35 Burst results for "Sahara"

Shipwreck on the Sahara

Against The Odds

02:02 min | 4 d ago

Shipwreck on the Sahara

"It's september twenty third. Eighteen fifteen the morning sun rising over the sahara heats up the desert to eighty degrees by eight. Am but city hammett doesn't feel it. He's sitting in his tent thinking about the future and no matter which way he spins it. It's risky captain. Riley wants hammett to by him and his friends and deliver them to morocco. There he said a friend will pay big money for the return. One hundred dollars for the captain and fifty for each of his men. Fifty dollars is a fortune and the desert. But he's not even sure they can make it eight hundred miles. They will need to cross the desert. Get past the torek and other. Hostile bedouin tribes. They have to be strong. He needs to get a better look at the men. He finds them sitting outside his tent. There are three and all riley and two men called erin and clark he squats down on his haunches examining each of them closely l. race. Have any of your men died. On this journey riley shakes his head. None my men are strong. The aren't used to desert conditions but their health will improve gets better every day but hammett's not so sure the one called clark is skin and bones. His face is young but he's already bent over like an old man. His scalp is cracked and oozing with source will only get worse. Sarah son this one is sick. he won't make. It's not worth it. But the captain renews his please. He must come look at how much he's improved from. Just the drink of water. You generously gave us last night. What of your men been eating a- of camel milk day. We found a few snails on our own to hammett size. The sailors will never survive the crossing without more food. Feeding them will be expensive.

Hammett Sahara Riley Morocco Clark Erin Sarah
"sahara" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

03:58 min | 2 weeks ago

"sahara" Discussed on Against The Odds

"Where are they. Riley takes a seat on a boulder and watches his men search through the rocks for springs others wade into the water looking for fish. The cook delile is the first return to the captain. There's nothing captain. I've searched the whole beach. Not a single crab no oysters. What about water. No riley thinks for a moment his men are defeated. Week he has to keep their spirits up. Okay delile you stay with the men. Tell them to keep looking for food. I'm going to get over the cliffs and see what's beyond if i don't come back and you don't find food. Take your chances in the boat. Go north you might run into a shipping lane. The rocky cliffs cut into riley's hands as he makes his way up to face. He stops every few handholds on the larger outcroppings to catch spread. Small stones tumbled down around him. He doesn't look down. It takes almost two hours to reach the talk. He uses the last of his strength. The pull himself over for a moment. He lays there staring at the sky. It's bright blue. Almost white from the blinding sun overhead. He thinks of his wife at home in connecticut his new baby. He doesn't even know if it's a boy or a girl. Then he stands up blinks his eyes. He can't believe what he's.

"sahara" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:10 min | Last month

"sahara" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Sahara has been described as a forgotten conflict there. No fighting taking place but little sign of a resolution either. But in the last few months, shots have been fired again, and the status of the error is once again in the headlines. Western Sahara is claimed by Morocco and by the Polisario Front, which represents the Sahrawi people. They both control a slice of the territory and a referendum was promised as part of a U. N brokered truce in 1991. The Polisario France cause is recognized by many around the world. But the balance seems to be shifting with President Trump recognizing Morocco's sovereignty before he left office. I asked the Polisario France Foreign Minister Mohamed Salam al Salik if he was concerned. Now let me say that the declaration of Trump is a violation of international legality and violation of, uh the decision of United Nations Security Council and the General Assembly as well as the International Court of Justice. The United States of America cannot be a judge and party. In the same time, this issue is an issue of their colonization. And Westerners had never been part of Morocco prior to the Spanish colonization. That's the pollution of the United Nations and also of the next S of America. So now Trump Did a mistake by linking the Western Sahara issue to another, which is the relation between Israel and Morocco, which is another case. And that's why European Union and even United Nation and especially African Union. Also, they say, this is there are two separate issues and the Western Sahara cannot be solved as a question of decolonization without The respect of the international law and which recognizes the Saharawi right for self determination and independence. Now we are very open to peace with Morocco with our neighbor. But in accordance with international law and in accordance with what we have signed, we signed a peace plan. Morocco must apply and must respect and honor its own commitment. Science in this settlement plan, Minister when I hear you making these arguments Many of these positions haven't changed, in essence for 123 decades. When I traveled to the camps near Tindouf, your camps 10 years ago, a bit more. Similar arguments were being made. In essence, do not you and the Polisario ever feel there's going to be a resolution. To this crisis. We are not sure we are more than sure. We are very, very convinced that Morocco must withdrawal and Morocco, Mass and its occupation. But why? Why would when it's so fundamental to Morocco's image of itself that That Western Sahara is its Western territories that it's part of its own country within its borders. When that's so fundamental to Moroccan political thought, why would they suddenly change now? They have to change. They must change because, you know We accept to go through the referendum, but we have been waiting three decades. We give time to time We cooperate fully within 80 nation. Now we are. Unfortunately, we are back to World sensor team last November. Because more alcohol didn't honor its commitment. And now that's why the African Union Summit of Peace and Security last Mars decided that we have to work with African Union and unite the nation. In fact, and you cease fire, which means that the artist fire doesn't exist anymore. Unfortunately, so we are open to discuss, but this time the world will continue until we find Lasting. Just solution where Morocco must respect its on commitment, and this issue is an issue of decolonization, you know? This is you cannot be resolved without the exercise part of the people of western side of their right for self determination. The thoughts of the Polisario France Foreign Minister Mohamed Salam Salik. We've also had a response in from how the chairman Uganda Howard says Morocco has no legitimate claim to Western Sahara, the African Union and the United Nations must urgently take appropriate action to end what he calls Morocco's illegal presence in the territory. Headlines. Quick Reminder Top Story World powers are gathering in Berlin for talks aimed at securing Peace and political stability in Libya and the first Hong Kong to have been charged under the national security Law has entered a not guilty plea at the start of his trial. He's done. A BBC World Service, Lawrence James and Isaac has got sports. Yeah, it's going to be. It's the final day of group stage matches in the European Championships. Delighted to say as ever joined by the BBC's football reporter, Mas Farooqi, who's in Budapest, IMAs. Let's start with Spain. They take on Slovakia in Group E two drawls for them so far the span the Spaniards I mean, they're going to this match on the quite a bit of pressure, don't they? Yeah, they did. Indeed, I was, In fact, we could see the 2000 and eight and 2012 champions European champions. Remember Spain fail to qualify at all. They have to beat Slovakia to be sure. Replace in the last 16 something. Which is you? You rightly point out they failed to do so. Fathers Tournament win, um, actually dominated games. Dominated possession in their opening game, 85% of it, but they couldn't find the back of the net and they fall from the side, which we saw dominate the European game a decade ago. The problem for them as well as that Slovakia still have plenty to play for they could still go through as Poland. They play sweet and the other final game in this group Sweden. The only side so far from group eats, definitely qualified, and we've got these four best place loser spots, remembering this championship, so four places reserved for the best third place teams alongside the top team from the six groups who qualify automatically, so it's sort of prolongs the nurse the tension for some of these sides, a couple of them Sitting in those spots at the moment, nervously waiting looking to see what happens in these four final matches tonight, because I'm sure we'll see this permutations, change and Varick lot throughout the full 90 minutes of these matches we have later. Indeed, before the tournament, everyone was looking at Group F as the group of Death. You have the recent titans in France, Germany and Portugal and the Hungarians, you might call themselves a sleeping giant. They played Germany in the final group game that draw against the world champions France on Saturday at that post, Katarina means that the odds of them qualifying they've got a shout, don't they? It was the unlikeliest of scenarios really, as you rightly point out Isaac. So who Hungary having this group, the world champions, the European champions Germany as well? Another heavy weight of the European again. It is quite tough for them, they need to beat. Germany in Munich and have other results. Go again go for them, including goal difference and things like this. It's head to head first and then goal difference that decides the order of things. If people finish on the same number of groups, it is rather complicated number of points. Rather, if you manage to follow it eyes that you'll do a lot better than maize, and basically, Germany needs to win. Or if they draw that's enough. If France don't lose here against Portugal. I think they'll be very happy to play Hungary away from the push gas arena as you say Hungary have been the surprise package of this group so far this championship, but they have had the raucous support of a nearly full capacity push gas arena here behind them, roaring them on and away from home in Munich against this Germany side who had a fantastic result against Portugal weekend. I think it will be very, very difficult for them to get anything out that game. The Germans look really good. The Portuguese Though they struggled. As you say against Germany. They play France. It looks good for France and they've got that magical four points. But Portugal though we're looking to bounce back after that tough result against the Germans on Saturday Yeah, the world champions France have the luxury of playing here in this match against portal known they are already through to the last 16. Whatever happens because of that magical four point month that you alluded Portugal, though they know that they have to win. If they draw again more permutations..

United Nations Security Counci Mas Farooqi Lawrence James 85% BBC Tindouf Budapest Trump 1991 Berlin European Union Isaac International Court of Justice Saturday Western Sahara BBC World Service 90 minutes African Union European Championships six groups
"sahara" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

08:10 min | Last month

"sahara" Discussed on WBUR

"Sahara has been described as a forgotten conflict. We're not fighting taking place, but little side of a resolution either. But in the last few months, shots have been fired again, and the status of the error is once again in the headlines. Western Sahara is claimed by Morocco and by the Polisario Front, which represents the Sahrawi people. They both control. A slice of the territory in a referendum was promised as part of the U. N brokered truce in 1991. The Polisario Front's cause is recognized by many around the world. But the balance seems to be shifting with President Trump recognizing Morocco's sovereignty before he left office. I asked the Polisario France Foreign Minister Mohamed Salam al Salik if he was concerned. Now let me say that the declaration of Trump is a violation of international legality and violation of, uh the decision of the United Nations Security Council and the General Assembly as well as the International Court of Justice. The United States of America cannot be a judge and party. In the same time, this issue is an issue of their colonization. And Westerners had never been part of Morocco prior to the Spanish colonization. That's the position of the United Nation and also of your next steps of America. So now Trump Did a mistake by linking the Western Sahara issue to another, which is the relation between Israel and Morocco, which is another case. And that's why European Union and even United Nation and especially African Union. Also, they say, this is there are two separate issues and the Western Sahara cannot be solved as a question of decolonization without The respect of the international law and which recognizes that Saharawi right for self determination and independence. Now we are very open to peace with Morocco with our neighbor. But in accordance with international law and in accordance with what we have signed, we signed a peace plan. Morocco must apply and master respect and honor its own commitment signed in this settlement plan. Minister when I hear you making these arguments Many of these positions haven't changed, in essence for 123 decades. When I traveled to the camps near Tindouf, your camps 10 years ago, a bit more. Similar arguments were being made. In essence, do not you and the policy Aryan ever feel there's going to be a resolution. To this crisis. We are not sure we are more than sure. We are very, very convinced that Morocco must withdraw and Morocco, Mass. And it's uh, occupation. But why? Why would when it's so fundamental to Morocco's image of itself that that Western Sahara is its Western territories that it's part of its own country within its borders? When that's so fundamental to Moroccan political thought, why would they suddenly change now? They have to change. The must changed because, you know We accept to go through the referendum, but we have been waiting three decades. We give time to time we cooperate fully within 80 nation. Now we are Unfortunately, we are back to war Sensor team of last November because Morroco didn't honor its commitment. And now that's why the African Union Summit of Peace and security Last Mars decided that we have to work with African Union and United Nations to find a new ceasefire. Which means that the Artis fire doesn't exist anymore. Unfortunately, so we Are open to discuss, but this time the world will continue until we find lasting just solution where Morocco must respect its on commitment. And this issue is an issue of decolonization. You know, this is you cannot be resolved without the exercise part of the people of Western Sahara there right for self determination. The thoughts of the policy area. France Foreign Minister Mohamed Salam would Salik. We've also had a response in from how the chairman Uganda, Howard says Morocco has no legitimate claim to Western Sahara. The African Union and the United Nations must urgently take appropriate action to end what he calls Morocco's illegal presence in the territory. Headlines. Quick Reminder Top Story World powers are gathering in Berlin for talks aimed at securing Peace and political stability in Libya and the first Hong Kong to have been charged under the National security Law has entered a not guilty plea at the start of his trial. He's done the BBC World Service, Lawrence James and Isaac has got sports. Yeah, it's gonna be. It's the final day of group stage matches in the European Championships. Delighted to say as ever Joined by the BBC's football reporter Mas Freaky who's in Budapest, Mass. Let's start with Spain they take on Slovakia in Group E two drools for them so far, the span the Spaniards and they're going to this match under quite a bit of pressure, don't they? Yeah, they do. Indeed, I think In fact, we could see the 2000 and eight and 2012 champions European champions. Remember Spain fail to qualify at all. They have to beat Slovakia to be sure Replace in the last 16 something. Which is you? You rightly point out they failed to do so far. This tournament win, um, actually dominated games. Dominated possession in their opening game, 85% of it, but they couldn't find the back of the net and their fall from the side, which we saw dominate the European game a decade ago. The problem for them as well as that Slovakia still have plenty to play for. They could still go through as Poland. They play Sweden, the other final game in this group, Sweden, the only side so far from Group It's definitely qualified. And we've got these four best place loser spots, remembering this championship, so four places reserved for the best third place teams alongside of the top two from the sixth groups who qualify automatically. So it prolongs the nurse the tension for some of these sides a couple of them sitting in those spots at the moment, nervously waiting looking to see what happens in these four final matches tonight, because I'm sure Brucie His permutations change and varied a lot throughout the 4 90 minutes of these matches we have later Yeah, Indeed. Before the tournament, everyone was looking at Group F as the group of Death. You have the recent titans in France, Germany and Portugal and the Hungarians who might call themselves the sleeping giant. They play Germany in the final group game Natural against the World champions France on Saturday at that post. Katarina means that the odds of them qualifying they've got a shout, don't they? It was the unlikeliest scenarios really, As you rightly point out Isaac When we saw who Hungary have in this group, the world champions, the European champions Germany as well another heavy weight of the European again It is quite tough for them. They need to beat Germany in unique and have other results. Go again. Go for them, including goal difference and things like this. It's head to head first, then goal difference that decides the order of Of things. If people finished on the same number of groups, it is rather complicated number of points. Rather, if you manage to follow it eyes that you'll do a lot better than me. Basically, Germany need to win. Or if they draw that's enough. If France don't lose here against Portugal, I think they'll be very happy to play hungry away from the push gas arena. As you say. Hungary have been the surprise package of this group so far this championship, but they have had the rock of support of a nearly full capacity push gas arena here behind them, roaring them on and away from home in Munich against this Germany side who had a fantastic result against Portugal weekend. I think it will be very, very difficult for them to get anything out that game. Yeah, the Germans look really good. The Portuguese Though they struggled. As you say against Germany. They play France. It looks good for France and they've got that magical four points, but Portugal will be looking to bounce back after that tough result against the Germans on Saturday. Yeah, the world champions France have the luxury of playing here in this match against Portugal known they are already through to the last 16. Whatever happens because of that magical four point month that you alluded Portugal, though they know that they have to win. If they draw again more permutations..

United Nations Security Counci Mas Freaky BBC Lawrence James Trump Tindouf BBC World Service Polisario Front Isaac International Court of Justice 1991 85% Berlin Saturday last November Howard Munich Western Sahara European Union European Championships
Priya Parker on the Art of Gathering

Good Life Project

02:06 min | 2 months ago

Priya Parker on the Art of Gathering

"So my mother comes from originally banaras. Which is the sort of you know. One of the oldest cities in india and her father who actually would have turned one hundred today. Pass away about a few months ago. Her father worked for the indian government and so she and her four siblings traveled around india lot and when it was time for her to kind of get married she decided she didn't want to earliest not didn't want to have an arranged marriage and she can secretly applied to graduate school and the us and got into a few places and at least in that generation virginia versus iowa vs minnesota. You're sort of just you have no idea what is what and you just say yes and she ended up at iowa. State university begged her parents to let her go and they allowed her to. Was that unusual for sort of that moment. In time it was unusual that she was a woman so the us immigration laws changed in sixty eight and allowed for a changed from country and orc origin to family like unification and so it was after that that a lot of indians kind of came into the country and but the majority of the i kind of indian to come of those families particularly to graduate school. Were men so is very unusual for the first person to be a woman of a family and she went to iowa state and met my father who was born and raised in waterloo iowa. Though the family came from south dakota and a white american like in every way you look at his high school pictures and it looks like the kind of americana like prom picture but he had just recently come back from the peace corps. He peace corps and cameroon and then stayed an extra year and hitchhiked across the sahara and came back and didn't sort of in reverse culture shock and his teacher has professor at graduate. School or from undergrad said. Why don't you just come to graduate school with me and to kind of get over. Your culture shock volunteer at the international students office and i actually recently learned that culture. Shock originally meant when people came to their own country after having experience abroad so essentially mountain reverse culture shock but anyway

Iowa Banaras India Indian Government Peace Corps Minnesota State University Virginia United States Waterloo South Dakota Cameroon Sahara
What to Know About Gaza's Rocket Arsenal

BBC Newsday

01:11 min | 2 months ago

What to Know About Gaza's Rocket Arsenal

"The were Palestinian kidnapped from Health Ministry their military says training an Israeli college airstrike in Kaduna on a State, refugee reviving camp memories in Gaza of has the killed abduction at of least the Chibok seven girls people in 2014. and officials said the dead included Legos a woman based and four risk Children analysis who were inside firm is estimated their home that in over the the past HRT 10 years, camp $18 west of Gaza City. million There was no have immediate been paid comment to from recover Israel. people Mercy kidnapped Abou for ransom, Aloof is in But Gaza. it's the first time that places Shortly of worship after have been the targeted. attack Dilemma. Hamas, McCarty the militant is an analyst group with said the Tony that Blair they are fired Institute for about Global Change, 10 rockets where he focuses towards on the Israeli violent extremist city groups off their in Shiva. sub Sahara It's Africa about and 40 joins US kilometers Live llama. away Welcome from to the program. Gaza, and he said. Thank In you the for having recent me rocket these we require abductions in of the retaliation mosque. First of all, for what the more killing is known off about the them. innocents. Civilians, according to Yeah. I a mean, statement these are by the worshippers Hamas on that wing abducted al Cassandra when, gets uh sent to the while BBC. playing in the most, Continuing um bombardment during off Gaza triggered Ramadan, a day it of unrest is mostly across the the occupied West midnight Bank and prayer in east Jerusalem. On independent Friday, at last least 11 10 Palestinians days off Ramadan. were killed in clashes They with Israeli were abducted security forces. from Inside their village Israel about cashes 40 have off continued them between Jews touchy where and Arabs. later Israelis reported in to several have been cities to have in escaped Jaffa to off Arab course. The Children police were have burned said after they their rescued home them, was but petrol residents bombs. said no There no were also one has protests to prosecute on the us. borders off We Jordan escaped and by

Gaza Health Ministry Institute For About Global Cha Kaduna Sub Sahara Gaza City Legos Hamas Abou Al Cassandra Mccarty Israel West Midnight Bank Shiva Blair Africa East Jerusalem BBC Ramadan
Record 29 Million in the Sahel in Need of Humanitarian Assistance

BBC World Service

01:29 min | 3 months ago

Record 29 Million in the Sahel in Need of Humanitarian Assistance

"That almost 30 million people in this a hell are in urgent Need of assistance? Yes, that's a rise of five million in just one year. Suffering is driven in large passed by ongoing Islamist violence. The newsroom's Peter Coffin told me more The hell is this broad stretch of West and Central Africa just south of the Sahara Desert. This statement by the U. N and some international charities has specifically mentioned Burkina Fasso, Chad, Mali, Neige and parts of Cameroon and Nigeria, and it said there are now a record 29 million people across those six countries who need humanitarian aid. 14 million are living at crisis or emergency levels of food insecurity, and included in that are an estimated 1.6 million Children experiencing severe malnutrition. Now that's a hell already faces challenges to food production. It's a new, arid place. The Sahara is expanding. But as you mentioned, the U. N has said that violence is really driving the increase in hunger. We know that governments in the region have been battling Islamist militias for the past decade. There are parts of the region under militant control. Just last week, we reported the Chad's president died leading his army against one of these groups, and in the past 24 hours, we've learned that a pair of Spanish journalists and an Irish citizen were killed in Burkina Fasso. But the U. N says it's civilians who really bear the brunt of the fighting. You have those numbers

Peter Coffin Fasso Neige Sahara Desert Central Africa Burkina Chad Mali Cameroon U. Nigeria Sahara Army
How France can avoid a “forever war” in the Sahel

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:51 min | 5 months ago

How France can avoid a “forever war” in the Sahel

"In twenty thirteen fronts sent soldiers to marley to stop jihadist advance seven years later and more than five thousand troops are still there in the region and despite their intervention twenty twenty was the deadliest year since the crisis began in the region known as a suhel avast sweep of land south of the sahara. So what is going wrong with the strategy of the so-called g five the group of five suhel countries became a facile. Mali mauritania initia- and chad. And of course a fronts will tell us more. I'm joined by the journalist and researcher in west africa and the sahel region. Pull me good morning pool. Good to have you with us. Good morning just explained to us how we've got to this state of did crisis what i think. We have to distinguish two things back in two thousand thirteen The jihad is already taken over the north of mali and they were launching a fresh push southwards and they had got down as far as the capital. Bamako that would have threatened security instability right across africa so the initial french intervention which was actually sent by Emmanuel macron predecessor. Phosphor alone which remember him that that may give you a sense of how far back in time. This was that was an almost conventional military intervention and it ended the jihadist the towns across the mouth of molly and remove that immediate threat but as so often in these situations a conventional conflict benefit of fragmented into more widespread terrorism localized attacks and some general instability. And that is much much harder to tackle. And you can't do it just with military means and so there's been a huge effort over really substantial seven years now as you mentioned to try and bring stability to the region but it's it's particularly difficult because you don't just have a ideology ideological jihadism if you're like fighting a terrorist war against a perceived international influence against the secular nature nature of these west african states. But you also have That mixed up with all sorts of local tensions and grievances For example between groups who depend on animal hooding and people who have commas and this is in this region the suhel which is just south of the sahara so it subjected to climate change water land grazing or in short supply. Population is rising rapidly. But the jobs aren't there to keep pace so you've got all her social and economic factors as well and that that's what's made it such a difficult challenge to bring this crisis under control but probably the most intense. The most dangerous situation was in the second. Half of twenty and nineteen when an armed group in eastern mali cooled islamic group in the greatest sahara pledging affiliation to die ish in the middle east staged a series of really very very bloody attack saw malia ninja army garrisons and the french also suffered heavy losses. And after that in january of last year there was a sort of strategic rethinking if you like and the decision to focus the military effort on them and to try and get up a stronger development have heard an peacemaking effort in other parts of the region sent. We have seen some progress since then

Suhel Mali Initia Emmanuel Macron Sahara Mauritania Marley Bamako West Africa Chad Jihad Africa Malia Ninja Army Middle East
Africa's Great Green Wall to combat desertification secures $16.8 billion  in international finance Impact

Science Magazine Podcast

11:48 min | 5 months ago

Africa's Great Green Wall to combat desertification secures $16.8 billion in international finance Impact

"Now we have science writer. Rachel danske with an update on africa's great green wall project which will soon see an infusion of billions of dollars from the world bank and others this project. The great green wall is intended to serve as a bulwark against desertification of the land south of the sahara desert while at the same time supporting communities that live in this region. Okay rachel how're you doing. I'm doing well. Thanks for having me sure. This is a rape big wall. This is a big project. It's basically supposed to be this green band that spans about seven thousand kilometers across the whole hop of africa. It launched back in two thousand seven. Rachel what would you say. The progress has been since two thousand seven now to two thousand twenty one almost non-existent which is why they launched this new round of funding last month. There was an assessment that found that a fraction of the goal had been achieved so far and the goal is for twenty thirty so they realized that time was running out right throughout this piece. You make this really important distinction between planting a tree and growing a tree. Why is that so important to think about when you know thinking about restoring lands or planting trees to help prevent desertification. The first time. I heard it. I just thought well. That's a really good way to put it. And then when racer after another would phrase it that way that we don't plant trees we grow them because that's been one of the missing pieces in restoration. Efforts globally not even specific to the great green wall but just in restoration landscape and forest restoration. Generally there has been this focus on planting trees but little focus really on looking at what gets planted in the first place in paying attention to the species diversity in the planting material and making sure that it's the right tree for the right place. There's also last follow plus maintenance of the tree then there needs to be talked to someone in west africa who was saying that. He's traveled to so many countries throughout the continental. Seen so many trees planted. But where the forests. Yeah that's a really interesting way of thinking about it. Basically tree planting mania that's been happening has come from all these different projects foundations quotas. That are saying oh. It costs a dollar to put a tree in the ground and we're going to offset our carbon. We're going to green the world but no one's looking after these trees and making sure that they live beyond that for sheer gas so now that we know that. That's not a good way to go about this. There's actually a lot of research. That's found some of the best practices for restoration projects. What are some of the recommendations have come out from research. In the past ten years when paper published last year talked about ten golden rules for reforestation. And they think those summed up a lot of the recommendations really well in addition to just protecting existing forests which probably sounds obvious. But there's a lot of research on the new. I don't have the same benefits that existing ones do and it's hard to replace that beyond that involving local communities has been just incredibly important component that researchers are saying was not really part of the focus before because the restoration ecologists are focused on the physical research and they aren't trained to think about how people play into the picture and it's just so important to the survival of the trees because it's people who are planting trees and it's people who are maintaining the trees and if you don't have community by an investment in rye these trees there and interested keeping them there. The trees aren't going to last and the trees only have their benefits when they last going back to trees here for a minute you mentioned keeping old us in place for protecting them. What else is being looked at. So that's when using a diversity of species so that there can start to be restored. Biodiversity rather than just monoculture of trees. They're starting to be focused now. Also on the quality of the seeds. And what you're actually planting. And how do we build. The systems and infrastructure for collecting and improving. Seeds is going to be the most resilient seed for that species but then it's also about the genetic diversity because there can be inbreeding with plants. If you're not collecting from wide enough geographic area than you can start to sort of limit. The gene pool and that can be problematic. You talk about this example in ethiopia of a seat initiative a network that is supposed to improve the quality of seats. Can you talk about how that would work. And how it would involve the community. The provision of adequate trees deep portfolio or pets. Bo is a project in ethiopia that they're calling it a functional trees seed system. It's a multi-pronged effort. They're trying to develop standards for seed collection and sharing that. There's high quality seed that will ensure that the trees that are planted can be their most resilient they're developing maps for how to source those seeds they're trying to strengthen the research system the infrastructure and the the research system to improve seed quality and they're linking all of that to the people who will use the seeds seeds there's technical training for farmers and the local language and there are diagrams of how to store different types of seeds. They're really trying to get that knowledge to the community to farmers and local nurseries to scale up the capacity of local decentralized infrastructure. Is there another model project that people might be looking at to expand as the money comes in. Are there other areas. That are doing good things. Yeah there was one of their project that i came across the one billion trees for africa project. And it's led by this man from cameroon tabby jota. He talked about how he grew up in this thriving economy system and he went off to university and when he came back the lands that he new as a forest with no longer for us. He started planting marina cheese and cola nut trees and mingo trees and all these different trees that would restore some of the soil health that he thought had been lost but also produce food and income generating opportunities for people so that they would be invested in keeping the trees there. He called his approach. The contagion approach. Because it's just sort of caught on. He got a bunch of men and women in this one community to be involved in the tree planting the neighboring communities saw what was happening and he was very clear that it's not like a drastic change where their community sedley rich where they weren't before but the small benefits were noticeable and so the neighboring community wanted to do something similar. And so it's just been a word of mouth approach so as he developed this very grassroots success he's gotten funding from more international sources than use it to do the work on the ground in these different communities mostly in west africa. And he's starting to do more and more with the great great wall which seems very exciting so there are a couple of different findings that we talked about that suggests the way forward for this type of restoration project involving the community diversity of. They're planting making sure that they're not just putting stuff in the ground but they're actually supporting plant growth and the communities around it but another thing that comes up a lot in your story is now we kind of what should happen. Researchers have come to a lot of conclusions that are very useful. But then there's the practice what's actually happening on the ground and maybe even what will happen on the ground. What are some of the biggest impediments to implementing the results of this research. One interesting comment. That i heard was that the implementing partners people with the money don't have scientist on their teams. They don't realize how complicated it is to plant a tree into get it right and to make sure that grows the lack of knowledge in the right places and the lack of communication between the people with the money and the people with the knowledge and also the community who is going to be involved. Those conversations aren't being had something else that a here is the expectations that donors have. They want fast results. And that's not. How trees in general work. But it's especially not how effective restoration works because all of these things need to happen and they take time getting communities involved. There's a lot of upfront investment. That needs to happen. In developing all of this infrastructure and research systems with a lot faster to just go and say just plant a bunch of eucalyptus trees. Because that's what they have the seeds and planting materials for. There's a disconnect between the speed that donors want to see results and the reality of what needs to happen. I've seen that you've written about this project for years now. What do you think you're going to see if you check back in two years. I hope to see that things. Like the pats project and this other effort the one billion trees for africa a hope that they have scaled and and that they inspire or serve as models for other projects. I don't know where. I'm placing bets. It feels like there is enough of a resounding message coming from the research community about the importance of this and the importance for the effective ecosystem function restoration and the community development but also for the climate benefits and if the global fenders governments who want to plant trees for the climate benefits if they are serious than they will start listening to these researchers. This is like thousands of miles. Four thousand miles. That's like the us plus another third right east west a huge huge area to cover an across countries. And all these different people's. How is this. possible. Rachel i mean this is a global scale. This is a huge project. it's huge. It's huge and that's probably why it sounded like the great idea when they announced it. And why didn't go anywhere for ten years but it's the partner agencies that i've spoken with involved in this project. The great queen wall are really clear that it's an environmental program but it's also the social alliance when that's meant to economic development but also really impart some resilience. See into these communities. Who are the most vulnerable to the effects of climate change. That's why they're really ramping. Up this funding now because they see the value for the planet from a climate change perspective but also for the millions of people across this gigantic area. Pinks rachel thanks for having me. Sure rachel Danske is a science writer based in denver. You can find a link to story on the episode page for the podcasts. At science mag dot org slash podcast.

Rachel Danske Africa West Africa Sahara Desert Ethiopia Marina Cheese Rachel BO Cameroon Cola East West United States Pinks Rachel Denver
"I Am Always Enough Just Being"

Immigrantly

04:56 min | 5 months ago

"I Am Always Enough Just Being"

"Today. I am so thrilled to have you all tuned in for our guest. She is so down-to-earth such a busy woman. And if you look at the movement. She's leading i. Frankly don't know how she does it all our conversation. This particular conversation inspired me. And i came away from it. Renewed and challenged do more introspection to look at my mental health. More covered issues. That always been booed in bogus bonnie culture and for me. It wasn't easy to talk about stuff that was considered and still is considered western construct or a privileged that many cannot afford but today's guest and i spoke about it and it was fun. It was beautiful. It was challenging. Yes but i would do it again. If given an opportunity. Sahara goalie is the prince and energy behind brown girl therapy. A mental has platform that is the first and largest of its kind. What started out as fashion project turned into a world where community for first and second generation immigrants who seek to understand a firm that emotional and mental experiences. I did a lot of research. I looked at other platforms and i realized you know there really. Isn't there just. There wasn't anything that existed for children of emigrants when it comes to mental health. And as i reflected on my experiences i realized a lot of by struggles are rooted in this cultural. As in this identity as a child of immigrants. I remember as a kid and even now there are moments of consciousness in experiences that i have literally trouble putting words to are fully comprehending a lot of cultures. Like my own did not promote mental health conversations. Never mind have the lexicon. To even engage nasa hodge colby biz witnessed this unique reality and uses her platform to address these issues. I cannot wait for you all to hear what she has to share. An amazing amazing cheney up onto now and if you want to learn more about brown girls. Ap give her a follow on instagram and they also have a newsletter for which you can sign him. And i've said this before if you have any new ideas story ideas guest ideas diaz even email us. You can reach out to us. This is your platform. And i want to have as many conversations as began with people who stories will resonate with you our listeners. So let's get started. So i am so excited for this episode because i feel like there is so much that i always wanted to talk about and this episode is going to be my answer. Do all that. I want to talk about especially in the context of mental health. But a lot of what we are going to talk about is tied to your story. So i want to start with your ginny thus far. Can you share your story way. did you grow up. where were you born. How did you end up where you are right. Now sure I'm really excited to be here and be having this conversation with you. So i was born in the suburbs outside of richmond virginia The first of my family to be born in the west. I have two older siblings. Who moved to this country with my parents. Right before i was born and i was socialized. Grew up in predominantly non-indian environments. Yes so my parents from job but my mom actually is from japan so while she's full indian full-page rb Grew up in japan. So i have family in japan so i was born outside of richmond. Virginia my parents and my siblings were all born in india but my mom was socialized and grew up in japan. So i spent most of my years growing up Our vacation time between visiting family in india. Which would be. My paternal family and split time going to japan to visit my maternal family. So i feel like. I grew up in a try cultural household because my mom would often make japanese food she would often be watching tv. Dramas and japanese and we have a lot of decorations around the house. That are japanese but my family is sick. They follow the sick religion and my dad is fairly religious and so we grew up speaking jobe. You know going to goodwater on sundays. But i was going to school and had friends. Who were not sick or indian

Hodge Colby Biz Bonnie Sahara Japan Cheney Nasa Diaz Richmond Virginia India Jobe
Searching For Indoor Beauties

Plant Of The Week

05:17 min | 6 months ago

Searching For Indoor Beauties

"Now because it's just grasses embarking things all of which i enjoy but we now have to look indoors for plants by that meaning. They're there I just walked by a whole raft of them. grafted tack time all kinds of sizes shapes and colors. Very very cute interesting and so on then right next to those was a plant. That is in flower right now. Indoors of course qalandia. Then african violence come into their own right now. Now they have been in of course before now but they're still outstanding at this point in time and then many large and small tropicals by that meaning the size the plant as well as the size of the leave and then some of the variegated tropicals posts and Some of the ivy's and so on are very pretty in their variegated nature and then if we look around and have taken care not to have too much water too much cold and so on on our poinsettias. They're probably still in half decent bloom at this time. I know that mine are and then looking back. You're cutting off of a white one and kept the breakfast kept the stems. The flowers dip stuck in a little vessel of water and i waited and waited and waited. Made sure the water stadium and then all of a sudden it's starting to show some new green leaves and lord knows the little rascal has rooted. I'm going to take a clear on through this winter out into the yard next summer. Let it develop. And i'm going to have a white one of my own so to speak next winter so those are the things that are happening right now and and one of the things too that is backing this statement of mine. The industry keeps track of sales and gross of of what is being grown so much like any other industry keeps track and the sales and a well. Let's call it. Sales of indoor plants has exploded this year. Many people being trapped inside needed something besides the dog or the cat would screaming kids and they have turned to indoor plants. And it's it's showing on actual sales records and that's good now one of the other things that i find really very interesting. Because i've looked at it several times a month apart. Countertop earns a friend of mine's wife has a very attractive when she grows six different herbs. Right on the countertop luminaries in the top of it place to put six pots little holders On and off switch well. It's a time thing. She tries to get sixteen hours of sun or sun light on these plants every day and loves to cook with fresh herbs. So there's all kinds of things that can be doing and color right now. Well what you should do is get one of those herb gardens and give it to your brother the gourmet and let him cook a nice dinner. If he was closer you can believe that would have been done. He he keeps over. A number of things in one is a bay plant now. I'm not gonna liberate too much but that would be plant has been cut back down to three feet tall. He totes it into the family room. Whether it's good light each fall brings it back out into the garden. Each spring and uses bay leaves galore in all of his cooking. So there's there's all kinds of things like that Sometimes i wish it closer. Sometimes we're about to write distance apart but when it comes to food and him being chef. I really wish he was a whole lot closer. There you go. Hey you know. Gardening indoors in the wintertime is different. Because there's limited light so limited growth right surely so mark and and then not only limited light but limited humidity many homes or dryers in the sahara desert by actual readings they're under thirty percent moisture in the air and so on Can and does shut plants down. I don't mean it kills them but they are not growing much right now. They should be in good light. They should be kept moist not wet but moist and no fertilizer right now while they're resting but it's just a different kind of gardening Where you may have had to water those plants if you keep the other things indoors all the time. You may have had to water them. Once a week. In the summer spring summer fall. Now you might even get by. They might even get by with every two weeks The best way to tell is put the first knuckle of your big finger into the soil if it's dried down that roughly one inch then it's time to water water to the point. Soya soiled gets moist. Excess water drains away. And then you don't water again onto maybe up to two weeks so it's just a whole different kind of gardening. Respecting the plants means where they don't have greatest needs while near dormant. Don't push him. Don't over water but keep minnesota on at least good ambient light at the site of a window so that they will continue to grow and be beautiful for you. Why

Sahara Desert Minnesota
Gardening in Winter: Focus on Indoor Color

Your Gardening Questions

02:43 min | 6 months ago

Gardening in Winter: Focus on Indoor Color

"Gardening indoors in the wintertime is different. Because there's limited light so limited growth right surely so mark and and then not only limited light but limited humidity Many homes are dryers in the sahara desert. By actual readings they're under thirty percent moisture in the air and so on This can and does shut plants down. I don't mean it kills them but they are not doing much right now. They should be in good light. They should be kept moist not wet but moist and no fertilizer right now while they're resting but it's just a different kind of gardening Where you may have had to water those plants if you keep other things indoors all the time. You may have had to water them once a week in the summer spring summer fall. Now you might even get by. They might even get by with every two weeks The best way to tell is put the first knuckle of your big finger into the soil if it's dry down that roughly one inch then it's time to water soil. The soil gets moist excess. Water drains away. And then you don't water again onto maybe up to two weeks so it's just a whole different kind of gardening. Respecting the plants means and where they don't have greatest needs while near dormant. Don't push him. Don't over water them but keep them in the sun or at least good ambient light at the site of a window so that they will continue to grow and be beautiful for you. Why no one thing that you always stress with me is the the fact that these pots have to be able to drain out. Yes mark and one of the things that makes it real slick. You can use any vessel. But i bought but clear plastic. Well bowls if you will their Their whatever woods base of the pot is a little more. they stand about an inch and a half high. I put pebbles any kind of pedals. But i have some decorative that i put in the bottom of those so they plant itself. Plant pot sits on top of the stone. Then when i water the excess can run out down into the area. The pebbles you usually doesn't overflow you have to be a little careful with that and then where the one or two standing still in the pebbles but not wedding the plant. There is evaporation of course and then evaporation humidity. Moving up through the plants gives them another break That is good for them. So you you actually keep your furniture in good shape. You keep your plants in good shape with not much trouble.

Sahara Desert
"sahara" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

07:04 min | 7 months ago

"sahara" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

"Living in alignment with our dharma. Were feeling that natural propelling now. Oftentimes we got wayside. We see the exit signs on the side of the highway. They might say become a real estate agent. You'll make a lot of money. You don't like it but you'll make a lot of money or your parents will be really mad at you if you do that. So come over here and get married or whatever it is so then we're like okay. Well i guess. I'll scare over this exit. A lot of people are going down this exit. This exit seems to make sense. I don't even know what's at the end of this highway. It's too risky for me to go down and under this highway so let me. Just get off this exit where it's safe and comfortable and i see everyone else's going so from that getting off the highway. That's when we begin to experience the barricades at the side of the highway. So we've all heard the word karma in sanskrit karma has many different meanings but we also like to think of it as bounded by the universe. Right bounded action so those barricades on the highway. So what it feels like in our actual lives is. It's feels like i poke. Something feels off your a little bit anxious about your decision. You're not feeling complete excitement over it. You're hesitating but you're still doing it anyway. Most time we don't listen and then the poke turns into a punch punch hunch. And that's you know bigger situations showing up problems arising these are more obvious reasons that we should be shifting gears getting back onto dharma highway but again while at the time we don't listen and then as eventually that hunch punch punch will get stronger until it can turn into a collision. That could be like a breakdown that can feel like suicidal ita shin. That could feel like so many very deep dark corners that we can turn for some people. That's what it takes to move towards their dharma for people like paul you know some people with very powerful purposes. They needed to get to that point. People need different levels of breakdown to make that shift. Some people still never do. It's not inevitable. Some people continue to live from that state. So if you can notice. Am i feeling that synchronous cities the flow the chrea or am i feeling the karma the blocks the everyday feels like a drag and then how can i make one decision every single day. Tipping me back towards flow beautiful. I love that. How can i make decision every day to bring me back toward slope now. We've spoken a lot about dharma in terms of occupational career creating but i wonder can dharma be related to help like could health issues that we are going true. Be part of dharma. Absolutely they may have been the obstacles that you needed to experience to be able to share them so for myself of undergoing those health issues brought me to the journey of ira vega brought me to dharma and all of these tools that i'm today teaching. Had i not done that. I don't know where i would be today. So oftentimes our health. Our physical bodies are actually giving us the exact symptoms of what is out of balancing or greater life so could take us into a very deep fire beta conversation which is really what this science is all about but for a quick tip of little symptoms you could look out for and how it's related to your dharma. If you're feeling really scattered really kind of confused. Your mind feels like it's racing all the time like you just got too many tabs open. That's a sign that that air. That vodka energy is out of balance. So bring it into the pit bringing into the action. If you're feeling really overheated heartburn rashes just a bit of agitation. Things are just kind of pissing you off. That's the sign. You have too much fire pit. So bring it into the coff- the earth if you're feeling really heavy sluggish tired. Wake up in the morning and no matter. How much coffee drink. You're still so tired. You're getting a lot of weight. That's a sign that that cough that earth energy is out of balance so bring it into the data so it's beautiful because now we can look rather than trying to sugarcoat. Put a band aid solution on it. What is my body telling me in. How's it shifting. Me towards further alignment I love it now. is there a way. I'm curious about this. And the reason. I asked us because recently i was speaking to a healer and the heels pointing out that a help aleman. I had came from past slides. I'm curious to know. What are your thoughts on. This and pass lives influence our help in this life. Desario beta or dharma philosophy. Speak about that. Yeah so again. This could get her into a very deep conversation. So in vedic spirituality. They do believe unpasteurized. You don't have to believe in past lives to benefit from ir vedic wisdom so i'll just share if you are someone who's interested in this so in the betas they would say that your soul went through many many lifetimes each lifetime gave you different lessons that your soul needed to experience to further develop on its path. So let's say in a lifetime. You were a wounded soldier right. Maybe you were like stabbed in the stomach or something. Very gruesome happened so in that next lifetime or one of the lifetimes preceding that you may feel like i don't know what it is but like i just feel this. Real deep wound is aching moon. My son. I've had it my whole life but i don't know what it could be. You know this is something that can be really to your passive or fear a lot of times. Our paranoia is can be related to deaths in previous lifetime so many people are afraid of the ocean. Perhaps they drowned. Perhaps your fear afraid of heights. There was some falling that happened so the awareness of it is actually the only healing that we need towards it because it shows us that this did not happen in this lifetime. There's nothing for me to be afraid of. This is just some far elusive memory. That i may have to know that in this lifetime i am safe. I see i see. Is there a practice. Heal ourselves or anything. We're experiencing now by healing. Whatever energy is coming from that past life. Yeah so. I like to do cord cutting meditation. So we're attached to all of our lifetimes all of our connections even everyone. We communicate with on the internet through cords. So i like to. Let's say you're seating for meditation. You're about to do something to literally. Just imagine you have these scissors in your hands. That are just cutting yourself from any energetic cord. That still may be connecting. You even doing it on your body. This is actually really good for breakup as well. Because you might be still very connected to that person physically and you. Might you feel like some. They energetically within me when. I'm cutting this area. I'm feeling it so practicing a cord. Cutting meditation even just repeating out loud. My energy is sovereign. I am clearing and erasing all previous lifetimes that do not serve me. I claim my sovereignty. I claim that. I am in my full power full expression so even just that declaration can be huge reminder for you to realize that this is your lifetime to shine. You are here on this planet. Do your dharma to live a path of joy and service and anything that happened in previous lifetimes. They were lessons for you to cultivate the strength that you need right now to flourish dutiful. I loved i loved that. Thank you sahara. There's so much more we can go into.

ita shin ira vega Desario aleman paul cough sahara
"sahara" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

05:28 min | 7 months ago

"sahara" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

"See that obsession with art design everywhere and as for performing arts. It's what allowed me to become speaker. It's what allowed me to be on camera with you right now and not mess up my words you don't to be able to flow directly and so i realized that i was following my garment. But you are right. I was ashamed of it. I was ashamed. Because i felt i wasn't being true to my parents who were paying for my university degree and they wanted me to be an engineer. So i wondered. Did you experience something like this in your life. Oh goddess story of my life. Yes i also come an immigrant background so so much pressure on of course making money and getting married and like doing the right things that you're supposed to do to survive and what actually really helps me understand as as laws hierarchy which i think a lot of people are familiar with but and maslow's hierarchy is actually really related to the shocker system. You could look at that and spirituality. Which is the system of balancing the energies the circles of energy within the spinal. Speak more into maslow's hierarchy. Because it's more familiar with people so at the bottom of maslow's hierarchy is just having your most basic needs that your survival needs so that's going to be your focus and once you've reached their survival needs. Then you'll go towards okay. What could i want. Maybe a big car an suv. Whatever it is and then from there. Only once you've got an essentially the things that you want you need then you start to reach towards self actualization which are really these types of conversations so a lot of times when we have immigrant parents or ourselves went through our own journey of survival. It can be hard for us to take those risks to do those things that are kind of reaching for self actualization because our entire existences have been so focused on survival so when we see someone else doing that we're actually shaming them out of fear that they may not be able to survive. It's our fear of will vision may end up homeless. He ended up a starving artist. We don't want that to happen for him. We don't know the modalities to us. So maybe if we guilt him enough then no stop doing it. So definitely the same experience for myself with my family. And i believe that our soul and away chose these obstacles to give us the strength. We needed to embody are dharma. So you might have been born with your purpose but you were born with the embodiment to be able to bring it out to the world so you needed those obstacles you needed to be so certain of yourself that even when your own parents were questioning you. Maybe even wanting to disown. Which is what happened for me at that moment. Can you still love yourself and honor yourself enough to continue with your dharma and if you're able to cultivate that strength in the own grounds of your own home and family very people. You are conditioned to impress. None of a hater says something to you on line or someone writes it battery view. It doesn't matter because you're like yeah. I dealt with my own family not wanting me to do this and i was able to overcome so we needed those obstacles to cultivate that strength to be able to embody it further. That's beautiful that's beautiful so key lesson over here guys. Is that sometimes something that you truly love but you feel guilty you feel guilty being obsessed about it. That might be a sign that that could be part of your dharma. Would you say sahara. Absolutely i would say that. That is an instrumental part of it. And finding how to bring that into your dharma is going to be the factor that you know a lot of times. We're struggling coaching for a long time. It's not picking up. I've been putting things on social media. I don't know why it's picking up. Have you brought in that. It factor that thing that maybe love anime. Maybe you love to do you know craft on the weekends and you're like people won't take me seriously. So how do we use our you beta to discover dharma so looking out those archetypes so we spoke about those archetypes of what they mean as a person the creative the executioner person the more one on one but we could also look at it as a compass guide of our energy. That's always moving towards dharma. So i like to think of our energy like a channel right. We're taking ideas from the cosmos by the way invade expire. Probably would say that. You don't come up with the idea the idea chooses you. So you're opening yourself up to receive the idea through the vodka now from that receiving the idea. You're thinking about it. Should i act on this. Should i not and finally you're getting excited enough about it that you take the action now from that vodka. The air energy. We've moved into the fire now. This is the asked of the grass. Take action get shit done. Like i think a lot of spiritual people. And i could speak in the circle community fuel resistant to the you know you want it to flow and be super easy. But it's taking that idea and like bringing it to form because we do live on physical planet so we need to take grounded action on this plane to make things happen. So it's how do i create a business plan around. How do i see cultivate a team or a community sign up for the right courses. Actually invest in myself to make this happen. So that's all through that energy of the hit the fire and you're actually feeling really charged up during this and then from that state. A lot of us remain there for too long so a lot of people who are like hardcore entrepreneurs in the managerial fields can really remain in the pizza. And what happens with the fires at burns out. You know that's when you just get you feel like a hamster going through wheels again and again and you're not able to see clearly you're coming up with the same exact solutions but you're needing to see.

maslow sahara
"sahara" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

08:21 min | 7 months ago

"sahara" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

"Let's get started with sahara row sahara. Welcome so i tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you get started down this path now so i think that every healer the healing themselves and not definitely what happened for me. When i was around. Twenty one years old. My body began shutting down so it began with digestive issues that trickled into bone density issues and essentially. My body went into paramedic. Pause when i was twenty one years old so doctors told me. I would never be able to have children. My body was completely shutting down. I had all sorts of issues from insomnia to ibs etcetera. Doctors just kept prescribing me. More and more medications and at one point i was on everything from antidepressants to digestive pills and and so much more progress. You're on hormone. And i knew intuitively that something was off with that that there was a deeper underlying reason. Why my body was out of balance. So i decided to do some research and go as deep as i could into especially ancient healing sciences. Because they were so tried. Intrude and their modalities. So i had obviously heard of ira growing up but i never really took it seriously. I don't know what your relationship was. i was like. Yeah my grandma talks about it sometimes. Not not for me. I actually at that point. In time. I was doing a lot of nonprofit work. And i was in delhi teaching health and sanitation the slums right outside of delhi. And i decided to sign up for an ira of course and from going back and learning about one of these archetypes. They break down your your health into these three main archetypes in reading about this one. Which is the air energy. It had all of my symptoms but also aspect of my personality creative idealistic think outside the box. Visionary loves to travel and all of the physical health symptoms that i had so i found it very unusual because for the first time i've found something that described the whole me so i became fascinated with the next two years in india studying ir beta and went on to write several ira books. Idiots guide to vega. Eat feel fresh. My yoga cod and just learning everything i could with ir vega and bringing it into this modern world that we live in that. We don't have time to for example. Do all of the self care practices in cook food from scratch. And do all of these. You know really beautiful practices and also how can they be hand in hand with today's lifestyle so that journey brought me very very deep into physical health but as we know when you take care of one aspect of your body at trickles into everything else and from doing that i was understanding myself at a deeper level that i ever had before and it was giving more strength and courage to embody who i was within. So suddenly my interests begin to further and further shift into knowing my truth knowing who i was and all of the gifts of that archetype that vodka the air energy which will chat about moore began to show up for me in a bigger way that i wanted to expand that out to the world. So you know whether someone starts with drinking green juice or exercising it kind of us back to the same place which is understanding the truth of who we are in. That brought me really to the concept of dharma and what i found is that we could use these ir. Vedic archetypes to help is not only getting balanced with our nutrition. Exercise self care meditation but also to understand our purposes here on the planet. So since then i have been teaching about it. I have my book. Discover your dharma also with forward by deepak chopra. I think we need to run some definitions here. Because i admit what you're talking about. I've never studied beta. And i know a lot of people. Listening to podcasts. Mind belly covers such a wide area of personal growth. Right sixty people listening to this podcast and to be people who are manages meter. Ceo's they may not be. As deep into eastern spirituality issue are. And i think we may need to define two things. I what is your beta and second. What is dharma. let's start with obata for sure. So ira is the world's oldest health system and sister signs of yoga best on the mind body connection so most of the time when we think about yoga we think about physical practices exercising. An irish data was really the science that was meant to go hand in hand. Balancing your body your mind. All of the lifestyle practices that are related to again. Living your truth word. Yoga means to yoke. And the word. Ira vega means the science of life. So they were always meant to go hand in hand in this yoga lifestyle. A yoga lifestyle. What it really means is to live a life that's indisciplined with understanding your soul so then the word dharma has over sixteen definitions in sanskrit but the most common one and the one that will be speaking to your purpose. So dharma is. The purpose that invaded spirituality would say that each of us were born with each of us chose which feels like how allowed i choose this but we all chose a purpose to come into this planet with as we would say invade experience because we all needed to fulfil these specific set. The world needed to come into balance whether it's to bring beauty to the world or to create deeper connections or to create solutions to people specific problems or whatever it is so when i say dharma just think purpose when i say i just think a science of life got it got it so in this conversation because of the limited time we have we're going to focus specifically on dharma so you don't have to worry too much about our beta if you anew it feel free to google that if you want that i know what happens right when we have a conversation with this you certainly speak so passionately about beta. It's not like going around in people's heads and then they can't shift the focus to dharma. Which is what we are really here to talk about. So just so we can close that open loop in people's heads explain a little bit more about our no more than five and it's an shut that new we can maybe have future conversation of it and then let's shift to what we are meant to be speaking about dharma. Yeah well i really see them as interconnected and you know one brought me to the next. So with ira vega there are three main archetypes. consider them based on the elements so air fire and earth. So someone that has an air archetype. You know just like we would say oh. That person is super area. We have an idea you know. Maybe they are coming up with a lot of ideas their creative there may be bouncing off between a lot of different things we could also say they're spacey right so we have these ideas of what an airy person is like so what that would be physically symptoms of air but what that would be like in relation to your purpose is. You're someone who's constantly in a way coming up with new ideas. That ideas person classify souls within certain hatton psoriasis and then each of these patents have a particular dharma which is a purpose which the act of living. Your life in alignment with your spiritual purpose. Would that be correct exactly. And we're all a combination of all three but in varying amounts so as speak about them. You'll find okay. Sometimes i feel like a really creative person but not all the time so we all have aspects of all three just like we have aspects of all archetypes all astrological signs but some of us were born really potentally with one type of archetype whereas for others it may feel a little bit more equal imbalance between all three. I see and also heard people speak about medicine of seen oils explain. What are you beta. Means in that context. Yeah so underneath ir vega underneath the science of life. There are so many different forms of self care proxies. You can do so ironic nutrition one entirely. Its own modality ir vedic spa treatments clinical treatments puncture karma. That's its own modality vedic beauty. that's own modality and an irate spiritual -ality which is what i speak more into. Its own but it all comes down into this one umbrella and all looks at these three archetypes these three doses in the same way. I see got it. Thank you thank you. Now dole show what is a dosa. That's another word we have to understand. Yes all the sanskrit terminology today so the word dosa means energy..

sahara row sahara delhi obata Ira vega insomnia deepak chopra ira vega moore india hatton psoriasis google dole
Pompeo announces U.S. consulate in Western Sahara

90.3 KAZU Programming

00:52 sec | 7 months ago

Pompeo announces U.S. consulate in Western Sahara

"Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says the U. S plans to open a consulate in Western Sahara that will be part of the U. S embassy in Morocco. NPR's Michele Calvin reports. It comes after the Trump administration upended long standing policy and recognized Morocco sovereignty over the disputed region. Secretary Pompeo says he's beginning a process to establish the U. S consulate in Western Sahara, and he's already inaugurated a virtual post meant to support economic and social development in the region. In a recent op Ed, former Secretary of State James Baker accused the Trump administration of turning its back on the people of Western Sahara. Who have sought a referendum on the status of the former colony. The Trump Administration recognized Morocco sovereignty as part of a deal to get Morocco to normalize ties with Israel. Baker called that an astounding retreat from the principals of international law.

Trump Administration Western Sahara U. Secretary Of State Mike Pompeo Morocco Michele Calvin Secretary Pompeo Secretary Of State James Baker NPR ED Baker Israel
Israel, Morocco to normalize ties; US shifts W Sahara policy

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 8 months ago

Israel, Morocco to normalize ties; US shifts W Sahara policy

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting the trump administration brokers a deal between Israel and Morocco president Donald Trump added to his Mideast legacy Thursday announcing on Twitter that Israel and Morocco have agreed to normalize relations the deal was brokered by trump's son in law and adviser Jared Kushner and his chief international negotiator avi Berkowitz in Jerusalem Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu I want to first thank president trump for his extraordinary efforts to expand sort of pleased to bring peace to Israel and the peoples of the Middle East as part of the deal the United States has agreed to recognize Morocco's claim over the long disputed western Saharan region might cross yet Washington

Mike Rossi Morocco Israel Jared Kushner Avi Berkowitz Donald Trump Benjamin Netanyahu Twitter Jerusalem Middle East United States Saharan Washington
Morocco Becomes Latest Arab Country To Normalize Ties With Israel

All Things Considered

02:26 min | 8 months ago

Morocco Becomes Latest Arab Country To Normalize Ties With Israel

"Me happy holidays. Another Arab country has decided to join the Trump Administration's Abraham accords. Under the deal, Morocco will normalize ties with Israel. In return the U. S is backing Morocco's bid. Sovereignty over a disputed territory. NPR's Michele Kelemen reports. Israel in Morocco have already had informal ties for years. But now in a tweet president Trump says they've agreed to full diplomatic relations. His son in law and adviser Jared Kushner, expects things to move quickly. They will grant overflights and direct flights to and from Israel for all Israelis. They'll reopen the liaison offices and robot and tell Aviv immediately with the intention to open the embassies you know, in the near future. For its part, the U. S. Is changing its policy toward Western Sahara Ah former Spanish colony In the past, the U. S. Has worked with the United Nations to promote talks between Morocco and the Polisario Front, which seeks independence for Western Sahara. Kushner says the U. S now recognizes Morocco's sovereignty over the disputed region is something that's been talked about. For a long time, but something that seemed inevitable at this point. A statement from the Polisario Front question whether the move by the U. S violates international law and said Morocco is quote selling it sold to maintain its illegal occupation. Trump's move also took the U. N by surprise. We've just learned of this through Twitter post, U. N spokesman Stephane Dujarric says the secretary general is still convinced that it's possible to reach a negotiated solution based on U. N resolutions. One Former U. N and U. S diplomat Jeffrey Feldman says the U. S. Was already leaning toward Morocco's planned offer some autonomy but not independence. For the people of Western Sahara. Previous administrations have never come out fully in support of Morocco. There's been kind of a wink wink nudge nights. The Moroccan economy plan looks pretty good as a basis for How you would negotiate a permanent settlement. But he fears that President Trump's move will short circuit diplomacy, leaving the Saharawi people weaker as he's done with others. He hasn't shown much empathy for weaker parties. Whether we're talking about the Kurds in Syria or the the Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza, and now this stuff rallies, Palestinians are sounding frustrated, too, as more Arab countries agreed to normalize ties with Israel

Morocco U. Trump Administration Western Sahara Michele Kelemen Israel Jared Kushner Donald Trump Polisario Polisario Front NPR Stephane Dujarric Abraham Aviv Kushner Jeffrey Feldman United Nations President Trump Twitter Syria
Morocco Launches Military Operation in Western Sahara Buffer Zone

BBC World Service

00:33 sec | 9 months ago

Morocco Launches Military Operation in Western Sahara Buffer Zone

"Front says a three decades old ceasefire in Western Sahara has been ended by a Moroccan military operation in the buffer zone. A senior Polisario officials have that war had started. Earlier, Morocco said it intended to clear a road linking Western Sahara with Mauritania. Polisario supporters say the highway shouldn't be in use and they've been blocking it. Western Sahara was annexed by Morocco in 1975. Since then it's been the subject of a dispute between the Moroccans and the indigenous people led by the Polisario Front. One of South Africa's

Polisario Western Sahara Morocco Mauritania South Africa
Sahel of a mess: France's impossible peacekeeping mission

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:28 min | 9 months ago

Sahel of a mess: France's impossible peacekeeping mission

"Jihadists are entrenching themselves. Ever further in the suhel continent wide strip of semi arid land just south of the sahara desert. There are former islamic state fighters ousted from the middle east al qaeda associates and a number of ethnic militias. The sahel's hitter ends are far from any city state. Laws don't hold. Public services barely exist last year. Nearly five thousand people died in battles or acts of terror in the region six fold increase on two thousand sixteen. An estimated four million people have fled their homes this week. Sixty world leaders are among those who have gathered online for the paris. Peace forum where the crisis is being discussed. A united nations peacekeeping force has a rim to patrol and to help rebuild the embattled region but most combat missions against the jihadists are led by several thousand french troops. Some of whom are based this gow in mali. Well we arrived in gow by plane then took a french military helicopter which flew at low altitude extremely fast for about an hour to get to this advance base that they've built out there in the middle of the sahel sophie. Better 'cause our paris bureau chief. An extraordinary region absolutely vast nothing in any direction will miss no human habitation. A few acacia trees the occasional goatherd and a tiny settlement. But that's about it and then you arrive in the middle of this dusty zone read colored sand where the soldiers who've made it. All the way from france had just finished a month. Long operation against jihadist. So these were both regular french soldiers but also special forces the most recent of these operations. They killed several dozen jihadists. They seize weapons motorbikes fuel and to one of them just described it. Talk to me that it was intense. There were violent encounters on the ground. This is real proper combat that the french soldiers are engaged in there. And how significant is the french presence in the region. Well the french have over five thousand troops as part of this operation that they called it by far the biggest contributor to any of the operations in the region there is a un peacekeeping operation with over thirteen thousand soldiers but no single country contribute as many as the french do. There are two hundred and fifty british for example due to arrive. Soon there are three hundred and fifty germans there but in effect. What's is obvious. Once you're there is how the real combat operations fall to the french conditions. A tough is extremely hard. The sand everywhere is grueling. And it's risky. How risky last year was the region's deadliest for years. There was a particularly nasty incident at the end of the year when the french lost. Thirteen elite soldiers in a helicopter crash but local soldiers from nizhny. Molly have also been on the receiving end of terrorist attacks. Neo lost seventy one soldiers in one attack than there was another took out fifty from marley. So it's a constant vigilance. And there's a constant sense of vulnerability even for the armed forces operating out there. But why is it that francis chosen to take the lead to to be the country with the greatest presence on the ground. Franz historically has links to the region it is the former colonial power which also causes something a problem now because it gets accused of acting in a sort of neo clooney away and fronts also has permanent military bases out there so it becomes a sort of natural partner for crisis in the past. I think that the french have really tried to change their strategy. This year. emmanuel macron host to summit at the beginning of the year with the leaders of the five signs countries and the idea is to trained share some of the burden to make sure that the french show more supported on the ground by the european countries for example they i saw estonians their swedish officer but also to try and get the regional armies to do a better job themselves and that was very clear in the description that i heard of the operations where they were working really very closely alongside marlon and nigerian forces in some of these operations against the jihadists issue in june macron emphasizes commitment to the operation solo vehicle always mma which party about the the fight against terrorism. But it's also about the return of governance and development for the region in which he wanted to work with local governments that are much closer basis and is that big french presence making any real difference to the levels of jihadist violence in this. Hell when i think it's important to think of it in terms of different regions and where we were so that was in the sort of central new central mari. I spoke to general marquan rate. Who commands the oppression. Can't overall the some offered to trish. She tested in terms of often. You said he was very satisfied with recent operations there. I think the french sense that they've really dealt a blow to what they call a die ashley. Islam state in the greater hara premium capacity results. Iovine underneath the media and the general said they haven't disappeared is but they don't have the same capacity to cause trouble that they did at the end of last year. So i think there is progress in that particular zone where they've been conducting these intense operations. Of course. the problem remains that can operate in one area but they certainly can't operate all over the country and that's where she doesn't remains a big problem and so what prospects for for actually paring back their prisons. I think is incredibly difficult. You know. I think the the french Condemned in a sense to stay in the sahel. The no plans to leave or to withdraw all their forces tool. I mean it's more question of trying to share the burden more the adversity. they're up against these jihadist groups. They are incredibly mobile than a magic they move about on motorbikes and pickup trucks and they can just disappear into the bush in a way. That's for the french forces. It's just makes it very difficult to contain and to target and so it sounds as if the the only option than it is to draw in international help. I mean how. How hard will that be the reds Help on the grounds. The american particular provide ups a crucial intelligence support to the operation. The british operates three shoot. Kelly copters there as well as part of buchan and they if french beccles and troops into combat zones on special forces which is obviously much more declined to start operations but the estonians are there and there are some checks and swedish special forces due to arrive soon so european countries are helping franz. But they aren't at the same time. Exactly lining up to offer these combat troops. And i think franz sometimes feels that. It's doing this job very much alone but the situation you describe is probably not going to be massively changed by a few dozen or a few hundred special forces. Even it's an incredibly difficult situation. The best the fringe show hoping to do is to try and contain the threat to try and secure areas and enable millions to go back to their homes into a more sense of security in some parts of the country. But it's not about defeating the enemy across the entire country. I think that much is clear.

Suhel United Nations Paris The Sahara Desert Emmanuel Macron GOW Al Qaeda Mali Nizhny Middle East NEO Franz Molly France Marlon Francis Trish Ashley Bush
"sahara" Discussed on Get Sleepy

Get Sleepy

07:56 min | 10 months ago

"sahara" Discussed on Get Sleepy

"Go. You Climb. Back Down again. But. For tomorrow. Right now do have an it venture into the depths. Of Sleep. Your mind continues to drift I do. I? INTO HAZY VISIONS To stillness. All peaceful and quiet. Slowing your breath. You Allow Yourself To relax. Into a long De. Contented sleep. With, the movement of the. Through your mind. ooh. ooh. ooh. ooh. ooh..

"sahara" Discussed on Get Sleepy

Get Sleepy

05:33 min | 10 months ago

"sahara" Discussed on Get Sleepy

"Heads and draped cost their next. are the brilliant indigo blue scarves of Berber tribesmen. Some are streaked with lines of docker INC while others are singularly died. Recognizable across this part of the world. They're bold. Glue Color stands out in stark relief against the monochrome sand. A younger man approaches you with a welcoming grin and introduces himself as FDR. Which means of live in the Berber language He has a very nice campy tells you. Beyond the largest dude. He can lead you there today on.

"sahara" Discussed on Get Sleepy

Get Sleepy

05:36 min | 10 months ago

"sahara" Discussed on Get Sleepy

"In every direction..

End of 'Green Sahara' May Have Spurred a Megadrought in Southeast Asia

60-Second Science

02:19 min | 11 months ago

End of 'Green Sahara' May Have Spurred a Megadrought in Southeast Asia

"Thousand years ago the Sahara had extensive grasslands and was dotted with lakes and trees but some five thousand years ago that Green Sahara dried up to become the enormous desert. We know today and scientists. Now think that this climate shift had effects far away including causing a mega drought in South East, Asia Kathleen are Johnson a Paleo climatologist and geochemists at the University of California Irvine says the key to that discovery were Stalagmites collected in cave in northern Laos. So like my I really amazing archives of past climate variability people are often more familiar with things like tree rings, ice cores, or maybe ocean sediment cores while select nights work in a similar way in that, they are deposited over time Johnson's team analyzed trace elements and carbon and oxygen isotopes in the hardened caved drippings that information enables researchers to determine rainfall patterns over the Millennia and. Johnson and her colleagues discovered signs of a thousand year long drought in Laos which began around the same time. The Sahara dried up about five thousand years ago as for why the two events might be connected the researchers simulated the drying out of the Sahara using climate models and included a couple things we know happened including the subsequent disappearance of vegetation and a connected increase in airborne dust, and they found that those variables. Would have been capable of cooling down the Indian Ocean and so the Cooler Ocean temperatures basically led to less moisture being being brought by monsoon circulation during the summertime when that region gets most of its rainfall, the details are in the journal Nature Communications One of Johnson's co-authors is joyce white a consulting scholar at the Penn Museum. She studies the Human History of Southeast Asia and her reaction when she first heard about the drought. On my God that's the missing millennia the missing millennia because she says, archaeological data are scant in that part. Of Southeast. Asia from four to six thousand years ago white says it's a critical period in which hunter-gatherers gave way to farmers, and there are a lot of debates about how the two periods related to each other. But we lacked the evidence in the area. I'm most interested in which is the maycom valley. White says this study doesn't answer that question directly, but the mega drought is a tantalizing clue for archaeologists has they continue to investigate those missing millennia.

Green Sahara Johnson Joyce White Laos Southeast Asia Indian Ocean Asia Kathleen Asia Maycom Valley Penn Museum University Of California South East
She Launched a Course, Here Are Her Questions

The Goal Digger Podcast

04:30 min | 1 year ago

She Launched a Course, Here Are Her Questions

"Sahara welcome to the show. We've been messaging in DMZ and staying connected throughout everything. You've got going on in your life but I am so excited to have this conversation with you today. Thank you so much for having me I am so excited to be here. Honestly this is ABC. News so much fun so before we dive on into the Nitty Gritty questions that you've created. Let's hear a little bit about you. Tell me about you your journey and entrepreneurship what you've been up to your recent success. Yes, sure so I started business actually with my wellness blog and it was called, or it is called, earth, and spoon and I started it a few years back about four years ago, and I started in the middle, and the thick of having my children, so I had just had my three kids. I started the blog and then I accidentally while accidentally, but unintentionally got pregnant with my. and. He has just been such a wild journey I started my one this blog because it was my lowest hanging fruit at the time, and I had results with my health and I just had that issue because I decided to be a stay at home, mom, as soon as I have the kids and I just wanted to kind of find myself again by using my brain and doing something other than changing nappies. You know and I love being a mom, but I just needed that. Stimulation and so I started it and. I found out in the process of doing it. That was more in love with the business and marketing side and. So I then began to pivot and my journey and I started doing that through pinterest. Because when I had my blog, I was struggling with traffic. You know you put in so much work into content creation only have like ten people. You know region blog post an like this. Mom. Come on. This can't be life so I, did a lot of research and tested out Pinterest, and within three months might traffic increased by over three hundred percent, and now I have millions of views on the platform, and so it's been incredible, and I'm really passionate about helping other MOMS who wanna get into business because spoken to so many who feel like having a fulltime job after having children doesn't serve where they're ad in life, and they're exploring how to have online business, and so I feel like they're my people and I want to teach all of them. If I can how to make online business work because I love it I think it's amazing. It's amazing to have that freedom. I agree so much so walk me through kind of the past few months. Because I've been able to watch everything that you're doing so share a little bit about what you've been up to. Yes Oh three months ago I joined the KGB course which is the knowledge business blueprint, and what happened was I started and Jessica was our coach. We had you coaching for six weeks in there was about a thousand of US doing the course and I was just lapping it all up and the moment the doors open. Actually that's when the lockdown happen suddenly. I was trying to run my blog. I was trying to homeschool my kids and try to do this course all at the same time, so it was an incredibly crazy season, but I loved I lapped up all that information, and that's when I did my pivot I realize. Oh, my Gosh! I have this tool that pinterest and I need to teach. Other MOM preneurs how to use it and so I put together my course Pinta, prophet blueprint while I was doing the chorus then I took your advice. Jenna, because you said to make sure to implement while you're learning rather than wait till finish learning, and that's how I'm wired like I like to put things in need boxes. And you know to take things off and so when you were like you need to implement as you're learning. Start Coaching people right now. It kind of messed with my head in the best way. Possible sells like okay. I'm GONNA do this. And it was great because I realize after doing it, it was that accountability pressure that I needed to actually get it done because I've been talking about having an online course for three years, and then within six weeks of doing the course I had done and dusted

Pinterest United States ABC Jessica KGB Jenna Pinta
She Launched a Course, Here Are Her Questions

The Goal Digger Podcast

04:30 min | 1 year ago

She Launched a Course, Here Are Her Questions

"Sahara welcome to the show. We've been messaging in DMZ and staying connected throughout everything. You've got going on in your life but I am so excited to have this conversation with you today. Thank you so much for having me I am so excited to be here. Honestly this is ABC. News so much fun so before we dive on into the Nitty Gritty questions that you've created. Let's hear a little bit about you. Tell me about you your journey and entrepreneurship what you've been up to your recent success. Yes, sure so I started business actually with my wellness blog and it was called, or it is called, earth, and spoon and I started it a few years back about four years ago, and I started in the middle, and the thick of having my children, so I had just had my three kids. I started the blog and then I accidentally while accidentally, but unintentionally got pregnant with my. and. He has just been such a wild journey I started my one this blog because it was my lowest hanging fruit at the time, and I had results with my health and I just had that issue because I decided to be a stay at home, mom, as soon as I have the kids and I just wanted to kind of find myself again by using my brain and doing something other than changing nappies. You know and I love being a mom, but I just needed that. Stimulation and so I started it and. I found out in the process of doing it. That was more in love with the business and marketing side and. So I then began to pivot and my journey and I started doing that through pinterest. Because when I had my blog, I was struggling with traffic. You know you put in so much work into content creation only have like ten people. You know region blog post an like this. Mom. Come on. This can't be life so I, did a lot of research and tested out Pinterest, and within three months might traffic increased by over three hundred percent, and now I have millions of views on the platform, and so it's been incredible, and I'm really passionate about helping other MOMS who wanna get into business because spoken to so many who feel like having a fulltime job after having children doesn't serve where they're ad in life, and they're exploring how to have online business, and so I feel like they're my people and I want to teach all of them. If I can how to make online business work because I love it I think it's amazing. It's amazing to have that freedom. I agree so much so walk me through kind of the past few months. Because I've been able to watch everything that you're doing so share a little bit about what you've been up to. Yes Oh three months ago I joined the KGB course which is the knowledge business blueprint, and what happened was I started and Jessica was our coach. We had you coaching for six weeks in there was about a thousand of US doing the course and I was just lapping it all up and the moment the doors open. Actually that's when the lockdown happen suddenly. I was trying to run my blog. I was trying to homeschool my kids and try to do this course all at the same time, so it was an incredibly crazy season, but I loved I lapped up all that information, and that's when I did my pivot I realize. Oh, my Gosh! I have this tool that pinterest and I need to teach. Other MOM preneurs how to use it and so I put together my course Pinta, prophet blueprint while I was doing the chorus then I took your advice. Jenna, because you said to make sure to implement while you're learning rather than wait till finish learning, and that's how I'm wired like I like to put things in need boxes. And you know to take things off and so when you were like you need to implement as you're learning. Start Coaching people right now. It kind of messed with my head in the best way. Possible sells like okay. I'm GONNA do this. And it was great because I realize after doing it, it was that accountability pressure that I needed to actually get it done because I've been talking about having an online course for three years, and then within six weeks of doing the course I had done and dusted

Pinterest United States ABC Jessica KGB Jenna Pinta
The City of Carthage

5 Minutes in Church History

04:14 min | 1 year ago

The City of Carthage

"Welcome back to another episode. Five minutes in Church history on this episode. We're going to a place to a very famous city in the ancient world. The city of Carthage Carthage was first settled by the Phoenicians. This of course was a crucial city right as were on the Mediterranean Sea. Carthage came to be known as the master of the Mediterranean. Sea Trade after the Phoenicians was part of the PUNIC. PUNIC empire, and then under Caesar Augustus who reigned from fourteen BC to twenty seven ad. Of course, this is the Caesar Augustus of the Gospel Narratives in the birth of Christ under Caesar Augustus Rome to control of Carthage and it became a great Roman city. It was second only to Rome and the Roman Empire Rivaling Alexandria from time to time for that position, but most give it to Carthage. At any given time in these centuries, the population of Carthage would be two hundred fifty thousand people that had all the telltale signs of a Roman city. There were theaters in the republic buildings. There were the extensive baths. There were aqueducts for. Water across the city, and even into the fields for farming, there was an extensive Roman road system. Soldiers were kept. There was a very busy port city and a very prosperous city. It also has quite a role in church history. It was the home of Talionis. Of course. Is that great church father from one sixty to two twenty as the one who gave us the word Trinity, and brought together all that biblical teaching of who got is in his Trinitaria and being, and so we have the word trinity coined at Carthage and two Oh. Three Carthage was the site of the martyrdom of perpetual and Felisa toss those very brave young women, and the wonderful story of their martyrdom in their courage in their stand for Christ. Well, it was at Carthage. and. The to fifty CIPRIAN was bishop of Carthage. This was on the heels of the decian persecution very intense persecution by the Roman emperor Shas. And after the persecution, and there was some relenting of it, folks were allowed back into the church created quite a controversy was known as the Donna test controversy that raged throughout the church from the fourth to sixth centuries and a key player in that controversy was CIPRIAN Bishop of Carthage. In three ninety seven. It was the site of the Third Council of Carthage. And the topic of discussion was the New Testament Canon and coming out of that council was an affirmation of the twenty seven books of the New Testament, so it played a role in the Canon controversies in development of the Early Church and in four sixteen, the Palais jeans were condemned at Carthage, so it played a role in the development of the doctrine of original sin. So what a fascinating city with rich history both in terms of the ancient world end in church history well as Rome was sacked by the barbarians in four ten carthage was sacked by the vandals and four, Twenty Nine Carthage became the capital of the vandal empire which spanned across that great north. Coast, and of course that North African coast had the Mediterranean Sea to the north, and the vast Sahara desert to the south. Is Long came on the scene, the six hundreds, and began to threaten from the East and Right at the end of the six hundred at the battle of Carthage Carthage fell to Islam. It was dominated by Islamic control. There was a brief time during the Crusades when Carthage was retaken, but only for a short time. It remained Muslim throughout the era of the reformation and right onto the present day. Carthage in the present day is a suburb of Tunis. Capital city of the North African nation of Tunisia. Tunisia's the first government North Africa to give protection for religious freedom. But the nation itself is still dominated by Islam and while there is a church. They're going way back to those early centuries. It is still a church that suffers persecution in our present day.

Twenty Nine Carthage Third Council Of Carthage Ciprian Bishop Of Carthage Bishop Of Carthage Carthage Caesar Augustus Rome Caesar Augustus Mediterranean Sea Tunisia Sea Trade Ciprian Early Church North Africa Alexandria Sahara Desert Talionis Canon Donna Tunis Carthage.
"sahara" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"sahara" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Sahara. During our discussion. The Wally repeatedly mentioned the close US Moroccan relationship which dates back to seventeen seventy seven. When Morocco became the first nation to recognize the United States, while the US has never recognized Moroccan sovereignty over Western Sahara, Washington has played a pivotal role ensuring up Morocco's occupation. In addition to secretary of state Henry Kissinger, hoping for a rigged vote at the United Nations Security council regarding Western Sahara, president Jimmy Carter State Department in one thousand nine hundred seventy nine gave two hundred million dollars to the US company Northrop page communications to build an intrusion detection system for the nearly seventeen hundred mile wall Morocco built in Western Sahara, which is lined with an estimated seven million landmines a year later Carter provided Morocco with two hundred thirty. Million dollars in military aid. It's been a bipartisan affair ever since King Hassan. The second with President Reagan in one thousand nine hundred eighty two more people and American people will be ready always to mix their blood. The dignity of men. His majesty briefed me on the latest developments in his efforts to reach a peaceful settlement of the conflict, the Western Sahara, and I express my admiration for the support after the Cold War ended Morocco became a key US ally in the so-called war on terror. In two thousand four President George W Bush designated Morocco to be a major non-nato ally of the United States opening the door for more military deals. And the money has flowed. Both ways the state-owned Moroccan phosphate company OCP, which operates in Western.

Morocco Western Sahara United States President George W Bush President Reagan Jimmy Carter United Nations Security counci OCP Wally president Henry Kissinger King Hassan State Department Sahara. Washington Northrop two hundred million dollars
"sahara" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"sahara" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"The Sahara lawyer Mohammad Labib RGB, he's a former activists who has disappeared in Moroccan prisons for sixteen years. He's also the brother of the recently deceased Pola Saria leader Mohamed Abdelaziz RGB is one of just four Sahara lawyers permitted by Morocco to try cases in court. Cutler will be the first stage of the arrests were made there, and they were brutal beyond imagination. Walk. They used an extensive number of strange tools for torture and beatings fee. An about the home. Some of the prisoners were even forced to drink their own urine. They showed up before the interrogation judge covered in blood. Why was good day of music such a turning point? What happened why were people protesting? Kinda nokta has name is Zeke was a turning point because it was a very genuine form of mass protests like Western Sahara, has never witnessed nor has the rest of the world off. Some of called it the first hour spring before Tunisia and before Egypt. I'm doing shook. Then had he kind of mocha democrat. Yes. Without any doubt. This was the beginning of the Arab spring every media outlet after getting musique could only talk about how well organized well managed, and well prepared the protest in Western Sahara, was is she. Bam. Facade. From here. It spread to Tunisia. Egypt. Of course, when the American academic noted that this was the beginning of the Arab spring. He was correct. Alabi forgot gun at also. After leaving Muhammed RGB's office. We drive to a restaurant near.

Mohammad Labib RGB Western Sahara Sahara Tunisia Zeke Egypt Pola Saria Cutler Mohamed Abdelaziz Morocco Alabi sixteen years
"sahara" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"sahara" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Sahara lawyer Muhammad Labib RGB, he's a former activists who was disappeared in Moroccan prisons for sixteen years. He's also the brother of the recently deceased Polisario leader Mohammed Abdel Aziz air is one of just four Sahara lawyers permitted by Morocco to try cases in court. Cutler will be the first stage of the arrests were made there, and they were brutal beyond imagination. I saw work. The Houston extensive number of strange tools for torture, and beatings and about the home. Some of the prisoners were even forced to drink their own urine show. This showed up before the interrogation judge covered in blood. Why was music such a turning point? What happened why were people protesting? Kinda knock the has Zeke was a turning point because it was a very genuine form of mass protests like Western Sahara, has never witnessed nor has the rest of the world audience. Some of called it the first Arab spring before Tunisia and before Egypt. I'm doing. Then had the kind of mocha Demeter labile. Yes. Without any doubt. This was the beginning of the spring every media outlet after getting music could only talk about how well organized well managed, and well prepared the protest in Western Sahara, was is you bam. Fisa? Women from here it spread to Tunisian Egypt. Of course when the American academic noted that this was the beginning of the spring. He was correct. Gun. After leaving Muhammed RGB's office. We drive to a restaurant near the.

Western Sahara Sahara Mohammed Abdel Aziz Zeke Egypt Cutler Morocco Muhammad Labib Fisa Tunisia Houston sixteen years
"sahara" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"sahara" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Icon of the Sahara resistance, so Tanna, Kaya drapes herself and the red white black and green flag of Western Sahara. Just holding this flag and public is enough to get an activist beaten and arrested. Hi, my name is gonna hire. I was born under Moroccan role in the occupied city of Bush. I live just like any other seraglio woman who is subjected to torture and beatings. And in my opinion, my cases milder than many other in two thousand seven sultana was peacefully protesting with fellow college. Students said a university in Marrakech Morocco when police surrounded her. Don't count may ninth was an anniversary that also always celebrate really hundred. Can we were a group of five hundred survive we students how? I'm gonna tell you left the university campus marching peacefully waving flags and chanting. There are no alternatives to self-determination sealed off the street and besieged in it. As tear-gas spreads sultana was beaten by police one of whom singled her out for more abuse classical. How often one of them recognize me in Egypt right at my eye with his baton as an when he did that I bent over, and I could feel my eyeball in my hand. I was yelling at him. Hey, you miraculously pulled out? My I saw Tana's. Ordeal. Continued in an ambulance says, she was tortured on her way to the hospital where I know I told them I had a hemorrhage in my he tried to put his finger into my eyes. And I didn't get any medical treatment till the next morning at eleven when a group of Moroccans came to be telling someone to sell up, my I them because when I was in the ambulance another woman was crying and telling me, you're is gone. They were trying to sell it my eyes. So other women could see it and think twice before getting involved in activism. They wanted to make an example of what can do you have confidence that Western Sahara will become an independent nation. That's for sure. Because the determination of the people is invincible in. What we've got is true. We've lost many men and women over this one day it shall be liberated. Even losing her on.

Western Sahara sultana Tana Kaya Marrakech Morocco Tanna hemorrhage Bush Egypt one day
"sahara" Discussed on Fit Fierce and Fabulous Podcast

Fit Fierce and Fabulous Podcast

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"sahara" Discussed on Fit Fierce and Fabulous Podcast

"Crazy story. I like to dream guests for the fit fierce and fabulous podcast. You know, sometimes you just wish you could have conversations with certain people and you think about it, you follow them on Instagram and you kind of almost daydream about what that conversation would look like. Right. Well, I totally manifested Sahara rose onto my show. You guys have no idea. I was at a point where I needed to start looking for guests. I do interviews pretty boom, boom, boom, boom. And then I just kind of dwelled them out because obviously I have a business a company I run and I can't do podcast every single week. So what I'll do is I'll do a bunch and then I'll to schedule them out for you guys. Everything is ready to go. So it was that a point right needed to just start searching for guests. And I was kind of going through my list of like my wishlist. I keep a running list of people. I'd love to have a conversation with and I literally was looking at some. Har- rose and my sister and actually wrote me and was like, you should reach out to Sahara rose and like she didn't if the other people and I was like, okay, no problem. I'll get to added it to my to do list. And literally that day I got an Email from Sahar rose herself saying, hey, I, you know, I want to come on your podcast when it come on your show. This is what I talk about. I was like out my God. Are you serious? This is so cool. I was just about to Email you and I get an Email from you asking to be on my show. Yeah. So you guys things are happening. These are amazing when you put them in writing when you put your mind to it, when you open your mind to it, it's so cool when things align in that way. So I had her on the show. We had this amazing conversation. I share my journey with aggravated. She shares her journey with aggravated. And the thing I love about her is that she's not listen. This is ancient stuff she's talking about this isn't new. This, isn't it something one day, like five. Years ago, somewhat decide or even twenty years ago, like this is agent practices. So a lot of the things that I learned about when I had an IRA Vetik practitioner and I was working with her where things that like I would never do. Like, I'm just being honest, I'm sure a lot of you who listen to the show you guys watch goop or you follow goop and you see what quotas Paltrow and all the celebrities are doing and you're like, you know, I don't not never do that like it's cool, but it's time for that. Like I don't even know where you get this stuff. That's what are your data was to me. Like I kinda was like, I don't know. Like some of this I could totally do a lot of it on like, I don't know. But Sahara roses made it modernized. She has taken a very ancient practice which works very well, and it's so cool. We talk about the different doses and I know you're going to be listening to this going to so me because I was totally doing that the whole episode which is a quiz on our website by the way little little drop. But as we were. Talking. She was making it sound so approachable, so cool. It's something that you're just sitting there going. Okay. I totally do that or. Okay. That seems like something I could add to my meals or change up in my diet or add to my practices, not a big thing. So for those of you who are listening to this episode, maybe you know little bit about your eight. Maybe it's something you've heard of. Maybe it's something you even bond to a practitioner inexperience either, or I want to invite you to sit down and listen to this episode and just listen to the different Doshi as the way she talks about her journey, which is so inspiring..

Sahara rose Har- rose Paltrow twenty years one day
"sahara" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

Almost 30 Podcast

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"sahara" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

"Today on the podcast, shall we? Yes, Sahara room. Our sweet sweet Sahara. Sweet, sweet sweet. Be humping out of the most beautiful dude. This valuable books I'm like book is gorge. She texted a friend where I'm all everyone knows. Everyone knows Harz amazing, but I just look at her fucking book. I'm like, dude. No, yeah. Do you have a know people are so in the process, I'm like, do you even know how gorgeous this boquets? She took a risk by going to India to shoot the beautiful photography for this eat feel fresh book of hers on and she hired local photographers all over India and she didn't know if they're going to be good, or if it was going to be like cool and chill and and work well and it. I mean it was like magic and you've seen the book, oh my God, the color of emotional. The recipes are just so great. It's it's bringing are you Veda to modern time. Times and making really assessable easy recipes that you know we can all use and kind of live more aligned to our Toshiba's. Yeah. We love her as always Sahara rose, keeps it real and she's fun. And she so like she makes, you know, talking about all of that stuff like very, we can do it today. You don't have to prepare it onto read the whole book like you can start tapping into perhaps even more what your body needs through IRA Veda. Two day, which is really awesome. And she's funny and she's beautiful newly engaged. We talk a little bit about that. I mean, flying high end just her own. She interviewed Deepak Chopra on her podcast recently make, which is a bomb episode go over and listen to it. It's really, really good. Yeah, she's such a good interviewer. Yes. We'll link that in the show notes to and then where you can buy the book and then her Instagram and everything that's you guys can connect with her just one of our gals. Alright, y'all, enjoy this episode..

Harz Sahara room India Instagram Deepak Chopra Toshiba Two day
"sahara" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"sahara" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"Take me through that. How can solar and wind power plants change the climate, an increase, the amount of rainfall? Well, the reason we thought this might be true goes like this. If we darken the surface of the Sahara, you'd have more upward motion. If you warm up the surface and that would lead to condensation motion leads to clouds and condensation and rain, and that might lead to little extra. Rain. Then the other thing with the wind power is, you know, wind is interesting when you are putting up winter by, you're working very, very hard to get as much momentum out of the atmosphere. You can. So in some ways, it's very direct way of influencing climate. So you're making machines that are designed to remove as much momentum as possible from the lowest part of the atmosphere. And one of the things that that does is it enables win to move across lines of pressure more easily. So that means it's e- if you have a region where there's a little bit of low pressure and you add some roughness at the surface that makes it easier for win to move from high pressure to low pressure. So by roughing areas of this era, you're allowing more inward motion across lines of pressure, and that in this case happened to bring more moisture into that area, making it easier to form clouds and have upward motion precipitation. Wow. So the the windmills what they slow the air down because dry. Yeah, coast drag on the atmosphere. Exactly. Okay. So I'm trying to picture this year. You think the windmills cause the air to slow down and circulate better and the solar panels darken the land so that the temperature goes up, but that makes more convection. So the arises you get more precipitation, so you're changing the climate of the Sierra basically? Yeah, that's right. So how much greener would the Sahera get? Well, that's a really good question. Our paper directly shows that there's a fraction of a millimeter per day extra precipitation, so it's a reasonable amount. It's substantial fractional increase in the amount of precipitation over the Suheil which doesn't get a whole lot. Now, what would that mean for the culture in the region? That's a really good question. We ran model that included natural vegetation response, and we found that that was actually a fair part of the response. You made these changes by putting in wind turbines and solar panel. And that caused moistening. But then you got extra vegetation in response to that, and the extra vegetation itself absorbed a little more solar radiation caused a an additional feedback that continued to moisten the region a bit more. Now, what would happen to agricultural productivity you'd have to look at that specifically in choose a model that was designed to look at how the local crops would respond to that little extra additional water. How realistic is this to cover the Sahara and solar.

Sahara
"sahara" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

Don't Keep Your Day Job

03:15 min | 3 years ago

"sahara" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

"It's just a magnifying glass of who you already are. Number nine, it can't just put out content. You have to put up value. Number ten, take the best of what you want. Then put your own spin on it. And number eleven. There are traditionalist and trailblazers. If you wanna be a trailblazer you've. Be pushing people's buttons. All right. You guys when I left Sahara's place, we recorded at her place in Santa Monica. I was like, mind, blown. I'm like, this is just yet another incredible heroic human being who said, yeah, I don't have a PHD. No, I don't have an MD. No, I'm not forty seven years old with a ton of life experience, but I have something that is true for me. I have something that I know is valuable because it changed the course of my life and I want to share it with other people and she heard no from twenty nine publishers, and she just kept going. And that's story about her sitting in that auditorium and then walking up to speak to deduct Oprah and walking onto a stage and just she didn't know where that strength came from. She just said, I don't know if I'm ever going to see this person again, and I want him to read my book and she went for it. And then when I'm always struck by, I walked away from her place and I was like, you know, it's amazing because we used to live in a time where people thought, ok, in order for me to be successful, either. Have to work for someone else or a have to create this huge, incredible business, or I have to be lucky enough to make some new invention, or I just have something go viral. It's just by happenstance. I post something and it goes viral. Listen to me that is not the only way to do it. There's a whole new path now that the whole world is basically sitting on the other side of your smartphone on the other side of that laptop, whatever you wanna create, whether you love, knitting, or you love pie, or you wanna talk about your Veda, or you want to do hand lettering, you can find an audience and you can create valuable things that they want. You can share information. You can teach them things. You can sell them, things you can create community. It's so different. It's not beyond say or nothing. I want you to really see this and that's why I love bringing on people like Sahara. She's another example of someone like Amy tangerine, like Jordan, harbinger, like all these people who just decided to say, what if I just started putting it out there, what I have. And I started to be consistent and they start to just go directly to a segment of the population who connects with me and who is interested in what I'm interested in. And then guess what you don't have to know all these people's names. Most people don't probably know the name, Jordan harbinger, Amy tangerine, or Sahara rose. It doesn't matter right. It doesn't matter because they're making an incredible living because they found their tribe. You just need to find your tribe. So in in a way, if you can start to see this, it's a major shift. You don't have to take on the world. It's so doable and there is room for you. There is so much room for you. So I hope that this was inspiring and I hope that you got a lot from this and I hope that you will use this moment right now, feeling inspired and decided to go do something about it. Now I'm going to be at the Hudson theater in Los Angeles for two full days with amazing panelist. We're going to do one on one sessions for you guys. You can meet with a mentor and get some feedback on your ideas. It's going to be amazing networking. There's been, we mastermind discussions..

Jordan harbinger Sahara Oprah Amy tangerine Hudson theater Sahara rose Santa Monica Los Angeles forty seven years