21 Burst results for "Safina"

"safina" Discussed on Tipsy Tales

Tipsy Tales

05:33 min | 11 months ago

"safina" Discussed on Tipsy Tales

"Out of this house. right. Marcus is very calm. Cool and collected. Well see i think people like that. Usually 'cause they don't think anything's gonna happen to them and he is like talking to the police and the police are like you need. Bring the kids out. And he he agrees. Oh wait what he says. Okay give me a minute to say goodbye and get them all their clothes and whatever and which you do decide. Listen oh my god. I i don't even just listen. It's gonna give me an ulcer. It's probably is dana. Dana right yes. Dana shame on you. I needed to shots for this one. Yeah we should have had two shots so the cops agree to let him do what he says. He shuts the door behind him. So what happens. Next still haunts. Everyone that was there including all the first responders that were there that night. There is a tense hour long way outside our hour and a half more like an hour and a half outside the small fresno house. Oh as chopping up people afterward and afterwards neighbors would say listen. Just listen. I can't even at certain maze them make and afterwards neighbors. Yeah you know. I didn't do my usual my usual thing. Where like i listen to thousand youtube somewhat. I listen to a couple times and finally just read it. Because i was just like i can't i can't see that's how i get with some of them Down member it anyways like i said. There's this tense. Hour long way outside the fresno house and afterwards neighbors would say that they heard gunshots however the police claim they they hurt. Didn't hear any all the while. Those nieces that are there for their children lake their panicked that but their names are rubio. Rt's in safina solorio and it's their seven year old boys at they're asking for seven your no. It's going to break. My heart. bay bagged the police to storm the house and get them because they believe the boys were in imminent danger and those pleas were ignored and also because the cops felt like their hands were tied because they did at this point. They didn't have a search warrant and they didn't have any cause to believe that the kids were in danger other than what the mothers were saying which will always believe a mother. Exactly almost have. We not learned anything. If you've learned anything at all listening to this podcast. Listen to the mothers so almost an hour and a half later. Marcus emerged from the house. Has clothes were soaked in blood motherfucker inside. The police would find nine bodies. Mother a horror mother motherfucker stacked on top one on top of the other ranging in ages from one years old. And he live ouch motherfucker. Most of them were under the age of eight. They had a single single gunshot through the i. What and. I'm just going to tell you the victims names One year old jada saint..

Dana fresno Marcus safina solorio dana rubio youtube jada saint
"safina" Discussed on Undesign: A Social Change Podcast

Undesign: A Social Change Podcast

03:51 min | 11 months ago

"safina" Discussed on Undesign: A Social Change Podcast

"You know cancel coach etc cetera as dp consigning and. I think we're leaving dp. Fractured times and technology has a zenith to the point. Where like it's further disenfranchising. People away from each other. And i am myself. I can speak for myself. I don't feel as liberated to share my social media. As i would have to three years ago. I because i i feel like little thing is being scrutinized. The teeth amount where people have lost the ability to be reading truly themselves because people don't think the best of people immediately anymore it's how can attack someone to validate my own experience instead of opening people So in this context. What is the future to me again. It's about it is about sharing my unique experience because no one can criticize me for that I think for me personally. I'm starting to realize the value in in In my community is something that matches is the quality of it by virtue of social media and how it shed on line you can hit scale safina. I personally focused on a small community that will be around with. My kids are aboard People who will be the community of my future invest in our community shed that experience with people around the world and if they want to if they like it and they want to be part of it great if they want to create little similar things in the way that we organize it'll be r. Sees a little get togethers in that house so if they want to represent great like hopefully i've provided away point into how to kind of create this wall that we were also giving But no way. Do i want to live in a world. That's moralizing or criticizing. I'm just wanna live. We'll stop building an idealized positive world for my kids to be born and raised in so Again community sought to home. I can shatter online to hit scale and if advised people great if then also with assuming like a it's still yours. Yeah exactly and it's still yours and it sounds like you know perhaps one good lesson here is to really understand social media as all. Perhaps we need to renegotiate our relationship with social media as instead of one destination but one as a facilitator of experiences of ideas of connections with people right where that's inherent in the would media. It's in the middle of its mediating different influences different parts of society. And what you're saying sounds very much like okay. Well the focus for you ease to use it for its facilitating abilities to facilitate a future for people to step into or to inherit to facilitate ideas of how other people can do something similar in this space. I guess maybe just s some closing remarks. What would you say to people that. Are you know that. Feel like they on the start of a content creators journey. But not you know not just for the the cloud and the the lies but for wanting to do something productive with this space and wanting to use it for a greater purpose. Now that's a great question and a lot of people ask me. This is a hard announced social media platform than it was a long time ago What i would say is that it needs to. It's very difficult to not be swayed by what works online on. What doesn't a lot of people chasing engagement. That message gets lost right. And i think we need to focus on is really owning what your intention is like. Why am i getting into the space rights on your ceiling writer on your wall. Remind yourself every morning..

safina
"safina" Discussed on TT Filmpodcast

TT Filmpodcast

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"safina" Discussed on TT Filmpodcast

"A hoarder also. We'd skunk weed. Yes guinnea tips. On own mantilla via syria so mccain's loss in new s. Fy place mere predeceased nikki mole. Had someone somboon hurry on the dog. Three lengths snowing lawrence vans produceer. Ceo of jello bird that the honda own at some four and babies and the store makes snug beaten up safina babson lost mitten them. Okudah art eggleton them are throw them. Ms tanka barrick decimal at louisiana to visit them. This off does your is raked it. Tight drama suspense ct orthodontic through up. This amount stole the sex off nutriments on their teams long or the span. Monday or they guess. Cure on the year onto morgan for nettie lismore borne so add extent along. Man they had cad in the holy. He'll avirgan in early. Moral organization is loot so held onto another snowing angler fence. Both play nice little tips. That deep south due on the air melissa max. Skiving yoga yoga do often when you see a twenty film so harshly. Absolute part of houses ship header.

Monday Both twenty tanka barrick safina babson Three lengths four Okudah art eggleton louisiana Ms
LSU officials will not testify in person amid Sharon Lewis' legal threats

The Paul Finebaum Show

02:02 min | 1 year ago

LSU officials will not testify in person amid Sharon Lewis' legal threats

"Learned today or yesterday. That the number of lsu officials which we thought would appear in front of this hearing in baton rouge are now not going to. They're going to send statements. There's a lot of litigation going on which could be one reason. Probably a pretty good reason why they're not going to show up glenn. Gilbert has been covering this story from the beginning. We've talked to him about it. A couple of different times glen. Thanks for the time. Great to have you back on the program show. Where are we right now Well i think the next step by this select cynic committee at the state capital. We'll be the subpoena Lsu officials wanted one of the attorneys one of the representatives involved with that committee. told me in this story today that they they're considering subpoenaing hordes. You're on so they'll probably so they're likely to safina some others as that. Committee's work goes on. And there's other hearings in the future after tomorrow. Searing subpoenas will be the next step in. That's that's fine. And i don't know what Coach oh really has to say to this committee can you. Can you explain to maybe some of the audience that is late to the party What this is really all about. Well i think what this is about. Is that a lot of state. Lawmakers a lot of people around lsu and lsu's very much married to the state legislature. they get a lot of money from him That they don't feel like Lsu did enough and then they should have fired. People after the hush blackwell report. They didn't do enough and disciplining people they just suspended to associate associate athletic director for a couple of weeks there already off suspension. They want People fired particularly verge. Ause berry and mary seager and possibly

LSU Baton Rouge Gilbert Glenn Glen Safina Legislature Blackwell Ause Berry Mary Seager
"safina" Discussed on Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"safina" Discussed on Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

"I went to the country to escape the noise and the pinecone zone trees got this sinking fi. Fell wrong was stripped. Does does diesel. South slept in a row and show knock. Shane saw snow in some lick concern. Let's have a crack tacoma. Crap down the caribbean way and the send all day wanna see core crap to come back and shake man this pillow acer in the salad. Aah been fan our into the city now. The trees are gone. Spa thousand days hurricanes in the streets ran some blah shah to combat shannon and..

"safina" Discussed on Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"safina" Discussed on Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

"Thanks again for listening. Scan produced insanity sandwich bc traditional turquoise those stanage song. He's people's if you like this podcast at one help us share more stories about orcas oceans ethics and the environment more often. Please join our pod. Patron dot com. If this podcast doesn't work view. I'm ira glass. And this was disa- merican life. I'd like to thank all of our patriot. Patrons including robert anderson nancy campbell. Darren learning solomon segal the green channel rican checkup movie the green chain and yosef wasco feel free to join this list. Patriots dot com backslash scanner. You can also support us at scana dot org with one. Ten donations there through kofi dot com is also brought to you by or publishing publishers of my three books about wheels for younger readers. Orcas at the sailor sea ambig- wales small world both of which were selected by the canadian children's book centre for their list of twenty twenty s. Best books for kids and teens and orcas everywhere winner of the city. Victoria's children's book prize also for grownups. Check book the killer whale. Changed the world available in print or audio or e-p-o-c-h. If you haven't already please subscribe to the podcast and our newsletter. She don't miss upcoming episode with guest like world renowned traumatologist and author. France wall chewy. Barnes the amazing young director of sea of life and the upcoming documentary. Break relies and you'll want to join us for a behind the scenes. Look at the upcoming real sea museum exhibit orcas our shared future be sure to check out our show notes scanner dot org and our scana magazine on medium follows on social media and show with your friends. Share the show with your cats. You may be able to hear my cat in the background right now. that's freya. She always a lot to say. Heck share it with strangers to share their cats and reviews on your favorite podcasts provider are always appreciated scan is produced by the always awesome rain banou our epoch associate producer audio engineer is isabella thanks to web wizard. Katie brown social media maven lists flick bellas and are behind the scenes team including nave. Mulligan and brian murphy scant esteem. scanner is by leah. abramson. Since carl safina's becoming wild animal cultures raise families create beauty and chief. Peace is about wales champs and macaws. We thought we'd end of this episode with a song by ontario's danny michelle feather for and fin..

robert anderson Katie brown danny michelle kofi dot com France wall chewy brian murphy Ten donations nancy campbell Scan leah. abramson carl safina twenty twenty s. Barnes wales Patriots dot com canadian both scana dot org dot com ambig- wales
"safina" Discussed on Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

06:16 min | 1 year ago

"safina" Discussed on Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

"The legal right not to be driven extinct and and we will take measures to make sure. The law requires taking measures to make sure that they don't go extinct but the main problem with the endangered species act other than that. A lot of people find it too inconvenient. The main legal problem with the with the the structure of that law is that it sets a floor and the floor zero zero. Anything above zero is basically okay and that is a guarantee that you will be losing species. the clean water act for instance sets an aspirational goal. It says that all waters of the united states must be swim. -able and fish bowl it doesn't say As long as you don't get burned by acid by dipping your foot in the water as as you don't die when you go swimming or you know or or get sick after you go swimming. It's okay doesn't say that it. It says swim -able and fisher-boel it had it aspires to health and vitality the endangered species act does not aspire to health and vitality. It aspires basically to the bare. Minimum species can continue to bump along and still exist headed animals. Become your thing had had become your world I don't know. I always loved animals. That's the that's the quickest easiest. Truest answer i can give you i had. I had some very good experiences with animals early on in my childhood in that kind of thing but i think lot of a lot of children do and not everybody decides that they want to be involved with them for the rest of their life professionally and and every day but for some reason I did i desperately did and Luckily much to my amazement it managed to happen. Was there a book or a movie or anything that ever inspired you yeah But i think the basis of what inspired me was just seeing animals. Father's hobby was breeding canaries. I raised pigeons from the time. I was seven years old. We went to the zoo. We went to the aquarium. We went to the museum of natural history in new york city where all the animals are dead and stuffed but in those dioramas made me as a city. Kid glimpse what the the habitats of the world were like and the animals of the world were like. I just found them to be l. Literally totally amazing You know and. I had some other experiences with animals at the zoo who were interactive and responsive to me and an atom. Most i had my pigeons had rabbits and things like that. They used to be a show on television with people tagging animals. But there will now. There's a lot of things like that. But at the time when i was a kid there was one show like that. I watched every sunday night. mutual of omaha as wild kingdom. Many people remember that always with a smile on tali. Remember that wants to watch going. He's sending stand up to die again. and i. i wanted to be like those guys and i. I was pretty desperately sure that i would never be able to be anything like those guys. Because i didn't. I didn't know how anybody got into anything like that. And i didn't know anybody who did anything remotely close to it and then in high school somebody. Anyone highschool somehow found out about a guy who banded birds and that was the first little brush. I had with doing anything. Light research on wild animals. And i sort of from there with a lot of lot of blundering and a lot of accidents look can talk about the safina center and y. You're up to that and how that happened. So that's my little not for profit group. That is to what we call. advancing the case for life on earth. We were a bunch of people who are science oriented people. but everything we do is done creatively. So we're trying not to just inform people to respect people's emotions and let them understand things. What is at stake in these things that we care about and that works should sounds like you have animals in the background. They're trying to visit your email. It will in the room right now. There are three dogs and our rescued mum. Cherokee here there was a beautiful. There's a beautiful quote that you've got on the webpage for the safina center. Facts alone can't save the world hearts can hearts must were working to make sure the hearts do. Can you please talk just a little bit about the philosophy behind that. Because so with you on that well i think you know we see more and more that there's a lot of information out there and people are very able to ignore information and they act on emotions so with we need to find a way for our information to affect people emotionally and for them to care about what is at stake you. Can you can tell people. A fact like elephants may go extinct and one person will say that's terrible. We have to make sure that never happens in another person could respond to the exact same fact by saying so what i don't i don't rely on elephants or any part of my life. Elephants don't live in the whole western hemisphere. It's clear that people don't.

three dogs Cherokee clean water act one show earth new york city one person first little brush seven years old zero mutual endangered species sunday night western hemisphere omaha safina center united states people center lot
"safina" Discussed on Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"safina" Discussed on Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

"What they learn culturally. Wow can you please just explain that a little further because that's fascinating well if you meet a complete stranger but human culture has a lot of a lot of cultural groups within cultural groups. So let's say you meet a total stranger and they don't speak your language will right away you know. They're not part of a group that you belong to a or at least at least the main group you belong to your your language group They may be wearing red sox hat and you may be a cubs fan ill. You'll know that they're not a group that you belong to. They may be wearing a religious. Insignia that that signifies that they are from the group your in or or a different religion and the main thing that culture seems to do well. Culture answers the question. How do we live here. That's the main thing that culture does it lets it. Let's individuals understand how they live in their groups. So if you're If you're a member of any of the cultural groups. I mentioned a religious group. A language group You know even fans of a certain kind of sport or art form you understand how you do things and you know that the others in that group will understand you and that allows you to cooperate and be together if if you do things very differently you won't be able to cooperate if you If you don't speak the same language or if you go into a religious group that's not your own you will understand the service that you are in so With other animals it's things like what do we eat where we eat it. How do we find food. What what food What it requires to eat food where whereas the water where the predators what's dangerous. How do we meet and greet subordinate or dominant individuals. How do we show proper respect. Or assert dominance. What what do we do. That's a that's what they learn. Some of them have dialects different different ways of using their calls and they learn that as well where they learn a very very simple vocabulary of a few few nouns or a few very short phrases that alert to particular kinds of predators with a predator in the air or predator on the ground and those kinds of things and because it answers the question. How do we live here. It makes individuals culture makes individuals come together in cultural groups and then it makes cultural avoid each other or become hostile to each other just sort of instinctively hostile to one another. They don't do things the way you do it. And it makes you uncomfortable and so you want to avoid or in some cases. Repel them You you do a lot with orcas so you know. Orcas are among the most cultural of all non humans and cultural implications of orcas are that the the mammal eaters fishy eaters and the shark eaters. Avoid each other completely. They don't They don't ever mangle. They don't ever socialize and the long term effects of that is that it allows them to specialize in how they do things. If you hunt fish you hunt fish very differently than if you hunt mammals with fish you want to be a big noisy group. Carol the fish together mammals you have to be in a very small very quiet group because mammals could hear you coming and then they could flee they. Don't you know live in big schools so humans unfortunately We think of culture as things like you know the arts or fashion or music and and we think of the the products of culture without ever asking what is culture and why do you have capacity for culture. And what are the implications of that and one of the big implications of that is as i'm saying it makes individuals come together in to cultural groups but then it makes cultural groups. Avoid or repel each other and and this sort of instinctive very basic very Animal thing that that is the reason we have. Culture is the basis of most of the cultural problems that we have now and why people can't simply accept other cultures live and let live get along together. Ignore people that don't do things your way. Wyatt is that we have these constant problems constantly causing friction frequently turning violent that we learn generation after generation to perpetuate and that learning is cultural as the song. Says you have to be taught to hate and fear but once you're taught who is in your group. It's unfortunately kind of instinctive to mistrust and feel hostile to those that are outside your group certain sperm whale cultures interact. Well as i say that they identify what clan therein and if if the other families are in the same clan they will mix and mingle and socialize. And if they're not in clan they will turn away from each other and not mix. Can you talk a little bit. You just raised dialects. And i'm always fascinated by the distinction between dialects and languages. And do you feel sperm. Whales have a language with their quotas with their cliques. Well with all these things. It's very important. I define what you mean by that word. Because words are labels we slap on different concepts in some some words mean very different things you know. They have a variety of meanings languages usually a system of communication that has grammar and syntax. If they're you know different things are different hearts of speech and the positioning of words can change their meaning in a sentence. There doesn't seem to be language which humans have language. clearly it doesn't seem to be language among other other animals but I would say that we don't understand a lot. About the communication systems of dolphins dolphins include some orcas and all things we think of his dolphins. They seem to be able to get some very detailed information across to one another in ways. We don't understand. there might be a modality. We haven't detected yet just like we didn't know about sonar until about the nineteen.

Wyatt Carol one sonar few nouns Insignia each nineteen about
"safina" Discussed on Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

08:16 min | 1 year ago

"safina" Discussed on Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

"So how are you where are you. I'm on long island new york. I'm very well right now. we we're doing okay here. Despite the pandemic all of our travels for the year of course have been cancelled. And we're doing lots of things remotely and virtually but we're okay with that right now. We've managed to stay healthy and We we're managing to work. If you write. Staying home is not necessarily a bad thing. Luckily i was at the end of a book project that required a lot of traveling but i had already done all the traveling. And and in fact all the writing when everything started to close down and Oddly enough ironically being home allowed me to spend a lot more time observing. An orphan screech owl that we had raised. That was living around. Our house decided to stick around much to my great surprise and acquired a wild made and raised three young right in our backyard and that is the subject of the book that right now so after writing a book that required traveling to three continents. I'm writing a book that required staying home. Wow on screech. Owl sounds amazing. It is amazing. Yeah your lovely really wonderful little thing a little bit of magic around the yard did you have you given the name. Her name is alfie. Which is short for alfalfa. Because she's a little rascal now sell. When i found out that you were game to be interviewed. I reached out to lori marino. Who's been a huge help with my stuff. And what am i. What kind of aeko heroes. And she said. Carl is one of those rare conservationists who actually understands these are all individuals with nyons. Well there's a lot of truth to that. I think there are. I think there are more and more people in the united. I think I think a lot of people who study free living animals understand that they make decisions that they have at least short term plans. They have emotions all of these. Things are very basic and very old. Things is no reason to believe that they suddenly all appeared in humans and have no history. That would make no sense. That would be that would be like thinking that are skeletons. Came from nowhere in our organs came from nowhere to our mind in emotion comes from somewhere also and you can see it in quite a few other animals so the you know these to me are very obvious things. I think too many people. They're very obvious things. But i think people are very confused about them. You know we there are a lot of people would say well. I don't even know if other animals feel pain. And yet we test cosmetics on the eyes of rabbits because if they sting the rabbits sting us so You know as i say we. We seem to have a lot of a lot of confused thinking and confused feelings about lettuce and One of the reasons that i think were confused about. The obvious is that the obvious gets in the way of Our favorite story which is we are completely unique. There's nothing like us and we're the only things that matter and going along with being the only things that matter is that we can do anything we want to any other living thing without worrying too much about it and if we do recognize that they can have experiences can can experience something ranging from a sense of wellbeing too sensitive misery than it makes a lot of the way the human species conducts. It's it's a life in time here makes that are inconvenient if you actually stop to worry about the implications of everything we do now. Thanks for that. I'd wanted to talk to you forever. Then i read becoming wild like then. Becoming wild came out and i didn't want to talk to me anymore. Oh no then. I had been. I had to talk to you. But i had to talk about sperm whales. Ah okay can you please tell i i've done so much work around orcas and read about sperm. Whales like that was just a joy. You please talk about how you decided to dive into the world of sperm whales. Well the book becoming wild is about cultures in other animals and there is a there are a lot of other animals that culture what is culture before we can even talk about having culture up to understand what we mean by. That culture is the behaviors and the traditions in the habits and the practices and even the attractions that flow socially they don't come purely instinctively you learn them from a social group so there There's a subset of other animals. That have that kind of culture that live in social groups. Were what you learn. Socially is extremely important to how you live and of that subset. There's a smaller subset. That are well studied and sperm. Whales are one of the ones that have culture. it's well studied and it's also a very amazing has the has the the The very fortunate side aspect of the fact that. It's quite amazing so sperm. Whales live in social groups. That are a lot like african elephants. They live in female lead families the female stay with their family of their birth. In other words they stay with their mother until the mother passes on Than they than they stay with their sisters eventually enough. They live long enough. They will be the oldest individual the oldest mother in that group and the males stay until about adolescence. And then they leave. They have a different kind of social life sperm. Whales live in a layered society where families belong to clans and clans. All the families within a clan can socialize and will socialize but they will avoid other clans. they won't socialize with families of other clans day. Unlike the orcas that you're very familiar with which make a lot of different kinds of sounds. In addition to sonar clicks sperm. Whales only seemed to make clicks. They use some of them for sonar and then they use others kind of like very simple morse code for identification and through the identification clicks. Other whales can tell while they announced basically here. I am this particular individual. I'm a member of this particular family and we are a member of this particular clan. That's pretty surprising. And it took people a lot of years to figure that out and there are only two animals in the world who are currently known to be able to tell when meeting a complete stranger. Somebody they've never seen before weather. That stranger is part of a group that they belong to or not and those two animals are sperm whales and human beings. So that's another really amazing aspect of house sperm. Whales conduct their lives and their and their cultural.

lori marino Carl alfie One long island united one alfalfa two animals three continents three young new york african years people reasons ones lot
"safina" Discussed on Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"safina" Discussed on Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

"Thanks again for making scana. Part of your surreal. Year scan is produced insanity traditional territories of the savage sung in this climate people. If you like the podcast at one help shared more stories but orcas oceans ethics and the environment more often. Please join scanners pod at patriot dot com slash scan. It you can find a side of the google if this podcast doesn't work for you. I'm the grinch actually today. this doesn't work. You're the grinch also electric. Thank all of our patriotism patrons for this episode. These are the people of help. Make this happen all year. Long including erica l. klaus rebecca jenkins shantelle strand. Neil murphy jim murphy. Sandy murphy alison. Vm brian murphy. You go murphy's katie brown. Dr joshua black sean ram glendon mcfarland sign mcnair. Naomi dine david bloom. Joseph plan to make sure you check out plant online. It's a wonderful gas. Riley jan cadeau. Tony was trevor strong from the arrogant worms. Dying while peter harvey erica vest and rob robert anderson nancy campbell. Darren learn young. The green channel solomon segal joan waters yosef and last and very much most my mom caroline feel free to join this list at patriot dot com slash scanner. You can also support us at scanner dot org with one time donations through kofi dot com scanners also brought to you by orca publishing publisher of my three new books about whales for younger readers. Orcas of the sailors see. That's a beautiful picture. Book sharing images of some of the amazing southern residents especially one of my heroes. Onyx big whale small world. That's a book for babies also known as a board book which needs it is one hundred percent shula bowl and orcas everywhere with just one the city of victorious children's book prize. Thank you said victoria as you all know. We really just exist because of all of you. So thank you so much for making time for this year. If you haven't already please subscribe to the podcast and newsletter. See don't miss upcoming episode with guest world renowned primatology france wall. He's the author of mama's last. Hog carl safina author of becoming wild animal cultures. Raise families beauty and achieve peace. This is one of the most amazing books in one of the most. Well reviewed books. Twenty twenty julia barnes. She's the director of sea of life and the upcoming documentary. Bright green lies. That's going to be making a lot of noise in march and you'll hear all about it. Our march episode. Also you can join us for behind the scenes. Look at the royal museums exhibit orcas. Our shared future now also be sure to check out our show nuts at scana or we've got awesome show notes and our scana magazine on medium where we offer some reason. Oliver episodes all of us on social media. All of the places and share this show with your friends. Hey this with everyone. Scanners produce the always awesome rain. Banou our epic associate producer audio engineer. It's isabella on mushy thanks to web. Wizard katie brown and social media maven. Liz flick bellas. We've had all sorts of help behind the scenes for maeve milligan amp. brian murphy. Like i was saying you go. Murphy's scanner is by abramson since you've been hearing pitch for patriot sponsorship. You probably want to know what we spend our vast podcasting millions on one things we do is each year. We buy a license from the canadian music organization so can to make sure that when we play music the people who make that music get paid for it. That's why we feature canadian music. Normally we go with newer artists. But this is new year's and it is hard to get more new years or more canadian than this old lang. Zion you've been hearing that throughout this episode and this is pretty much the ultimate canadian classic tune because even though all things i not so canadian group that made it famous the group that made this song. Me new year's guy lombardo and the royal canadians. So that's what you've been hearing throughout this episode. Thank you so much for joining us this year and listening to scanner. It is an honor to be able to interview so many amazing people and to share these interviews with you and all of us here at scana want to thank you for listening for subscribing for sharing and for carrying from all of us to all of you farewell twenty twenty and all of us at scana would like to wish you a very new new year..

scana erica l klaus rebecca jenkins Neil murphy Sandy murphy alison Dr joshua black sean ram glend Naomi dine katie brown Riley jan cadeau peter harvey erica vest rob robert anderson nancy campbell segal joan brian murphy david bloom jim murphy carl safina julia barnes mcnair yosef
"safina" Discussed on Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

06:06 min | 1 year ago

"safina" Discussed on Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

"It and happy new year. I'm mark beck austin. I live in boulder colorado and my vision of the world would be a place where all beings non human and human could live in harmony with one another show compassion to one another and the peaceful with one another and a lot of people right that office being an effective living in boulder colorado. But but that really is my vision. And i think it would be a better world i mean i know it would be better world and i think it's possible down the line but there's still a lot of work to do. Which is why we all do the work that we do. But i just really think of world where you just have no. It's just peaceful. I mean people are gonna disagree and they're going to disagree with how they handled issues that arise with non human animals but there's gotta be peaceful solutions and i'm really a fan of compassionate conservation in which the life very individual matters and all the stakeholders cow so i'm not discounting humans. I actually like humans. A lot of people who worked for non human animals don't like humans like humans. And and i am for me it. It's just totally impractical to say. I love animals. Non human animals. But i don't like human animals so let's get the world going because it isn't gonna work. I my name is liz flick bounce. I'm an assistant for and rain. And i'm responsible for scan social media in twenty twenty four to slow down and examined the impact of our actions and a lot of good has come from that. We've along to go. But i think twenty twenty one that started the new normal when have consideration on vacation and newfound found e for everyone else in precarious situation chair. Happy new year dear listeners. We're all in this together. Hi i'm julia. Barnes director of seattle life and bright green lies. And here's my wish for twenty twenty one. I wish for dance to come down for a moratorium. On industrial fishing and logging rapid deindustrialization of society and environmental movement. That's in touch with reality and treats the problem as serious as it is happy new year. Hi my name's maeve video editing and Research for scana and my wish for the new year is that we can continue to be safe and social and look for each other in the new year. I'm carl safina and author and my vision of the world is of beautiful living planet. Where every living thing has the room it's supposed to have and all the populations of all living things that are here with us now which come from more than a billion years of evolution. Everything that's alive. Now is the survivor of an unbroken chain. That stretches back. A billion years has enough room and viability to continue on into the future. Like it's supposed to and people. Human beings can live in dignity and peace. Which implies. I'm afraid that i also think that we are too much of a good thing. There are probably about ten times as many people on the planet as there would need to be to have the kind of place that i envisioned would room and dignity for all living things. Hi my name. Is brian murphy. And i live in baltimore maryland. I'm a volunteer researcher. Scholar dime excited for twenty twenty one. I recognize the challenges of our current circumstances. But when i stop and truly account for the reasons to be hopeful i find them everywhere i look hope in a new us president that will rejoin the paris climate agreement. Hope green new deal that will reduce our impact on the environment and hope and humanity that we will embrace our responsibility for planet each other and the other beings on this earth including the orcas. Hello everyone i'm robbie bones and i'm the thirteen year. Old founder of kids pay for parks. My wish for the orcas in twenty twenty one is that all the scana listeners will strive to reduce their single use plastic usage for the protection of the orcas..

mark beck austin boulder liz flick colorado carl safina Barnes julia seattle brian murphy baltimore maryland paris robbie us
How to Unlearn Diet Culture's Rules with April Quioh of She's All Fat

Food Psych

04:06 min | 1 year ago

How to Unlearn Diet Culture's Rules with April Quioh of She's All Fat

"Go talk to April Quiapo. So tell me about your relationship with food growing up my relationship with food. What did you see? Well, I grew up in a matriarchal household like I was raised with my single mom, my two older sisters and my grandma, and so it was just like all ladies and they are all immigrants except for me I was the first person to be born in America in Minnesota, actually in the rest of our board in Liberia and the became immigrants so it was. Like a clash of cultures, types, of thing like the Liberian ideal standard of beauty is different than the American one like more curvy figure is kind of the norm. If you will back there whereas in America at least growing up in the nineties and early thousands I felt very much like I should look like Nicole richer whatever her. So so it was like being curvy trumpy or whatever was accepted to a certain degree, and I was always like fat growing up like not. Curvy but like fat. So we always were on diets together like I think it was just kind of this household were was totally normal to be like we're going on. Atkins this week we're going on weight watchers is speaking it was just like it's almost like a bonding thing like what we did together and then I didn't realize until growing up that it was like, oh, we all just like participating diet culture like as a family basically which I mean yeah, it was. Just kind of something that was super accepted in my family. So it's like in Liberia culture food is super important. It's like how people von how people grieve just like in a lot of cultures, but it was also like vanity is very important. So like we made out this delicious food, but like don't eat too much of it. Otherwise, my grandma will decided be like your fat she was just very she's very upfront lady like that, and that's totally lake the culture is. Different. Ladies assigning, hit your fat like if you ever want to get married maybe maybe not. So that's kind of how I grew up. I was always like naturally you know pretty pretty a Chubby kid and was always remembered I going on a diet when I was maybe six like very young. that. Went on until I. got to college and I was like, Oh, I'm done. I'm over it. So that was that was growing up what a dieting do to your relationship with food and your body did you have feelings about it or it's hard to like this is just how it is. I, mean I had a lot a lot of feelings about it Safina on our podcast. US L. fat talk about a lot like growing up dieting nonstop makes it impossible to know once you break out of that like what you want like today the thing I still struggle with like am hungry and my just eating like I don't even when you diet you read a book and it tells you like, okay, you eat this much foods do this and so you break out. Of It, it's hard to tell like, am I hungry? What do I really want? What is my body want from me like to be nourished? It's like that relationship between your body and you is broken because it's like I ignored what it needed or wanted for so many years. So I think that is the biggest thing that's been damaging like the whole concept of intuitive eating like. Wow sounds so great. I'm not there yet I still am not clear on how to do it because like dieting disea- exact opposite breaking free of that like it's GonNa take a really long time and so I think that that would to me has been the most clear direct result of grabbed away did but yeah I mean I was like I was tortured by my buddy growing up. Everybody in my family is plus is and I am also plus is including my body is like naturally made to be like everyone in my family is but I'm constantly fighting against it and it just felt fruitless inches felt like this project that Ozzy felt like a waste of my time was a real kid and I'm like man, I, wish I could beat the library and instead my mom's like forcing to join a basketball team or whatever. But I know choose choose just she's just trying her best in like also also was very lazy. So she's like please please just get off the couch. No but it just felt you know it was just this kind of like tortured relationship wherever I wish this wasn't that much of I, wish I didn't have to spend so much you by energy thinking about this and it didn't even wear I mean diets don't work. We all know the never worked. So. Yeah that.

Liberia Atkins Safina America Nicole Richer Minnesota Basketball Ozzy
"safina" Discussed on The Documentary Life

The Documentary Life

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"safina" Discussed on The Documentary Life

"So why am I sharing this with you today? Because for at least the past several weeks, my decision to make a film outside of my own ethnicity has been at the forefront of my mind both night and day. When I think of that screening experience now I feel I must challenge myself to look at it through another Lens. Even though I know how I felt in what I witnessed from others, the question has now become. Did a white filmmaker have the right to make this film or was it not his place to tell the story? Is it my place to be making my film should I? We only be making films that tell stories of. Of our own races been proposed by some the discussions we've been experiencing in the documentary community as of late has I think prompted all of us to have questions and conversations with ourselves and our filmmaking communities, and for the most part, those conversations have been much needed. Progressively intended the generation of conversation on race, diversity and equality in filmmaking have sparked important dialogue on aspects of filmmaking opportunity. That should be an need to be addressed. There has been a lot of discussion on race. And how narratives have been told are being told and how to better tell them in the future. At the time of the producing of this episode there have been online panels put on by both the. D. Word and DOC NYC that have moved the conversation forward larger figures in the community like Stanley Nelson or Don. Porter have hosted some of these panels or written up Ed's in prominent newspapers on the subject Matthew Heineman, a white filmmaker most notably known for the academy. Award nominated documentary feature cartel land recently came under fire on his facebook page in a very public fashion when he was promoting his newest documentary about tiger, woods. Now is time for all of us to be having open and honest conversations about race in our communities, and not least our own filmmaking communities, which is why we set out to this kind of discussion on td. L. And we did this with two known documentary film-makers margin. Safina and Grace Lee both women of color who collaborated on the two part documentary series and she could be next, which recently streamed on PBS..

Safina facebook Matthew Heineman DOC NYC Stanley Nelson Grace Lee Porter Ed
"safina" Discussed on Dental Leaders Podcast

Dental Leaders Podcast

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"safina" Discussed on Dental Leaders Podcast

"Last. There is a team central tape. There's a localized team, says regional teams in this, as so, it's more regional so I think that's that's quite import with the size of these clinics in the difference in the clinics and the way they run completely different can't do everything once is definitely doesn't feel and patient. Air is a different patient needs of different demographics different, and all effects serves provide, so it's very important. Not to to centralize either in our service and I think and the other thing is I. Do have a law flexibility in the service, and I love like I said problem solving, which is why what happened happened, and how we responded to read was because of off flexibility in problem, solving and the ability to adapt and change and. Think on, I'll say. Safina Safina what's The big vision. You've gone from zero to hero in three years. What's the next three five years going to look like what was? That was the big vision that you've got? This. This is saying like I'm not someone who sits there and does is winded business and I. Constantly have people like account stuff tiny I. Know You need to plan this out? And I think one of my successes, the fact that not too rigid on how to do things and I do go with the flow because that flexibility, and that has allowed me to respond to situations, qualify had all my money tied into one thing I wouldn't be able to be flexible is king, but what one thing is really important to me is having. Not all my eggs in one basket, trying to spread again the business and having. Different kind of security, and you know I am trying to be very, and this varies I try to be logical and sensible.

Safina Safina
"safina" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

Rewilding Earth

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"safina" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

"Org. Well we were mostly SCIENC- people were not all scientists by training. But we're mostly SCIENC- people were interested in conveying things that are true facts about nature but not. We're not about information. We're about the information and an emotional connection to wildness to wild animals. To what nature means in our lives. What nature means out of our lives? What it means on its own terms are workers to is to make creative products things you can hold or share like books photos films. Sound are paintings we all these are the kinds of things said the people at the Safina Center. This is what they're doing their creative people who are trying to connect US emotionally to the natural world. I was just talking about this kind of thing with a guest just yesterday we were talking about. It's one thing to be science as you say and then just you know spill information out there that it seems to me. Because I'm I lean toward that. I've been reading the science. He stuff and trying to translate that to other people who are not so SCIENC- for quite a long time and I I read it and I get it Other people look at that as not just indecipherable. Sometimes but even a little preachy which is weird. Because it's not. It's just information it's just data. We've been spitting out data for quite a long time and we're still where we are. I mean we find ourselves here today. So obviously there's a problem with that and we talked about yesterday are and music and storytelling and things are so important. It seems that that's really a core fundamental part of what the Safina centers all about. Is there anything you can share with us about? An example of how some of this stuff works that. The things that we produce are often. They often become bestselling books or they win awards we we've won some of the highest kinds of awards. You can win. We have a string of bestselling books out so that approach does reach a lot of people and I know that people not infrequently will write to me and say that something that we've put out has changed their life or made them. WanNa change the major that they are studying in college or or do something different in Grad school or as affected how they view things at work. We do touch a lot of people and I. I know that if we simply put the information out there in the form of reports it would not touch a lot of people people filter information through their values. You have to speak to people at the level of their values in order to have a conversation. Engage them I as a science person. I find information alone convincing. I look for information. I find information persuasive and interesting. Most people don't act that way and any system delivers on its values. It does not deliver on information delivers on its values by paying a lot of attention to the values and the emotional content that we use as the conduit for the information. We're trying to come across. I think is often more successful for more people. I think that helps us to those of us who in the movement and it's a very big chunk of our listeners. Here On this podcast. In some way or another executive directors activists organizers We also really cherish people like you who help even though we we can read information and and have the same reaction to it in in value of it that you that you just described but it sure is nice to read stories and it and it sure is fulfilling and it. Kinda keeps US going. I know this for a fact So thank you for all that you do. And for having an organization that helps to put more of that out into the world in a really big way Because it's not just the people we need to convince. That's a really big deal and it's a big job that must be done but it is also taking care of the What I guess I would call the essential workers of the conservation movement. The people who You know have really dedicated their lives to this. So thank you for them from them. I'm sure they would all say. Yeah thank you very much. That's very kind and I really appreciate that. Somebody's listening to.

Safina Center Grad school executive
"safina" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

Rewilding Earth

13:11 min | 2 years ago

"safina" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

"Don't hit snooze. Can you talk a little bit about that? In recent years we've had an accelerating series of epidemics that have erupted through our broken relationship with the rest of life on earth people going farther and deeper into wild areas eating animals that they used to not eat it killing lots of monkeys and even even eating apes farming wild animals that don't normally exist in the same place in having them all up against each other. These all of this stuff is just a series of giant test tubes for viruses that don't normally inhabit humans to have constant contact with humans. So that when there's some change or some evolution they they can begin to start infecting humans and some of them are exceptionally dangerous. An and quite lethal Like for instance. There's a thing called Simian. Immunodeficiency virus that infects apes and monkeys. It doesn't make him sick at all. It doesn't give them any immunodeficiency disease but the slight twist on that that became human immunodeficiency virus virus causes the disease AIDS which Until for several decades until the most recent drugs AIDS was a total death sentence. Everybody who got it dive it. It wasn't that easy to transmit unietd intimate contact with people but there have been others where it's a lot to transmit the one we have right now is very easy to transmit. Luckily it's not that lethal it only kills about two percent of the people two or three percent of the people it infects but two or three percent for something that's very easy to catch is millions of dead people and that's why we have the total upset of You know everything that we do. Our our ability to be social are our jobs. Our businesses commerce art. Everything is being completely upset by the fact that this particular epidemic reached pandemic proportions. Luckily some of the others which were much more lethal like Ebola or Marburg Or even Swine flu or SARS. They weren't as they were more deadly but they weren't as easy to transmit and three quarters of the new diseases that are infectious. Come directly out of a new contact with wild animals or with or with these. Really intensifying farming techniques is factory industrial farming techniques. We're just creating these tremendous virus laboratories where the viruses are finding ways to infect human beings and their every every person who studies viral diseases. Says that there will be more of these coming because not only are we not eliminating the root causes of them but we are intensifying the causes of them and a lot of that has to do with the tremendous mistreatment of the natural world. And of and of other species. Whether they're wild or farmed. I'll likely do you think it is that one day in this giant test tube experiment. That's being run on the planet that the ease of transmission of something like coverted and something like the Marburg virus which has a kill rate of twenty five to eighty percent. I mean is that also in the cards somewhere in our future. If we don't change well yeah. We're just playing a roulette game with that. It's only a matter of luck that this this most recent pandemic is not very lethal but I think all of us now have friends. I'm trying to think all of us now probably have friends who have family or family members or friends family members who have died from covet. And that's A. That's a lethal volley three percent but if we had something that was killing one out of every five I mean it would be like the black plague it would be hitting every household than you'd have to stay inside for unforeseeable amounts of time. I don't know maybe maybe a couple of years knows that the fact that we have one which we're sort of muddling through a and the that it it is not very lethal is is just. It's just luck that it that it isn't killing a much. Higher percentage of people that it's killing the next the next one that becomes a pandemic. I mean imagine. If Ebola became pandemic buffalo is killing something like you know eighty percent of the people infected in some of the places it it had broken out. We can't really afford to fool around with this and we are very much fooling around with it. Because our relationship with the rest of the world is broken there have been epidemics and pandemics for many centuries but but the rate is accelerating because penetration of the rest of the world is accelerating and our connectedness around. The world is near Total. Do you think there's a difference between choosing to do something about this? To protect ourselves our species humanity and choosing to do it. Because it's the right thing to do for the way that we're treating in a way that these things originate in the way that we treat other species on this planet well clearly. It makes a difference because people don't seem to care enough that they exist in miserable conditions. I mean no matter no matter why you want to get the job done. The job either will get done or we will have more pandemics likely more deadly ones. I have this theory that there was some place some clearly. We're supposed to get as a species that was going to tell us that we belong here that we are from here that we are all connected and and a lot of people know those kinds of sayings and and and have heard those things before. But we've certainly carry on as if we've never heard those things before and we've never had that feeling on a hiking trip a river trip or It's more of a a user situation. Humans used this planet rather than feeling as if they belong here and given that there's so much lip-service has been paid to that and a lot of people love to put that on social media. Sounds Great. Do you think that something like this? What we're going through now is going to have a material. Make a material difference in in certain things going forward. What are you hoping for in this point of reflection? That humanity's forced to find itself in. Well what I'm hoping for him. What I think will happen are unfortunately two different things of a lot of people I know anyway. Have the luxury of being able to reflect. On the fact that we're throttling down were slowing down. We're spending more time at home. And there are good things about that Luckily any many of the people who are feeling that way are not the people who are who have lost their entire income. Very suddenly there are a lot of people like that. I know a lot of people like that. I wonder if they have the luxury of seeing any silver linings but those are the silver linings that I see that spending more time at home and not flying all over the place There there are. They're good they're instructive things about that. It would be nice if we got out of this this disease situation and took some of the nicer things About the fact that we we don't have to be running all over the place and driving everywhere constantly in flying everywhere constantly that we can get along quite nicely at a lower speed and lower intensity and trade trade that intensity for more beauty and more attention being with loved ones and family members. More of the time the those those would be good. But we're in a big system that at at the moment I mean it's only. It's only stopped working for a few weeks. It's nowhere near you know. Losing its ability to fire itself right up again and I think probably what will happen is it will fire itself right up again and people who are desperate for any kind of work will probably take any kind of work that they that they can get. So I I don't. I don't expect that there will be major changes that come out of this if we come out of it kind of soon if it if it becomes a situation where there are chronic flare ups in lots of lots of lockdowns or we sputter along Try to get back to normal. You have to go back into hiding. I don't know what will happen. I mean one of the one of the things about this whole situation that generates the most anxiety is that literally. Nobody knows what is going to happen. Or what about the core issue I have? I have a little more hope about the wet market situation but then I see these differing reports where China it sounds like in one report is definitely doing something about it. Shutting Down Wet markets. Then I find out we have a tunnel wet markets here in the United States and I didn't even know really that much about what a wet market was until certainly not as much as I do now until this but it seems like that at least is the most obvious thing that we could stop doing. I would hope so I. This is term. Wet Market is so ridiculous. I don't have any idea where that term came from. I don't either. It just sounds gross to me. Now they're live at their live. Animal markets were animals are killed and handed to the customer. I've been in places like that and it's it's a matter of scale you haven't placed like China with over a billion people in this being a very common way that people get food. We're talking about a tremendous number of animals in a tremendous number of places. We're not talking about a few live chicken markets in in Brooklyn New York or something like that. Not that those are great places not that I can down. Those chickens are living a short miserable life in those places. But that's not where these diseases are being generated. It's it's it's what's happening at a larger scale and for a variety of reasons. It would be good to not have any of those markets for variety of reasons. It would be good to not eat any farm to animals it would. It would also be good to not be eating a lots of wild animals out of these forests that were destroying so and the factory farms that are you know unfortunately the more normal situation in our country the United States and many other countries they have had their share of New Diseases. Coming out of there as well like Bird flu swine flu SARS. They have not come out of wild animal markets. They've come out of factory farming situations. Look at the result right now. The the entire human race is basically a halt because people wanted to eat some wild animals in China. That's that's not a good enough reason to shut down the entire human race. You people didn't have to do what they did. That caused these problems and these problems were predicted. Books have been written warning against them. The the other outbreaks that were stamped out that they're stamped out. After they killed a bunch of people were fair warning. This is another major warning and we don't seem to be very good about heating warnings but hopefully this one is going to be the one that does make change some things. Tell me a little bit about the Safina Center and What people should pay the most attention to when they get their when their? Check you out at Safina Center Dot.

China Immunodeficiency United States Marburg AIDS Safina Center Dot Ebola Safina Center epidemic Brooklyn New York
"safina" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

Rewilding Earth

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"safina" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

"Music you're listening to the wilding. Earth podcast immune The rewinding Earth podcast Supported by businesses such as Patagonia Tula and bio habitats as well as the Weeden Foundation and listeners..

The Promise and Forgotten Journey by Silvina Ocampo

Bookworm

09:57 min | 2 years ago

The Promise and Forgotten Journey by Silvina Ocampo

"Of the joys on the path of a reader is seeing a name that you see for years and years. Who is this person as we know today? This person who we hear of and don't know is likely to be a woman who's been neglected. This woman Safina. Oh compo was considered to be one of the great unknowns of South American Literature. She worked with or who we spore his when he was putting together his collection of fantastic literature working on that anthology as well was her husband. Cassavetes who wrote a book that Voorhis praised very highly the invention of Morrell. I read born face and Casado race as a young man but until recently I had never read much to my discredit savina Ocampo. Now I can say in my defense. The two of her books a novel and a book of Stories have just been translated and published by city. Lights press many people know city. Lights Bookstore do you also know that froing getty has oppress attached to that bookstore? Yes there is a press and they have published Safina Compost Forgotten Journey which is a book of short stories. But if I am not giving away too much the forgotten journey is the journey out of the womb into the world. This is a journey. None of US succeed in remembering completely. He did not remember it or face. He saw that. Silvino aqap ball had the gift he said of clairvoyance and so now. We have to thrilling books. Forgotten Journey a book of her short stories and I mean the longest is six pages and then a novel called the promise and we say an awful because it is probably the longest thing she wrote. But it's fairly a hundred pages. I have three translators here who have been working on Silvino compo and they are just some of the translators who are working on Silvino Compo. Because she's about to be the discovery that we have all been waiting for. It's very exciting. And one of these translators is the marvelous Suzanne Joe Levin who goes by the name June. Wien many of you will know as soon as I tell you that. She has translated. Cabrera Infanta. Julio Cortazar Carlos Fuentes Man will tweak Severo Saad we hand Buick Assad Race. And she's translated a great deal of poetry more than forty book on translations she is the dean of Spanish South American literature and translation with her are to people who've been her students and who worked with her on each of these two books. Jill how did you come to know? Savina OCAMPO's work well I came to know Selena. Compost work Because I had the good taste and look to make amazing Literary critic when I was very young New York name a mirror years ago and he with him I was down in Argentina and Together we went to the House of Combo They were married. They were married and so I met them for the first time but of course I had already heard of them because I studied Latin American literature in college and And I was at graduate school that time so but getting to meet. These people was like so exciting. You know it's sort of like meeting Gods When you're a student you're studying. These people like absolutely amazing. Did you also meet for his? At that time. I actually met him the year before because he was brought to yell to give a lecture and evolve bone. Was there also Savino Campbell about whom we're speaking being cassavetes and all who were triumvirate of sorts? Once they married for fifty years he continued to be their dinner guest and You know he as I said. He said of her that she was clairvoyant. She didn't take many photographs. She did not like to be photographed when you see a picture of Safina or Campo. It's not unusual for hands to be crossed in front of her face and if fast if she were going to this or that party she would sing with this ugly face. Jessica Powell use started to read Cedar Fina under the direction of Jill Levine. Yes I was first introduced to Selena's work many years ago in a translation seminar that I took with Jill when I was a graduate student at UC Santa Barbara and after that class ended Jilin. I decided to collaborate on a novella which was actually the only work that Silvino Compo and her husband Blake Assad wrote together and so it was lower haight which is fantastic and we co translated it. And after that Jill and I started talking about you know Oh wouldn't it be wonderful to translate more of Selena's works and so then in Katie a? New Young came on the scene and she's completing her doctorate and her dissertation is in part on Compo Katie's Latif John worked on the translation of forgotton journey. A book of short pieces. There has been also. I don't want to confuse anyone a book of poetry from the New York review books as well as another book covering the entire spectrum of So Vena or Campos pros. I've found my own beginning point. Were these two thrilling little books. Let's here who would like to read a section of Savino Compo? Who'd like to go start with the first black? I can read a section of the Olive Green Dress. The first paragraph from journey forgotten journey. The very first book of Savino Gone Full. Let's hear the first paragraph of the Olive Green dress the olive green dress. The display windows stepped forward to greet her. The only reason she had left the House that morning was to go shopping. Miss Hilton blushed easily her skin translucent as a waxed paper like those packages who's wrappings reveal. All that's inside but beneath such transparencies where the thinnest layers of mystery behind the branching veins growing a little tree over the surface. She was ageless unjust when one noticed the deepest wrinkles on her face or her long white braids. It was possible to catch an unexpected glimpse of her youth in some childlike gesture. Other times she seemed to have the smooth skin of a young girl and light blonde hair precisely at the moment when she looked as if old age had caught up with her. The first paragraph of a very short story called the Olive Green Dress as I read. The stories seem to escape from me as I moved forward in them. There's a strange quality of presence and absence coal joint as she writes. It's quite extraordinary and this first paragraph. Because it's so zigzag you know I I saw it begins with a very odd sentence received like awkward. How could display windows stepped forward to greet you of course? That's that's very surrealist element of you. Know which was the time she was writing in but you know she she young as she old. It's like going from a woman's You know perception of herself but you were talking about how she felt about. She looked I mean. I thought this is kind of interesting example now. Above of that of of those issues and so as very twisty this is Jill Levine. Who is perhaps the Guardian Angel of these three translators bringing savina Ocampo's writing into our present

Jill Levine Silvino Compo Olive Green Dress Savina Ocampo Selena Savino Compo Cassavetes South American Literature Casado Lights Bookstore Savino Campbell United States Voorhis Cabrera Infanta Savino Morrell Julio Cortazar Carlos Fuentes Suzanne Joe Levin
A Live Chat with Two of the Biggest Rabbis in Phoenix

Unorthodox

08:52 min | 2 years ago

A Live Chat with Two of the Biggest Rabbis in Phoenix

"Have two of the biggest rabbis and Phoenix here with US tonight. Rabbi Dr Smelly Yanko. It's the president and Dina validate me Josh and Rabbi Pinchas. Illusion is the founding rabbi of Congregation Beth Safina in Scottsdale Arizona. Come come welcome rebuttal. Don't usually have two guests because things can get really off the rails so we'll see what happens here rabbis. I'm GONNA call you. We'll we'll we'll figure out what we're GONNA call you but let's start with this question for both of you. Why isn't this Jewish community different from all other Stephanie Loud Mark this is why all the people who don't touch the MIC? Don't have problems every house. That better josh all right there we go sorry Stephanie. So let's start off because there's like no spoilers here because only spoilers so rabbis. Why is this Jewish community different from all other Jewish communities? Are you guys even Jewish? You're letting each other speak. It's an excellent question you went on to. I twenty all right so I think for two main reasons number one. It's a community that has just been founded really in the past. Few decades other communities are centuries old. This community is quite new and therefore its future is still very much ahead of it. I think that's why many people are really attracted to the potential of the community year as I was when I first move you thirteen years ago. And it's buzzing with excitement that's number one number two. I also think that it's a community. It's quite diverse and it's diverse in its culture it's diverse in its levels of observance of background. But it's not just the diversity that is attracting and that is quite unique to Phoenix. But it's a unity within the diversity truly feel that we're a united community which can't be said about Kish Committees. That was speaking about before in other places so those are the two main things that I see almost immediately like musing. Yeah well you say when. I was thinking about moving in the middle my seventh year. The two points that people shared as to why I shouldn't consider it. They said it's an intellectual wasteland which is totally untrue. We have people coming out to our learning events every night interesting ideas. And secondly they said it's a moral morally passive community very private very individualistic which is also completely untrue. When we have various activists campaigns people lined up lined up to show support. Who said that? And should we beat them up here? Do you want the crowd here? That can go after them. We the J. Crew here I want. I want to address the thing that you just said. So I'm kind of two minds about the activism angle. There's a part of me that thinks that it's really beautiful and essential for community of face to be very involved in you know social political elements and feel this kind of moral calling and there's another part of me that is a little bit kind of taken aback by how dominant this political discussion. Become just you know. Want to go to show just to hear the Torah just to be together with Jews and worry about that later some other place. How should we be feeling about? Its connection being social justice and question so Rambam my monitors in the third section of his guide for the perplexed. Says what's the purpose of all this stuff and answer is the welfare of the body and the welfare of the soul by which he means the well. If you have to know a little play there which we do. The welfare of the body means just state and the welfare of the sole means the perfection of the intellect so basically the goal of Judaism view is our inner life and our outer life which is to say the inner life is our ritual or beliefs or spirituality stuff. You're touching on and the outer life which he comes to say becomes the priority is that Jews should be on the front and center of fostering the Jus- -ociety and so I think we have a problem. Today I think that The traditional segment of Jewish life prioritizes the parochial and the traditional and not the universal. And I think the more liberal segments of Jewish life prioritize the universal and less of the less attritional and this middle ground of saying yes we care about the world we care society and we care about Jews. That complete package is what we're GONNA do. You agree that he taught us to call them. Yeah that's pleasure. No NOPE BRONCO. Way Back like twenty minutes back calls me peony so all my friends do so no problem. I I would agree with that. I would say though that needs to be a healthy balance of course between the two because if almost like Mark Twain said some people are so open minded that the brain spill out. Sometimes we were so much in open that we forget the message. And so we have to be steeped in the roots of Judaism very much so and yet not forget a calling to go to the outside point out also that if there is an emphasis in Judaism on which side counts the most. It's the outside if you think of the idea of Mitzvah. Most of the six hundred thirteen meets vote are outside oriented. They deal with the world that don't really deal with the internal world. I can only think I don't know maybe you can take more of to mitzvahs on top of the mind that deal with the inside. Prayer Torah study but otherwise everything else really deals with the outside so there is. I do find this emphasis on. Tacona LOMB on trying to rectify the world of course with God's light and with God's message but on the other hand also not forgetting where we come from forgetting to be a steeped in our roots as possible. Something we talk about a lot on the show. Is this idea that a lot of juice today don't necessarily feel like they can just walk into a synagogue and be welcomed or would even feel comfortable. There would even know how to get there. What do you think is the best way to connect with Jews? Who Don't haven't necessarily found their place within the institutional Jewish world thank you. They should go to the valley. Bettman rush to go ahead twenty. I was first before you go second. I'm sorry what did what are these. Mutations Paul Ince Geneva come on these guys could pull off a Juku. They've got the organization got the intellect coming the trail be stealthy. It's a fascinating question and I think that was a really good at alien one another. It's true and I think that the percentages of Jews were not engaged. Not because they're disinterested because they've been alienated is also very high and I think the challenge here is to embrace pluralism which does not bracket are absolutes but creates space for other absolutes. That means that for those of us who are really fervent beliefs. We learn how to create space for others. And those who are more relativistic and actually don't hold. Views are able to cultivate those in our space. I'm worried about those on the margins. I'm worried about single folks who have had had trouble finding partners and we were the people of Color feel alienated those of lower socioeconomic status who feel alienated Those who are converts all types of marginalized Jews that I think are. Establishments can do better being inclusive those with physical disabilities or and really a whole host of others. And I think our community is very good at embracing those who naturally fit in. I would agree also. I think it's an excellent question because he hit it right on the now. I think the biggest challenge we have is rabbis is to make Judaism not just relevant but also accessible and I would say that the lenses I try to wear as rabbi and I think that all Jews should try to wear is the lenses of what my rabbi teaches in his book. We Jews the STEINFELDT He came up with the idea that he was the first one since then. I've heard it many times. But he came up with this idea. That Judaism is not a religion. I don't approach another Jew because of religion nor do I approach another job. Because he's part of my ethnic group. Judaism is not an ethnic group. Judaism is also another nationality. We don't have to live in Israel to be Jewish. What is Judaism? Judaism is a family. I approach another Jew. Because he's my family and yes you could have two Jews and seven opinions but as another Aba of mine taught it's one heart and we can't forget that we do have one hot. We we are part of that. Same family what unites us is much greater than what divides us as the CLICHE goes. But it's not just a cliche it's the truth and therefore not do is better than me. We all have the same soul. No Jew is wiser than me. No Jew is deeper than me. I think every Jew in a way is a part of God and you can't add measurements to divinity to the infinity God is God and Jews that reflection of God he has that Jewish soul and together as a family. That's what unites us. That's what we celebrate. There's that great bit in Michigan where they say that you know. Why did God make us all descended from the same couple so that nobody could say you're better than my father is so so

Phoenix Rabbi Dr Smelly Yanko Josh United States Beth Safina Rabbi Pinchas Arizona President Trump Stephanie Kish Committees Mark Twain Jus- -Ociety Paul Ince Dina Israel Michigan Bettman Juku
"safina" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"safina" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Dollars single sitter Safina progress from that to what it is now I mean I agree I love that politics and sports you know the whole thing with the or are they a role models this net Steve I I I I don't watch sports to the lands of looking for role models either for me or anybody else watching for pure entertainment the money hasn't ruled sports at all as as far as I'm concerned look cheating in sports is as old as sports I mean so that that spits why I kind of assume everybody is doing it now or are there certain things that bother me more than others yeah yeah I'll I'll admit that but something like this it doesn't bother me I understand why for the NFL you have to punishment but it doesn't get to the level where I'm yelling and screaming about it in terms of the patriots and Astros having certain advantages there is a degree of arrogance that I think winning organizations have the Astros thing for me is befuddling because if if you're the patriots you can do something like videotape your opponents signals and chances are that's never going to trickle down to the players or even many of the coaches in baseball with all the player movement you know the the the the the guy who ratted him out or helped rat them out as a former player Mike fighters who used to pitch for the Astros in a day and age of player movement of guys hopscotch in teams you're a quality clubs so you know people are going to hire your coach is former bench performer third base coach is now the manager of the red Sox it is really good teams have a hard time keeping all their players to the gonna go play for other clubs at some point somebody who benefited from the Astros sign stealing is going to go to their other club and say Hey we had a system restore signs the stupidity of doing this and thinking we're never going to get caught is that's my body.

Steve NFL patriots Astros baseball Mike fighters red Sox Safina
"safina" Discussed on Science... sort of

Science... sort of

04:11 min | 3 years ago

"safina" Discussed on Science... sort of

"Rub rub in bed tall under my nose. After that. It's a whole different deal when were at the whaling station 'cause those few that was just everywhere. I mean, that's fifty sixty tons of whale most of which is being churned in giant pit beneath you so that that like smell that like enters your nostrils and the roof of your mouth kind of doesn't leave. I rarely smelled that. But the time I get something close to that. I'm just like, oh, yeah. That's that's too much. Scientists we talked a lot about the different tools that we can use to get data from these animals that are really magmatic and difficult, but as ever frustrate you that well, it's probably smart enough that we could have some semblance of conversation spoke. I mean, you know, it's clear over extending. Well, I think there's a great book written by Carl Safina called beyond words, all about animal communication, Carl's a marine ecologist, and he talks a lot about. I mean, it's written great books about sea turtles about seabirds. And this is I think it's his most recent it's about animal communication. I has a whole chapter about killer whales, and there's some fascinating interactions anecdotally between humans and captive killer whales where it really seems based on the chronicle of interactions. The killer whales are perceiving more about us than we recognize. So that's it's not not like getting new AG. I'm just saying like they're able to perceive a lot about our gestures in our intense more than we think we're revealing you know, it's kind of clever. Haunts course story or count. I mean, so. So like, they're mammals. They're intuitive. The reading the social the social and the reading a whole range of a spectrum of communication coming from, you know, micro gestures of facial muscles and our hands, you know, because we're bipedal and we've kept him in captivity. So they're probably pretty bored. Right. No. I think they're completely under stimulated. I mean as much as the new thinking about having animals even animals, we don't consider smart. We talked about this recently benefit from having stimulus stimulus stimulation. Stimulating objects new things to look at things interact with there's a reason why octopus is our escape artists. They're just like tanks to. One where they had to start putting undercovers zookeepers in the crowd just outside its enclosure. So stop trying to escape. That's funny. I mean, so given that Wales are diverse. They're clearly very brainy. They're saying a lot just by information content through the ways that they communicate. Yeah. I don't have an issue with calling culture. Now. What does it mean? That's your question of can we communicate? Can we tell them? You know, humid, we could just tell the big whales just hang out at the surface for a minute. Let us get your false because it's important to keep you alive. I think. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. High five dude, we will actually I do know about data sets on heart. We went through the ocean hall a little bit to look at the new C monsters exhibit. When my parents were in town for thanksgiving. And my dad did have a moment he's like my dad's orthopedic surgeon. So we know skeletons, but he saw the front flipper of a whale was like those are all the Fangio's again on the that's what I told him. I was like we have a word for that call them, and it's mazing that that hasn't been lost. I mean, like the fact that you can find almost any vertebrate after the Permian on the planet, and they're five digits tetrapod. Yeah. Any tach? Sorry. Sorry, any tetrapod not far away. But it's cracked, but most tetrapods have five or less. But you're not really like what is it? I mean, there's that's an evolutionary biology graduate school these question. But yeah, there are some ways of there's these sort of ways that biology works seem pretty successful in static. That are hard to change. And that's for me. That's what makes Wales pretty damn interesting is that they have these innovations that have no precedent filter. Feeding there is no other filter. Feeding mammal on the planet the way Wales echo occasion, underwater. No other paleontologists say that please might have been filter feeders..

Wales Carl Safina ocean hall fifty sixty tons five digits