35 Burst results for "Saharan"

Illegal Immigration Has Skyrocketed in the Last Two Years.

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:11 min | Last week

Illegal Immigration Has Skyrocketed in the Last Two Years.

"The number of people in Latin America and the Caribbean who wish to migrate this isn't quite something this is from Gallup. The number of people in Latin America and the Caribbean who wish to migrate in other words leave their countries. Presumably permanently. Has jumped this past decade to 242 million. Many eyeing the United States, heightening fears about the border crisis. In 2011, so that's 12 years ago, only 18% of people in Latin America and the Caribbean wanted a permanently leave their homes. By 2021, that had risen to 37% of the region 655 million people. Gallup polling shows. The desire to migrate rose faster in South America than anywhere else in the world. By the end of 2021, the share of Latinos wishing to migrate was on par with those in poverty wrecked sub Saharan Africa.

Latin America Caribbean United States South America Saharan Africa
"saharan" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:19 min | Last week

"saharan" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is a special edition of Wall Street week from the World Economic Forum. I'm David Weston. Global Wall Street wasn't just focused on the developed world when it came to Davos. The developing world also got a fair amount of attention. Starting with sub Saharan Africa, which cities Jane Fraser says is very much on her client's mind. A lot of the discussions we're having, particularly interestingly, with a lot of our Middle East and clients, what are they doing about Africa? I think Africa is one that we've all got to keep our mind on because that is where the net growth in the workforce is going to come over the next few decades. If we get it right, it's a wonderful opportunity if we don't, it's going to cause a lot of problems both in Africa as well as in Europe as well as other parts of the world. And so looking at how do we build out transmission networks, greener supply chains there. And the Biden administration echoes what city is hearing from its clients as the United States trade representative Katherine Todd laid out plans to support and engage Africa and described a great opportunity for the world economy there. President Biden hosted the African leaders at a summit in December and Washington D.C.. And I think it came at just the right time. The message that we wanted to send across the board across the administration was that America is ready to partner with Africa to work for Africa with Africa. Entre, we've got our baseline trade program. It's a preference program. It's called the African growth and opportunity act. It is set to be reauthorized in 2025. Now is exactly the right time to be reviewing what performance has been like, how effective has this been in stimulating and fostering development economic development and investment in our partner economies. And then also to start thinking, how do we make this better and more effective? It is very clear from all of the engagements that we had last December in Washington, D.C., including my trip to Nairobi for president Ruto inauguration in September. The future really is Africa. The resources in Africa, whether they are in the ground or that they are the human beings, the people of Africa, the potential is tremendous. If we can, find the way through trade, economics, investment, finance, to unlock the potential of Africa and its people. Africa could be the engine that drives economic growth and prosperity for the next phase of globalization, but it is going to require us to think big and to be creative because the tools that we have so far haven't done what we know we need to do in this next phase. President Biden also just recently traveled to Mexico City for a North American summit meeting with the head of Canada, Mexico, as well as President Biden. There are trade issues pending under the UFC USMCA and other places. Where do those stand? Are they being resolved? What's the timetable? So there is an energy consultation that we are engaged in right now. Both the United States and Canada have requested consultations with Mexico. Those consultations are ongoing. We have certainly gotten Mexico's attention. They know we care deeply about this. Our economies are and have been inextricably linked for many decades now. And we are the kind of partners. We are neighbors, geography is never going to change. We're going to be neighbors forever. So these are really important conversations. They're about energy policy. They're about our vision for a competitive North American future. We are still in consultations. And we are committed to finding a solution here using whatever tools are available, including the ones under the USMCA. The pandemic drove home some of the great disparities between the developing and the developed world. Pfizer chairman and CEO Albert bourla explained how the mRNA vaccine that his company developed with BioNTech was made available for free and how that has led to a much broader initiative. The vaccines particular vaccine, those all countries in the world were offered completely free through a brave movement the government made the U.S. government. They bought 1 billion doses from us at cost, and they offered for free to the world. Unfortunately, they were not able to absorb it. Because there is no demand for those vaccines in, unfortunately, in the poorest of the countries. But nevertheless, that gave us the whole story with COVID. Since it has been even more. So in 9 months ago, here in Davos, we launched in a court where we said the Pfizer will offer all the patent prothetic products, which means the products that genetic manufacturers can not make zip copies. At cost and we say, of course, these manufacturers and send no regulatory, no compliance, no legal, nor administrative no research. We announced not all our patent protected, but all our prevention. This moves there is from 23 products to over 500. Wow. So it's not just so much patent patent protected. We were here when we were given for example, it would give them maybe the most prescribed customer medicine in the world, high technology, but they will say we have also need for antibiotics who have needs for antiparasitics who have needs for anesthetics or basic chemotherapy. And we have them and then we do everything. I'm going to say that sounds wonderful. Absolutely wonderful. It's wonderful. Why did you do it? Because we owe to do it. I don't think it is, there is no reason why the poorest countries in the world right now won't have access to the same medicines that kids in America are in France already. One of the reasons I think Pfizer has been a successful has been because there's been an investment in science, basically. What about larger for the U.S. government and other governments? Are we investing enough in basic R&D? Could that help you? I think we've helped. And I think there is a lot of work happening, particularly in the U.S.. And this is why in the U.S. attracted all the research investments of the private sector. If you see what is going on, even companies

Africa President Biden David Weston Saharan Africa Jane Fraser Biden administration Katherine Todd Washington D.C. Washington, D.C. Ruto U.S. World Economic Forum Mexico USMCA Albert bourla BioNTech Middle East Pfizer Nairobi Canada
"saharan" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

Bitcoin Audible

02:43 min | Last month

"saharan" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

"A tool that is capable of allowing people to build and access wealth independent from institutions of control can be seen as a leftist project. She says as an activist that believes citizens should be paid in currencies that actually value their life and sacrifices. Bitcoin is a people's revolution. I find it painful, she says, did a farmer in sub Saharan Africa only earns 1% of the price of coffee on the global market. If we can get to a stage where farmers can sell their coffee without so many middle institutions, more directly to the buyers and get paid in Bitcoin, you could imagine how much of a difference that would make in their lives. Today, she says, our countries in the global south still borrow money in U.S. dollars, but over time our currencies depreciate and lose value and we end up having to make twice or three times the payment we initially promised in order to reimburse our creditors. Now imagine, she says, if we get to a stage in ten or 20 years, where Bitcoin is the global money that is accepted for business worldwide, where every nation has to borrow in Bitcoin and spend Bitcoin, and every nation has to pay their debts in Bitcoin. In that world, din foreign governments can not demand that we repay them in currencies that we need to earn, but that they can simply print. And just because they decide to increase their interest rates, it won't automatically jeopardize the lives of millions or billions of people in our countries. Of course. Bitcoin is going to come with issues like any innovation. But the beauty is that those issues can be improved with peaceful, global collaboration. No one knew 20 years ago what amazing things the Internet allows us to do today. No one can tell you what amazing things Bitcoin will allow us to do in 20 years. The way forward, she says, is an awakening of the masses. For them to understand the ins and outs of how the system works, and to understand that there are alternatives. We have to be in a position where people can reclaim their liberty, where their lives aren't controlled by authorities that can confiscate their freedom at any time without consequences. Gradually, we are getting closer to this goal, with Bitcoin. Since money is the center of everything in our world, says the fact that we are now able to obtain financial independence is so important for people in our countries, as we seek to reclaim our rights in every field and sector.

Bitcoin Saharan Africa U.S.
Biden says he plans to visit sub-Saharan Africa soon

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | Last month

Biden says he plans to visit sub-Saharan Africa soon

"President Biden says he plans to visit sub Saharan Africa soon. During a summit with African leaders, the president underlined his focus on the continent. The United States is all in on Africa. And says he will literally be in Africa. I'm looking forward to seeing many of you in your home countries. The president did not say when or where he will go. His first two years of travel in office have focused on Asia and Europe. Donald Trump was the first president since Ronald Reagan not to visit Africa. Sagar Meghani at The White House

President Biden Saharan Africa Africa United States Donald Trump Asia Europe Ronald Reagan Sagar Meghani White House
"saharan" Discussed on Climate Connections

Climate Connections

01:31 min | 2 months ago

"saharan" Discussed on Climate Connections

"I'm doctor Anthony Liz, and this is climate connections. 600 million people across Africa today do not have access to electricity, and the continent's population is expected to grow rapidly. That's a lot of people are going to need electricity. Paulina aramil is a professor at Carnegie Mellon university. Her research shows that some areas of sub Saharan Africa, such as Ethiopia, have a lot of potential hydropower that could help meet that demand without burning more fossil fuels, and hydropower can be paired with other renewable sources, such as solar, to help balance the energy supply on cloudy days or overnight. Africa has a lot of solar potential, solar is not available at night, but hydro could be but hydropower depends on having water available, so air mio says interconnecting different regions of the grid could help move hydropower from where it's abundant to where it scarce. And building more reservoirs would allow water to be saved during the wet season, so it can be used during the dry season. She says hydropower can have significant drawbacks, such as the impact of flooding an area to create a reservoir. But careful planning can ensure this renewable resource is one piece of the electricity future for billions of Africans. Climate connections is produced by the Yale center for environmental communication. To hear more stories like this, visit climate connections dot org.

Anthony Liz Paulina aramil Africa Saharan Carnegie Mellon university Ethiopia Yale center for environmental
"saharan" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

What Bitcoin Did

05:20 min | 2 months ago

"saharan" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

"Yeah, did I read yesterday 12 countries of applied to join brick? It's possible. And could this I'm not that very bullish on China for a variety of reasons. It's an energy and food importer. It has the demographic crisis, its population is shrinking. I don't think it's going to have the same success as the U.S. has had for many, many, many reasons. Primarily because it doesn't issue the world reserve currency. One of the reasons this IMF and World Bank thing has been able to work so well, especially since 1971 is that it's fueled by this like Fiat system. So the deposits that are flowing into the bank and fund that allow them to offer these loans are generated often essentially from thin air from the American printing press. It's not like there's like a certain amount of scarce resources that are at stake here. When McNamara was at the World Bank in the 70s, again, he realized this concept that these poor countries could only pay back the debt with more debt. So he was like, all right, we're just going to, we're just going to expand the debt in a massive way. And all of a sudden, all the admins, the hundreds of people who worked at the bank and the fund had to allocate like four or 5 times as much money each year. And that's what led to what are called these white elephants. White elephants are these enormous projects in these poor countries that clearly have no benefit for the local population. And the reason they were chosen is because it's just sort of easier for the administers administrators of the loans to deal with. So for example, you have, if you're like, oh my God, I got to give a $1 billion out to sub Saharan Africa. Is it easier to do a thousand small projects or like a giant dam? Well, obviously the giant thing. So a lot of it, as you point out, is like incentives that are micro incentives that shape a lot of things. But in the end, a lot of the massive expansion of the debt that's been extended to these countries has been used for really, really large projects like hydroelectric dams that facilitate the extraction of minerals or transmigration, which I definitely want to get into. But yeah, I mean, the typical white elephant project would be

World Bank IMF Fiat McNamara China U.S. Saharan Africa
World Population hits 8 billion, creating many challenges

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

World Population hits 8 billion, creating many challenges

"The United Nations says the world's population has now reached the 8 billion mark confirming an analysis from earlier in the year The projection came in a UN report released in July the sit much of the growth expected between now and 2050 is coming from just 8 countries Half of those are in sub Saharan Africa Nigeria Congo Ethiopia and Tanzania the UN says the populations in the region are growing at 2.5% That's more than three times the global average still experts say the bigger threat to the environment is consumption highest in developed countries not undergoing big population increases I'm Charles De Ledesma

UN United Nations Saharan Congo Ethiopia Nigeria Tanzania Africa Charles De Ledesma
John Zmirak and Eric Discuss Medicine Going to the Dark Side

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:07 min | 3 months ago

John Zmirak and Eric Discuss Medicine Going to the Dark Side

"Know that in Germany under the Nazis, this is exactly what was happening. Every field was affected. So that they're no longer with science. There was Nazi science and Jewish science. In other words, they began the madness began to go backwards into every part of German culture. And if you did not parrot the lies of the national Socialist Party with regard to science and literature and whatever it was, you were pushed out. But what's amazing is this is happening in the United States of America right now. What you just said about Peter McCullough, I mean unbelievable that this would happen to a tremendously successful, brilliant doctor doing his best and by the way, doing better than all of the people that are trying to cancel him. But who are the people behind canceling somebody like him? I'm just astonished that the medical establishment has basically gone over to the dark side just as they did in Germany. I don't see how it's any different. It's amazing. Well, remember, the medical establishment has accommodated the whole trans dilution. Now it's considered science that there are 47 genders. There were only, there were only two before Bruce Jenner decided to have a sex change and did a cover story in Vanity Fair. And that changed the scientific consensus and added 47 genders. That tells you how much you should trust the so called scientific consensus. But remember, there was a scientific consensus that overpopulation was going to destroy the west that we're going to have famines in the United States and Britain. They were saying that on the Johnny Carson show. It didn't happen. But you know what did happen? Massive birth control and population control programs by governments all around the world, birth rates have are now plummeting in virtually every country on earth, except for a few sub Saharan African places. They haven't gotten to yet. And we're going to have a complete collapse with like one young person to one old retiree. It's not going to work, but

Peter Mccullough National Socialist Party Germany United States Bruce Jenner Johnny Carson Britain Saharan
Democrats Cannot Answer THIS Question

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:50 min | 4 months ago

Democrats Cannot Answer THIS Question

"Extent is man-made activity contributing to rising global temperatures. They can not give you that answer. They can't. Are there any other potential explanations for rising global temperatures? Over the past couple thousand years have global temperatures risen or fallen absent human activity? Have there been other environmental changes regionally from the Mediterranean climate to north England to sub Saharan Africa that might have changed not because of human activity, but because of other actions, when you have a hemisphere, when you have a planet that is so large and so massive, isn't it rational to believe that there could be other inputs or other potential, let's say, other potential explanations as to why the earth would be getting warmer? Is and here's the other question to what extent extent to what extent are other variables factored in. And here's the most important question. Let's pretend they're right about the alarmism. Let's pretend they're right about all this, even though none of their predictions come true. One prediction after the other is exaggerated is elaborated. Does that then mean this is the most important question does that then mean we put into jeopardy our ability to power our hospitals, transportation, our economic engine so then we then satisfy the slight increase in rising global temperatures? Is that right? And if so, why are you then making a widespread moral argument? Because that is a moral argument. Under what basis do you make that argument that poor people in America now have to pay 30 or 40% more to heat their homes this winter? That working class people have to pay 30 or 40% more to drive to work. Why? Because while she says, we own the science and the world should know it.

North England Saharan Mediterranean Africa America
"saharan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:18 min | 6 months ago

"saharan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"No economic activity, we knew that that was a recession. We didn't need to be told by the NBR when in 2009 there was a huge stock market crash. Everyone started getting fired, banks were going bankrupt every week. That we knew was the financial crisis we didn't need the NBA to tell us that this is not like that. But what about the 2023 recession? If there is one, will that one be different? Very, very different. So number one, they're probably isn't one. And number two, if there is, it's just a recession that's not a crisis. And again, this is something which people I can't blame them for getting wrong because the last two recessions that we've had have both been crises. We had the financial crisis in 2008, and then we had the COVID crisis in 2020, and both of them were really, really bad. And so now, after having gone through two recessions which were crazy, everyone's like, well, a recession is terrible because it means we're in a crisis. No, that's not what it means. Well, if you're under 40, no one would blame you for thinking that. Absolutely. The last time we had a recession that wasn't a crisis was a little baby recession in 2002 1001, which I'm over 40, you're over 40. I don't know if either of us really remember that as a recession, but it was not such a big deal. Oh, this was the explosion of the tech bubble. Exactly about it. Yeah. That was not an all consuming collapse. You could go through your life if you were separated from that and not even notice. Yeah, the rest of America just went along its merry way. And there was a recession, and it was okay. So it's a political inevitability that as the midterms approach the recession chatter will get louder, so much of this is partisan. How should news consumers GERD themselves? So I'm just hoping and crossing all my fingers, not just for the sake of America, but also for the sake of the discourse that we don't get a negative print for GDP in the second quarter because if we do every single Republican and a bunch of gray beards on the television, they're all just going to say, we are in a recession. Look at this. We had two quarters of negative GDP growth and anyone telling them that they're wrong is going to sound like a moron. And ultimately it really that's what a recession is. A recession is just a lot of people feeling bad vibes at the same time. So I think the first most important thing to do is to try and tune out any hysteria. Stocks go up, stocks go down, volatile prices in commodities, like oil, go up and down, oil, by the way, is a key ingredient in food. This is something a lot of people don't understand. There's this thing called the haber Bosch process, which basically creates all of the nitrogen and all of the fertilizer that is used to grow food. So when oil prices go up, food prices nearly always go up as well. This is a cyclical thing that happens every so often and the all of us in America pretty much. The worst that happens is we wind up having to spend more on our food. In much of the rest of the world, there is a real food emergency that the Americans outbidding everyone else for the food, which means that if you live in large areas of sub Saharan Africa, say, there is actually a hunger problem. So put it in perspective. If the worst that happens is you wind up having to spend more for your food or to fill up your car and you can drive to your job and get your paycheck. You're really doing quite well. But nevertheless, recession is so Brooke, can I just stop you here? You've used the word recession 8 million times in this interview. And this is the problem. We are having a conversation about the economy and you're like, well, what about this kind of recession? Are we in a recession? Do you think people are going to say we're in a recession? And if anyone remembers this interview, this time tomorrow, the main thing that they will remember is you saying the word recession. And that is exactly how the media contributes to the general vibe that we're in a recession or could be going into one. Even though I'm skeptical. Even though you're skeptical. The word is being in toned over and over

America NBA Saharan Africa Brooke
What Is the Monkeypox, and Who Is Infected?

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:06 min | 7 months ago

What Is the Monkeypox, and Who Is Infected?

"All right, so Michael, give us a little background, a brief synopsis of what is claimed with regard to monkeypox. Well, the truth of it is this is definitely unusual. This is an outbreak. There's no doubt about it. Monkeypox historically has been a disease not just of sub Saharan Africa. So really just a small cluster of countries in west Central Africa. I'm looking at a map right now. So what we're seeing is that we've apparently never seen before. It is we're seeing cases of Latham Australia on one side of my potato projection to the United States and founded and Latin America on the other side. And Europe as the actual biggest cluster, the most cases right now is in Spain, the UK has a large number of cases. We've never seen this before.

Monkeypox West Central Africa Saharan Michael Africa Latham Australia Latin America United States Europe Spain UK
"saharan" Discussed on Practical AI: Machine Learning & Data Science

Practical AI: Machine Learning & Data Science

05:29 min | 7 months ago

"saharan" Discussed on Practical AI: Machine Learning & Data Science

"With wasm. So that it just runs in the browser like super fast, like everywhere. And it's just like a group of a set, a subset of our open-source community who just picked up the tools and are running with it. You know, so and then for the speech synthesis side of things, honestly, one of the easiest places to interact with those models is on hugging face. We have a hugging face space. I think it's cokie AI. And you can just, with radio, the radio app is really nice. I have to admit. You just type in what you want to say, you click the language in the marble you want, and then you get it. I don't remember exactly how many languages we have for speech synthesis, but it's growing. And after the massacre collaboration, it's 6 more languages from sub Saharan Africa. So it's pretty cool. So I'm just wondering as you're doing some of these, how kind of going back to when you were talking about how you just thinking about this all the time. You know, and you can't really turn that off. Voices in your head know exactly. Like so many topics, what are the types of things that practitioners, as opposed to the users need to be thinking about as the field at large is moving forward because, you know, we've asked these kinds of questions of ourselves and, you know, 99% of everyone has the best of intentions as to you. But how do we make sure that as we really move the state of the art forward in terms of having things like very, very genuine sounding emotion in different emotions rippling through this, how does that how do we need to think about that in terms of the effect on the users? Because there's some amazingly positive things and potentially if we screw up or for the very few bad actors out there, there could be negative things as well.

Saharan Africa
"saharan" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

04:53 min | 11 months ago

"saharan" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"A military scenario in Ukraine that leads the Europeans to completely cut off their inbound gas from Russia this year. It's very hard to see. And also I would say it's very hard to see any level of economic sanction that would change the mind of the Russians in terms of their military decision making on the ground in Ukraine. Now, I think there are a lot of things that the west is doing in terms of providing weapons for the Ukrainians that are having an impact on the ground a lot more Russians are getting killed. It won't prevent them from taking the Kyiv. Again, in my mind, I feel quite confident about that. But it's quite possible, perhaps even likely that the west that the west of Ukraine will remain in Ukrainian hands, which means that after this fighting is over that a rump Ukrainian state in exile exists in the west run by zelensky or someone that's aligned with him and that they continue to get enormous economic and military support from all of the NATO countries. So even though I don't think that the energy situation will become so parlous, then it would affect Putin's decision making. I do think that the west's response does matter on the ground. The war has kind of having radiating economic shockwaves around the world and our people effects on food markets, for example, and food security. We talk a lot about energy security. What about food security? What happens when commodity prices spike up and we have severe supply chain challenges with energy and food and those things are obviously very related. What happens is that a lot of people die. What happens is we see a lot more starvation, the number of people who are food stressed in the world is going to go way up and sub Saharan Africa and Yemen in Afghanistan and Bangladesh. It's going to go way up. And it's horrible to think about, but the massive impact of this Russia crisis is going to be much more global inequality. And this is, of course, a direct consequence of the end of the peace dividend more structurally, that over the last 30 years of globalization, what did you have? A lot of people were left behind, but the biggest thing you had was the explosion of a single global middle class. On the back of the pandemic and now this Russia Ukraine war and the decoupling of the Russian economy from the west, which doesn't matter so much in terms of the size of the Russian economy, but it manages immensely in terms of commodities globally and supply chain, those two things are going to seriously unwind the growth of this global middle class. And they're going to stress developing countries to a much greater degree. They will lead to financial crises in countries like turkey, for example, that will no longer be able to service their debt. You'll see more Lebanon's out there. You'll see some in Latin America. You'll see some in sub Saharan Africa. Those are the knock on effects..

Ukraine Russia Saharan Africa Putin NATO Yemen Bangladesh Afghanistan turkey Lebanon Latin America Saharan Africa
Carter's dream, almost reached: Guinea worm cases drop to 14

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Carter's dream, almost reached: Guinea worm cases drop to 14

"Former former former former president president president president Jimmy Jimmy Jimmy Jimmy Carter Carter Carter Carter is is is is close close close close to to to to reaching reaching reaching reaching his his his his dream dream dream dream of of of of completely completely completely completely eradicating eradicating eradicating eradicating Guinea Guinea Guinea Guinea worm worm worm worm infections infections infections infections from from from from the the the the planet planet planet planet during during during during his his his his lifetime lifetime lifetime lifetime Guinea Guinea Guinea Guinea worms worms worms worms are are are are parasites parasites parasites parasites people people people people who who who who drink drink drink drink on on on on clean clean clean clean water water water water can can can can ingest ingest ingest ingest them them them them Guinea Guinea Guinea Guinea worms worms worms worms can can can can grow grow grow grow as as as as long long long long as as as as three three three three feet feet feet feet before before before before painfully painfully painfully painfully emerging emerging emerging emerging from from from from the the the the skin skin skin skin Adam Adam Adam Adam Weiss Weiss Weiss Weiss with with with with the the the the Carter Carter Carter Carter center center center center says says says says they they they they have have have have come come come come a a a a long long long long way way way way coming coming coming coming down down down down from from from from three three three three point point point point five five five five million million million million people people people people year year year with with with Guinea Guinea Guinea worm worm worm it it it to to to say say say that that that we we we only only only have have have fourteen fourteen fourteen human human human beans beans beans on on on a a a planet planet planet of of of almost almost almost eight eight eight billion billion billion people people people Guinea Guinea Guinea worm worm worm infections infections infections were were were in in in just just just four four four countries countries countries in in in sub sub sub Saharan Saharan Saharan Africa Africa Africa Chad Chad Chad Sudan Sudan Sudan Angola Angola Angola and and and Cameroon Cameroon Cameroon after after after outbreaks outbreaks outbreaks of of of Kobe Kobe Kobe record record record or or or in in in security security security situations situations situations emerged emerged emerged teams teams teams were were were able able able to to to re re re access access access areas areas areas the the the Carter Carter Carter center center center began began began leading leading leading the the the global global global Guinea Guinea Guinea worm worm worm eradication eradication eradication effort effort effort in in in nineteen nineteen nineteen eighty eighty eighty six six six I'm I'm I'm a a a Donahue Donahue Donahue

Guinea Jimmy Jimmy Jimmy Jimmy Carter Adam Adam Adam Adam Weiss Weiss Weiss Weiss Carter Carter Carter Carter Ce Carter Angola Cameroon Sudan Saharan Saharan Chad Chad Africa Kobe Kobe Kobe Saharan Chad Carter Carter Carter Center Ce Guinea Guinea Donahue Donahue Donahue
"saharan" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

What Bitcoin Did

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"saharan" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

"So and of course, it's also a fact that we shouldn't go there to Africa, emerging countries and tell them how it works. I mean, that would be the next form of colonization that we don't want to do. But building coaches, you know, talking about it. Going there, showing them new technologies that they can use, for instance, or even understand that they think completely differently than we do, for instance, this I mean, these people don't need our ideologies. They need solutions to be able to lift themselves up. And so I was when I was there, I was talking with aura from Zimbabwe and I said to her, you know, Bitcoin is self Soren tea. And freedom and she looked at me and said, you know, we here in sub Saharan Africa. We have something called Ubuntu. When the ponto means your responsible for your family for your Friends for your community and you need to work also for them, you need to share everything. And this is how we live. There is no such thing as ego like it's for me and from myself Soren here. So I found that very interesting and funnily enough are not finally, but I think it's great is that there are also solutions now coming on top of Bitcoin or as an alternative to the lightning network or to side chains that will help people to have their own community money. And without new tokens. And that's a great thing, I think it's called many mint. It's from block stream, or they support the development. And basically, people can set up a multi sig, and have distributed ownership. So they lock Bitcoin in this multi sick, have their own rules. Like the Bitcoin contains rules. So how can they be spent and things like that? And you can then deposit Bitcoin and you get a redeemable note. And with this redeemable notes you can then pay like a heavy circular economy in your own community in a town or in a family or whatever. And everything is backed by Bitcoin. So you have no inflation, but you can have your own small monetary policy. And I think that's a great way to scale Bitcoin for communities like that. I'm just reading about this here on the blockstream website, not even heard the mini mint. Yeah, it's very new. At impact, tweeted about it, I think, end of October. And it's in the making. It's not there yet. But I think it's a very exciting technology and possibility. So sorry, just trying to understand it. So village could lock up some Bitcoin in one of these multi sigs and it brings this minimum. Yeah, exactly. You have basically this project or the code. You can set.

Bitcoin Africa Saharan Soren Zimbabwe
"saharan" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"saharan" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"I'm going to try to put it in a kind of understandable way. Maybe if you were to say. Let's just take typical. Crematorium are typical graveyard across the country over the whole pandemic period where they would normally have seen three cremations faso full over the that was an extra one. There was one third. Extra cremations wanted extra barriers which occurred but over a long period of time that adds up to a lot of debts night. I mean to have this one. Turn extra debts over a period of sixteen months which is the period. We looked at that adds up to of course a lot of debts. Yes so if you compare this to some sort of infection mortality rate so four million one point four billion. I don't know what that is. It's a point three percent or something like that little sen- so lengthy percent of the people who got infected died. I would say it's a. It's a bit more than that. It comes out a little bit model that here right. But he said what you're finding s live i case mortality was more like two percents. Be just as you say. It's only useful if you have. All the cases come did so. You don't have an anonymous proxy in india for that but the excess mortality is sort of a proxy for in section mortality rates. I was spending figure out is point. Three point four percent. You know sort of on average. But you're seeing the world. It is kind of what you expect. Based on india's aid structure structure is crucially important. When you're trying to make those comparisons you know just to be kind of food to understand the difference that you would expect between a country like japan. let's say and then a country in sub saharan africa. It's it's Like not an order of magnitude like you have four or five times difference in the expected. Level of modalities simply because you've got more of an elderly poppulation and in particular..

india saharan japan africa
Climate Change Could Push 200 Million People to Move by 2050

Newscast - Africa

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Climate Change Could Push 200 Million People to Move by 2050

"The mall bank one that reduced agricultural production water scarcity weisensee levels and other adverse effects of climate change could cause up to two sixteen million people to migrate within their own countries by twenty fifty. The washington-based development lender had released a report in two thousand eighteen covering climate changes effects on migration in south asia. Latin america and sub saharan africa and projected one forty. Three million people could move in those regions by twenty fifty throughout bank vice-president for sustainable development georgian vote gala. Says is important to note that this protection is not cast in stone. He says of countries start to reduce greenhouse gases closed development gaps restore vital ecosystems and how people adapt internal climate migration cook thirties by up to eighty percent to forty four million people by twenty fifty

Saharan Africa South Asia Latin America Washington
"saharan" Discussed on InnovaBuzz

InnovaBuzz

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"saharan" Discussed on InnovaBuzz

"In the way that i was pushing through life before that i never noticed that it was negative. Because i'd never took the time to see it interesting and saharan starting that mindfulness practice and and accepting that self love and self way self-esteem was was really important to work on as opposed to just leaving it to happen itself headed that impact. Your lock added that china lauch name completely changed my mindset. It took me from a place where i was catastrophes. Ing around my health or my business or my academic pursuits expecting the worst. That's what i call it. The tasks revising And trying to stand for the worst all the time. It took me to a place where i was either planning for kings to neutral or expecting the best and one thing that happens when we start to expect the best of things or a positive outcome of things is. We're actually more likely to see it. So it's not that the outcomes are necessarily that big of a difference but it's the lens by which were looking at the world through. And when all i could think of in my task was negative outcomes than force. I saw them everywhere. But when i changed my perspective is something neutral or positive. I was much more likely to notice when a positive outcomes happens the particular activation system the things that we pay attention to the classic example. For as the if you buy a second cosso i. I drive a silver subaru. So when i pulled that silver subaru over sudden nails. Hill-wood subaru's everywhere. And i said wow it else's head the simul idea by new silver subaru's i would say before it's just i didn't notice them. I didn't pay attention to and being able to notice positive outcomes. It really really helps with motivation particularly in business so so many times business owner set goals and they may even achieve that goal if they're focused on being critical of themselves even though they achieve that goal they may only see the things that they could do better next time and when we do that over and over we lose motivation any time. It's kind of like chipping away. Lock remarkable or something and but when we celebrate our achievements then we actually build on to that youthful piece of marvel and it grows and grows and grows just like our motivation point so as as someone that probably always foes into this trap of seeing where the opportunities for improvement and then taking that to an extreme offshoot dot should have nine that. I should have done that better of sir it instead.

lauch saharan china
"saharan" Discussed on African Tech Roundup

African Tech Roundup

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"saharan" Discussed on African Tech Roundup

"For growing businesses henault guys on e for the last part of a third installment with canada's in solo see of cooler as africans that have company disrupting the agribusiness industry his reminder always about offering minimal actionable responses in about fifteen minutes or less you can shake out especially those leave andrew berkovitz seat of social stack unpacking our partnership with african tech around the yes will soon be launching tokens. This we believe will be a great way to interact with you listeners. And for the gs to reward your loyalty. According to oxygen business group report africa's home to sixty percent of the world's arable land. Agriculture is one of the topic economic sectors for the continent and employs fourteen percent of the population in sub saharan africa. We've asked for questions about the supply chain what is really wrong with african survive chain. How do we fix it. How do we level the playing field for new entrance. You do have one bonus questions at.

andrew berkovitz canada africa saharan
Predicting Urban Land Use

Data Skeptic

02:15 min | 1 year ago

Predicting Urban Land Use

"My name. is daniel omega. I am impede student in the computer. Science department of the university of oxford marriages on this neighbor. I in almost driving this research. Are we talking about today. I did which on my professors about two years ago. The remind masters program to kick things off. We'll start with the imagery problem. I guess to set the stage. Would you mind providing some background on urban growth especially in sub saharan africa. What's the nature of the problem. You're looking into a musician. Common phenomena in developing countries like in africa. And there's this trend of lack of planning and management which is resulting in into the encroachment of obama fabrics in the reserve special regions. Which of course will lillian do like. Unsustainable increase in population so. Mary site at that time was a jolly to study. The growth rate of how abundance are being used and house do some forecasts to inform the decisions of obama's and the relevant stakeholders so that they can adequately prepare to do the abound growth and influx of people from the radovan area. Basically so i live in los angeles california in the us. It's a very urbanized place. And i don't think there's any even an inch of land that isn't accounted for. So if you want to do something here. It has to be planned out and bureaucratic and things like that. Which i guess in some ways makes it predictable. How much predictability is there. In the way the the landscape is changing in the data set. You looked at well. I think that's a very difficult question. Because download the dust is available out there for land use in israeli in africa and elect to discuss about this in detail because gives us at a rally used to make predictions are that classify land based on land use was outside africa and i said that aside from europe. So but you give up presented data set or the Provided deducted jolly had disclaimed that did was representative gone from different parts of the world from developing countries from transgenic countries on developed countries. So based on this information so we used to sit and that trained a modell that will dictate different kinds of lung categories

Daniel Omega Science Department Of The Univ Africa Saharan Barack Obama Lillian Mary Los Angeles California United States Jolly Europe
"saharan" Discussed on The Comb

The Comb

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"saharan" Discussed on The Comb

"Of abuse and discrimination starts to get public attention. I can see that it gives me life. I believe that if there were not the revolution. I would do the same person as i am. Now i will be in jail. Maybe or i will go to another country because it's impossible to live under a dictatorship if you have some people on some values. A lot of voices were raised after the revolution. I had the opportunity to know people who are like me. People who shares the same values because before the revolution. Even if you have this values you you will not have the courage to share it with someone as because we were always in on the safety of the other person's so the revolution gives me the space to develop my way of thinking and to fight for my way of thinking in two thousand eighteen seven years after the revolution. Tunisia passed a law. Which for the first. Time actually criminalized racism that was the law that hampton daddy was able to use to prove his right to change his name and it was designed to be used to protect minorities including black nations and migrants from sub saharan africa. From racial abuse and discrimination. Did that change things. I don't know. I don't think so. I think that justice is for rich people in tunisia. This low was meant to protect the the lowest counter says that for all the good intentions of the law. The most vulnerable people. Those who most designed to protect are the ones who struggle most to actually access as benefits. They can't afford a lawyer earned afford the time of weighed in for this long process. So if you have money to go for justice you will go for justice and you will wait for like five or six years to have rights are net. I don't believe consult problem. I can say also that the problem is really complex. It's not a legal issue that we can solve with the legal frame..

tunisia saharan africa hampton
Will Ants Rescue Wounded Comrades?

BrainStuff

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Will Ants Rescue Wounded Comrades?

"You've probably seen stories about exemplary bravery and battles soldiers and volunteers who risk everything to pull injured. Compatriots out of harm's way so they can receive much needed medical attention but some of these heroes will never receive. Any medals parades accommodations for their work. And not because of injustice but because their ants species called capone-era analysis are termite hunting. Aunts that scientists say not only rescue injured comrades but also treat their wounds. The survival rate among those injured in this combat is remarkable up to ninety percent. These ants live in colonies in sub saharan africa that average nearly one thousand members the ends wage war on termites rating their nests and dragging the dead back behind the lines as a source of food. These rates however often come at a heavy price. The termites biting crushed the ants ripping off limbs and snapping off heads. Eric frank a scientist at the university of low son in switzerland has studied these ants and seeing them do battle with termites at a research station in the komo national park one of the largest protected areas in west africa in northern cote d'ivoire. He would watch the and drag the injured back to their nest. But because the ants make their homes underground it was difficult to define exactly what happened next. So franken has team set out to discover what was happening inside the nest i they captured entire ant colonies and set them up in artificial nests. They then hooked up infrared cameras to keep tabs on the insects. The scientists also captured termites and then allowed the answer to stage a raid. Many aunts were gravely injured during the melee. Many lost limbs they're able bodied comrades responded by staging a battlefield triage separating gravely wounded from the only slightly wounded. The seriously injured those who lost at least five limbs often died on the battlefield because as the researchers noted they didn't seem to want to be helped that bendon distort their bodies making it difficult for their sisters in arms to carry them to safety. Those whose wounds were less serious however allowed themselves to be cared for

Eric Frank University Of Low Son Komo National Park Saharan West Africa Africa Switzerland Franken Bendon
"saharan" Discussed on Speaking of Bitcoin

Speaking of Bitcoin

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"saharan" Discussed on Speaking of Bitcoin

"Where if you do not have the currency your smuggler. And there is no due process right. So you get a shot for holding bitcoin. That's a bit of an impediment. We don't need to worry about that. You know someone issues. A suspicious activity report on us. At least we can argue about it. There's no suspicious activity report in zimbabwe. They shoe right. Or maybe not zimbabwe. Maybe some other country these things happen. So can you safely hold. Bitcoin is it worth more than the currency. You currently have in your pocket. Do you have the technology within your country to adopt it. That's very very critical right. We all have smartphones. we have internet connectivity. We always on internet connectivity. That is not the case. So i don't expect bitcoin to be adopted as bob way. Not because it's not more valuable but simply because they don't have the means to be on the blockchain even occasionally or even be without electricity occasionally in order to take advantage of bitcoin at that level so utility or value fear or lack of fear in the adoption of the currency and technology. Do you have the necessary. Technology and the fourth one is neutrality. Can i talk that currency without violating some expectations of my culture. Some cultural norms. Some religious norms does it work with my language. Etcetera etcetera now. We all focus on the features of bitcoin. Making it easy to use. That's really important but we have to think of these barriers. Because what they do is they provide that sweet spot. Where all of these three things converged with these four things converge and suddenly. Bitcoin is a much better choice. And when you reach tipping points and technology what happens is massive viral adoption. We've seen this with currencies like impace which is essentially a transactional currency based on cell. Phone minutes was built as a transactional currency based on cell phone minutes. No it was for carriers to be able to sell cell phone minutes and people to move them between their family but it's convenient. It maintains its value better than many currencies in sub saharan africa. So it became rapidly adopted..

zimbabwe Bitcoin bob impace saharan africa
"saharan" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"saharan" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Unhcr <Speech_Male> in partners <Speech_Male> have only been <Speech_Male> able to provide shelter <Speech_Male> a basic <Speech_Male> plastic <Speech_Male> tent with a wood-frame <Speech_Male> to one <Speech_Male> inten <Speech_Male> displaced people <Silence> in the country <Speech_Male> as my <Speech_Male> visit progressed. <Speech_Male> A feeling of dread <Speech_Male> took hold <Speech_Male> of me. It <Speech_Male> felt like. I was glimpsing <Speech_Male> the future. <Speech_Male> I've made more <Speech_Male> than sixty visits <Speech_Male> to refugees. <Speech_Male> Globally in <Speech_Male> the past twenty years. <Speech_Male> I've watched as <Speech_Male> political solutions <Speech_Male> to conflicts <Speech_Male> have dried <Speech_Male> up for an ever <Speech_Male> growing population <Speech_Male> of forcibly <Speech_Male> displaced people <Speech_Male> and their children <Speech_Male> born <Speech_Male> displaced <Speech_Male> or stateless <Speech_Male> passing their entire <Speech_Male> childhoods <Silence> in limbo <Speech_Male> wars. <Speech_Male> No longer seem <Speech_Male> to end. They <Speech_Male> simply shift <Speech_Male> just as al <Speech_Male> qaeda and the islamic <Speech_Male> state have <Speech_Male> shifted their operations <Speech_Male> from afghanistan <Speech_Male> and the middle <Speech_Male> east to the <Speech_Male> suhel and sub <Silence> saharan africa. <Speech_Male> Meanwhile <Speech_Male> the number <Speech_Male> of forcibly displaced <Speech_Male> people has <Speech_Male> doubled globally <Speech_Male> in a decade <Speech_Male> to more than eighty <Silence> million people <Speech_Male> looking <Speech_Male> back on those loss <Speech_Male> decades. <Speech_Male> It's as if <Speech_Male> everything was leaving <Speech_Male> us to the kind <Speech_Male> of conflict now. <Speech_Male> Seen in burkina-fasso <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> combining the reality <Speech_Male> of a protracted <Speech_Male> war <Speech_Male> fueled by terrorism. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> These threats are <Speech_Male> made worse by <Speech_Male> the devastating <Speech_Male> effects of man made <Speech_Male> climate change. <Speech_Male> African <Speech_Male> nations have generated <Speech_Male> only a tiny <Speech_Male> fraction of the <Speech_Male> emissions heating <Speech_Male> our planet yet <Speech_Male> in burkina-fasso <Speech_Male> arable <Speech_Male> land and <Speech_Male> they're natural water. <Speech_Male> Supplies are <Speech_Male> drying up <Speech_Male> at a terrifying <Speech_Male> rate. Making <Speech_Male> it next to impossible <Speech_Male> for families <Speech_Male> that have formed <Speech_Male> the earth for generations <Speech_Male> to feed <Silence> their <Speech_Male> one molly <Speech_Male> in refugee <Speech_Male> who had fled to <Speech_Male> burkina-fasso with <Speech_Male> his family and their <Speech_Male> livestock <Speech_Male> described how <Speech_Male> their cows <Speech_Male> died one <Speech_Male> by one from the <Speech_Male> lack of grazing <Silence> and water. <Speech_Male> We had <Speech_Male> decades to try <Speech_Male> to prevent conflicts <Speech_Male> from breaking <Speech_Male> out or to <Speech_Male> find peace agreements <Speech_Male> to enable refugees <Speech_Male> to return <Speech_Male> to their home <Speech_Male> countries. We <Speech_Male> now face the <Speech_Male> prospect that <Speech_Male> climate change effects <Speech_Male> will mean there <Speech_Male> is no home <Speech_Male> for displaced <Speech_Male> people to return <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> governments in <Speech_Male> wealthy industrialized <Speech_Male> nations act <Speech_Male> as if refugees <Speech_Male> can be treated <Speech_Male> as someone else's <Speech_Male> problem. If <Speech_Male> they simply fortify <Speech_Male> their borders <Speech_Male> pay <Speech_Male> developing nations <Speech_Male> to continue to <Speech_Male> host millions of <Speech_Male> displaced people. <Speech_Male> They make <Speech_Male> shiny new humanitarian <Speech_Male> announcements <Speech_Male> to distract <Speech_Male> voters <Speech_Male> and themselves <Speech_Male> from decades <Speech_Male> of uncapped <Speech_Male> promises. <Speech_Male> The hypocrisy <Speech_Male> makes it harder to <Speech_Male> hold to account <Speech_Male> governments that <Speech_Male> commit mass atrocities <Speech_Male> against their <Speech_Male> own people <Speech_Male> causing them to <Speech_Male> flee. <Speech_Male> At which point <Speech_Male> will we be <Speech_Male> concerned enough to <Speech_Male> recognize that the <Speech_Male> model is broken. <Speech_Male> As well <Speech_Male> as immoral <Speech_Male> when one hundred <Speech_Male> million people are <Speech_Male> displaced or <Speech_Male> two hundred million <Speech_Male> which we could <Speech_Male> reach within the next <Silence> twenty years <Speech_Male> as citizens <Speech_Male> we need to <Speech_Male> shift our thinking <Speech_Male> learning <Speech_Male> to understand <Speech_Male> the human cost <Speech_Male> of the minerals <Speech_Male> mined in <Speech_Male> conflict zones <Speech_Male> to meet our demand <Speech_Male> for smartphones <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> the environmental <Speech_Male> cost of manufacturing <Speech_Male> our close <Speech_Male> our <Speech_Male> foreign policies. <Speech_Male> The promises <Speech_Male> we break <Speech_Male> the allies we <Speech_Male> indulge the <Speech_Male> exceptions <Speech_Male> we make and <Speech_Male> the atrocities we <Speech_Male> overlook also <Speech_Male> carry <Speech_Male> vast human <Speech_Male> cost. <Speech_Male> That price

burkina saharan afghanistan africa
"saharan" Discussed on More than Abstract

More than Abstract

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"saharan" Discussed on More than Abstract

"<Speech_Male> In fact i see <Speech_Male> river flowing <SpeakerChange> out of it <Silence> into the desert right now. <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Male> that's pretty much. My favorite <Speech_Male> part of olpis. Just <Speech_Male> the main. <Speech_Male> Oh <Speech_Male> lake mega chad. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> hope that is on <Speech_Male> like <SpeakerChange> their tourism <Speech_Male> page. <Speech_Male> I wonder how <Speech_Male> they would market <SpeakerChange> themselves <Speech_Male> like the <Speech_Male> most chad <Speech_Male> lake in existence. <Speech_Male> Do <Speech_Male> yes <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> but either way. <Speech_Male> That's how the <Speech_Male> sahara a- <Speech_Male> desolate and vast <Speech_Male> desert was once <Speech_Male> turned green <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and it's all <Speech_Male> because it was just hotter <Speech_Male> it just a bit hotter. <Speech_Male> You <SpeakerChange> know what that <Speech_Male> means <Speech_Male> were <Speech_Male> re growing the <Speech_Male> saharan <Speech_Male> savannah. <Speech_Male> Yeah <SpeakerChange> actually <Speech_Male> we are. <Speech_Male> climate scientists. <Speech_Male> Think that if our <Speech_Male> climate change <Speech_Male> problem <Speech_Male> You know the problematic <Speech_Male> one <Speech_Male> gets bad enough. <Speech_Male> We might <Speech_Male> get a resurgence <Speech_Male> of the green <Speech_Male> sahara. <Speech_Male> but not in our lifetime. <Speech_Male> of course it'll <Speech_Male> it'll be. <Speech_Male> It won't be a fast <Speech_Male> change that <SpeakerChange> happens. <Speech_Male> What would the <Speech_Male> consequences of happy. <Speech_Male> I mean <Speech_Male> looking just <Speech_Male> at <Speech_Male> not <Speech_Male> not the rest of the world <Speech_Male> like what <Speech_Male> would <Speech_Male> reforestation <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> in north <Speech_Male> africa. Look like <Speech_Male> from what i understand. <Speech_Male> It would just <Speech_Male> turn <Speech_Male> what is now desert <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> more more <Speech_Male> vegetation <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> if it gets hotter <Speech_Male> so there are <Speech_Male> there is stuff <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> a hotter <Speech_Male> climate does to <Speech_Male> the rest of the world <Speech_Male> like for example <Speech_Male> in america <Speech_Male> the arable <Speech_Male> land in <Speech_Male> the continental. us <Speech_Male> has been decreasing <Speech_Male> over time <SpeakerChange> and going to canada. <Speech_Male> Actually <Speech_Male> i i <Speech_Male> learned about that <Speech_Male> with pop popcorn <Speech_Male> corn. <Speech_Male> Oh really <Speech_Male> that's <Speech_Male> there's only <Speech_Male> a certain regions <Speech_Male> which is like <Speech_Male> illinois <Speech_Male> indiana <Speech_Male> wisconsin area. <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Male> the right <Speech_Male> climate for growing <Speech_Male> it and <Speech_Male> it might start <Speech_Male> moving <SpeakerChange> further north. <Speech_Male> Oh <Speech_Male> in know that. <Speech_Male> But yeah i would <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> climate change stuff. <Speech_Male> I'm not. <Speech_Male> I don't <Speech_Male> know exactly what's going <Speech_Male> to happen. I don't think <Speech_Male> anyone really does <Speech_Male> but it's it's gonna <Speech_Male> change our world. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> None no good <Speech_Male> way necessarily <Speech_Male> yeah. The canadians <Speech_Male> are going to steal <SpeakerChange> the popcorn <Speech_Male> manufacturing. <Speech_Male> Yeah that's right. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It is gonna <Speech_Male> be the bread <Speech_Male> basket of the world or <Speech_Male> something. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> They <SpeakerChange> got a lot of <Speech_Male> land up there <Speech_Male> so all these climate <Speech_Male> change things usually have <Speech_Male> a knock on effect. Mp <Speech_Male> back loops <Speech_Male> saying <Speech_Male> like once <Speech_Male> once you get the ball <Speech_Male> rolling. It'll keep <Speech_Male> on rolling until <Speech_Male> a massive change <Speech_Male> comes by <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> To stop this <Speech_Male> like the earth's <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> changing <Speech_Male> okay. <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Male> that's all i have <Speech_Male> for you. What did <Speech_Male> you think it's <Speech_Male> really <Speech_Male> like. I would love <Speech_Male> to see like a computer. <Speech_Male> Simulated <Speech_Male> like time <Speech_Male> lapse of that. <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Male> that <SpeakerChange> would be cool. <Speech_Male> In the beginning. <Speech_Male> I motivated <Speech_Male> this entire episode <Speech_Male> by <Speech_Male> wondering how <Speech_Male> humans actually <Speech_Male> left africa <Silence> <Advertisement> in the first place <Speech_Male> given <Speech_Male> there were hostile environments <Speech_Male> in their way. <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Male> is a bit of a larger <Speech_Male> topic <Speech_Male> in. I need multiple <Speech_Male> episodes to give it <Speech_Male> the attention. It deserves <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Male> will be the first part <Speech_Male> in a series <Speech_Male> of episodes <Silence> that will come out <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> later on <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> how humans <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> left <Silence> africa. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> If you like this episode <Speech_Male> please consider subscribing <Speech_Male> and leaving review. <Speech_Male> Tell us what you <Speech_Male> think about it and telephoned <Speech_Male> frightened about it <Speech_Male> and for supplementary <Speech_Male> material <Speech_Male> follow us on twitter <Silence> at more abstract. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> And <Speech_Male> you can find more episodes <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> wherever <Speech_Music_Male> you get podcasts. <Music>

america africa illinois indiana wisconsin first place first part canada twitter Speech_Music_Male Speech_Male
"saharan" Discussed on More than Abstract

More than Abstract

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"saharan" Discussed on More than Abstract

"So air comes in from the surroundings to fill that gap. So it's hot around the coast. Air rises caused a low pressure. Region air flows in from the surrounding. Still backup a. Whether is it going to bring. It'll be whatever the ocean has to offer which is a lot of humidity clouds rain now. The now it's raining on the coast that makes sense. Yeah it makes a lot of sense that makes sense. How the rocky mountains. Screw that up in america. Yes that's a great observation whenever you have a mountain region and then a Coast onsite expect the other side to be a desert or arid and that's what have time all right so that's pretty sweet Since it rains this place that used to be a desert turns into a savannah with trees and grass in animals all round. And you know what that does since all. That sand is not filled with Is now filled with vegetation that region can absorb more sunlight and gets even hotter bringing more low pressure regions that cause more humidity and rain from the surrounding oceans. And there's a lot of oceana pulled from the continent is surrounded by it and it's also massive. It's it's absolutely massive all of a sudden. There's an unexpected consequence since there's since there are more trees around and since this is closer to the equator you get a good number of what's called deciduous trees that decide these trees decide that Unlike pine trees for example that we see around these deciduous trees decide that it's better to not hoard all your water in themselves and instead release it into the atmosphere making it even more humid. Thank you trees. They had then. All of a sudden is a bit of a domino effect. That goes on here. A more rain and water lead to plans that call more water and all was an all this because land got a little bit more sun Over the course of a few thousand years sounds like a jungle. It sounds like you're describing how to make a jungle. Yes it would be how you make a jungle. In fact the the tropical rainforests around the region probably expanded as the savannah expanded as well so all that turned the sahara green until about six thousand years ago. This period is known as the african humid period and it led to human settling parts of the sahara rugged while that is in awkward name. The african humid period..

america about six thousand years ago thousand years sahara equator african
"saharan" Discussed on More than Abstract

More than Abstract

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"saharan" Discussed on More than Abstract

"Welcome to more than i'm jill and i'm joined by eric. How you doing. I'm not doing too bad. how about yourself. I'm doing pretty good. It's it's it's a beautiful day out in love to love to see it so tell me how good is your geography around africa I haven't had someone asked me that question since middle school. So i'm not sure that's perfectly fine just so like you know what i'm talking about. Could you open a go to google maps shirt. Pull up africa. I guess and change it to satellite you. yes okay. are we going to be talking about. Erosion not erosion. But you're close. You haven't figured. I'm going to be talking about africa specifically i. I have wondered how the hell hugh early humans left the continent. Okay interesting. it's something that really baffled me. It didn't really seem possible. Like think hundred thousand years ago. Humans were in africa in the middle part. They were hunter gatherers at this time. So they had to move to greener pastures wherever the their food went. Yes you mean to tell me. The animals and humans collect Decided to collectively migrate to the of the most vast and desolate desert on earth. Something doesn't add up. 'cause we got a real mystery on our hands here. What possibly compelled migration good question. I do think there was much less erosion at the time. I know that the her desert desert expanding because of soil erosion and it's growing and spreading. Because there's no vegetation to to keep the sand in place. I do believe at the desert wasn't as big back prehistory times. Well that's that's where we're gonna be talking about. How how humans went from central africa back in the hunter gatherer days past the desert and through through the arabian desert as well to places elsewhere. Yet looking at the map and that size of desert. I would think the same. How the main idea here is. The climate used to be different back in day and to show just how it changed drastically and talk to you about how it's possible for the sahara to be green until not long ago. I am completely interested in that before we get into the actual climate part. I need to define a few things i know. The most riveting discussion so a desert is a place with very little precipitation. For whatever reason as you might be able to guess that That makes it pretty hostile environment but by definition it only cares about rain. The only thing that matters is moisture in the atmosphere so places like antarctica are considered cold. Desert's as well just because there's no real rain or snow around there so desert slightly off topic. But i saw a map of american desserts and there are many more than our common knowledge. And it's really interesting really. I mean we try and find that you wanna take how many there are twenty one. You got that backwards. it is twelve. Oh thank you wikipedia. Here are the cold desert's. Oh yeah okay. What does more than i expected but in the region right while k..

africa antarctica hundred thousand years ago eric jill central africa wikipedia twelve earth twenty one arabian desert american sahara google maps hugh
Dominican Catholic Sisters Help Create Climate-Friendly Investment Funds

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Dominican Catholic Sisters Help Create Climate-Friendly Investment Funds

"Catholic sisters and nuns live quiet lives of prayer but some are wielding influence on wall street. Pat daly is part of a group of dominican catholic sisters who set out to make sure their congregations investment funds reflect their catholic values they to find a fund that supports climate-friendly projects that also help vulnerable communities. We wanted to make sure that we weren't just investing. Let's say a tesla bond but that the investments were really focused on getting green energy into villages and areas on the planet. They didn't even have energy. But the sisters could not find an investment fund that took this kind of holistic approach. So they teamed up with morgan stanley to create two new funds one public and one private that invest in solutions such as clean energy for sub saharan africa and small businesses in india. Sixteen congregations seated the funds with more than forty six million dollars which then attracted tens of millions more from other groups daily says the public fund has shown strong returns outperforming the market so the investments are doing well while also doing

Pat Daly Dominican Catholic Sisters Tesla Saharan Africa Morgan Stanley India
Being gay in Ghana: LGBT community is 'under attack'

The World

01:58 min | 2 years ago

Being gay in Ghana: LGBT community is 'under attack'

"The world now to West Africa and Gamma. That nation has long been look to as a beacon of stability on the African continent. Ghana was the first sub Saharan country to gain independence. Gonna instill pride themselves on their freedoms. But that liberty isn't afforded to everyone Consider the LGBT Q community there. Recently, Public acts of homophobia in Ghana have pushed LGBT Q gun and into the national spotlight. World's Bianca Hillier reports January 31st was supposed to be the start of something new and Ghana How crazy it was opening ceremony for the country's first ever LGBTQ center. Alex Dong core is the director of LGBT Plus Rights, Ghana, the organization running the space. Way wish to create a peaceful ourselves as a movement to be able to sit down and strategize and mobilize and quartered needs be sources. Honors. LGBTQ community has a history of fighting for freedom. But most of this organizing has been done online for security reasons. So this physical space in across signaled new opportunities, but it didn't last long. Moses fall moaning, heads up Ghana's National Coalition for proper sexual rights and family values and quickly put up a fight the presidency and the minister of foreign affairs and the RGB have every right to investigate the setting up of that office to close it down immediately and arrest and prosecute those people involved in it. In the weeks following the LGBT Q Center's opening Fella moaning led a campaign to shut down the space. Archbishop Philip Nama, president of the Ghana Catholic Bishopsconference quickly echoed the stands on local television. This practice is completely foreign to our Ghanaian culture. And the law should be friend and such a way that It is punishable in a very

Ghana Bianca Hillier Alex Dong Lgbt Plus Rights Saharan West Africa National Coalition For Proper Lgbt Q Center Moses Archbishop Philip Nama Ghana Catholic Bishopsconferen
South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine rollout

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:57 min | 2 years ago

South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine rollout

"South africa has halted its rollout of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine just a week after the country received. Its first million doses. It seems the vaccine offers limited protection against a new variant of the corona virus. That's now dominant in the country. Salim abdul karim co-chair of south africa's ministerial advisory committee on covid nineteen spoke to a world health organization briefing yesterday. We don't want to end up with a situation where we vaccinated million people too. Many people would have vaccine that may not be effective in preventing hospitalization and severe disease in total more than one point. Two billion corona virus doses have been allocated for the continent. But it's not clear when all those jobs will arrive. The longer any region remains unvaccinated. The greater the chance that more variants arise vaccines though can be tweaked in a formulation of the oxford vaccine targeted at the south african variant could be going into arms by autumn. What scientists cannot address is the long run damage to africa both in human and economic terms so far continent to have been spared from the worst case scenarios predicted early on in the pandemic but the longer term picture remains bleak many ways the impact of the pandemic and africa is worse than it appears on the surface around the official numbers. Kenley salmon is one of our africa correspondent based in dakar. It is the case that having a young population has to some extent protected the continent from the virus africans and died from it that americans europeans but the true scott of infection. Death is really hard to gauge. Studying sudan recently showed the perhaps only two percent of all the covid desk for a quoted in the official tally and the economic impact is worse than it looks last year. The region's economy shrank for the first time. In twenty five years tourism has been badly hit as have commodity exporters things like oil in nigeria and taken together. Gdp per capita fell below twenty ten levels last year so things are perhaps not quite as bad as some other parts the world but certainly still very tough and things may get tougher house. What are the particular challenges to africa. Africa faces quite a number of challenges in the next few years as it tries to recover from the pandemic but the biggest i of the really is vaccines. Some african governments have perhaps failed to grasp the urgency of the situation in tanzania for example the populace president john food even casually cast out with a vaccine work but i do forgive aside claiming the postman precautions such as steaming nation were better than vaccines and even added that if the white man was able to come up with next nations then. Vaccinations for aids. Malaria and cancer would have already been found. So it's not so much a question than of supply. I mean given that quite a few vaccines have been essentially booked at the stage. A number of vaccines have been booked but the big question is when will they arrive because right now there aren't anywhere near the number of axes required forever on in the world and rich countries are of course the front of the queue for those vaccines have been produced africa's going to need perhaps two point six billion doses to vaccinate everyone and those are not being made locally so they have to rely on supplies elsewhere for the moment so that means joining the queue. All this means that whereas rich countries aim to vaccinate most of their people by the middle of this year the african. cdc a public health. Bali in africa's aiming for sixty percent of africans to vaccinated by the end of next year. But even that may be too optimistic. For the poorest countries. The economist intelligence unit sister organization estimates that in most african countries most people will not be inoculated until mid twenty twenty three or even early twenty twenty four and there must be serious consequences of it being that long until the continent is on average vaccinated. Africa is likely. It doesn't get those vaccinations into suffer. Further waves of the infection while after the disease may have amped in the rich world. And that of course will cause more death and more suffering. Doesn't risk that. Having the virus transmitting between people frequently africa could allow new variance to evolve. We've already got the south. African variant and these new variants could endanger people even in rich countries if they prove to be resistant to vaccines and then finally of course not having vaccines could force. African policymakers to continue with these very difficult economic lockdowns curfews even after many other countries around the world set free of those kinds of restrictions and if the public health concern lasts that long then surely the economic concerns will last at least that long. That's right in many african countries facing pretty severe crises at the moment just getting finance to pay their bills. Africa has very limited fiscal space on average countries in sub saharan africa. Spending more than thirty cents on every dollar. They raise and text revenue paying their debts. And that's up from twenty cents on the dollar before the pandemic on the debt side to over half of low income sub saharan african countries are now classed as in distress or at high risk of distress. According to the imf and what about countries with bigger economies the two biggest economies in africa nigeria and south ever both in pretty deep trouble nigeria for example was described by the world. Bank is being an unprecedented crisis. Recently the bank is not normally quite so blunt in nigeria. There has been a legacy of management for a number of years and pandemics really accessible that quite badly. Now focused suggested by twenty twenty three. Gdp per capita may go back as low as it was in one thousand nine hundred eighty time when the oil price was some high on so africa too is in trouble that have been in recession twice in the last three years before the pandemic hit of course now is dribbling itself with a particularly heavy toll from the pandemic so both countries in fact are facing a difficult road out of the crisis. And what about outside help in terms of financing has been quite a bit of outside help although the crisis of course is very big but in twenty twenty the imf for example provided sixteen billion dollars in loans most of that came with relatively few strings attached and this help frigging countries to respond to the pandemic to avoid some of the liquidity crises that were looming the world bank also dispersed another ten billion but many countries got that funding to if the imf under emergency allocations that came quickly and relatively easily and those allocations for many countries will soon be exhausted. The rich world has been trying to help when it comes to debt. They've provided liquidity to countries through some bits of suspension initiative that basically allows poor countries to put off debt repayments until july. Twenty twenty one. This is of course helpful but the trouble is that those payments just suspended and they have to be paid back with interest in about five years time so as the chief economist for africa the world bank put it to us. It may just be kicking the can down the road to. How do you see this playing out. Then how high could the human cost of all this be while the stakes are pretty high. The pandemic has already done lower damage to people's health and africa. it's hitting their economic prospects and they wealth and it's also affecting education of course. Hundreds of millions of students in africa have been affected by school closures. This increases the risk of dropouts and reduces the prospects for africa's largest every generation so overall the costs here really quite significant. There are some reasons for optimism. We may see vaccine rollouts accelerate. There's also hopes that commodity price rises could give africa real boost as the global economy recovers been on balance. The evidence probably points to at pretty difficult road ahead with several more waves of the virus hitting already struggling health systems and perhaps a form of economic long covert in africa. So you know africans have come through this showing remarkable resilience but it may be toughest years are still to come in. Thank you very much for joining us. thank you

Africa Salim Abdul Karim Co Ministerial Advisory Committee Kenley Salmon Nigeria Oxford South Africa John Food Astrazeneca Dakar Saharan Africa IMF Sudan Tanzania Malaria CDC
Solar-powered battery packs offer cheap electricity in Tanzania

Climate Connections

01:20 min | 2 years ago

Solar-powered battery packs offer cheap electricity in Tanzania

"Dr anthony leiserowitz and this is climate connections in sub saharan africa. Over five hundred million people live without electricity for lighting many of them use kerosene a fossil fuel that contributes to global warming emits toxic fumes. And can start dangerous fires so we started looking for a low cost way to provide electricity for an entire village. That's jeff schnur. Ceo of jazz energy. The company figured out a way to meet that goal without conventional power plants and a distribution grid in tanzania has an energy has built about seventy five solar hubs small buildings with solar panels on top. Two women from the community staff each hub. The women use the solar power to charge battery packs customers. Rent the packs and use them to power lights charge cell phones and for other small electricity needs. Schnur says it's cheaper to rent a battery pack that it is to buy kerosene so the approach not only helps protect the climate. He can save people money and improve their quality of life. The hub operators we call jazz stars. The women running locations are literally lighting up house by house in their community. When you sit down in here directly from someone how it's just a dream come true. It's pretty transformational.

Dr Anthony Leiserowitz Sub Saharan Jeff Schnur Schnur Africa Tanzania
Israel, Morocco to normalize ties; US shifts W Sahara policy

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Israel, Morocco to normalize ties; US shifts W Sahara policy

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting the trump administration brokers a deal between Israel and Morocco president Donald Trump added to his Mideast legacy Thursday announcing on Twitter that Israel and Morocco have agreed to normalize relations the deal was brokered by trump's son in law and adviser Jared Kushner and his chief international negotiator avi Berkowitz in Jerusalem Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu I want to first thank president trump for his extraordinary efforts to expand sort of pleased to bring peace to Israel and the peoples of the Middle East as part of the deal the United States has agreed to recognize Morocco's claim over the long disputed western Saharan region might cross yet Washington

Mike Rossi Morocco Israel Jared Kushner Avi Berkowitz Donald Trump Benjamin Netanyahu Twitter Jerusalem Middle East United States Saharan Washington
UNAIDS calls on countries to step up global action and proposes bold new HIV targets for 2025

UN News

01:17 min | 2 years ago

UNAIDS calls on countries to step up global action and proposes bold new HIV targets for 2025

"Should adopt ambitious new targets to tackle hiv aids to avoid hundreds of thousands of additional infections and deaths from the disease linked to the covid nineteen pandemic the un said on thursday citing data showing the pandemic's long-term impact on global hiv response. Un aid said that there could be up to nearly three hundred thousand additional new hiv infections between now and two thousand and twenty two and up to one hundred and forty eight thousand more aids related deaths. This collective faded to invest sufficiently in comprehensive rights-based people. Scented hiv responses has come at a terrible price. Said winning be anemia executive director of you and aids. She added that the only way to get the global response against hiv aids. Back on track was by tackling the inequalities on which epidemics thrive although countries in sub saharan africa including swan and ezra teeny have achieved or even exceeded targets. Set for two thousand twenty. Many more countries are falling way behind urinate said in a new report called prevailing against pandemics. Its proposed targets for twenty twenty five focus on a high coverage of hiv and reproductive and sexual health services together with the removal of punitive laws policies. Stigma and discrimination. If these targets are met the world will be back on track to ending aids as a public health threat. By twenty thirty the agency

HIV Aids UN Anemia Saharan Africa
Special Edition Echo Red Available

Voice in Canada

01:27 min | 2 years ago

Special Edition Echo Red Available

"As you may know coming up this week is world. Aids day and amazon is getting in on the action to raise money for this Very worthwhile cause and how are they doing this well. They have just launched an echo device. The new generation won the fourth generation. But it is a red one so the fabric is read. It's a limited edition echo red and it's to help Bring awareness and raise money for a couple of Great causes In particular If you buy one of these devices the red one amazon will donate ten dollars from the sale of every one of those devices to the global fund to support covid nineteen response and hiv aids programs in the sub saharan africa. So this is wonderful so if you want to get a special edition read echo and support a very worthwhile cause at the same time. Then you may be interested in picking up one of these now. Here's the thing because it's actually black friday week if you will. They're actually on sale as well. So the regular price of these are normally one twenty nine ninety nine hundred thirty bucks but right now. They are on sale for ninety. So it's forty dollars off. If you want to go straight to this particular device you can use. My phillies link a. l. e. x. Eighteen canada dot ca slash echo red and. That'll take you right to the

Amazon Saharan HIV Aids Africa Phillies Canada CA
Let's Talk About Toilets

Why It Matters

04:31 min | 2 years ago

Let's Talk About Toilets

"So world toilet day is coming up and the response to hearing that there is a serious. Un sponsor day for toilets might make people laugh or feel a little iffy on discussing it. So why would we need a day like that. Well what would you do if you didn't have a toilet a fair point. This is brooke yamaguchi. She's a water sanitation and hygiene specialist at the united nations children's fund also known as yuna south based in new york. She knows a lot about toilets. I mean the ability to manage our bodily functions and these things that we frequently don't talk about but are so core toss bodily functions of urination defecation for half the population menstruation. Really at the core of our dignity. it's also a foundation for health without a toilet that contains waste and then separates it from people coming in contact with that waste. We would all be exposed to harmful pathogens that cause many different illnesses and diseases and it doesn't stop at the toilet either so without waste being safely transported away from our toilets and from our homes and treated somewhere we would all be surrounded by wastewater and our neighborhoods and in the environment so in terms of the numbers. Can you give me a wide angle view of toilet access as global issue. Will there are three main things that we measure the global level. This is tom sleigh maker. he also focuses on global monitoring of drinking water sanitation and hygiene at unicef headquarters in new york. He sees the big picture of how this plays out around the world. He spoke to us on a rainy day from london to one. Is the population here. Practice open defecation. So that man's added kind of told us a tool a may just is that bush's fails beaches little. Walter crosses the other thing that we measure is the population with basic sanitation service. So means that they have. Some kind of hygienic toilets but is not being shad with other people. It's not shadow the household and then the next level of service up is what we call safely managed sanitation. I'm not means that you not only have a hygiene twins but you also have a mechanism in place to ensure shaming west. That's produced is then being treated on despised safely before being discharged pakistan arm and how many people fall into each of these categories so the global level resell have six hundred. Seventy three million people practicing cash there about two billion people still lack even basic level of service wanting people worldwide and if you look at the population without sanitation that's more like four point. Two billion people that is more than half the people on earth and runs the risk of getting sick every day. Do we have an idea of how many people die as a result of this problem. Whol have estimated globally around one point. Two million deaths could have been prevented through access to cat drinking water sanitation hygiene. The problem is particularly acute for young. Children are very vulnerable. And so i think we estimate there around three hundred thousand children under five who die each year as a result of not having bicyc- water sanitation and hygiene. So when you look at a map where do you see this happening. While some regions and countries have much further to go. If you look out you'll say that particularly sub saharan africa asia and will say ice yanni of civic have much lower levels of coverage of sanitation. And this is polly today with greenwich stages of developments in my slate core countries. But even if you move up the ladder you start to look at issues of treatments and disposal of waste even in europe and north america and australia and new zealand. We're still only at about three quarters of the population that has high says site. All countries have further to go in order to improve sanitation but obviously by roles starting at different positions.

Brooke Yamaguchi United Nations Children's Fund Tom Sleigh Unicef Headquarters New York UN Walter Bush London Pakistan Saharan Greenwich Asia Africa North America Europe New Zealand Australia