talking about the little crevice between your balls and you're tired i could be a lawyer not now for the chris rest yes parks if you say you gotta try to solve it in our neck in the area let me is actually ourselves is this oh my hate this nigam it also wound up this call should is over my nickel your order center.

singh saini lamar africa chris
"saini" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"saini" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"And of course we see forms of sexual everywhere throughout religion throughout society it it runs you know it's so common in societies all around the world to repress female sexuality in various degrees even the moral doublestandard if you think about it is really a way of making sure that women behave sexually differently from men by creating a norm around sexual behavior now if women a chased if we are not tree monogamous them why do we do this why halfway for thousands of years so brutally and violently controlled women's sexual behavior in forced 'virginity enforced faithfulness in women if we are monogamous anyway surely we don't need to and this is sarah buffer heard his ton of genius insight she uses a historical argument a social argument and if you like a feminist argument two really undermine this kind of a scientific assumption the socialists option that we have the men and women uh so sexually different m unfamiliar that is the beauty of having a women in the sciences anyone who says that signs is purely objective a not it doesn't make any difference the sex of the researcher women like sarah hoodie proved them wrong because the science was all before women came along and having women there to give that perspective to think again about these questions to do with themselves has really changed the way we think about the signs altogether while just in time for valentine's day another controversial social construct you can get your loved one angela saini's book inferior how science got women wrong and the new research that's rewriting story i'm sure it will generate excellent conversation angeles amy thank you so much for being on enquiring minds thank you.

angela saini sarah researcher valentine