35 Burst results for "Saharan Africa"

Carter's dream, almost reached: Guinea worm cases drop to 14

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 4 months ago

Carter's dream, almost reached: Guinea worm cases drop to 14

"Former former former former president president president president Jimmy Jimmy Jimmy Jimmy Carter Carter Carter Carter is is is is close close close close to to to to reaching reaching reaching reaching his his his his dream dream dream dream of of of of completely completely completely completely eradicating eradicating eradicating eradicating Guinea Guinea Guinea Guinea worm worm worm worm infections infections infections infections from from from from the the the the planet planet planet planet during during during during his his his his lifetime lifetime lifetime lifetime Guinea Guinea Guinea Guinea worms worms worms worms are are are are parasites parasites parasites parasites people people people people who who who who drink drink drink drink on on on on clean clean clean clean water water water water can can can can ingest ingest ingest ingest them them them them Guinea Guinea Guinea Guinea worms worms worms worms can can can can grow grow grow grow as as as as long long long long as as as as three three three three feet feet feet feet before before before before painfully painfully painfully painfully emerging emerging emerging emerging from from from from the the the the skin skin skin skin Adam Adam Adam Adam Weiss Weiss Weiss Weiss with with with with the the the the Carter Carter Carter Carter center center center center says says says says they they they they have have have have come come come come a a a a long long long long way way way way coming coming coming coming down down down down from from from from three three three three point point point point five five five five million million million million people people people people year year year with with with Guinea Guinea Guinea worm worm worm it it it to to to say say say that that that we we we only only only have have have fourteen fourteen fourteen human human human beans beans beans on on on a a a planet planet planet of of of almost almost almost eight eight eight billion billion billion people people people Guinea Guinea Guinea worm worm worm infections infections infections were were were in in in just just just four four four countries countries countries in in in sub sub sub Saharan Saharan Saharan Africa Africa Africa Chad Chad Chad Sudan Sudan Sudan Angola Angola Angola and and and Cameroon Cameroon Cameroon after after after outbreaks outbreaks outbreaks of of of Kobe Kobe Kobe record record record or or or in in in security security security situations situations situations emerged emerged emerged teams teams teams were were were able able able to to to re re re access access access areas areas areas the the the Carter Carter Carter center center center began began began leading leading leading the the the global global global Guinea Guinea Guinea worm worm worm eradication eradication eradication effort effort effort in in in nineteen nineteen nineteen eighty eighty eighty six six six I'm I'm I'm a a a Donahue Donahue Donahue

Guinea Jimmy Jimmy Jimmy Jimmy Carter Adam Adam Adam Adam Weiss Weiss Weiss Weiss Carter Carter Carter Carter Ce Carter Angola Cameroon Sudan Saharan Saharan Chad Chad Africa Kobe Kobe Kobe Saharan Chad Carter Carter Carter Center Ce Guinea Guinea Donahue Donahue Donahue
Climate Change Could Push 200 Million People to Move by 2050

Newscast - Africa

00:53 sec | 8 months ago

Climate Change Could Push 200 Million People to Move by 2050

"The mall bank one that reduced agricultural production water scarcity weisensee levels and other adverse effects of climate change could cause up to two sixteen million people to migrate within their own countries by twenty fifty. The washington-based development lender had released a report in two thousand eighteen covering climate changes effects on migration in south asia. Latin america and sub saharan africa and projected one forty. Three million people could move in those regions by twenty fifty throughout bank vice-president for sustainable development georgian vote gala. Says is important to note that this protection is not cast in stone. He says of countries start to reduce greenhouse gases closed development gaps restore vital ecosystems and how people adapt internal climate migration cook thirties by up to eighty percent to forty four million people by twenty fifty

Saharan Africa South Asia Latin America Washington
Predicting Urban Land Use

Data Skeptic

02:15 min | 10 months ago

Predicting Urban Land Use

"My name. is daniel omega. I am impede student in the computer. Science department of the university of oxford marriages on this neighbor. I in almost driving this research. Are we talking about today. I did which on my professors about two years ago. The remind masters program to kick things off. We'll start with the imagery problem. I guess to set the stage. Would you mind providing some background on urban growth especially in sub saharan africa. What's the nature of the problem. You're looking into a musician. Common phenomena in developing countries like in africa. And there's this trend of lack of planning and management which is resulting in into the encroachment of obama fabrics in the reserve special regions. Which of course will lillian do like. Unsustainable increase in population so. Mary site at that time was a jolly to study. The growth rate of how abundance are being used and house do some forecasts to inform the decisions of obama's and the relevant stakeholders so that they can adequately prepare to do the abound growth and influx of people from the radovan area. Basically so i live in los angeles california in the us. It's a very urbanized place. And i don't think there's any even an inch of land that isn't accounted for. So if you want to do something here. It has to be planned out and bureaucratic and things like that. Which i guess in some ways makes it predictable. How much predictability is there. In the way the the landscape is changing in the data set. You looked at well. I think that's a very difficult question. Because download the dust is available out there for land use in israeli in africa and elect to discuss about this in detail because gives us at a rally used to make predictions are that classify land based on land use was outside africa and i said that aside from europe. So but you give up presented data set or the Provided deducted jolly had disclaimed that did was representative gone from different parts of the world from developing countries from transgenic countries on developed countries. So based on this information so we used to sit and that trained a modell that will dictate different kinds of lung categories

Daniel Omega Science Department Of The Univ Africa Saharan Barack Obama Lillian Mary Los Angeles California United States Jolly Europe
"saharan africa" Discussed on The Comb

The Comb

05:32 min | 10 months ago

"saharan africa" Discussed on The Comb

"Of abuse and discrimination starts to get public attention. I can see that it gives me life. I believe that if there were not the revolution. I would do the same person as i am. Now i will be in jail. Maybe or i will go to another country because it's impossible to live under a dictatorship if you have some people on some values. A lot of voices were raised after the revolution. I had the opportunity to know people who are like me. People who shares the same values because before the revolution. Even if you have this values you you will not have the courage to share it with someone as because we were always in on the safety of the other person's so the revolution gives me the space to develop my way of thinking and to fight for my way of thinking in two thousand eighteen seven years after the revolution. Tunisia passed a law. Which for the first. Time actually criminalized racism that was the law that hampton daddy was able to use to prove his right to change his name and it was designed to be used to protect minorities including black nations and migrants from sub saharan africa. From racial abuse and discrimination. Did that change things. I don't know. I don't think so. I think that justice is for rich people in tunisia. This low was meant to protect the the lowest counter says that for all the good intentions of the law. The most vulnerable people. Those who most designed to protect are the ones who struggle most to actually access as benefits. They can't afford a lawyer earned afford the time of weighed in for this long process. So if you have money to go for justice you will go for justice and you will wait for like five or six years to have rights are net. I don't believe consult problem. I can say also that the problem is really complex. It's not a legal issue that we can solve with the legal frame..

tunisia saharan africa hampton
Will Ants Rescue Wounded Comrades?

BrainStuff

01:58 min | 10 months ago

Will Ants Rescue Wounded Comrades?

"You've probably seen stories about exemplary bravery and battles soldiers and volunteers who risk everything to pull injured. Compatriots out of harm's way so they can receive much needed medical attention but some of these heroes will never receive. Any medals parades accommodations for their work. And not because of injustice but because their ants species called capone-era analysis are termite hunting. Aunts that scientists say not only rescue injured comrades but also treat their wounds. The survival rate among those injured in this combat is remarkable up to ninety percent. These ants live in colonies in sub saharan africa that average nearly one thousand members the ends wage war on termites rating their nests and dragging the dead back behind the lines as a source of food. These rates however often come at a heavy price. The termites biting crushed the ants ripping off limbs and snapping off heads. Eric frank a scientist at the university of low son in switzerland has studied these ants and seeing them do battle with termites at a research station in the komo national park one of the largest protected areas in west africa in northern cote d'ivoire. He would watch the and drag the injured back to their nest. But because the ants make their homes underground it was difficult to define exactly what happened next. So franken has team set out to discover what was happening inside the nest i they captured entire ant colonies and set them up in artificial nests. They then hooked up infrared cameras to keep tabs on the insects. The scientists also captured termites and then allowed the answer to stage a raid. Many aunts were gravely injured during the melee. Many lost limbs they're able bodied comrades responded by staging a battlefield triage separating gravely wounded from the only slightly wounded. The seriously injured those who lost at least five limbs often died on the battlefield because as the researchers noted they didn't seem to want to be helped that bendon distort their bodies making it difficult for their sisters in arms to carry them to safety. Those whose wounds were less serious however allowed themselves to be cared for

Eric Frank University Of Low Son Komo National Park Saharan West Africa Africa Switzerland Franken Bendon
Dominican Catholic Sisters Help Create Climate-Friendly Investment Funds

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Dominican Catholic Sisters Help Create Climate-Friendly Investment Funds

"Catholic sisters and nuns live quiet lives of prayer but some are wielding influence on wall street. Pat daly is part of a group of dominican catholic sisters who set out to make sure their congregations investment funds reflect their catholic values they to find a fund that supports climate-friendly projects that also help vulnerable communities. We wanted to make sure that we weren't just investing. Let's say a tesla bond but that the investments were really focused on getting green energy into villages and areas on the planet. They didn't even have energy. But the sisters could not find an investment fund that took this kind of holistic approach. So they teamed up with morgan stanley to create two new funds one public and one private that invest in solutions such as clean energy for sub saharan africa and small businesses in india. Sixteen congregations seated the funds with more than forty six million dollars which then attracted tens of millions more from other groups daily says the public fund has shown strong returns outperforming the market so the investments are doing well while also doing

Pat Daly Dominican Catholic Sisters Tesla Saharan Africa Morgan Stanley India
South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine rollout

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:57 min | 1 year ago

South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine rollout

"South africa has halted its rollout of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine just a week after the country received. Its first million doses. It seems the vaccine offers limited protection against a new variant of the corona virus. That's now dominant in the country. Salim abdul karim co-chair of south africa's ministerial advisory committee on covid nineteen spoke to a world health organization briefing yesterday. We don't want to end up with a situation where we vaccinated million people too. Many people would have vaccine that may not be effective in preventing hospitalization and severe disease in total more than one point. Two billion corona virus doses have been allocated for the continent. But it's not clear when all those jobs will arrive. The longer any region remains unvaccinated. The greater the chance that more variants arise vaccines though can be tweaked in a formulation of the oxford vaccine targeted at the south african variant could be going into arms by autumn. What scientists cannot address is the long run damage to africa both in human and economic terms so far continent to have been spared from the worst case scenarios predicted early on in the pandemic but the longer term picture remains bleak many ways the impact of the pandemic and africa is worse than it appears on the surface around the official numbers. Kenley salmon is one of our africa correspondent based in dakar. It is the case that having a young population has to some extent protected the continent from the virus africans and died from it that americans europeans but the true scott of infection. Death is really hard to gauge. Studying sudan recently showed the perhaps only two percent of all the covid desk for a quoted in the official tally and the economic impact is worse than it looks last year. The region's economy shrank for the first time. In twenty five years tourism has been badly hit as have commodity exporters things like oil in nigeria and taken together. Gdp per capita fell below twenty ten levels last year so things are perhaps not quite as bad as some other parts the world but certainly still very tough and things may get tougher house. What are the particular challenges to africa. Africa faces quite a number of challenges in the next few years as it tries to recover from the pandemic but the biggest i of the really is vaccines. Some african governments have perhaps failed to grasp the urgency of the situation in tanzania for example the populace president john food even casually cast out with a vaccine work but i do forgive aside claiming the postman precautions such as steaming nation were better than vaccines and even added that if the white man was able to come up with next nations then. Vaccinations for aids. Malaria and cancer would have already been found. So it's not so much a question than of supply. I mean given that quite a few vaccines have been essentially booked at the stage. A number of vaccines have been booked but the big question is when will they arrive because right now there aren't anywhere near the number of axes required forever on in the world and rich countries are of course the front of the queue for those vaccines have been produced africa's going to need perhaps two point six billion doses to vaccinate everyone and those are not being made locally so they have to rely on supplies elsewhere for the moment so that means joining the queue. All this means that whereas rich countries aim to vaccinate most of their people by the middle of this year the african. cdc a public health. Bali in africa's aiming for sixty percent of africans to vaccinated by the end of next year. But even that may be too optimistic. For the poorest countries. The economist intelligence unit sister organization estimates that in most african countries most people will not be inoculated until mid twenty twenty three or even early twenty twenty four and there must be serious consequences of it being that long until the continent is on average vaccinated. Africa is likely. It doesn't get those vaccinations into suffer. Further waves of the infection while after the disease may have amped in the rich world. And that of course will cause more death and more suffering. Doesn't risk that. Having the virus transmitting between people frequently africa could allow new variance to evolve. We've already got the south. African variant and these new variants could endanger people even in rich countries if they prove to be resistant to vaccines and then finally of course not having vaccines could force. African policymakers to continue with these very difficult economic lockdowns curfews even after many other countries around the world set free of those kinds of restrictions and if the public health concern lasts that long then surely the economic concerns will last at least that long. That's right in many african countries facing pretty severe crises at the moment just getting finance to pay their bills. Africa has very limited fiscal space on average countries in sub saharan africa. Spending more than thirty cents on every dollar. They raise and text revenue paying their debts. And that's up from twenty cents on the dollar before the pandemic on the debt side to over half of low income sub saharan african countries are now classed as in distress or at high risk of distress. According to the imf and what about countries with bigger economies the two biggest economies in africa nigeria and south ever both in pretty deep trouble nigeria for example was described by the world. Bank is being an unprecedented crisis. Recently the bank is not normally quite so blunt in nigeria. There has been a legacy of management for a number of years and pandemics really accessible that quite badly. Now focused suggested by twenty twenty three. Gdp per capita may go back as low as it was in one thousand nine hundred eighty time when the oil price was some high on so africa too is in trouble that have been in recession twice in the last three years before the pandemic hit of course now is dribbling itself with a particularly heavy toll from the pandemic so both countries in fact are facing a difficult road out of the crisis. And what about outside help in terms of financing has been quite a bit of outside help although the crisis of course is very big but in twenty twenty the imf for example provided sixteen billion dollars in loans most of that came with relatively few strings attached and this help frigging countries to respond to the pandemic to avoid some of the liquidity crises that were looming the world bank also dispersed another ten billion but many countries got that funding to if the imf under emergency allocations that came quickly and relatively easily and those allocations for many countries will soon be exhausted. The rich world has been trying to help when it comes to debt. They've provided liquidity to countries through some bits of suspension initiative that basically allows poor countries to put off debt repayments until july. Twenty twenty one. This is of course helpful but the trouble is that those payments just suspended and they have to be paid back with interest in about five years time so as the chief economist for africa the world bank put it to us. It may just be kicking the can down the road to. How do you see this playing out. Then how high could the human cost of all this be while the stakes are pretty high. The pandemic has already done lower damage to people's health and africa. it's hitting their economic prospects and they wealth and it's also affecting education of course. Hundreds of millions of students in africa have been affected by school closures. This increases the risk of dropouts and reduces the prospects for africa's largest every generation so overall the costs here really quite significant. There are some reasons for optimism. We may see vaccine rollouts accelerate. There's also hopes that commodity price rises could give africa real boost as the global economy recovers been on balance. The evidence probably points to at pretty difficult road ahead with several more waves of the virus hitting already struggling health systems and perhaps a form of economic long covert in africa. So you know africans have come through this showing remarkable resilience but it may be toughest years are still to come in. Thank you very much for joining us. thank you

Africa Salim Abdul Karim Co Ministerial Advisory Committee Kenley Salmon Nigeria Oxford South Africa John Food Astrazeneca Dakar Saharan Africa IMF Sudan Tanzania Malaria CDC
Solar-powered battery packs offer cheap electricity in Tanzania

Climate Connections

01:20 min | 1 year ago

Solar-powered battery packs offer cheap electricity in Tanzania

"Dr anthony leiserowitz and this is climate connections in sub saharan africa. Over five hundred million people live without electricity for lighting many of them use kerosene a fossil fuel that contributes to global warming emits toxic fumes. And can start dangerous fires so we started looking for a low cost way to provide electricity for an entire village. That's jeff schnur. Ceo of jazz energy. The company figured out a way to meet that goal without conventional power plants and a distribution grid in tanzania has an energy has built about seventy five solar hubs small buildings with solar panels on top. Two women from the community staff each hub. The women use the solar power to charge battery packs customers. Rent the packs and use them to power lights charge cell phones and for other small electricity needs. Schnur says it's cheaper to rent a battery pack that it is to buy kerosene so the approach not only helps protect the climate. He can save people money and improve their quality of life. The hub operators we call jazz stars. The women running locations are literally lighting up house by house in their community. When you sit down in here directly from someone how it's just a dream come true. It's pretty transformational.

Dr Anthony Leiserowitz Sub Saharan Jeff Schnur Schnur Africa Tanzania
UNAIDS calls on countries to step up global action and proposes bold new HIV targets for 2025

UN News

01:17 min | 1 year ago

UNAIDS calls on countries to step up global action and proposes bold new HIV targets for 2025

"Should adopt ambitious new targets to tackle hiv aids to avoid hundreds of thousands of additional infections and deaths from the disease linked to the covid nineteen pandemic the un said on thursday citing data showing the pandemic's long-term impact on global hiv response. Un aid said that there could be up to nearly three hundred thousand additional new hiv infections between now and two thousand and twenty two and up to one hundred and forty eight thousand more aids related deaths. This collective faded to invest sufficiently in comprehensive rights-based people. Scented hiv responses has come at a terrible price. Said winning be anemia executive director of you and aids. She added that the only way to get the global response against hiv aids. Back on track was by tackling the inequalities on which epidemics thrive although countries in sub saharan africa including swan and ezra teeny have achieved or even exceeded targets. Set for two thousand twenty. Many more countries are falling way behind urinate said in a new report called prevailing against pandemics. Its proposed targets for twenty twenty five focus on a high coverage of hiv and reproductive and sexual health services together with the removal of punitive laws policies. Stigma and discrimination. If these targets are met the world will be back on track to ending aids as a public health threat. By twenty thirty the agency

HIV Aids UN Anemia Saharan Africa
Special Edition Echo Red Available

Voice in Canada

01:27 min | 1 year ago

Special Edition Echo Red Available

"As you may know coming up this week is world. Aids day and amazon is getting in on the action to raise money for this Very worthwhile cause and how are they doing this well. They have just launched an echo device. The new generation won the fourth generation. But it is a red one so the fabric is read. It's a limited edition echo red and it's to help Bring awareness and raise money for a couple of Great causes In particular If you buy one of these devices the red one amazon will donate ten dollars from the sale of every one of those devices to the global fund to support covid nineteen response and hiv aids programs in the sub saharan africa. So this is wonderful so if you want to get a special edition read echo and support a very worthwhile cause at the same time. Then you may be interested in picking up one of these now. Here's the thing because it's actually black friday week if you will. They're actually on sale as well. So the regular price of these are normally one twenty nine ninety nine hundred thirty bucks but right now. They are on sale for ninety. So it's forty dollars off. If you want to go straight to this particular device you can use. My phillies link a. l. e. x. Eighteen canada dot ca slash echo red and. That'll take you right to the

Amazon Saharan HIV Aids Africa Phillies Canada CA
Let's Talk About Toilets

Why It Matters

04:31 min | 1 year ago

Let's Talk About Toilets

"So world toilet day is coming up and the response to hearing that there is a serious. Un sponsor day for toilets might make people laugh or feel a little iffy on discussing it. So why would we need a day like that. Well what would you do if you didn't have a toilet a fair point. This is brooke yamaguchi. She's a water sanitation and hygiene specialist at the united nations children's fund also known as yuna south based in new york. She knows a lot about toilets. I mean the ability to manage our bodily functions and these things that we frequently don't talk about but are so core toss bodily functions of urination defecation for half the population menstruation. Really at the core of our dignity. it's also a foundation for health without a toilet that contains waste and then separates it from people coming in contact with that waste. We would all be exposed to harmful pathogens that cause many different illnesses and diseases and it doesn't stop at the toilet either so without waste being safely transported away from our toilets and from our homes and treated somewhere we would all be surrounded by wastewater and our neighborhoods and in the environment so in terms of the numbers. Can you give me a wide angle view of toilet access as global issue. Will there are three main things that we measure the global level. This is tom sleigh maker. he also focuses on global monitoring of drinking water sanitation and hygiene at unicef headquarters in new york. He sees the big picture of how this plays out around the world. He spoke to us on a rainy day from london to one. Is the population here. Practice open defecation. So that man's added kind of told us a tool a may just is that bush's fails beaches little. Walter crosses the other thing that we measure is the population with basic sanitation service. So means that they have. Some kind of hygienic toilets but is not being shad with other people. It's not shadow the household and then the next level of service up is what we call safely managed sanitation. I'm not means that you not only have a hygiene twins but you also have a mechanism in place to ensure shaming west. That's produced is then being treated on despised safely before being discharged pakistan arm and how many people fall into each of these categories so the global level resell have six hundred. Seventy three million people practicing cash there about two billion people still lack even basic level of service wanting people worldwide and if you look at the population without sanitation that's more like four point. Two billion people that is more than half the people on earth and runs the risk of getting sick every day. Do we have an idea of how many people die as a result of this problem. Whol have estimated globally around one point. Two million deaths could have been prevented through access to cat drinking water sanitation hygiene. The problem is particularly acute for young. Children are very vulnerable. And so i think we estimate there around three hundred thousand children under five who die each year as a result of not having bicyc- water sanitation and hygiene. So when you look at a map where do you see this happening. While some regions and countries have much further to go. If you look out you'll say that particularly sub saharan africa asia and will say ice yanni of civic have much lower levels of coverage of sanitation. And this is polly today with greenwich stages of developments in my slate core countries. But even if you move up the ladder you start to look at issues of treatments and disposal of waste even in europe and north america and australia and new zealand. We're still only at about three quarters of the population that has high says site. All countries have further to go in order to improve sanitation but obviously by roles starting at different positions.

Brooke Yamaguchi United Nations Children's Fund Tom Sleigh Unicef Headquarters New York UN Walter Bush London Pakistan Saharan Greenwich Asia Africa North America Europe New Zealand Australia
As Tanzania Votes, Many See Democracy Itself on the Ballot

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:18 min | 1 year ago

As Tanzania Votes, Many See Democracy Itself on the Ballot

"Tons Anita went to the polls yesterday to vote in an election overshadowed by opposition complaints of irregularities such as ballot box, stuffing President John Maga. Fully who is accused of stifling democracy seeks a second term in office alongside fourteen other candidates talk to Dan. Padgett is electoral politics at the university. Of Aberdeen, he specializes in political communication through mass rallies and populist and nationalist ideologies in Tanzania and joins me on the line. Now Don Tanzania's long been thought of in the West is a a haven of stability within east Africa but I mean this isn't necessarily the case and I. I wonder if you could sketch out the political dynamic there, the ruling party's been in power since nineteen sixty one. Yes that's right. It's is the longest ruling party in sub. Saharan Africa. The political dynamic in Tanzania has been one of the ruling Kanzi, CCM's decline over the last fifteen years. Reaching a low point in two thousand fifteen where it where the margin of victory was. The fittest is ever been. Since then President Michel, Foodie, it came to kyle and that's election has led Tanzania. Very shot an increasingly extreme offered Harry. Intern. And we weren't sure how just how? Radical that authoritarian agenda would be and the election this we're just getting results from now suggests that it is as bad as any of us feared as so the opposition allegations of vote rigging, etc do stand up. Well. So. Of course, normally I would turn to international election observers. Attorney to arbitrate these claims to decide which to give credence in which not to give credence. Unfortunately, we can't almost no international election observers. Were invited and those that were invited were. Invited at our so Given that and given the advantage of the opportunity that this creates the ruling party the elections it's hard not to give at least prima facie credence to these opposition claims especially given the the wide range of anecdote to. Video and photographic evidence that I've seen an which which I've been collecting these last twenty four hours, and of course, zipping a social media crackdown various restrictions on the press. Has Been, a crackdown all over and and for the last five years. So in many ways, the the rigging receipt which we've been seeing apparently seeing of the next twenty four hours. Is. Really just the icing on the authoritarian cake. There's extreme. Media Censorship rallies have been banned and consider route the rally. The most important means of communication tends to emotional time about seventy percent of people attend local meetings on a regular basis and attend election campaign rallies they were they were abandoned twenty sixteen and indeed the opposition at large have. Hottest. Struggle underneath. Almost constance. Of States and extra state harassment in includes trumped up court cases but also extrajudicial. So extra state attacks. Unknown assailants that have arrested some abductors killed. And in fact, one of the main challenges has recently returned to the country after recovering from gunshot wounds. That's right. So tenderly series is. Presidential. Candidate is the largest opposition party in Tanzania. and. So that's Experience of being of surviving attempted assassination attempt has has given. US already in very impressive political figure a sort of a sparkle. Some people referred to him as a living miracle. But of course, we don't know the results. Yes. But we all seeing violence particularly in Zanzibar. Zanzibar the autonomous. ARCHEPELAGO's Zanzibar, which is a federally devote area of 'em. Into UK. Has has often seen electoral violence. We saw it in ninety five and two, thousand and thirteen, thousand, five and twenty fifteen and actions by varying degrees. So in in some ways, this is a return to form It's not. The recurrence of violence is is. Seems to be because the opposition has probably one in sensabaugh almost every time. But they've never officially one out one means or another has always been used to not in the that's the that's the the scholarly consensus on. Politics what's different? This time I think is that there's violence on the mainland as well. So this is no longer an issue of contained physical violence in Zanzibar. There have been a series of incidents including. What appears to be an attempt to a to attack the chairman of the leading opposition party on the eve of the elections. So that's one difference the other is considered. No money there is. A. Sporadic protests violence and in return state brutality, police army heavy-handedness in putting down those protests that the protests have often been. Constrained and sporadic because they have not been condoned led. By, by the leaders of the opposition there, there are indications that this could be different this time one of the reasons for that is. The, the rhetoric is different. The leader of the opposition in Zanzibar say amount has been say had has been saying that in the past he's held his supporters back. He's been of restraint, and at this time he he won't urge restraint to newly sue has said that he will. Bring people out onto the streets and consider the state of the opposition behind because it seems like this might be the last stand in a sense that vikings they can make, and so they they don't have that say incentive to hold back this time and say the keep up how to drive the next time. Just finally before we go, do you think that this is part of something that we're seeing across parts of Africa there is a younger demographic. They were all born after independence that not prepared to accept authoritarian rule the just coming to the age where they are protesting we're seeing it in Nigeria within saws and in various other places could this be the the Africans spring. My sense is if there is African spring to come, it will come off and an Wiki will extend. Mexico an authoritarian winter. The trend on that strikes me is that a number of leaders are emerging in an intense Aena in Zambia. In other parts of the consonant, which bear a striking resemblance to this sort of authoritarian. Developmental. Nationalists of is so The there's a young population I are angry. But in fact, I think the trend seems to go the other way. And results. When can we expect those? So the first also are already dripping in and they show. That a series of opposition strongholds, there's places that you would never expect or or at least likely. To expect to go to a to the ruling party are being won by then by margins of three to one, which suggests that the the the rigging. Being worried about maybe taking place typically a Tanzanian election result takes three or four days that was related end and announced especially with the presidential elections but. So far. This is actually has been crisis already.

Tanzania Zanzibar Don Tanzania Saharan Africa East Africa Padgett DAN Aberdeen Anita President Trump John Maga Africa Aena President Michel United States Intern Harry
Study: Air Pollution Contributes To 500,000 Newborn Deaths A Year

90.3 KAZU Programming

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

Study: Air Pollution Contributes To 500,000 Newborn Deaths A Year

"Researchers report that air pollution contributed to the death of about 500,000 newborn babies worldwide last year. NPR's Michaleen Duke left has more Each year about 2.4 million babies die within the first month. Now. Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, say that about 20% of those deaths are related to the mother's exposure to air pollutants during pregnancy. Even in small amounts. Chronic air pollution raises a mother's risk giving birth prematurely or having a low weight, baby. Both of those conditions reduce an infant's chance of survival. The problem is most of year in sub Saharan Africa in southern Asia, where many families burn wood or coal to heat their homes. Even in rich countries, like the U. S. Some families are exposed to unhealthy levels of air pollution when they live near highways, airports or other sources of

Saharan Africa Michaleen Duke NPR San Francisco Asia University Of California
Protect & Assist - An Interview with the Head of the Australian Cyber Security Centre

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

03:41 min | 1 year ago

Protect & Assist - An Interview with the Head of the Australian Cyber Security Centre

"As you've said, I hit the styling Sada security security center. Now am missions pretty. But it's also pretty simple. It's to Mike Strategy of the safest place to connect. Online and do business online and out at prime responsibilities really to protect old parts of the Australian economy from the beginning of business to government critical infrastructure provides small medium enterprise and individuals and. Families get on with life online, which as we know in Grad example is the way that wearing gauging today is an increasingly important very much. In Lock wise I agree with we wouldn't normally have reached out to you. So readily you've come from that mentioned a bit about your background you've been in the role to six months and you came from the National Bushfire. Recovery Center of go committee ought not to show that the Prophets Dada was, but you've come from a, is it across? into. What we obviously absurd at the same time as I saw across the. Up Tyke in Saada crime and saw active duty during covid nineteen has the right thanks I fire. I'm assuming you're Ri- You're enjoying it or you're funding it the challenge that was made to be it's I have to say the people that work here who mice distractions. made to ever speak to some of the most incredible human beings having encountered by in terms of their incredible. Personal drive towards that mission and really advancing Australia's interests but also the technical capability which is second to none. You. You mentioned I had come from the National Bushfire Recovery Agency, actually not a dissimilar function in the sense that you're trying to engage h very different sectors of of the community who've been affected by That's materialized and assist them to get back up on their fate again, actually to build resilience, it's just the context he's. Prior to that I was the head of the national. Security Division Prime Minister and Cabinet had some timing critical infrastructure. Yeah. In High McVeigh's and. Inaugural Chief Risk Officer for the Department of Homeland Phases Wales. Postings looking after Europe and sub Saharan Africa region it sounds like a WIG background but look the headline is this a love a good crisis? Could us a find that the same skill set? Of Translating. Deriving problems into their various segments responding to each one of ours always having a plan or campaign or or an operational approach assists in obviously having a a a defense background helps that way and and and of course, the May you quite rightly point out. I don't have a long technical history but. I said twenty million constituents across the economy. The vast majority of dying Ada semi bottom line is if I'd. It how customers and I think that kind of balance swelled.

National Bushfire Recovery Age National Bushfire Saada Department Of Homeland Phases Security Division Mike Strategy Prime Minister RI Chief Risk Officer Saharan Africa Australia Mcveigh Europe Cabinet
2 million stillbirths every year, pandemic might worsen toll

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

2 million stillbirths every year, pandemic might worsen toll

"And new Tonight, the World Health Organization and partners say there are about two million stillbirths every year. That comes from its first ever global estimates of this, the U. N Health agency says tonight that last year three and four stillbirths Still took place in sub Saharan Africa or South Eastern Asia. The report warns that the ongoing pandemic could go could worsen the global toll hear it estimates that a 50% reduction in health services during the pandemic could result in an additional 200,000 still births in the next year in developing nations

World Health Organization U. N Health Agency Saharan Africa Eastern Asia
"saharan africa" Discussed on The Heat

The Heat

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"saharan africa" Discussed on The Heat

"Public Transport has still not your rain. Ending the in this ridiculous situation. I think what we've done is imported western concepts. To a middle income country. which is not exactly practical. Even. Concept like physical distancing is very difficult in a population with high population density. the on the positive side. However, farmers actually have had done a wonderful job and we expect a bumper harvest in November. So it is now problem of distribution of this bumper harvest and food crops do families which are on the edge, what the lockdown his done is exacerbated inequalities of cost class and gender. The government policies strangely had increased inequality introducing any quantity. So, we have one million fair price shops and the government has given through grants to families from them. But sixty percent of families have these Russian God's to get those food grants. and. They have doubled the quantum available for them at the forty percent who did not have these rushing cuts have got nothing. So I think the government needs to be thinking strategy betty clearly, and we do not need such a stringent. In clock I saw you nodding your head I suspect a lot of the same problems are prevalent there on the African continent social distancing. Also a major issue when you get congested groups of people together is this also something that that you're seeing there as well One doesn't have to look far to see issues regarding social distancing. Especially when I mean there is a scheme currently where about three hundred fifty rand is being provided to unemployed people to people who are the most indigent in our country, which is the equivalent of about I'd say about twenty thousand dollars at various points at which these payments are being made you look at the. Long lines that there exists there little if no social social distancing and people not observing strict protocols which have been set out by government, it's quite a very important to note that South Africa is among countries that have taken a very strict stance or very tough lockdown, which has gradually eased from a level five being the most strict to now level two and level of. The lockdown has seen many of the rules literally being broken where people are just not adhering to a strict protocol suggestion set out by government and people taking a more relaxed approach especially when when it comes to issues of hygiene, some of the talk that you hear in public circles is where people say, well, I, don't know anybody who's been infected with covid nineteen so I guess. The pandemic. No longer exists in this country, which is the wrong approach as we all still living with this pandemic, and if seen quite a number of people succumbing to disease and you've talked about so many issues there But one of the things we haven't talked about is the local outbreaks which have been extraordinary Is there any be done in terms of that problem as well? Indeed it is. Proving quite a headache for a lot of farmers who have already had to contend with a severe drought, and now you have a locust outbreak that's also. Eating away at at their crops but they they us some farmers who are trying to find innovative ways to respond to this whether it's using more effective pesticides which some argue still not yielding the kind of results we want to see but. Many are also within the farming, the farming sector, a calling for aid from government calling for help from government saying we have suffered quite a bit. This lockdown and we've suffered even before this pandemic broke out and they are seeing little if no assistance coming for them in that sector, and this is a very critical sector one has to think about it i. mean this is a sector that literally put. Food on the plate of many South Africans and if it suffers One can only imagine how households are having a very difficult time especially accessing the proper nutrition that's required swatting. I'm going to give you the last word obviously You're very active in this talk to me about NGOs in the role of activists in this I imagine there's a lot of sleepless nights when you get something this big but but what are what are some of the rules there? We have no choice but to be acted because the government is not fulfilling its responsibility. We yields have. Pressure in order to ensure that, we have a Food Security Act and an employment guarantee act, but both of these acts which other lifeline right now for people to survive on not being implemented or expanded. So number one demand that we have is every single person be given adoption guards that they can buy cheats grants, and also as he said, in South Africa they be given cash grants, unemployment grant to people who cannot walk. And lastly, I think. Clearly importance the children because school would mean have been stopped completely and children are the most vulnerable and the rains could be damaged with deficiency. So school meals needs to be restarted, including giving the eggs and poultry products so that farmers get be supported. I think governments to rethink this traffic use that we as activist do not meet to step in and do their jobs. They have a responsibility to death. That was in the inactive Suadi the Ryan and South Africa journalist clause humming speaking with me earlier. The heat is produced by CD in America our. Executive producer is at tier by. And our senior producer is John Gilmore this episode was put together by Mosh, cod? Kilowatt once again on like Walter..

South Africa government Public Transport John Gilmore Executive producer betty rand America Suadi producer
"saharan africa" Discussed on The Heat

The Heat

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"saharan africa" Discussed on The Heat

"As lockdowns continue and the global economy falters nowhere is covid nineteen impact. Me Felt more than in middle and lower income countries. Poor. And vulnerable populations in Indian sub Saharan African nations have been hit the hardest barely able to make ends meet at the best of times there now hovering on the brink of starvation as jobs disappear. So. What can their governments do to stop tens of millions of people from sliding into poverty and hunger? Hello. Unlike Walter Welcome to the podcast today, I wanNA play a conversation with Indian activists. Narayan. And South African journalist the clot clot so. I began the discussion by asking and claw claw how covid nineteen is hurting sub Saharan Africa. While in sub Saharan, Africa including areas or the region of which includes country like countries, like South Africa, Zambia Stars Landless Soto and but. We have found a situation where even before this pandemic, the region WAAS facing a very severe drought and things have been made worse by the covid nineteen pandemic and the ensuing problems that have come with it. In response to have been a number of measures, I can speak specifically to South Africa where government has launched various measures including providing food parcels to many of the people in the population to try to ensure that they are at least dmed halfway even as they deal with the economic consequences or the dire consequences which involve the coca nineteen and the resulting effects of it. Swazi let me ask you about India because it's got a dichotomy and. One of the world's largest food producers and yet home to so many people who are going hungry including one third of the world's malnourished children. So give us an idea. I imagine what the pandemic things were even worse. Absolutely, and we'd had the drug them of hunger amidst plenty several decades now, right now in a situation of extreme hunger in quality. From, the very first day of the lockdown. Unprecedented situation of Cutty, million migrants or more. Migrating from open cities where they found themselves chanted without food going back to their villages, and now those in villages including areas a skipping meals did eating less We had never seen such a situation in as a middle income country with resources. It's clearly a problem of distribution stylish in debt also increased across the country and a five-year-old gun succumb last week. Dire situation there let's hit back to Johannesburg I've got a question for you United Nations Conference on Trade and Development from two thousand, sixteen to two thousand eighteen came out with some figures that really pretty alarming Africa importing eighty five percent of its food. That's a thirty five, billion dollar Tad they say by twenty, two five is going to grow to about one hundred and ten billion dollars despite the continent's resources what more can be done to make some of these nations more self sufficient you think. WOFFORD government like South Africa, which has made a very deliberate effort to try and respond effectively to the CIRKOVIC nineteen pandemic and the ensuing economic impact of it. A number of measures have been put in place including a an economic stimulus package of some five, hundred billion around however, this says also been met with its own problems in the sense of money being looted from this fund and problems including the corrupt activity which have. Somewhat, marred the response from the government. It's quite it's very important to note that government has since responded putting on a very tough stance saying that it will tackle the corruption that comes with money that's literally being stolen from the put. This is money that's meant to amongst others provide for people including a the country's indigent in the form of food parcels just to give you an example Ab South African government along with other. Have seen or other distributed more than one million food parcels. But the problem here is that some of these proposals which are meant for end up in the wrong hands people are alleging that politically linked of officials or people are the ones who are who ended up getting these food parcels instead of them going to the country's most of the people that need the most you look at a country like South Africa with a population of some fifty million or more. Quite I mean it's a drop in the ocean, but still here's money that's being put aside, but it's still not to be used effectively. Inclined Claw I gotta ask you about Howard Buffett I interviewed him a couple of years ago. He's a Senate. Warren Buffett spent a lot of time on the continent traveling around trying to address this issue. And one of the things he says is that you know you can't use western thinking to solve African problems and he said one of the greatest failures from the west end from organizations like the United Nations the World Bank is that basically they they failed to listen. So if they were to listen to the people in the continent, what might they here in how might they address some of these pressing issues? For, many of the countries in this region A. New Idea that says that we want to be more sustainable, we are not looking to. Be Too dependent on aid coming from Western nations however, as mentioned a short while ago, even as South Africans or other up many of these African countries trying to find solutions of their own the still systemic problems that still continue to to prevail a top among these being corruption you see innocence I, it takes us ten steps backwards as we try and find solutions to our problems when we still find systemic issues that still remain very prevalent. Especially issues that also implicates the very the very same government I mean we had the president of the ANC and leader of the of South Africa. MR CIVIL REMORSE UP SENDING A. Letter to members of his own party accusing the party of being accused number one when it comes to the issue of corruption in this country if the head of state criticises his own party actions which are taken, which basically set us back, it leaves really much to be desired and twenty talk a little bit more about India because you mentioned the migrants, which is obviously a serious problem with farmers also kind of taken it on the Chin because so many countries there was a lockdown, they can't get out in the field they can't the supply chains or impacted talk to us about that and what can be done to help them. Eights actually. So we have one of the most stringent lockdowns in the word..

South Africa Africa Saharan Africa United Nations India Howard Buffett Warren Buffett Walter Johannesburg Trade and Development WOFFORD president Zambia Senate Soto ANC
"saharan africa" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"saharan africa" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Live you dial in you take control of the airwaves. If he wants otherwise, we talk about stuff the number is eight, fifty, five, four, fifty free with you in the studio tonight it's Ian and RAF, and also want to invite you over to our satellite fundraiser, which I haven't talked about on the air in quite a while but I'm going to start doing it here. Now, it's sort of a last push attempt to try to bring some attention to this particular outreach program we started doing a. Fundraiser for for the N. DOT FM satellite channels which have existed. Since one of them was started in two, thousand, Ten, the other twenty twelve. So we're over two continents, north and Central America and sub Saharan Africa to two different satellite channels, and the point of the patron was to try to raise some money to support these this form of outreach, which is a way to reach people in the case of sub Saharan Africa where only like twenty five percent of people have. Twenty sixteen numbers twenty five percent of people have Internet access there. So it's very, very low it's the lowest. With the exception of North Korea sub Saharan Africa is like the worst place in the world to be to have Internet access. So the idea was, well, let's put our channel up there over free to air satellite. So the people there at least the ones that could speak English can hear the idea of freedom and maybe a lot to be a good thing. And we have we've had phone calls from some listeners to that satellite channel. So Stephanie that there are people out there who have heard it and it has influenced them and I think it's been a success in that way. But the bad news is that very very few people have ever supported this particular program. There, in the sound to be an expensive program, it's not that expensive. I mean, if you think about it, we've got to satellite channels for a thousand bucks a month roughly I mean I can't say I'm not legally able to disclose the exact amount, but I'll tell you it's not. It's not more than a thousand dollars. So for two twenty, four hour a day satellite channels covering huge swaths of the planet. I consider that to be pretty pretty good. I would agree for the average person they're expensive. It's expensive to have a satellite in orbit. True. But if you divvy it up amongst a group of people. is in a lot of money to raise right like per month. That's like on the scale of money. That's pretty insignificant. All things considered that's that's ten people doing one hundred bucks a month. You know it's one hundred people doing ten bucks a month by no means is that an? Goal. But you know maybe it's because we didn't push it enough for or whatever. But there are less than twenty four great donators to that program some donating donating as much as fifty bucks a month. To to what the program is, but ultimately, it's only about one hundred and fifty and change per month. It's coming into that sewer we're covering maybe fifteen percent of the costs. So my thought was maybe offering a matching donation would help to incentivize this to reach its goal. Reach the goal of at least covering one of the channels. Okay. So that's what I'm going to do is anybody that joins the Patriots.

Saharan Africa North Korea Stephanie Patriots Central America
Coronavirus pandemic disrupts HIV treatment in many parts of the world

Morning Edition

00:57 sec | 2 years ago

Coronavirus pandemic disrupts HIV treatment in many parts of the world

"U. N is warning that the corona virus pandemic is causing serious disruptions to HIV treatment in many parts of the world. As NPR's Jason Beaubien reports. Medications are in short supply and dozens of countries with their cargo and shipping routes restricted or closed. The World Health Organization says 24 countries are reporting their supplies of antiretroviral drugs have reached critically low levels or been cut off entirely due to the Corona virus pandemic. Nearly 50 mohr say that they're at risk of running out of the life saving medicines, flight cancellations, border closures and scaled back shipping schedules have upended global supply chains. Local lockdowns and further complicated dispensing antiretroviral says patients have been unwilling or unable to travel to clinics, other clinics that closed or been converted to covert 19 wards. Yuen's AIDS agency warns that the Corona virus pandemic could lead to a doubling of AIDS related deaths this year in sub Saharan Africa.

Jason Beaubien Saharan Africa World Health Organization HIV NPR Yuen Mohr U. N
COVID-19 imperils AIDS progress, UN warns

Morning Edition

01:00 min | 2 years ago

COVID-19 imperils AIDS progress, UN warns

"U. N is warning that the corona virus pandemic is causing serious disruptions to HIV treatment in many parts of the world. As NPR's Jason Beaubien reports. Medications are in short supply and dozens of countries with their cargo and shipping routes restricted or closed. The World Health Organization says 24 countries are reporting their supplies of antiretroviral drugs have reached critically low levels have been cut off entirely due to the Corona virus pandemic. Nearly 50 mohr say that they're at risk of running out of the life saving medicines, flight cancellations, border closures and scaled back shipping schedules have upended global supply chains. Local lockdowns and further complicated dispensing antiretroviral says patients have been unwilling or unable to travel to clinics. Other clinics have closed or been converted to Cove in 19 wards. The U. N aid agency warns that the Corona virus pandemic could lead to a doubling of AIDS related deaths this year in sub Saharan Africa. Jason Beaubien NPR

Jason Beaubien Npr Jason Beaubien NPR Saharan Africa World Health Organization HIV Mohr Cove U. N
More than 70 countries at risk of running out of HIV drugs due to coronavirus pandemic, WHO says

Morning Edition

01:00 min | 2 years ago

More than 70 countries at risk of running out of HIV drugs due to coronavirus pandemic, WHO says

"The U. U. N N is is warning warning that that the corona the corona virus virus pandemic pandemic is is causing causing serious serious disruptions disruptions to to HIV HIV treatment treatment in in many many parts parts of the of world. the world. As As NPR's NPR's Jason Jason Beaubien Beaubien reports. reports. Medications Medications are are in short in short supply supply and and dozens dozens of countries of countries with with their their cargo cargo and shipping and shipping routes routes restricted restricted or or closed. closed. The The World World Health Health Organization Organization says says 24 24 countries countries are reporting are reporting their their supplies supplies of antiretroviral of antiretroviral drugs drugs have have reached reached critically critically low low levels levels have been have been cut cut off off entirely entirely due due to the to Corona the Corona virus virus pandemic. pandemic. Nearly Nearly 50 50 mohr mohr say say that that they're they're at at risk risk of of running running out out of the of life the life saving saving medicines, medicines, flight flight cancellations, cancellations, border border closures closures and and scaled scaled back back shipping shipping schedules schedules have have upended upended global global supply supply chains. chains. Local Local lockdowns lockdowns and further and further complicated complicated dispensing dispensing antiretroviral antiretroviral says says patients patients have have been been unwilling unwilling or or unable unable to travel to travel to clinics. to clinics. Other Other clinics clinics have closed have closed or been or been converted converted to Cove to Cove in 19 in 19 wards. wards. The U. The U. N N aid aid agency agency warns warns that that the Corona the Corona virus virus pandemic pandemic could could lead lead to to a a doubling doubling of AIDS of AIDS related related deaths deaths this this year year in sub in sub Saharan Saharan Africa. Africa. Jason Jason Beaubien Beaubien NPR NPR

Jason Jason Beaubien Beaubien Jason Jason Beaubien NPR Corona Saharan Saharan Africa Mohr Mohr The World World Health Health HIV Cove To Cove Aids Africa
The Urgent Need to Make Disciples - Matthew 28:19

Pray the Word with David Platt

05:41 min | 2 years ago

The Urgent Need to Make Disciples - Matthew 28:19

"Matthew Chapter Twenty Eight. I nineteen. Go therefore. And make disciples of all nations. baptizing them in the name of the father and of the son and of the Holy Spirit. So much, we can talk about here so much. We could pray based on just that that one verse in the Great Commission but I want us to pray. Based on one truth. And what? We just read that I think many people often miss. So when Jesus says, make disciples of all nations. That is not a general command to make disciples among as many people as possible. No, that's a specific command to make disciples of all nations Ponta ethnic of all the ethnic groups. Of all the peoples of the world. So Jesus told us to go to every ethnic group. Every people group in the world and make disciples there. So what that means is, if we are not working in our lives, our families and churches to take the Gospel. To people groups ethnic groups places where the Gospel is not yet gone. Then we are disobeying the Great Commission. Disregarding what Jesus is us to do here. And the reason this is so important because. We already. And our lives and families and churches even in our churches. We spend so little on missions. Taking the Gospel to other places, but then even out of that which we spend on missions. Did you know? That ninety plus percent of missions resources in north. American churches so resources we're spending on. Missions are actually going to places in the world where the Gospel has already gone. Where churches have already been planted. Many churches even Christians when we think about missions. We think all over Latin America. We think all over sub Saharan Africa. When reality is by God's. Grace The Gospel has gone all over Latin America. All over sub Saharan Africa Yes. There are small pockets in these places, these regions where the gospels now gone, but for the most part the Gospel has gone disciples of in May, churches have been planted, and it's not wrong by any means to come alongside our brothers and sisters in these places to learn from them to work together for the glory of God, no question at the same time. We're fooling ourselves if we call that emissions when the reality is were still not obeying the mission. When ninety plus percent of our resources are going to places where the gas was already gone, and Jesus has commanded us, not suggested not implied he is crystal clear commanded us to make disciples take the Gospel, the good news of his love to people. Groups places where the gospels not yet gone. So this is why I know why. We radical started urgent, just identify the places in the world, the groups of people in the world, even the countries in the world, where there's the least access to the Gospel and to mobilize resources to go to them. It's called urgent. That's what initiatives call like. Because there's urgent need, there are people dying and going to an eternal hell who've never even heard. Nobody's even brought the good news of how they can go to heaven through Jesus to them so I just wanted to lead us to pray accordingly. Jesus we. We want to obey your. Command. We want to make your grace and your glory known among all the nations. So we pray. That you would. Open her eyes. Inner Churches to see where the Gospel is gone and to work to take the Gospel, their and our lives, and our families, and our churches to go, and to send, and to come alongside brothers and sisters who are in these places, a few brothers and sisters. I think about that we're. Partnering together with these places in the world, God help us to get behind him and work with them. For the spread of the gospel of never heard gotta we pray you think about all these countries that we're focused on an urgent like Syria God for Your glory in the Megan disciples in Bhutan North Korean. Across India and Iraq and Afghanistan and Iran Laos Lebanon Nepal and some Malia and Yemen Jesus Make Your glory known in those places and use us to do it. Don't don't let us sit back. Content to hold onto the gospel or just to take it where it's already gone God, help us to work us our efforts to take the Gospel whereas Never Gone So that disciples made in all the nations. Just as you've called to do for Your glory for the glory of the name of Jesus in all nations. We pray these

Jesus Great Commission Inner Churches Saharan Africa Holy Spirit Latin America Iran Laos Lebanon Nepal India Malia Iraq Afghanistan
"saharan africa" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"saharan africa" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Anti HIV measures of the U. S. government was funding and taking in sub Saharan Africa that's this is something that media you don't hear very much about that's absolutely true millions of lives saved by the United States government by George W. bush in Africa and you know H. I. V. when it progresses to full blown aids we now it's a horrible disease you get is incredibly painful isn't just the worst the worst millions of human being safe from that god bless that effort and god bless all those folks were able to live long and and healthy lives as a result of those efforts we know world hello world health organisation where where are they on this and why should we why should we think that it's not right it's all right to ask questions about you know this doctor this doctor Ted rose who I mean do you really think Ethiopian government's corrupt I got news for you he's yielding governments very corrupt okay all all you go you leave the the countries of the first world I mean you you leave you know America Canada Europe Australia Japan South Korea you know you leave and you go into a lot of other regions the world and corruption is everywhere everywhere all across the Middle East all across the former Soviet Union unite and the headlines in the Daily Mail China's doctor who I think that says a lot this was a huge mess those of us who are critics of international institutions like the United Nations point to this and say maybe we shouldn't be told how much we have to listen to to these so called experts and maybe it's time to recognize that an American America first policy should also apply to our view of how much we can trust international institutions that think that America and China are in anyway on a similar moral plane let me just say it whether it's Donald Trump as president or Barack Obama's president or if it turns out to be Joe Biden's president our government with any of those leaders these orders of magnitude more decent more trustworthy and better than the songs you run the Chinese Communist Party including Shizhen paying that's just reality I wish our media would pick up on that and I wish your international institutions would reflect that but that's that's never gonna happen never going to happen.

Saharan Africa George W. bush Middle East Daily Mail China America Donald Trump president Barack Obama Joe Biden Chinese Communist Party Shizhen United States Ted rose America Canada Europe Australi Soviet Union United Nations
"saharan africa" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"saharan africa" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Let's begin with news that sub Saharan Africa now has its first case of coronavirus the case has been identified in Nigeria more we can go straight then speech the BBC is a soccer league in Abuja good morning to you is I can tell us good morning Connie tell us about this case would you know what so far what we know the press statement by the Nigerian minister of health is that the patient is an Italian mom who works in Nigeria he traveled to Milan and it turned to Nigeria on Tuesday and he fell sick and he was taken you know to a hospital and they they did blood samples and tests were conducted on the case I mean it it let that turned out to be a corona virus by the Nigerian authorities are saying that he is now stable he has no serious symptoms and he is being managed and infectious disease in leading us and they are also saying that that trying to transport contacts that he might have heard I mean people who he had related I interacted with to discover if there is any other possible scenarios indeed what about the flight he was on any talk of fact well so far this there are no details about the flight but I think I'll be contacted the authorities are talking about may include his roots I'm particularly within the Niger initials they also advises Nigerians on basic hygiene us aware of protection I'm Hon what she meant keeping distance I mean some distance from people who have shown some symptoms of respiratory diseases and then also calling on citizens to stay at home if they have such symptoms and contacted the authorities okay so you said he was in isolation how a well prepared is Nigeria for this what Nigeria in I mean the government has been saying that they have prepared that ready death like did they tell the emergency response center out of the national center for disease control and it's some instructed to go locations and they have been suspected cases in Nigeria so far eleven was tested negative before the leftist confirmed case and many people are saying that well they're not surprised that he bought I mean the coronavirus has finally landed in Nigeria because it's a global phenomenon and so no country is immune from it for now that was the same that and they they're also concerned about you know that the situation at the moment but many I say well Nigeria did well in twenty fourteen when it out the board like Casey said that Dr rich African some African countries but the court of viruses it just different disease even countries with robust health systems are struggling with it so the country is yet another try in time that's what many Nigerians I say but that coverage in each at bat to mentor and basic hygiene on to you know help and collaborate with the authorities to make sure that any possible case or cases out I immediately contain chicken it's really interesting to hear the confidence that Nigeria the citizens have in the you know in did government being able to tackle this very very briefly if you could is there sufficient information though coming from the government well at the moment the government has just confirmed the disease I mean the case in Nigeria but there is going to be a press conference by the Niger ministry of health later today the so a bit that expected to give more details and even though many have talking about the ball out she'd they brought us success Nigeria hot they're also raising concerns that this is a different scenario so they're not you know really a hundred percent confident that my dad's going to tackle it because even countries with robust health systems I generally go with the new corona virus so it just a trying time for Nigeria indeed subsaharan Africa because that is the first case in sub Saharan Africa and only the third in Africa intended okay thank you very much that's the BBC's isha college joining us there from Abuja the government of the Democratic Republic of Congo is set to sign later.

Saharan Africa
"saharan africa" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"saharan africa" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"From the BBC world service we Connie shop and James Caan we'll go live to Nigeria which has just recorded the first coronavirus case in sub Saharan Africa to the Democratic Republic of Congo to to hear about the rebel group signing a peace deal why has Malawi legalized cannabis for medicine purposes about the hopes of Afghans as talks with the Taliban progress first thing in the BBC news with keris Barlow senior Turkish military commanders in the defense minister have gone to the Syrian border to take charge of ground and air attacks against the forces of president ascent he says the strikes were in retaliation for the deaths of thirty three of its soldiers in northwestern Syria on Thursday unverified video interviews media shows Syrian military vehicles being hit by explosions the first case of the new coronavirus in subsaharan Africa has been reported in Nigeria the patient is an Italian citizen who flew into legos from Milan officials say the person is in a stable condition with no you serious symptoms the authorities in the south Korean city of Daegu say they'll file charges against the head of the religious sect which is at the center of the corona virus outbreak that he's accused of violating disease control measures by failing to submit the names of all the six members concerned about the economic impact of the epidemic continues to affect trading on the world stock markets that was selloffs across Asia with indices down in Japan Hong Kong and Shanghai three prominent pro democracy figures in Hong Kong have been charged with illegal assembly for taking part in an unauthorized protest in August last year the media mogul Jimmy Lai has been arrested along with two politicians mutual gang of the labor policy and the former Democratic Party chairman Yeung sum a Mexican drug cartel member has been jailed for nearly fifteen years over the murder of a prominent prominent journalist Javier Valdez was shot dead in Sinaloa state in twenty seventeen and about so because but as it was identified as the driver of the getaway vehicle and astronomers have detected the biggest unknown explosion in the universe since the Big Bang it came from a supermassive black hole in the galaxy hundreds of millions of light years away it took the light four hundred million years to reach us BBC news thank you welcome to Newsday we Connie shop and James come look in the next half hour we'll talk peace deals in Afghanistan and the Democratic Republic of Congo controversial constitutional referendum in Guinea yeah it's about presidential term limits and about Malawi's decision to legalize the growing of cannabis and James Craig has a full sports medicine try to make him promise not to mention all snow.

Afghanistan Guinea Sinaloa Yeung chairman Democratic Party Milan president Taliban Democratic Republic of Congo BBC James Craig cannabis Malawi James Caan James Connie shop
"saharan africa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"saharan africa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Butler's long flooded key Largo neighborhood but that will take years in the meantime he says residents are making their own adjustments well it's kind of tough to go out walking a dog unless you have hip boots on there is people that are going to work that won't drive their vehicles through here and they park up to the grocery store up on US one and they'll walk up Butler and other residents say if history is any guide flooding should subside soon in their neighborhood at least until the next king tight Greg Allen NPR news key Largo Florida every day as many as five hundred babies in sub Saharan Africa are born with HIV now a study out of Botswana finds that EF newborns are given treatment right away the virus becomes almost undetectable NPR's ping pong reports if the baby test positive for HIV standard practice and many sub Saharan countries is to give them treatment but not for weeks or even months after they're born the concerns that newborns can't tolerate these powerful drugs for some time though researchers about a hunch that treating right at birth is better never per side is a virologist at Johns Hopkins and she wrote a paper six years ago about a baby girl in Mississippi with HIV who is treated thirty hours after birth bad baby was known to be infected went off drugs and then for twenty seven minds there was no signs of HIV but researchers weren't sore at this of working other babies any clinical trial about Swanee gives an answer ten HIV positive babies were given a three drug cocktail within their first days writing in the journal science translational medicine the researchers report that two years out these babies have very little virus and their bodies Dino current skills and study co author and a doctor at Brigham and women's hospital in Boston says the kids aren't cured yet but you'll likely that we may have set them up for the possibility of long term remission of their HIV kids started drugs months after birth had two hundred times more virus in their blood than those given treatment right away shot at Johns Hopkins who is not involved in the study so that shows that giving drugs soon after birth keeps the virus from taking firm hold on the body giving this very early treatment limited establishment of a long lived reservoir well it's great to know that cheating earlier is better it still says that one of the biggest hurdles will be getting drugs to be be that need them you really need the kind of infrastructure that exists in Botswana or in a country like the United States in order to be able to identify and rapidly intervene and these children that has to be AT is in sub Saharan Africa infected with HIV don't have access to anti retroviral drugs researchers say that needs to change wrong NPR news this is NPR news six nineteen is the time on KQED bay area traffic and transit news on thanksgiving morning covered by Paul Maxwell good morning Dave very client out on the morning roadways no incidents from the C. H. P. if you're heading into San Francisco no back up at the bay bridge toll plaza metering lights Ralph and it's at the limit into the city it's a little wet from the bay area but a winter storm warning continues in the Sierra until four o'clock this afternoon cheating requirements continue for interstate eighty from gold run to the Nevada state line highway fifty from Camino to Myers and for highway eighty eight from pine Grove to wood for its I'm Paul Maxwell for.

Butler thirty hours six years two years
"saharan africa" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

10:18 min | 3 years ago

"saharan africa" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"It's in sub Saharan Africa. They are getting an extra decade of life an extra decade of life. That's incredible. And again, this is not like the center of of the, you know, the economy here, we're talking about sub Saharan Africa where they not only had to deal with a an economy. That's still developing. You know, they're essentially in the past compared to us, but also massive wars breaking out in an genocides and all sorts of terrible things going on there. Well hunger. This is talking about the way they measure, this is the how many calories per day. The average person is deprived. If you're hungry. We just talked to a lot of people are not hungry anymore in Africa. But globally has declined by thirty three percent in since two thousand one. Say this. Remember what Bono said remember Bano because you used to be able to say it was the kindness of the rest of the world. It was America stepping up and delivering food. I remember seeing giant bags of rice and grains, sitting on docks over in Africa, as we would airlift these these huge sums of food, and it would all have the American flag on it. It's not that anymore and his Bonneau said aide doesn't work except short term. It has to change fundamentally. It is the free market system. Bano is talking about the free market system. And how it is saving lives in Africa. He laid around to say, hold me thrill me kiss me. Kill me. As a percentage of the population globally since two thousand one has declined by twenty seven percent and thirty percent in sub Saharan Africa maternal mortality rate. Okay. Make it through the birth has declined by thirty six percent since George W Bush was president poverty ratio. So this is the ratio of people who are in extreme poverty adjusted for inflation. This is percent of population has declined by fifty five percent since two thousand one and actually say that's two thousand one to two thousand eleven the number is not completely updated yet. And so we and we in China, by the way ninety eight percent drop in that number and that time ninety eight percent. Teuber Closys has dropped by thirty six percent since two thousand we can go through these things legitimately all day almost every single measure of whether you're better off in this world has improved dramatically since two thousand and yes, a lot of this is happening in places like China and India and Africa, and we have to focus on our own priorities here in the United States. We should step back and realize that, you know, especially if you're person of faith people really matter like their people. And so, you know, I think a lot of times because of the sort of geopolitical stuff, you know, people are like, oh, well, who cares if China's doing well, I care because the Chinese people are really important people just like every other person on earth. And every other thing of every issue when it comes to abortion, and all these other things, you know. We're fighting for people to live. That's really the basis of that. It is right to life goes well beyond just the abortion issue. It goes it goes beyond we fight for people in Venezuela. Why because we because of oil now for people in Venezuela because we want them to experience the same great things. We're experiencing when it comes to capitalism. I love capitalism that because it's a fun word or because it's on my political side of the aisle is because we've taken two billion people that used to just die from hunger and starvation and lack of medical care and all those things. And now, they live like it is a literal miracle that has happened within our lifetimes, and nobody notices the news never tells you any of this stuff how can a tweet from ihop possibly make the news. When this stuff is going on how can it possibly make the news? Let me tell you this marry my daughter, she's my eldest she had strokes at birth. And she. She's she's just a living miracle, and I just love her. And she's been having a real hard time with seizures lately, she has them all the time. And we have tried for years now to get them back under control. We try to every medicine every combination of medicine she's been to every doctor every hospital every expert, and we just can't find a way. And so we're down to surgery now brain surgery sounds really truly frightening because you screw up in the brain. You're done. Okay. And let me just tell you what this free market health care system has done in this and tell me as I described this you tell me if this is going to be available under a single payer system. Like they have an England where the leading country for innovation us is done. My daughter started going in for testing. And she went in for the first thing they had to do is have her have seizures with her head wired for seven days they had tripper into seizures. So they did everything they could to map where all these seizures were coming from. And it was the hardest thing to watch because she didn't have any medication in her and she has bad seizures without medication. She has grand mall. She has bad seizures with medication without medication. She has grand mall, and we'd never seen those before. And it was terrifying to watch. But this hospital here in Dallas. It was remarkable. And they're watching her in monitoring her twenty four hours a day. Incredible. After that they had to map generally where they were coming from. Then you have to take the next step and the next step is they have to do a three d. Modelling of her brain. This is brand new technology. There's only one guy in all of Texas. And I think it might even be the region that can even read these tests, and they model her brain. And she goes in for three hours. And they said the first part is I want you to think of these words, don't speak. Just think of these words read, you know, car cat, and so she has to just think of them in real time there watching her head light up as she's thinking about processing those words, then they say think about speaking these words, they watch that let up now speak them. Now. Move your hand. You're right. Finger move, your right hand move, your left, hand, move your arm up and down move your leg all modeling in real time. So they're seeing how she understands speech what part of the brain processes, her speaking what what part processes movement etcetera etcetera, and they put it in a three D model. K now they lay lay on top of it where her strokes are coming. Now, they can they can laser surgery because she has scars on her brain. They can laser off if there's a scar. And that's what's causing the seizure. They'll just slice that part off. But they're not sure exactly where the seizures are coming. From is it on the scar is a beneath scar. How close to one of her centers that she's using is this seizure is it in the middle of that thing. Because if it is then you can't really do anything. So the next step that she has to have in the next few weeks. She's going in for I think fourteen days, and they will spin it starts with surgery. They drew. Really holes some sort inner head, and they drop these sensors all throughout her head. They actually implant them into her brain and the wires are coming out. So it's sending signals and they will watch her in seizures. While for for two weeks, and it will show exactly where the seizure is coming from. So then they pull them out. And they'll be able to know this is pinpoint exactly where that seizure is starting what it affects. And if we can if we can take it out, if we can't go in surgically and take it out what we can do is we can insert pacemakers into her head that will sense any kind of seizure starting and it will send signals out to disrupt that signal and stop her from having seizures. That's modern medicine. My private insurance that I have for the company my private insurance. I've had to pay five thousand dollars one test was fifty thousand dollars one test. That was the one five hour test. That wasn't the two weeks in the hospital. If she has this done, it will cost probably about a million dollars. We'll probably pay ten grand. That's what good private insurance. Does. This is what modern medicine is doing with the free market system, and it starts expensive and goes down. You know, the one thing that they don't take insurance on is is laser eye surgery. Have you noticed how cheap labor laser eye surgery is very effective too? And very effective why because people have to personally pay for it, and they shop it. There is simple solutions to the problems that we have with healthcare. The last thing we need to do is stop the advancement of medicine. Okay. With the unemployment rate being as good as it is where three point six percent unemployment. I've never seen that while I have seen that in my lifetime. But I was four the last time we had an unemployment rate that.

Saharan Africa Africa grand mall China Venezuela Bano George W Bush Bonneau America Teuber Closys president Dallas Bono
"saharan africa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:38 min | 3 years ago

"saharan africa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Next time on city autzen lectures, psychiatrist Daniel Siegel, the parenting expert, and the author of the whole brainchild talks about navigating the worlds of psychiatry and medicine and his own challenges as a father that's next time on city arts matches here on K Q E D. City arts lectures, it comes up tonight at eight tomorrow morning to a new NPR poll shows climate change is not getting taught in many classrooms. Even though most parents wanted I'm Joshua Johnson setting a standard for climate science next time on one A one tonight at eleven. From NPR news. It's all things considered body. Cornish. Ari? Shapiro today. Global health officials are making history. They're rolling the first vaccine aimed at stopping malaria malaria, infects more than two hundred million people a year, and it's one of the biggest killers of children worldwide in Africa more than a quarter million kids die each year from the disease that scene has taken thirty years to develop and as NPR's Michael do cliff reports toddlers in Malawi will be the first to get it back in the mid nineteen eighties. Scientists at Walter Reed Army is to toot here in the US started developing an experimental malaria vaccine the I failed. So they teamed up with the company now known as Clark so Smith Kline and try it again, then they started seeing promising results in the Petri dish thirty years later that Beck scene is finally ready to be given to kids in the countries that need it. The most those in sub Saharan Africa were extremely excited that we're at the point of being able to. To do pilot introductions in the areas where malaria is actually causing the death and disease. That's Deborah Athalie who these vaccine deployment at path a nonprofit, which has helped develop the vaccine every two minutes child or baby is sub Saharan Africa dies of malaria in some places Abadie can have six thousand in just one year after Lee points out that this vaccine is one of the few to be and launched specifically for children across Africa. I think that's that's also really really important milestone in survey seen development and introduction. Most XI's are targeted for people in rich countries because they are expensive to make. But this vaccine has been heavily subsidized by GSK foundations in governments starting today. Toddlers in the lower or see the vaccine then kids in Kenya. In ghana. The initial goal is to immunize about three hundred sixty thousand children over the next few years, but the vex. Scene isn't a silver bullet for malaria for starters kids. Need four doses of the vaccine for it to be affective for families in rural areas four trips to a clinic could be hard. The second problem is the vaccine is super effective the vaccine efficacy is much lower than many of our other childhood vaccines. That's William off he directs the international vaccine access center in his an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins University, he says the vaccine protects kids only about thirty percent of the time by comparison. Many childhood vaccines offer eighty or ninety percent protection the buzz around the vaccine is warranted. So many children get malaria in Africa that even a weak vaccine can have a big impact on communities health their estimates. That one live would be saved for every two hundred children who are vaccinated. So that's where the impact is in that could save the lives.

malaria Saharan Africa NPR Joshua Johnson Daniel Siegel E D. City arts Walter Reed Army Ari ghana Shapiro Beck US Kenya Deborah Athalie Malawi Johns Hopkins University GSK
"saharan africa" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"saharan africa" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Gene that causes sickle cell anemia evolved in places like sub Saharan Africa because it protects people from malaria, their millions have the disease, and it's estimated more than fifty percent of babies born with it die before the age of five right on the bone. They're here in the United States, it affects one hundred thousand people mostly African Americans for having the disease as a child often meant spending Christmas in the hospital as an adult she struggled through pain to complete college. But keeping a job was tough. Because something as simple as walking up stairs could trigger pain crisis. You friends who've died. Yes. Younger than me. And you've known this your whole life growing up that you could potentially die early. Wait. Did you think you would direly? I did actually when I hit about twenty two. I was like, you know. Precipitous hour. I'm kinda middle aged right now, what are some of the things that you've always wanted to do that. You couldn't do honestly everybody laughs at me for this. I just want to run it to be honest things that most people take basic things one of the most cruel parts of the disease journal. And other patients have told us is being accused of faking pain to get narcotics being labelled a drug seeker during one trip to the emergency department when she fell to the floor in pain, Dr refused to help her and I'm looking up at her. And I mean, tears, I'm doing the best. And you got to be thinking. Sometimes I just don't understand. I don't get it. Mike. I'm in so much pain. Do you think I just want some Murphy? Makes me sad that some people. In the medical community. Don't get it. So this would be my lab. Dr Francis Collins is director of the national institutes of health the largest biomedical research agency in the world the overseas, a nearly forty billion dollar budget that funds more than four hundred thousand researchers worldwide dot Collins, please.

Dr Francis Collins Saharan Africa malaria disease journal dot Collins United States Murphy director Mike forty billion dollar fifty percent
"saharan africa" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"saharan africa" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"As sick as I am not you didn't actually it did not oh it had to do with Google videos. Oh, that's the worst. Like, I said it's sick. You'll have having to drink tonight. Is it coke? Nope. Why is it lie? Made is a diet lime made. But it's not made with diet seven up. It's made the soda water. What do you mean? Chris. It's really good soda water soda. What what did you just drink water? With the little cucumber and mint in this is infused with the little lame. But it's fuzzy. That's what I'd like him back carbonated. I know makes me purple. You'd be doing on the air. If you taught me burping on air tonight. Heard anything I did earlier. We have we cover breast ironing enough to you. Any more details. New. That's really stupid. Isn't it? Yeah. It is. I understand how we're supposed to be respectful of other cultures. But this is this is the twenty first century, even in sub Saharan Africa. It's like come on. I was gonna say. I was gonna say something it'd be an appropriate. Oregon could become the first state to require in home surveillance of newborn babies. There. Eighteen sponsors of this Bill. They claim it's passages necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace health and safety and therefore in the -mergency is declared to exist. Which leads to the natural question of. What's the big emergency? Well, apparently state of Oregon is really concerned that some parents are raising their children without the watchful eye of big brother..

Oregon Google Saharan Africa Chris
"saharan africa" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"saharan africa" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Like this. Somebody. The question. I'm afraid I'll get beat up. So I'm going to ask the question. The colonization of Europe sub Saharan Africa has culturally enriched. Europe. With the festive practice. Breast ironing. Banji? Yes. Have you ever? Have you ever heard of or engaged in breast ironing? I'm not really sure at that means it's an African practice of ironing a girl's chest with a hot stone. Just would you? Listen, don't interrupt me. I'm trying to explain this and people are curious. It's an African practice of ironing a girl's chest with a hot stone to delay breast formation practices spreading in the United Kingdom with anecdotal evidence of dozens of recent cases, a guarding investigation has established. The practices described. As are you ready? Painful. Abusive. And what do you think the last is? Dumb stupid futile. Doesn't stop the development of breasts. Right..

Saharan Africa Europe United Kingdom
"saharan africa" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"saharan africa" Discussed on Science for the People

"So let's see what the worst case scenario might be. If if the fear is that somehow, this is Dr could leap over and eliminate all mosquitoes is what's the coherent fear? Actually. So I'm is it just this abstract fear of of manipulating nature. But of course, that horse is out of the born. Longtime ago, we've been manipulating nature since we became human beings that you could say the definition of what makes a human human being right about humanity itself is our curiosity or are are tricking around with with nature are are yearning to change nature are manipulation and taming and growing in harvesting and seating and and breeding natural world into an order. That is in fact, good for us safer us. And so this is a continuation of long held long long decisions about the fact that you should eliminate malaria from the world, we've eliminated polio, for instance, and the, and that's been altogether. A good thing for the children of sub Saharan Africa. Not to mention the children of waas Angeles in Chicago. So we do manipulate nature. We've made a decision that we don't like how the natural world rages, and is an and kills and we intervene whenever we possibly him. So the idea that we ought not do it. Suddenly when the the. The people that are being harmed our children in Africa. And suddenly, that's that point. We draw the line seems to me hypocritical. Right. I mean, this in any mosquito comes into my house bearing malaria, I would kill it. There's no question. So why would I deny that same moral gesture to a woman who who is in sub Saharan Africa doesn't have resources that the critics often have? So that's why that's why I'm I'm concerned about this. Because if you start with the science, and you understand the limited nature of this intervention, only, one species only species that causes the most of your cases of malaria, if you don't if you think about the actual science and don't have science fiction fantasy than I think most ethically ethical, and thoughtful moral people would say, of course, we should and this this terrible terrible disease. And this is this is a fish and good way to do it in a way, that's actually may have less of an impact than spraying and killing every living thing..

Saharan Africa malaria tricking Chicago polio
"saharan africa" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"saharan africa" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"We also are available via satellite feeds to sub Saharan Africa, the Americas and all over the place where also you can also watch and listen to us on twitch dot L orenda defense. Don FM. Hey, what time are we gonna do this show? If New Hampshire moves into Atlantic standard time, that's a great question because there is a hearing this week at the New Hampshire state house where if Massachusetts Maine, according to the New Hampshire Bill, it's Massachusetts and Maine agree if their state legislatures do the same. Thing we will move into the Atlantic standard time zone, and it will not change during the daylight saving. It'd be awesome. Wouldn't it? I would love that during the change. A we have to have our. The services on Friday. The Germans have to be over an hour earlier. Because like right now was supposed to be the nighttime prayer is like six o'clock in the evening right now. That is nighttime. It's just insane. Because if we have the hook, but at the same time as every other mosque in the country, one o'clock, then we can blow right through the next prayer time certain times of the year because of the fat happens right after this change before the change everything's fine. But right after the change we have like four weeks that we have no choice, but to do the services at noon instead of one or we'll go right through the next prayer time. Can I be clear? This is not a Muslim problem everybody. Everybody in the United States is screwed up in daylight savings time or whenever flips back and forth, and nobody likes it. I've I've read stories that animals don't like it. It freaks them out when they're going out to get. Milked at the wrong time and things like that. There's also.

New Hampshire Saharan Africa Don FM Massachusetts Maine Americas United States four weeks
"saharan africa" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"saharan africa" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"Is that's that's working on public data the, but we've also had a sort of growing business on making enterprise versions of Wolfram alpha where we're taking the internal data of some large company and letting people ask unstructured questions about that internal data making use of public data plus there until later, so, you know, somebody might say what will my sales between Christmas and new year in sub Saharan Africa or something, and you know, for that you have to know things about the world like Christmas and new year after no, you know, what sub Saharan Africa, you have to be able to know concert conversion, right, Zola's kinds of things and to answer that question, you have to go behoved up to the you know, until databases of company X to go and to onto that. So so we've been that some, you know, we we've done a bunch of those things one of the things that's been interesting is is the people sort of. Horrified. You know, you mean, you actually have to go and do things with humans to make this stuff work. Yes. I mean, you know, it's it's we can do we have very good in a we've got very leading edge machine learning stuff and appeal stuff and so on, but you know, that's not if you really wanna make computer data you can't use that stuff. You can use it to help prime barris pumps, but in the end, humans and experts and having to be in the loop. If you actually want to build something that is capable of being a foundation on which you can build sort of a big computational tower. And I think one of the things about the culture of data curation is it's it's interesting because. Oh, there's a large volume of work to be done on. This also judgment to be exercised, an it's a it's a tricky management is to how you propagate sort of judgement calls up and down kind of the the chain of of of of people who who working on this type of thing, you know, at what point do you propagate? You know, I don't know in in. You know is this. I I don't know like if you're doing image curation, you know, does this really count as an elephant. Or is it a model of plastic elephant? You know, what does a do? We really call us an elephant or do we call it a toy? Yep. And somebody, you know, at some point somebody has to make a decision like that. But you have to kind of propagate that to the point where that decision is made by somebody with appropriate experience. And who knows how it fits together with the rest of the system, but the person who's actually looking at pages and pages of images, doesn't, you know, isn't isn't the one who has to has to be figuring that out all the time. I feel like there's something like cutting. Offically profound about that. You there's there's basically two types of jobs, there's their jobs that have almost infinite scale ability and their jobs that that don't. So for example, being a musician now has is one of these jobs that scales in the sense that some famous musician will will go in a studio and record a song once and then it gets played on the radio over the whole world to millions of people. Being software engineer is also one of these scalable jobs, where you can design some software that's used by billions of people with with only a few hundred engineers, right? And and everyone is really worried about say automation taking job that isn't scaled like truck driving and turning it into a scalable job. But but in your case, you you're doing the opposite where you are taking a job that had been done with say an LP poorly. And your your changing the scale changing that that sort of dynamic to get something that has really high fidelity. And it's funny how even intuitively like on the surface. I kind of you my first reaction is all of that doesn't that doesn't scale..

Saharan Africa Zola Wolfram barris software engineer
"saharan africa" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"saharan africa" Discussed on Ologies

"My adviser was wonderful. He he's very similar to mean is interested in kind of everything. And so he's like we'll just throw a bunch of things that you and see what sticks, you know? Like, clearly this existential question, why do we have garbage you need you need to narrow this down a little, but we'll give you the time. So Julie had the chance to go to South Africa. And she was looking at tools used to dig into termite mounds, and then because of her love of animals, it got her interested in chimpanzee behaviour around termite mounds. She's like what is happening with primates and termites. Primates termites. Let's get into it. I like to imagine her standing on termite mound in khaki shorts and dusty field boots just pumped as hell and then sprinting into a library, maybe. But the funny thing is is in in reading it on reading all the worst all the work. It was like we'll hominids probably termites knows like well what termites? So I started thinking about it knows like started looking into it. And there's eighty-five genera- of termites in sub Saharan Africa. What? Yeah, they're crazy diverse. And then the eat a bunch of different things. So we think of them as eating would. But they can eat grass they can eat soil, and then there are social insects. So they have a caste system. So if you eat the Queen that's different than eating the soldier, which is different than eating the worker. So this whole like hominids eight termites just didn't sit. Well with me. I was like that's like being way common. It's eight food. You know, like it didn't tell us really anything. And so that's really where my dissertation when often an angle I never expected. Did was to learn more about termites and reconstruct. You know, what I thought which termite genus were hominids eating. So that was my dissertation. And so it all kind of made sense to me because I wanted to study brain size, and you need to understand, tools and food and orders understand brain size. So it took this turn towards termites that might seem like it came out of nowhere. But for me it made sense at the time. Did you like bugs before this? I just liked nature. I was not necessarily a bug lover. But I think about it. And my mom was raised me to like if there's a bug in the house, you get a glass and a postcard and you take a bug outside. And so I definitely had a respect for them that I didn't realize was unique until I started studying them, and then termites are just fascinating. I mean, the social behavior of them, they they communicate through fair moans. They they're just they were just spectacularly wonderful just sit there and read about it was just something new. And I think that was a big thing was I was studying human evolution. So now does he have Aleutian on a totally different scale? I mean, it just it. It happened so much faster because new generation time so much smaller and they get so specialized and the termites that chintzy and the ones I focus the most on our fungus farmers. Yeah. Yeah. So they have their lives to yourself. Well, Well, so so far. far, they're architects. Right. So they build these nests. So that the heat and everything can be regulated it has chimneys. So they're architects, and then inside that structure, they have a symbiotic relationship with fungus..

Aleutian South Africa Saharan Africa Julie