35 Burst results for "Saddam"

Using Existing Edge Hardware for New AI Capabilities - with Roeland Nusselder

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

05:47 min | 6 d ago

Using Existing Edge Hardware for New AI Capabilities - with Roeland Nusselder

"So Roland. Glad to have you on the program. I. Know we're going to be talking about a at the edge. I. Think in order to have that conversation based on where your firm is focused we should talk about micro controllers and a tiny am l. This is for for you folks really really big opportunity for ai at the edge he maybe not up what we're talking about today. Yes sure thing very me of course. So tiny mel is machine learning or a I own really cheap low power hardware and then usual micro controllers. Some Mike controllers are very cheap low-power chips and they're literally everywhere are hundreds of billions of my controllers in a roads sets also why they can be cheap. But it's very challenging to deploy machine earning or to run machine learning or microcontrollers and its resulting but maybe it's good if I did a bit of a wide so important to run machine learning microcontrollers. So one way to do this, I mean if he thought, you could think that you can just sense the data back to the cloud depressing Darren very heavy and. Expensive jeep use bid. This is often not a very good idea. First of all, they're bench with limitations. So if you have a camera that's connected to Wifi network and they sent up the whole camera to the clouds, if you have multiple gummer's connected through same wife network that just doesn't work your your wife is down immediately than there are things like latency take. Time to send it to the cloud to person Darah Senate back there reliability issues, diner radiant, and it's done. You still want to make sure that your product works their privacy issues. You don't want to send feed data or audio data through the clouds and dinners energy consumption. That's actually a big issue because sending data to the cloud or even if use WIFI consumes a lot of energy and that's not good. especially not if you have a battery powered device Saddam L. Solstice by running machinery and work by running two workloads on the device itself the very cheap low power chip. But. The thing is it's very difficult to run machine learning on a chip and that's what our companies folks them. Got It. When you say chip in this case, you're you're talking about microcontrollers. Yeah. Exactly. Okay. Got It. Got Maybe. So you've walked through a couple of instances an. Familiar. With you know the edge as as sort of an idea and the intersection of of Iot nfl you focus on this space pretty ardently though maybe we can talk about some of the cases where hyping data to the cloud makes sense and some of the cases where a dozen year security he brought up bandwidth. There's a lot of these practical concerns. Can we tie this to you know potential business cases Hey dan here's an example where it completely makes sense we we gotta send this stuff up it might be at the edge, but we got to send it to the club and here's an example where we really should not be doing that Do you have any? We can talk about The main thing here is that you want to have devised a battery powered. That's an important issue because makes much cheaper much easier to install vices. So for example, if you have a small camera in a grocery shop to detect if a shelf is empty or not. You want to make the device battery-powered at getter with smoke, and you can do that if the machine learning workloads is running on a mic controller and it just sense a small signal to the cloud if the shelves empty or if the if the shelf is enough to empty and you always want to tasks on the edge, if that's bull doing reason, why would not want to do it on the edge is if you need so if the Model is so complex that requires a lot of energy to run and requires very expensive. Large ships skull jeep use said, that's why you want to do hoax over example for very complex and opie models of complex NLP tusks you you might want to do it in cloud, but if it is Bulbul, if you game run it locally, you generally want to do that because of bent with. Issues, because of latency issues, because of reliability issues because of privacy issues. So a good example of adults that you want to run locally is, for example, an H. system where on a heating air conditioning system where you have a small camera which idex if there are human in room, and then if there is a human into room, the heating air conditioning system automatically turn on or turn off. You don't want to send it whole feed your feet to the cloud it. It's not great for your free event with of your Wifi network. Another great example where we ecstasy for between is in retail. So you're starting to see devices that are battery powered that have a small camera and that have a small microcontroller controller, and it runs in a little deep learning model to detect if the shelves empty or not car, and if the shelf has empty than the signal to store manager that someone needs to fill up the shelf again. Yeah. Yup or for example, as small camera detects how many people are waiting in acute and at the stores manage store managers do more effectively locate their their stuff thus like debt or you can do gay seduction off shopper and detect. What kind of products show purser January interested in said at the shop nick and do better product placements those kind of thoughts. been if you're running ds on larger chips that are more energy consuming, you have to connect them today Tristan Nets, somehow that makes it much more expensive to install much more painful store owner. So if he can make this battery-powered, you can just clip it on a shelf or you can just Louis this evening for example, would you really like if you can make these device better half these kind of

Roland Saddam L. Solstice Darren Mike Bulbul Tristan Nets Louis Nick
Arian Moayed On How Fear Never Leaves, And Why You Should  Just Keep Going

Good Life Project

06:47 min | Last month

Arian Moayed On How Fear Never Leaves, And Why You Should Just Keep Going

"I believe in curiosity I just I. Just think that we can't do anything without it early and just asking people obey the is basically a version of empathy. Enemy. Empathizing with WHO people are and what they do over were you the curious kid like is this something that's been part of your life or somebody who cultivated? Yeah. I mean. I think the circumstances of my life you know being born in Iran and then moving here as young immigrants in the eighties where Iran was like enemy enemy number one if you recall. And like Iran Russia which kind of back there again I kind of felt that like you know I was so curious about this world is culture and I think that's kind of where it started also you know It's crazy. It was crazy. My parents don't speak any the my spirit's English is not great. The they came here when they were forty and fifty. The I mean it's not like they. You know I'm thirty seven. So like imagining myself in three years time taking all of an IV and Chrissy and saying, Hey, well, going to move to China and we're GONNA make this. We're going to make life better in China as a show I mean that's All you can be as curious I. Guess. Yeah. I guess. So how so how old were you when you actually let on? Well, we laughed Iran you know it's hard to tell because at time here was crazy there was a war happening and I think a lot of you especially you a bit younger don't don't really remember that whole window of of our history and our relationship with Sir Yeah, the Middle East Yeah. Yeah it's complicated. It's long and it's GonNa either bore fascinate all of you guys. But the the the the the truth is we you know it's it's. It's it's hard to talk about because there's so many levels to like how crazy it is. One is my mom was married to my dad at the age of thirteen. My mom was thirteen Wendo arranged marriage. My mom is pretty standard. You know it was on the outs in that time period. Yeah. But my parent, my mom's mom was a single mom she was the youngest you know she couldn't make she couldn't make it happen, and so she had to like you know she had to like give I, guess her her daughter La youngest daughter away and so then my dad, my dad's they were more religious than my mom's side was and so. They got arranged. My mom had her first kid at fifteen years old her second kid at sixteen and Arthur kid eighteen, and then had me when she was thirty five. So my siblings are seventeen eighteen in. I'm sorry. Yes. Some teen eighteen basically twenty years than me. So, and then and then the revolution hit seventy nine. And then a war hit right after that because Saddam invaded with you know and then got the support of the United States. You know because we of the Iranian situation and then we were in a war. And so everyone was closed inside as is bombings happening all over Tehran all over the border, and so we were indoors and and you know when when people get doors and there's a lot of fear in the air of uncertainty, you procreate you know and so the baby boom in Iran happened at that moment in seventy nine to eighty five, where like sixty percent of Iranian. Population right now in Iran is under the age of forty. Fascinating you walk down the street and everyone's young. So anyway and then and then. CRAZILY my brother. My oldest brother was sixteen. When he graduated high school in Iran, his name is Amir And then he went to A. He got accepted to a school in. CHICAGO. Right. When he was sixteen. So sixteen twentyish he's in Chicago, ish issue like something like that, and then the revolution hit. And then my brother was like should I come back and. My parents were like you're never coming back here will come to you. And then in that time period. My. Youngest my brother that's closest to me who seventeen his name is. Oh, mead omen was drafted in the Iran Iraq war. And fought three years in that war. With a couple of my cousins who are who are who have passed away who died in that war one of them, which data that were, and then my brother was in war my sister was in the middle there. I was just born. We got the F out of town and we went we went as far as my dad's connections and money and. You know and you know connections could could could take you in that was Dubai. We've got to Dubai who lived in the Arab Emirates and we were there for off and on for about five years and then and then we and then you know a long period of time you know no one heard it from my brother was fight in the war. And trying to and trying to try to like move three pieces ahead while also like making sure the pieces back here it's a chess game you know and and dangerous one. And then my dad then. We had were that Amigos live. We went back to Iran. Might he got back? He was no nine, hundred twenty you know fought three years in a war in a city called Oh mead his name is omitted, which means hope and wherever like was slaughtered murdered and died because it was a brutal war brutal war and he he's a twenty year old brainwashed you know. PTSD. Kid. And in that time period as we're figuring out to go back to Dubai and come back, my sister falls in love. Falls in love with the guy and and then that made things tricky and then, and then we all laughed and my sister stay. So I- sister got the states in two thousand and three we left in eighty five. So An and then we came to the states and again you know the analogy that the Chinese like us like you and me and you taking your family and your son going to China or whatever language that you don't know our culture, the No, and you're like, this is the best news for us. Now you know you're GonNa, you're not going to be easy and so in all of that, you just get you know a a sense of like the world in a very kind of complicated way. A very young age and and not only do they not speak the language they don't know what? Christmases. They don't know what Hanukkah is. They don't have any idea why people are going to church all the time. They have no clue why the cars are this way they don't know why the food is patching. There's nothing that is familiar. There's nothing that you can empathize with as as an Iranian living in the states and being like I know this thing and so in all that you are learning rapidly. You know a very drastic way and so that curiosity might have had something to do with it. I'm not really sure

Iran Dubai China Amir And Sir Yeah Chicago Wendo Middle East Ptsd Chrissy United States Arab Emirates Saddam Arthur Tehran Russia Iraq
The French history behind Lebanon's problems

Between The Lines

06:00 min | Last month

The French history behind Lebanon's problems

"Earlier this month, a deadly blast in Beirut killed more than one hundred and seventy people, engine thousands, and lift three, hundred, thousand homeless. And a vast landscape of destruction. Now, Lebanon was already in extremely bad shape before this blast exacerbated by the covid crosses the chronic corruption and dysfunction that had defined Lebanese politics for decades with all that had brought the economy to ruin. Many people have lost they laugh savings and investments no wonder widespread protests recently led to the resignation of the Lebanese Prime Minister and his cabinet. So the poodle listen a broader historical context. Let's welcome back to the program Joshua Landis. He heads the Middle East Program at the University of Oklahoma Josh Welcome back to between the lines. It's a pleasure being with you Tom. Now Lebanon was once a model for the Middle East by route was dubbed the Paris of the East. Now, today Lebanon looks like Syria Iraq how did this happen? Well it happened because Lebanon is an extremely divided country it like Iraq and Syria there are Shiites and sinise dividing the Muslim side but there's also about thirty three percent of the population are Christians. Both marinade there and and Greek Orthodox. So you have the same. Religious Divisions in Lebanon that you do in Syria and Iraq but in fact, you have more and that's one reason why Lebanon fell into such a bloody civil war from nineteen, seventy, five to ninety, which was. Patched up. Most recently and They've been running in what turns out to be a real puns e scheme through the central. Bank. In which they shored up the Lebanese pound by borrowing gobs of money billions upon billions of dollars and. and. Supporting the exchange rate, but it turned out that that was a Ponzi scheme because tons of Lebanese in Australia. The United States Europe were sending their dollars to Lebanon to be in these dollar-denominated accounts that were getting interest rates as high as twelve thirteen percent. So everybody wanted that kind of interest rate, but it turned out to be a Ponzi scheme in just collapsed a few months ago, which was sparked these terrible demonstrations and instability because the country is now impoverished inflation has gone through the roof and people are discovering that they don't have any money and it's it's Lit tensions between different sectarian groups, and of course, as I mentioned in my introduction many people in Lebanon I've lost their life savings and investments. To people realize that it goes back to the collapse of the Ottoman Empire at the end of World War One this in France and Britian what do they do that essentially created free great minority ruled regimes in the Middle East, tell us mall. Yes they did and Lebanon was carved out by France which got a both Syria and Lebanon from the League of Nations after World War One. The League of Nations conceded this to France to really rule over the mass colonies, but they are called mandates and. France carved out Lebanon as an independent country. And made the borders such that they were as big as they possibly could maintaining a Christian majority so that the government would be dominated by Christians at the center ruling over Shiites Druze a bunch of sending Moslems none of whom would be able to compete in theory with the Christians and this allowed for a very French friendly country on the Mediterranean that France thought would serve it. Well, the problem is that within the years. The demographics began to change and Muslims became the crushing majority and this led to the civil war in hundred, seventy five and ever since then the various religious groups have been squabbling over. Political power. And today fifty percent of all parliament members that have to be Christians. National Pact even though Christians are probably only a third, the population which underlines how You know precarious. The entire political system is, and of course, in Iraq following the collapse of the Ottoman Empire with the British mandate the Sunni minority pretty much ran the show from the time of the collapse of the Ottoman Empire right through the downfall of Saddam Hussein, and in Syria it was the Alawite minority that ran the show and of course Stiffer differs from the Sunni majority during the recent civil war. Correct. You're absolutely right and this was a pattern throughout the northern Middle East where the colonial powers whether it was. Britain or was France would establish a minority in power given the lion's share of power, and that helped them to rule by divide and conquer, but it left a terrible legacy. That the Middle East is suffering from today because the Alawites this religious minority that's twelve percent of the country ruled Syria and today the uprising was an attempt by the Sydney majority to overthrow that minority that's clinging to power in Syria Saddam Hussein sunny twenty percent of the country Cenis and the Shiite majority and Kurds rose up to try to get rid of Saddam Hussein leading to very bloody civil war ethnic war and and that's that's one of the major causes for instability throughout. The region is this terrible fight between these different religious groups

Lebanon Syria Middle East France Iraq Ottoman Empire Saddam Hussein Middle East Program Ponzi Scheme Beirut Prime Minister Joshua Landis League Of Nations Parliament TOM Australia University Of Oklahoma
Unifying your will with the will of Allah

TMV Podcast

05:32 min | Last month

Unifying your will with the will of Allah

"Blessed to be joined by a very good friend of mine said Sane Machi-. He's an Islamic lecturer he's been studying in. Beirut for some years now. Just an all-round quite and. Inspiring and Kind of God centric Guy I think. So. We've been wanting to do content together and we wanted him through some something with the Muslim viable years now but he's always out studying, and then when he comes, he's kind of like lecturing for a few days and then he's back out. But we were able to find some time. and. We. So. Obviously, you hear the conversation that we have but why I really wanted to get him on is that I think there's like a very unique way in which he talks about God and religion. And it's quite an empowering thing. So like even I remember when we were having the conversation I was thinking back to some lecture gave last year I think when he was in London and I had the same kind of thing where it's also simple and it's all just anchored around God I'm so I so I called them up and I said you know, let's let's your podcast and I want you to kind of talk about some of these things and some things you mentioned your lecture series and whatever else and we had like twenty minutes half we mapped out what we're going to discuss. Item we go into go into record. A couple of days AIDS like over a week weeknights and then he's like I was like, oh, she would just recap what we discussed. It acknowledged freestyler. So he kind of just thought at the conversation and and just saw when I loved it to be honest I'm. Always enjoy his company and conversations with him. And that's that's it really If you did actually, if you do enjoy this podcast there is potential opportunity for us to. Record more with a sane so Why as in like message email will ever ask postal social media tiger us. Last No, and let me know and I will be sure to me because in London for a while very short time I'm going to try and. Getting back in if there is a a decent response from people, so please do. Everything without further ado. Here's my conversation with Hossein. Monkey. Saddam Hussein. Thank you very much for for coming on the podcast I I. Think It's worth people nine the background that you me. Quite a few favours now because a few few years ago I was out in in. Lebanon. Yes, and we would you to meet. It's about three years ago and but three to two or three three years ago and you you flopped I mean I had a car accident. This is the second. Comes on an important. Was that and then you've come to London Tovia from London reason you've come to the under every an we've had like brief moments of being able to meet up and chat and whatever but we haven't sat down like this. longtime common. Yeah. It's quite exciting to be honest So. What, begin wherever you want my i. I think social talk about is in the we've allowed to catch up. But let's specify those part that to one side right. So I think for me when when you said Yes to podcast I thought it'd be interesting to talk about quite a few things. So recent you've been talking about you did an election series into what the Prophets yes and stories from the Koran what was was really interesting and and the stuff that she would we wanna do, oh, we're going to be doing more of, but the year before that you were in London and you delivered ten lectures and it was all kind of shaped around the love of God. Yes. And what was quite striking for me personally was that there was something in because I know you personally as well and I I've known you for for a long time before you were studying and everything else, and maybe we'll do another a whole podcast on on the whole journey has been about nine years almost nine ten years. It's been a long time but but there's there's there was something there is something in the way that you when you talk about God and when you're talking about all of these notions of loving God and really embracing. The spirit of Islam and everything else that this is a a really deeper kind of passion. And belief and almost serenity as well in the way that you kind of talks I wanted to I think if we start with that like. What Okay we approach allies a concept and a as a as a topic as you know our. Creator Moss and everything else What is allow mean to you? That's a big I'm sorry for. Jumping from the great question. So I think. Yes. I do use love as the launchpad to talk about a loss upon down and talk to a law SUPERNOVA. But I think that when a human beings especially in young is. When they think of God or the concept of God even in when it comes to parents for example, because when we're young, we don't fully understand the concept of God, but we see in

London Sane Machi Saddam Hussein London Tovia Beirut Lebanon Hossein
"saddam" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

07:31 min | 2 months ago

"saddam" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"We need this we need that. And a lot of these same guys in the Bush administration were the same guys in lower level mid level positions in the first. Bush administration, they're like wait. I've heard this before. In fact, Colin Powell, who secretary of state now? WHO's the one who's telling us to be very very careful here? We're going into Iraq. I've heard this from you before. You were cautious in the first Gulf War as well. And so there was a little bit of a little bit of distrust between the soil in military leadership came in. That's really. Really. Disturbing, but it's such A. It's like a- as you talk about it. It's just like Oh. Yeah, I mean I. See this all the time. Right? See this all the time from businesses from leaders that they don't have a good enough relationship. They don't communicate to each other properly. They don't explain things in a way that could be clear. Instead of explaining, they just get mad and they say you know what I'm telling you to trust me and like that all all of that is it's it's. It's awful. It's off. Yeah, yeah, and. You know I think that. The intelligence side as well. You know there's no intelligence did not see the invasion of Kuwait caught us off guard, and so you you know. Some of the civilian leadership lost trust with the intelligence community there when nine eleven surprised us again. A lot of those same people come to distrust you know some of the intelligence establishment even more. And I it was a little bit of a toxic relationship. By the time you got two thousand three between you know the the brass at the dod, some of these other places and the actual military leadership and the intelligence community leadership that I think you know there were we'll get into that, and then maybe the next episode, or so that you know. There were some breakdowns in communication at the leadership level that that ended up filtering down. To you guys on the ground, and that's what I'm kind of interested in hearing about. Is there anything else to to wrap up kind of pre-? Pre like escalation of tensions leading into into The invasion of three. I think we can probably. Talk a little bit about it in the next up so we'll talk about how we kind of started. That ball rolling after nine eleven and I want to talk a little bit about what Iraq was up to. In the nineties as well and how we dealing with them, and how it had become this kind of festering sore that we did not have a good solution for you know that it was just sitting there. Because Oil for Food Program, and because of the way, the sanctions were being cheated by a lot of countries in the most corrupt and ugliest way you know just. Saddam's regime is letting a lot of these countries. You know just full corruption. From like the oil for food sales, and then they're feeding billions of dollars back to Saddam's regime, ugly stuff, by people who are supposed to be our allies and So you know it creates a situation where you You have this regime. WHO's there? WHO's ruling through brutality and terror? Who's not going anywhere? The sanctions are not going to work, and children are dying of starvation in the streets because of the sanctions. So a lot of people are starting to say we can't keep this up. We can't just start. Keep starving this population well, okay, what are you? What are you going to say Oh Saddam? You got us all those UN resolutions. All none of that means that you want. You outlasted us. You outlasted the global community right the global order with all of these institutions behind it. You just beat US outlasted us because you were willing to inflict such suffering on your own people to watch them starve while you and your regime took all the money that you were getting and used it to control them, and we just can't take watching this anymore, so you know we're just gonNA. Lift all this in it. You admit you one in create that precedent for other people like you going forward. or You know in a post nine eleven world we can go in there and do something about it. And that was really the second Iraq war. You WanNa put it that way as a lot of people and I think history will bear this out. It wasn't a second war. There were there were you know to ground fights to you know moments of acute combat. In one long war with Saddam Hussein's regime. we were launching airstrikes at him all through the nineteen ninety s in nineteen ninety-three, he tried to assassinate George H W Bush is after he's pret-. He's not even president anymore. And he was visiting Kuwait, and Saddam's sent a hit team over there to try to assassinate him. You know a former American president. And so this guy is not cowed. You know he's still causing problems for us. and. Meanwhile, Iran is growing and becoming more dangerous, and you know we. We need a functional Iraq. If you look at a map of the middle, East is just right there in the middle of everything. And we need it to be somewhat functional. But we can't help it. Be Functional as long as this guy's in control. because. We can't build him up. And so, what do you do? and. People are going to be debating. How long after we get done with this the you know what the right thing to do there was, but I think people oversimplify what our options were. Yeah, and again it's. Well two things one thing. I want to correct as I said that a guy that had the podcast was in the first Gulf War and actually I was in my mind. I was thinking, but no, he was on the push up, but he had guys that had been in the first. For that kind of the they help them along. And it did. I'm thinking about this again. I just the frame this up. Some people say that I'm like a driven person, right and and. You know and I i. Am you know there's I wanNA. Do Things I wanNA. When somebody says you know what you call to take over the world, right? Haha Fun like gather some. There's a hint of truth in there because I want to go out and make things happen, but you know we're looking to take over the world in a literal sense. Anything about Saddam and you and you like some thinking about it from my perspective is you're talking through all the stuff I'm thinking you know I like to. You know as I was reflecting back and I told you earlier. Hey, aren't you good? Like. You've got a country you've taken over. You got billions of dollars worth of assets. You fought a long war. Wake. Even me. I think I'd look around and be like. You know what I'll I'll go ahead and we'll just call this success. I've got my own nation. I've got. Billions of dollars. I'll call it good. But. Not Good enough. Is actually there is one thing that we did leave out. We talked about a little bit earlier, but is that after the war is over. On his way out of spite, he lights up all the Kuwaiti oil wells just to blackened sky. Creates the biggest oil spill in human history by opening up the valves in Kuwait and sending it out into the into the Persian Gulf. And then, and this is really where you got a lot of people who were after nine eleven really really really. Looking for Saddam's throat in the United States Is. We had told the people of Iraq meaning sort of the Shia. Population in the south the Kurds in the north. Rise up against, Saddam. Hussein We thought that he would be overthrown in kind of a natural way. We're also talking to his generals..

Saddam Iraq Saddam Hussein Kuwait US Colin Powell president Persian Gulf dod George H W Bush Iran us.
"saddam" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

06:21 min | 2 months ago

"saddam" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"Or the US meals. I wasn't there, but the guys that were on the ground there hundred percent thought we're going to get you know there's GonNa be chemical biological attacks. That's what's going to happen. MOP level know they're in and out of their mop level suits all day long. Put The gas on putting them away. I mean we one hundred percent, and so as soon as you start throwing chemical and biological weapons into the scenario. You're going to lose. You're going to lose a lot of guys. I can't even. It's the straight year. Did you ever have to put on mop gear? D Did Not like strike you as the saddest excuse for like something that's GonNa Save Your Life for instance. On the first of all, it's in two pieces right so you've got like these pants on. They're not even they're not even like a BIB. That would come up hydro. They're just pants and put them on over your regular pants. There's a drawstring. Do not a belt. There's drawstring, so you just pulled this thing tight. And then you put a jacket on over your upper body, so there's. A. There's a big gap. Yeah like this is going to save you. Is that what we're saying? You got maneuver in the desert. and. That's all fine. That's all like. Take take all the maneuvering out of it. I'm just saying if you put me in that suit and you said Okay I'm GonNa put you exposure to chemical weapons now. I'd be like cool. Appreciate it I got a twenty percent chance of living, and it's only if I can run away. Quick enough. I had no faith in those suits, and we had good suits. Do we had the good ones? I had this lower contraption that? When you put on your gas mask. It would it would give you it would. It would send positive airflow into your into your into your masks or was like really nice. yeah, so it's very strange. There were estimates. that had the first marines. You know the first marines just rampaged through the Iraqi army for sure when they went up, but there were estimates going in San they might lose ten fifteen thousand on the first on the first push, there were estimates that said we might lose one out of five aircraft on the first attack, and so we you know the guys who are planned to military guys Colin Powell. General Schwartzkopf these were these were Jay in Vietnam and so we were looking at doing this. We were hesitant at first. I sure started off with like George Bush was like we need to make. Make statement here, but a lot of military guys like I've seen this movie like I want clear political objectives and more than that. I want overwhelming force, and gladly that's push came. We brought six carrier strike groups in their up. We brought the seventh corps down from Europe. We brought the first. Marines and Marine Expeditionary Force. We had Arab allies. We had a bunch of we came rolling deep, three, hundred, thousand, four hundred thousand troops. What was the number? Do you know the number off top of your head? It was over four hundred thousand when you count the Arab allies. And six carrier strike groups I mean. We hit it hard, and I think that even our own side didn't quite realize how far we had come technologically now Saddam thought. This is some. Lessons learned on both sides that ended up coming back to bite US both. In the first Iraq War Saddam thought this is a technological power. These Americans are technicians. They're not soldiers. And you know all their fancy gears, not it can't win a war, and so we hit him. Watch this. We hit him hard, and we drive them out of Kuwait, but when we didn't pursue him, he thought we were afraid to you know he thought we were afraid to go pursue and fight. and. I got to. Guess it must've been like ninety three ninety four. I used to. Kid Ninety, four and ninety four when I was in. Kuwait, and you know we would. We were going out to the desert train, but we went up the highway death, and like still there was littered. Yeah, there's vehicles. Destroyed and. Man You ever heard about the Again our talking about, it's not just Saddam but. There's there were there were maybe the story there were. Kuwaiti there were there were. Places where they had Kuwaiti women. Nine months later where they had these orphan kids could so many Kuwaiti women had been raped by the by Saddam's. Soldiers that they had these orphans pretty much. Have you heard that? Yeah, yeah, there's there was no limits. There are all sorts of atrocities committed in Kuwait while they knew the whole world was watching. That's the crazy part about it, you know. He had a level of arrogance and I. Mean the which led to a lot of bad decision making on Saddam Hussein's part you know. He thought he thought his military was ready. He thought we were going to. You know, get a bloody nose like you know. We tried to go after him and he he blamed the loss on his general. He had a bunch of his generals executed words. He blamed it on his military leadership, and on the cowardice of like you know some of the some of the officers who had just let order breakdown. He did not accept that he lost that war. He thought we were afraid to go after him. And it is Kinda strange when you think about it. How quickly they broke down. because. Here's what you'd think in like wait. You just got out of an eight year. War with Iran are hardened combat soldiers. That's very strange I wouldn't predict that. Somebody sometimes I talk about the fact that I don't bet on the UFC. Italy the ultimate fighting championship I. Don't bet on UFC and the reason why. Because there have been all say about ten times. In my I've been following the UFC since. There's been about ten times where I knew I had inside information like you know, because I'm friends and training partners and training with people and training with people that were about to fight I had inside information. where I would have easily said Oh, I'll bet the House I'll bet my you know. I'll bet next year's paychecks that this guy is going GonNa win. And sure enough I lose I would have lost and I realized you know there's been a couple times where I had good inside information played out just the way I thought it would, but. As Joe Rogan says it's a fight and anything can happen to fight so if you were to tell me and I'm an employee, I'm trying not to be not trying to use the benefit of hindsight, because it's real easy to look back. Of course we've got the technological power, and even when you just I I threw out that little arrogant quote when you're like..

Saddam Hussein UFC Kuwait US Joe Rogan Iraqi army Europe George Bush Iran Iraq Colin Powell Marine Expeditionary Force Jay Italy Vietnam
"saddam" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

03:05 min | 2 months ago

"saddam" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"Just a brutal. You know horrible war that's fought with credibly brutal tactics. That ends in late nineteen, eighty eight, and you would think that like. Maybe Saddam would want to kind of take a breather. But it's nice now with this guys. And it was kind of draw. Yes, it came to draw basically yet. No neither side achieved any. Any Games through it. Saddam was the one who wants the war and he didn't achieve any gains. You could see lost on that count, but yeah, but yeah. yeah, nineteen, th. That's late nineteen eighty-eight by early nineteen eighty-nine. Saddam is already telling Kuwait. So a lot of the other, Arab countries worried about Iran too, so they were financing Saddam. They were loaning money things like that. And, already by early nineteen eighty-nine Saddam is telling Kuwait you're GONNA have to forgive that debt because we were defending you too, and we're not paying that sixty five billion dollars. And Kuwait's not willing to do that. They say that we're not going. Do Saddam's Oh. You're GONNA do it. and. By the next summer summer in one, thousand, nine hundred. He's invading Kuwait. So no rest for the weary. And he's he doesn't unpredictable way. I remember seeing an interview with Mubarak the Egyptian President at the time longtime. Egyptian, president. And we're allies Mubarak. We knew him well. He was not just allies with friends with Saddam Hussein by this point he knew him. They talk on the phone. And he called Saddam on the phone and he says what's going on here. You GonNA, Invade Kuwait. And Saddam tells him. No. No I'm just bluffing. Just don't worry about. It totally fine the next day. He invades Kuwait Owen so actually here's what happened or something else in there is. Mubarak comes and tells us that he says hey, he's bluffing. Don't worry about it, and so our ambassador at the time gets called in by Saddam. And Saddam wants to feel him out right. See how we're doing with this whole thing and our ambassador had just heard from Mubarak. Piece bluffing. Don't worry about it. Don't don't push him, and so he says you know Arab on Arab. Lake Affairs that's not really our business. We're not. We don't really not invested in this and Saddam right and the next day. He invades Kuwait right. So Mubarak nobody had any idea what's going on here I mean I don't even know if I read that quote in the last episode that he tells somebody one thing he tells another person and other thing, and then after that does. Does something completely different this surprises? He's even surprises himself. So maybe it was something like that. I mean He. It's not beyond him. Just the mentality that you're dealing with you eight year war, and by the way you're sitting in a place in a country that's got these incredible amount of natural resources and. Saddam Hussein could have lived. Like a king, but like he could live, because he did live like a king, but he could lived like a peaceful king, and just had an incredible. Incredible existence especially with Iran right there, threatening everybody, we would have been happy to him. The face of the Arab world. We would have been happy to do it, so that's where you start the OH. That's where you start to really. You know look when.

Saddam Hussein Kuwait Saddam Mubarak Iran President Lake Affairs
"saddam" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

06:48 min | 2 months ago

"saddam" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"How can we bring along? How can we bring him on? RT? Our Team, yeah! That was definitely the thinking and you know we didn't know who we were dealing with. We did not recognize the the level of of beasts that we were dealing with with Saddam. And I think by the end of the eighty S. we had a pretty good idea that that was the case. because we'd end up at war with ourselves shortly after that. I mean but the Iranians again like they. They seem very dangerous at the time. This is a big country, large population, a well-equipped military with an expansionist foreign policy and when they were fighting Iraq. You know. These are people who who were who were sending human waves of teenagers across minefields to clear them with no weapons, just sending human waves, kids across minefields to clear them out. This, is it? This was a regime that look very very dangerous and they were dangerous. We, just maybe you know. We allowed ourselves to get sucked into some allusions about how how controllable Saddam Hussein was. That's for sure. When. I think. Is a lot of there's a lot. We don't know about the casualties in the Iran Iraq war, but most estimates have between eight hundred thousand million people. It's a big war. It's a big conventional war, the battle of Bosnia toward the end of it I think was the biggest battle since the Second World War if I'm not mistaken. Maybe since one of the one of the Korean War Korean wars, battles, but I. Think Sixty five thousand Iranians and twenty five thousand Iraqis were killed. I mean it's a big battle. That's a big. A set piece battle. Or, we're just not used to those kind of things where there's a lot of trench warfare going on, and they are just a war of attrition literally. I mean they're at the point toward the end where they're manpower's depleted in there, just launching Scuds at each other cities you know and. Brutal thing. And that ends in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty eight. Month before that is when US intens shutdown that Iranian airliner. But as Iranians now know from their recent experience. Things happen yeah I brought that up. A I was surprised. It wasn't brought up more. After this recent incident, and this is again you know when you start talking about the the theme of having a threat die back to, but yeah the Vincennes. Shot down an Iranian, airliner. However, many souls were on board. You know hundreds of one, hundred fifty or whatever that number is. In, so it's A. Massive loss of life and we. Very very actually very similar circumstances. When you pick that apart, you know the. The Iranian shooting down the airline. Iranian shutdown of the airline was it was so similar like the panic buttons going off, you know they. There's there's uncertainty going on. I remember I had some people that I knew not military people who? When the Iranian shut down that airliner! They were kind of like Oh. Something like that doesn't happen by mistake. I'm like no total. Very. Who's running that thing? They've never been in combat before that. The person running that air defence battery has never been in combat. They've never had a situation where it counted. And they're in a situation where they're probably expecting to be. Up You're waiting to get attacked by the Americans and all of a sudden. You know you're you're? You know you and I can picture this. He probably better than me because you were in the. In the? Combat if information centers at the. So you're in that on a ship, and there's all of a sudden. You know someone's going right. We got tracking. We're tracking inbound and there's spin off of the voice, and and now you gotTa make a decision. You GotTa make a decision to what we're GONNA do. We. See something on the radar where looking at it. We know we're vulnerable to attack right now where we're anticipating attack. Oh, where is it heading? We're tracking August. We're heading for us. All Right? Hey, we need to take this thing. This is a missile attack boom. This is A. This could so easily happen. It's ridiculous actually how easy it could happen in eighty seven, when the stark got hit by Iraqi cruise missile to cruise missiles, I think the Te'o, tactical action officer and the commanding officer they got disciplined for failing to defend their ship and I. I got to Imagine I. Mean they're sitting there like? Is this really happening right now? If I hit fire, am I going to kill a bunch of civilians like that's a? That's a worrying thing you know, and it's got to be a tough. I've never had to make any decision like that obviously and it. Yeah, it's a tough one. I mean especially if you're paying that, I have to imagine that night. When the Iranians launch those missiles at us a few months ago and They must have just been sitting on pins. Seattle's bracing for impact especially with trump. You know what that guy is GonNa? Do and if he does respond, you know it's going to be overwhelming. And they had been bracing for impact. I mean it up, you know. They called the head and everything supposedly, but golly you just don't know. And the Vincennes had had similar like spin ups going into that shootdown as well where. That, wasn't that wasn't A. Again I'm not saying not making excuses, but. Sitting here, I can understand how that unfolds. You bring up the fact that in Ramadi. There was blue on blue. There was Humvees shot other Humvees so so think about that. You know like Humvee when most recognizable vehicles ever made. which is. Solely used by the US military, and I guess we had Iraqis Houston at that point as well, but the enemy was not driving around these. Years later Isis was driving around in Humvees. But at that time there was no one driving around in Humvees. No enemy and you know a young guy paranoid and freaked out and scared, and you know sees a muzzle flash or sees whatever and engage. That's what happens. It's horrible knowing that it you know. If you fail to act then the next second, you might be dead and you just gotTa do it, and it's the wrong decision, but and and yeah, when you're doing something like air-defense. You're not looking at an aircraft up there. You're looking at a blip on a radar screen. You know at an aircraft that's out of visual range. and so Saddam Yeah, we're talking about. Saddam sky comes in power and seventy nine starts. Executing people starts terrorizing population immediately goes to war with Iran has an year long war. It's the bloodiest war the second half of the twentieth.

Saddam Vincennes US Iraq Iran Saddam Hussein Saddam sky officer Bosnia Ramadi Isis Seattle
"saddam" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

07:52 min | 2 months ago

"saddam" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"It. there's like a nine minute version kind of cuts his short. You can go see the thing, but. He's got all so he's taken over right from general. Qassim was the guy before him, and he's taken power, and he calls all the Baathist party leaders and senior senior membership into this assembly hall. And there you know some people who talking and everything Saddam's strides up and he is I. Mean You watch him? He is just like either a great actor or he is confident. He is just striding up there with an arrogant pose. And he starts speaking about the traders that are out there, and all the people that are besetting the country of Iraq. The Party and Blah Blah Blah and the people are like yeah okay. And he reaches down just slowly pulls this big long cigar out of his pocket and lights it and he's there on stage, and he starts smoking this cigar and he just starts saying. If I, call your name. Stand up and go to the back of the room, and people are kind of start to look around each. He's planned all this, so he's having it filmed and he knows who's going to be called so like the camera will go to some of them sometimes and as he's calling, his name's people are kind of looking like what is going on. They know what's going on, but they're just they're. They don't know what to do, and so they get up and they head to the back with the guards are. And finally one guy goes stands up and he says wait. Why'd you call me I? Didn't do anything I didn't do anything and Saddam just says. If I. Call Your name. Please stand up and go to the back with the guards, and the guy just goes back and people go back and people are starting to look at each other and realizing like what's happening here and. That these guys are being called back to go be executed. And then afterwards he up. He says a few words and all of a sudden the people just break out long live Saddam long live Saddam and they're giving him like a big standing ovation. Because what else are you going to do in that situation? and. You know this is a guy who was in power for over. For almost thirty for twenty five years, and he had a long long period of time to find exactly the people. To put into positions who were going to do exactly what he needed him to do to keep control of that of that society, and the rest of the people there had to figure out how to survive under that. I mean from. The moment Saddam takes power. He is at war essentially. One, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy nine. He takes power, and he's at war with Iraq next with Iran the next year. And it's a war that kind of gets lost today. A lot of people just slide right past it I mean it was one of the it was probably the worst war and second half of the twentieth century in a Lotta ways. It was. For sure. Brutal over a million killed. you know devolving to a point where the two sides are just launching. You know. Ballistic missiles at each other cities just population centers indiscriminately just launching them at each other. Chemical weapons being. Used on population centers. Purely to terrorize. To let people know that you not rise up. And This at this point. Saddam's pretty a pretty secular leader. Yeah! I mean this isn't a guy. That's out touting Islam. As the as the rule of law around Iraq, he would stay that way until the nineties. Yeah, yeah, the Baathist party is a secular. Socialist Pan Arab Arab Nationalist Party. And That's why one of the things I think. People really really lose a little bit today. Is, they think like America in the middle. East that we've just been over there. Pulling the strings like the puppet masters from all the way back from seventeen, seventy six or something that that's what we've been doing. When Centcom wasn't even stood up until nineteen eighty three. The Iraq. War been going on for three years. This is ten years after the oil crisis in Central Command stood up. And I remember after the US stark got hit. The frigate got hit by a cruise missile in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seven, even in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seven, the response to that from a lot of the navy brass was. Why are we over there? What are we doing here? We were very much reacting to events, and we didn't know a lot about who these people were you know when when somebody like Saddam comes along, He seems like a secular nationalist type leader Scott some worrying tendencies, but he's only been around a year, and meanwhile we've got the Iranians over here. Who just took over with like an extreme Islamist revolution? Overran our embassy took a bunch of our people. Hostage and are are starting to act out some pretty extreme ways, so that's the context that Saddam comes into the picture and all of a sudden. He wants to fight with Iran. He's got a big Soviet army. You know the Iranians unfortunately have a pretty well equipped military as well because we were shows, you know. We were his friend before that, so they took his that we had just in the last few years before nineteen, seventy nine had sold him a bunch of F. Fifteens and a bunch of just great aircraft. And it gave Saddam fits in the war because of that, but I mean they had a pretty well equipped army. Iran as an ally for years, and now you have this revolutionary government. Yeah, this is when you see the pictures of Iran. In Nineteen, seventy four and the women are wearing miniskirts out in town, and it looks like a Metropolitan Western country. And I I. You know it's one of the reasons that a lot of people get on my case because I tend to give I tend to give Saudi Arabia a little bit more break than a lot of people I know, and the reason I do it, though is as opposed to a place like. Iran where Iran was a certain way. You know we're women were free, and it was relatively modern place, and then they had this revolution, said no, no more of that, and presumably a lot of those people who were enjoying their lives back in the day. Still Live there now. They have to live under this regressive aggressive manner. Saudi Arabia for however however they look to us. Obviously, it's not acceptable according to. The way we do business. There's liberal now they've ever been. You know it's a slow long project. It's not like they were a certain way. And then they got taken over by these crazy Islamists and you know. Iran's not that way ran was a relatively free and open secular country where women were free, and so all of a sudden you get this revolution in the revolutionary parts important right because it's not just a government that's kind of hostile now and maybe doing things passing laws, social social laws and stuff that we don't like. It's a revenue. It considers itself a revolutionary state like the Soviet Union did so. It's not just an enemy country. It's a revolutionary movement, and they're eyeing the rest of the Muslim world. You know that's why they established has belonged Lebanon. It's why now they're still trying to establish an Iraqi version of that to this day. Is. It's built into their system into their ideology that this is an expansionist thing that there's a larger project, so it doesn't just involve them. In involves the rest of the Muslim world. So that's very worrying to us. Nineteen seventy-nine still got our people. Are Holding captive from the embassy. Saddam comes along. He starts fighting with these people, and of course it I were Kinda like all right. Maybe this guy's all right. Let's see how this plays out. Hasn't done all the things he's going to do yet. I'm he's not a nice guy. We know that. But. We don't have the whole story and we kind of have some hope in, so we start out in the Iran. Iraq war. And you know we're kind of hoping that maybe he can. Who knows maybe create enough stress on the Iranian regime that they flip back over something like and you're also. You're also looking at the situation you've got gotTA leader coming into power, and you don't really you know like you said you know he's bad, but you kinda think well. He's stepping into power. He's GonNa Influence. He's going to need what we have we can. How can we?.

Saddam Iran Iraq Baathist party Saudi Arabia Arab Nationalist Party Qassim US Centcom Soviet Union Soviet army America Lebanon F. Fifteens Central Command TA Scott
"saddam" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

08:00 min | 2 months ago

"saddam" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"So. Where does that kind of Where's that guy come from? How much you know about his origin story I. Know Pretty be a decent amount. I mean it's a it's a super villain origin story in some way complete you know. He is father and brother die of cancer while his mother's pregnant. His mother so depressed that she tries to abort Saddam, but he survives, and so she just abandoned him, and he goes to stay with an uncle for a while. He eventually comes back to his mother. After she remarries stepfather just abuses them terribly, and so he flees and goes back. It's like well. That's how you start. That's that's those are the those are the opening ingredients for you. Get a guy like this, but I think it's important to remember to like the stuff you're reading right. They're all this stuff that happened. One guy does not do that. One person cannot do that Hitler can't commit the Holocaust by himself. You know instead dom could not create that. Tear state all by himself either. Yes I'll tell you what man. Leadership is the most important thing on the battlefield, and it's guys like Hitler and guys like Saddam the man they set the conditions, and then what's really scary? Is You know as we see in with atrocities? Take Place Right. Sure it's not. It's not that leader. A doesn't take. It doesn't take much. It doesn't take much. To. To. To lead people down this road like all the all the all the YOU WANNA. Throw it out there that people are you know. Naturally Benevolent and they're naturally. People want to help each other. I get it and I I. I know that that is a thing to. You can convince yourself of, and it's probably right in many cases in the right conditions. you those conditions. And it's it's it's. It's not a stretch. It doesn't take as much as you would hope it takes. Two to lead people down this path it just that's the. That's the horrible truth, and that's why we have to be. So aware of it. That's why you have to understand it. You know when we did the when we did the podcast on the me. Lai massacre and the Sand Creek massacre and we went. We went through those, but when I did me lie on my podcast. You know those were normal people. That was a that was a cross section of America. Now one of those! Ob and I had this conversation with Jordan Peterson as wall which was. I had told. An army group that they had sadist in their platoon like I said listen, you got, and they were looking at me, and I talked to a lot. I can read a crowd and they were looking at me. As if I was a little bit crazy, and maybe just you know trying to be extreme or whatever and I'm looking back at them, and I'm thinking. They don't believe me right now. They don't believe me. They think I'm wrong or they don't believe me your, or this is just hyperbole, and no, no, no, and it's all away, would second you guys are looking at me like I like I don't know what I'm talking about here. Like you're like you're going to be in a platoon and this was actually young. You know Officers on the way to being commissioned, so I was an officer candidates or cadets. As, you looking at me like I, don't know what I'm talking about right now. And and I said. Let me let me ask you this if I'm wrong than how did how did MEELI UNFOLD? How did that happen? If if you've got a platoon? Or Company and there's one hundred and fifty guys. There's no bad apples in there. How does that happen? That one that one company just happen to get all the bad guy. Every bed and you know when I actually. Drilled down a little bit with Jordan Peterson and I said. Hey, you know this is what I told. These army guys. I said I told him in a platoon. They gotta say in there. Am I right. I said murderer to which I don't know what the I don't know how you draw that line, but. He said well. He said how many people in two hundred forty and he goes. Oh, yeah, you're good you're you're you're in? And especially because there's a whole chunk of civilization that just don't go in the military right at that chunk. That just doesn't want to go in the military. Almost none of them sadist right you as soon as you're in the military, you have a higher percentage of you know. What are you? What are you signing up for signing up to shoot people and kill people? That's what I'm signing up, so there's a there's a whole element. It's already gone so one out of forty. It's Pretty Pretty Pretty Nice. Pretty Generous. And so as we talk about this, it's like. Yes. I get it that. Saddam clearly. But man you. He absolutely set the conditions for this, and that was the other interesting thing about the massacres that. It was one officer. You Know Thomson. Who'd flown in saw was happening. Flashback headquarters said these guys are murdering people tell you need to stop it. And the the commanding officer on the Horn and says hey stop killing people and they're like okay. They stopped like instantly. It's instantly you wouldn't believe you saw it in a movie. You wouldn't believe it like waking up from a dream. You wouldn't believe it if you saw the movie. They just GONNA. Stop now. No, that's what happened. They got told no and they stopped. I wish I would've brought i. read an account by a guy who was a member of Isis, and he had this. He had done it all sex slavery. Killing I mean everything. and. He sort of. He describes it as like waking up from a dream. He's in the middle of massacring village of an assault on a village, and he snaps out of it and goes. What am I doing? And he found his way out of it after that he st talks about this stuff now I have to. End Immoral and you wonder like okay. That's a guy who's capable of waking up and saying what am I doing. The same guy who was he's raped. He has murdered children. With. Conviction doing it with conviction. You know. We're we're complex creatures and we're very adaptable creatures and we can adapt to. Whatever environment we find ourselves in and I think one of the things that you know we have certain. Models that we use for thinking about other people's behavior we think about. You know we think about like the French Resistance in Germany right or the partisans out in the east when when Germany overran them. We think well. They didn't give up right. They just kept fighting and they resisted the power. Okay, what if what if it's over Hitler One? Because that's what happened in Iraq Hitler One. It's over. And now you've got to adapt yourself to that society because nobody's coming to save you. Not until two thousand three at least I mean that's that's it and you got to figure out how to survive in a place where? You don't just get killed for treason. You get killed because you know somebody's having a paranoid attack, and that's it and or some needs to send a message to a bunch of other. People's got nothing to do with you, and you got to figure out how to navigate that people can become very different creatures than They kind of naturally devolve into when they live in. Vermont. You know. I've seen some pretty devolved creatures up in Vermont. Yeah. No, it's. Actually Vermont probably a place where you wouldn't evolve you get better. You become a better person up there in in the woods in the sticks, so let's go back to Saddam. Where were we? Have you ever seen the video? It's an amazing video the video. When he at the at the bath this meeting where he took power. It is an I tell I. Tell everybody to watch it and watch him. And, so for.

Saddam officer Hitler Jordan Peterson Vermont dom Germany army America Ob Lai Sand Creek Iraq assault Horn
"saddam" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

02:48 min | 2 months ago

"saddam" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"This is the Jaakko unraveling podcast episode two with Daryl. Cooper and me Jaakko willink. I know that the last episode you know we wrapped up with A. Pretty a harrowing account. and. You kind of said well. We'll move on to other things, but. I gotTA keep us there for one more account here. It goes like this horror in. Iraq takes endless forms. In, one, thousand, nine, hundred, thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty, eight Iraqi air force helicopters sprayed scores of Kurdish villages with a combination of chemical weapons, including mustard gas seren in VX. A deadly nerve agent. Scores of thousands of Kurds most of them, women and children died horrible deaths. Of those who survived many were left blind or sterile or crippled with agonizing lung damage. But most of the Kurds slaughtered in that season of mass murderer were not gasped, but rounded up and gunned down. Into mass graves. Those victims were mostly men and boys. And their bodies have never been recovered. In one village near Kirkouk. After the males were taken to be killed. The women and small children were crammed into trucks and taken to a prison. One survivor Salma A. Ban. Described the ordeal to t to journalist, Jeffrey Goldberg. WHO reported on Saddam's war against the Kurds. In The New Yorker in March. More than two thousand women and children were crammed into a room and given nothing to eat. When, some starved to death, the Iraqi guards demanded. That the body be passed to them. Through. A window in the door. Seizes six year old son grew very sick. She says he knew he was dying. There was no medicine or doctor. He started to cry so much. He died in his mother's lap. I was screaming and crying. She told Goldberg. We gave them the body. It was passed outside and the soldiers took it. Soon, after she pushed her away to the window to see for child had been taken for burial..

Jeffrey Goldberg Saddam Cooper Daryl Iraq nerve agent Salma A. Ban lung damage Kirkouk t
Philadelphia restaurant puts together 62-page hygiene manual

KYW 24 Hour News

01:01 min | 2 months ago

Philadelphia restaurant puts together 62-page hygiene manual

"The co owner of a popular old City restaurant, says new covert era hygiene practices Would soon become commonplace. Hey Y W. Saddam's cousin, it's as more staff a Cuba Libre, a restaurant and rum bar have spent months coming up with hygiene manual for Seif service and co owner Barry Guten predicts much of the 62 page manual could soon become routine. You think about all the protocols that came up directly after 9 11 and all the security saw in airports, and at first they seemed kind of odd and over the top. But a lot of those stuck and now are commonplace, he says. Covert could change what we consider to be proper etiquette at restaurants like the idea that it's rude to check your phone at dinner. Yes, Khun View their menu on their own device phone or I pad or otherwise. It says they have protocols in place for masks and temperature checks, but had smaller capacity could also impact how guests dine hope. Flatten the curve. A different curve. This is the restaurant seating curve. Everyone should think about dining early or late, dining on off nights instead of just peek nights. KOW news

Barry Guten Khun View W. Saddam Seif Old City
How Healthy is Your Family?

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

05:26 min | 3 months ago

How Healthy is Your Family?

"How are your children being affected by the disintegration of the American family in a recent news week poll, half of the people ask said that their families are in worse shape now than they were ten years ago and no wonder, the divorce rate has doubled since nineteen, sixty five and experts say that one third of all children born in the eighties will live in A. A stepfamily before they grow up on top of that one of every four children lives with a single parent and twenty two percent of today's children were born to a teenage parent, and when it comes to who is watching our children. Two thirds of all mothers work outside the home. If you feel that your family is going a little helter skelter, everybody doing their own. Own Thing and the family unit is falling apart, or if the people you call your family, don't fit the traditional description like the cleavers or the huxtables. We want you all to join family unity workshop. We asked to our studio audience to take several tests so that we could find out how healthy their families are, and now we want you to test your family's health. Health, too, so get a pencil and paper and take this first test. It's called the family rituals test, and the test is taken from a fascinating book written by one of our favorite guests on the Oprah Winfrey show Dr Paul Pearsall renowned family psychologist, and it's called the power of the Family Paul. Glad to have you here. Thank you glad to have you once again. Well. I know the audience is already taken. The test and I went over the test. And what does this ritual tell us know it's a strange thing. Many of the couples we interviewed families didn't have time to take the test because we're too busy to look at one of the family had rituals or not, and one mother looked at me and said we have the Dooby Doo Bee. Doo Syndrome in our family. I said what's this dooby? Dooby Doo Bee Doo, she said we spend too much time doing and not enough time being so the rich test is a measure of whether or not you really give dignity and celebration that the simple daily acts of family life, or you just run right past them and have separate breakfast separate dinner, separate bed times and live alone, even though you're in a group, dignity and celebration I like those choice of words what it sounds kind. Kind of Corny to say that, but we found families that would eat in quiet or fight during dinner. They'd take a bite and say well school Goin- what you're telling me shut up. Don't pick on your brother I've had it with you. This is enough to. Did you enjoy dinner eight? That's really what's happening and it's not that the family is failing. We are failing our families, and if we don't make enough time at least a. A Saddam most families didn't even sit down for dinner. That's what the ritual test. Let's see. I think children are in crisis in this country, but children are in crisis only because families are in crisis. That's where it starts. That's what we think that these children just didn't refer to their families much anymore. Children are aware of rituals. They'll pointed out to you. Sometimes. They'll say mom we. We always used to do it that way. We shouldn't do this even the simple act of saying grace I. Don't mean to get too pushy about those type of things, but we saw people. Sam So fast. You couldn't tell her saying grace. Somebody be grabbing, food. What happened to the idea of just sitting down a moment, you know the old idea we used to say. Sit Down and shut up. Okay I. Tell You what we wanted to do. Now. Let's go through the test. Can we do that? The test of the family rituals and our audience is already answered these questions, and perhaps maybe if you watching it home with answer these questions, you'd get a clear idea about where your family is right now I. Question. Does your family move is one unit when it walks a group or does someone dragged behind? I found that very interesting because I said. If you're walking down the street, everybody can't walk at the same time. Honesty families go to shopping centers and you'll see these somebody's lagging behind. The fodders looks discussed. It I'll go sit there. You go shop. I'll meet you in the lot. If you'RE GONNA. Do it. do it together. Okay now. Who who answered that question? No, now why why Antonio Yep? Because whenever I'm walking with my husband, he's either always pushing the child or walking the dog, or whatever so he's far ahead or five behind and there we go as a separate unit else walks is a separate unit. I know. Some people lied on the test to see that. Some people lied on the tests. They want us to think they're to huxtables, not only lie, but some people don't pay enough attention to. My husband is sixty five. He always walks a few steps ahead of I'm always behind standard. Intentional! I tell stem this all the time, too, because his legs are so long that when he takes a step, I have to take one and a half for every step that he takes so we're in the airport and I'm looking like we're from foreign country. Walk Twelve paces behind. A lot I sometimes have to turn around and wonder why she's like a blockbuster. Because your legs are so much longer. Yeah, okay. What does that really isn't the walking style you? Yes, it's certainly cause I'm kind of Tom Lanky to my family alive behind, but this issue the attitude while you're doing this. Is there some attempt interesting family say come on, catch up. Let's all go look at this rather than I'm going to the store you go to. The dresses will lose the kids if we can and will meet in the lot, it's really the attitude is not just the distance. Doesn't that mean in some way that that person feels separate from you? Well, that's the tragedy. Tragedy sounds a little corny, but it's just like we're not really doing this together. We're going to get hurt close. He's gotTa get three pairs of slacks. I'm sick of the shopping any way faster. We get it done. The better somebody's disgusted. That's not doing it together. That's not a ritual. It's a routine routine is just getting done. Ritual is a celebration of the doing

Dooby Doo Bee Oprah Winfrey Dr Paul Pearsall Saddam Antonio Yep Tom Lanky SAM
Brazil's COVID-19 death toll becomes second-highest in the world

Freakonomics Radio

04:06 min | 3 months ago

Brazil's COVID-19 death toll becomes second-highest in the world

"Those death toll from cove in nineteen has surpassed that of the UK and is now second only to the United States more than nine hundred people have died in the past twenty four hours according to Brazil's health ministry taking the total number of fatalities to forty one thousand eight hundred and twenty eight the WHO's says some intensive care units in in Brazil Brazil are are at at a a critical critical stage stage having having exceeded exceeded ninety ninety percent percent of of capacity capacity because because of of the the high high number number of of covered covered nineteen nineteen patients patients saw saw South South America America correspondent correspondent Katie Watson now reports from sao Paulo another could be cool out in Brazil's biggest in the center of the content the traffic flowing to these days because of quarantine but distance is still significant in the city of twenty two million and the roadster is bad as I thought talk to Francis knows him not to and drive it to attending a woman in her nineties cave in nineteen seventy percent of that call out and now related to the virus the university hospitals emergency ward dedicated to cope with nineteen patients health services here a badly coping the patience to make it a hospital all in a sense the lucky ones and also says the same three times as many people die in combat to life before the pandemic for a nickel Mister Ford became known Ching eyes to keep enough as it and then he started all we were doing was registering that's at home people interest leap and never woke up they didn't even have a chance we can come and get them to the hospital so we can give their family we arrived and they were already dead the motion Saddam Spinoza but for me to check out this story of a topic off to every patient they clean down the anti begins and change that protective equipment his close them down the not taking any risks they've been hit pass me by this virus a colleague many in the fourth looked up to pasta way home code nineteen in April the cross town in Sampaoli's eastern suburbs one of the worst hit areas of the city the virus is all too visible I had a vague but I bought out the whole Josie tells me how fond she was of her dad and Tanya hardworking in his sixties he passed his high school exams it had long been a dream of his to finish his education until you passed away last week as did his daughter chose to Kelly admitted to hospital the same day treated next to each other in intensive care they passed away within days of each other the case they said only the family called quite believe it they thought it was just panicked by the media fast nobody they knew had had the disease the president Jaipal Singh are of course his credit and we flew something that just absolutely disagrees with Hassan also courted he said just getting to the ball three was a struggle to brief nobody's taking this seriously they say well this is family mourns on tell you and Kelly cities like sao Paulo and Rio a starting to re open this despite a thousand people dying every day at the moment it's a strategy that many people fail to understand back in the ambulance Francis finishes a cool night his children's house so he decides to swing by the fact that you can only way through the gate the psychological toll he says is the most difficult he's not hog seven year old auto for more than two months such as his fear of passing the virus on he jumped in the ambulance and turns the siren off to this little game has to make do for now the end of the evening W. auto stretches out his arms to show how much he loves Francis and then he's off this is someone

Russia's Putin Declares State Of Emergency After Fuel Spill In Arctic

Environment: NPR

01:46 min | 3 months ago

Russia's Putin Declares State Of Emergency After Fuel Spill In Arctic

"Russia's President Vladimir Putin declared a state of emergency in a remote Arctic. Region of Russia in that region, twenty thousand tons of diesel fuel spilled into a river two weeks ago. Here's NPR's Lucian Kim. The accident took place at a power plant and no risk, an industrial city north of the. Arctic circle almost. Two thousand miles from Moscow, or than six hundred workers are now collecting the mixture of oil and Water Natalia Karma Nov.. Local environmentalists says it could take decades for the delicate Arctic ecosystem to recover the Snow Shania. She told the Redux Youtube. Channel that toxins could enter the food chain, affecting not only aquatic life, but also the reindeer population. Four employees of the power plant have been arrested on charges of violating environmental regulations Bucci Saddam. Thursday a spokesman for Russia's investigative committee sit on state TV that neural six mayor was being charged with negligence. The accident has been compared to the nineteen eighty nine Exxon Valdez spill. The one big difference is that the diesel fuel has not reached the open sea Sergei cheng-kuo is a chief operating officer of neural SC Nickel which owns the fuel tank. He blames global warming Thawing Permafrost Denise it I'm syndrome. Magic Captain Sandwiches Right, and obviously it's actually go back on the ground in a call with investors. This week he promised the company would start monitoring the permafrost below its facilities I am repeating again the going through February monitoring. For now. Norilsk Nickel is focused on the cleanup. It estimates the cost at one hundred fifty million dollars Lucian. Kim Npr News Moscow.

Russia Lucian Kim Moscow Sergei Cheng-Kuo Norilsk Nickel Vladimir Putin Kim Npr Bucci Saddam Exxon Valdez NPR President Trump Chief Operating Officer
Alligator rumored to have been Hitler's dies in Moscow

Orlando's Morning News

00:51 sec | 4 months ago

Alligator rumored to have been Hitler's dies in Moscow

"One alligator that many people believe once belonged to Adolf Hitler has died at the Moscow zoo the zoo said the alligator was about eighty four years old when he died on Friday its name was Saturday the zoo says Saddam was born in the U. S. and later sent to the Berlin zoo he later escaped when the zoo was bombed in nineteen forty three his whereabouts were unknown until three years later in nineteen forty six when British soldiers found him and gave him to the Soviet Union is it okay to be a fan of that Gator I mean if you survive a bombing and then you live into your eighties in your Gator I think that's an accomplishment you know it's an innocent animal I mean come complicit in any of this right just being a Gator right he didn't want to be Hitler's Hitler's Gator Gator you you just just want want to to be be a a catering catering live live long long time time we we should should put put up up a a plaque plaque for for him him over over lake lake Jesup Jesup why why because because there's there's thirteen thirteen thousand thousand other other Gators Gators lake lake Jesup Jesup that's that's why why

Adolf Hitler Saddam Soviet Union Jesup Jesup Moscow Berlin Lake Lake Jesup Jesup
All About Alocasia 'Polly'

On The Ledge

09:19 min | 4 months ago

All About Alocasia 'Polly'

"Plant is allocated Paulie applaud. That certainly poses some challenges for most of us. Mere Mortal House plant growers and Today. I'm joined by Mireya of instagram account. Born gardening to help you pick your way through the minefield that is allocated Eur polly care. Maria is a gardener. In the wonderful city of Baja. Lana did I say that. Well probably not in Spain. And she is a DAB hand at growing this plant. A member of the asteroid Klein with those vein leaves the look so stunning when you buy them and look some terrible as they start to die. So where have we all been going broke? Will his my chat with Mariah so we will find out Mireya. We are here to talk about. Alec as your Paulie which I think might be up there as the number one plant that people find a bit tricky to grow. It's a beautiful beautiful plant though and I can understand why everyone is so captivated by it isn't one of your favorites. Yes is eased one of my favorites for me. It's a plan. I associate with the tropics and just takes me straight to the tropics and with this deep green Arrow shaped way. Wavy edged leaves mesmerizing. I mean I can spend hours looking at A. It's unbelievable really nice and I think that's why a lot of people would have in. The House is Yeah. It does seem very widely available now. I think it must've been being being mass produced and so everyone can get their hands on this blog now but not everyone can keep it happy and the number of times. I see a post from somebody saying my Poli is dead. Wayne Coors is a day polly. How do people kill this particular law? I think the number one issue with this plan is maintaining the high levels of humidity and warmth as well in in the House. You know to recreate this kind of ganguly environment in a house is quite is quite hard. It really likes sort of temperature from sixteen to two seven degrees so that could be a tricky especially in the UK in the winter when the Heaton is on the air. It's way dry. I mean I live in the Mediterranean. So that helps quite a bit because he is quite warm Resolution is very humid. So it's sort of like lifestyle. I know by St Louis talking about high levels of humidity which are to trades in a house about fifteen percent of up. So I think what he what is good. Is to have a humidifier few hours a day if you can if you can have one. I mean I don't have one so what I use is pebble trade. We've so when J.j This humidity around it. And what I really like doing as well. Which mind is in this environment is grouping grouping the plans which claimed his micro and you really works. My one is surrounded by Begonias Theis fans which is they will require high levels of humidity on. I think he's really nice as well. Because you create a little landscape like literally to your landscape of having them scattered around the house so I think this this this works. That's a good point because people often want to display this plot as a specimen plan on its own because it is so gorgeous but as you say it's probably going to be much happier in agree with all the plots where it's it's possibly going to get a bit of a boost not just looking at my little Thermometer slash humidity monitor in here and it's only thirty two percent humidity in here right now which is terrible. I think you know the winter. Obviously I didn't know how you'll heating works here in the UK mainly have radiators. Which are you know hopefuls being piped through and it's makes yes so dry states they have avenue which is even worse so there is a real issue. That as you said humidifier can breed really help. I think it would be excellent. It's it's it's it's the it's the trick the humidifier if you have the heat on he. I live in various choir choir. Small you know by a flag and you really need the heating on winter so we quite lucky without the you polly was getting too little humidity. How would she know? What size does it? Give off that. It's really unhappy is it so the crispy edges to the lease is that it produces this brown tapes and sometimes we see Yellow Halos as well on the leaves then when we when we started saying that it. That's that's what it needs really and sometimes what happens as well then using all my God. You know it's so we can. We get that confusion between humidity on wartime with sometimes is really difficult to handle and restart over watering and then what happens is a leads to grow pot and then with a prominent as well does it. It can it di- back can go into dormancy and winter and lose leaves and then come back in the spring yet. That's what he does actually below twelve degrees. It goes into dormancy. Need to keep in place. But don't worry if you see that growing leaves coming out image just is having FBI arrest during the period and then in the spring will come back. Come back to live so the bright again and you can you can start again with the winter and you have to look at match less obviously and defined with this plot the oftentimes. It needs reporting when you buy it because it's been posited into something that's possibly not suitable in terms of potting mix. Then I think What I do with mine I? I like to try to regularly regret as I can. This sort of Equi jungle me soil which I try to create my own with the potting soil. Potting ORCHID BAR. It is possible the one and then alight and then. I think we're really works as well as could innovate finally In in the mix and because he keeps it gives the soil them. Which is what this plan likes as well. It doesn't like soggy soil like Saddam so spag. Moore's is great doing that so I think he's good if you can get hold of some spinal Moscow. Someone can mixing it with the soil and mix it. Yeah because sometimes comes in when you buy is not is it just you water him water and all the nutrients and unique to to change it a bit and we'd like to this. Hugh applaud. What's the regime there? We don't want it alongside the CACTI and succulents possibly now now. We don't want with in full Sun. Full side is not advisable egg because they will just banned leaves and and the economy comes from San alikes. Brian direct sand. Actually so a really likes my. My one is in east facing window a few a couple of away from the window and get the morning sun. Which is the best son because sign is strong so it's going really well there. Nfc South facing window is especially in the main Rainey's it's you can have it in the UK. Maybe the winter months. It'd be alright but I will keep a few a few feet away. Not South is this applaud the Subject to draw like if he did keep near near window a cold drafts. Presumably won't be good for it either now doesn't like graphs suffer now. So that's why is bad to say a few away from the window because if you if you have a draft in will kill it definitely doesn't at all and if you have a shady area a one maybe one grow so well I would advise as well. It's too late at least once a month so it will improve with capture in lines for the leaves. Because sometimes you get you get the state the best on the leaves in that. What do you use the ducks? Just damp cloth. Yes a damn close and I think is really is really good for the land and every like is like a set of penalty from his long relaxing and connects you with a plan even more so. I think he's a good thing to do. I do with my ray. I tried to do it

UK Mireya Paulie Mortal House Instagram Spain Lana Baja Maria Polly Wayne Coors Mediterranean FBI Mariah Alec Ducks St Louis NFC Heaton
Across Europe, Reopening Borders in Time for Summer

Kentuckiana's Morning News

03:41 min | 4 months ago

Across Europe, Reopening Borders in Time for Summer

"CBS news Pamela Falk foreign affairs analyst joins us this morning for the latest what's going on in Europe this fall thanks for your time this morning absolutely well gradually as you know cases are still really high there's four point two over four million now confirmed cases and worldwide and those almost three hundred thousand death so that's where they're approaching in Russia is now getting a big wave of confirmed cases but in Europe is particularly complex now when you look at the map Spain is up there right after the U. S. and Russia in the highest number of cases the U. K. E. and as you know Boris Johnson the prime minister is one's home he's back at ten Downing Street but he's running the government but with a mask but he was out for a few weeks and U. K. is and up there and then Italy France now Germany is up there but they kept their businesses open if you if you want to look at the car the countries that have a great deal of success is Belgium Netherlands in Europe and of course New Zealand on the other side of the world but what you're seeing is a lot of the countries in Europe in particular are very complex because the passport free travel you know across borders and that Saddam allowed in twenty two of the European union's twenty seven countries for you we're talking to include you can't but of course you pay is now how because of brexit but all European countries impose some kind of border restrictions and most of their trap I mean terrorism is one of the European union's biggest industries ten percent of their gross national product twelve percent of their job so they want to put that back in and allows some travel so you've seen Austria Czech Republic Denmark Greece all idea of making some headway on terms of containing corona virus and allowing some travel by other countries like Italy and Germany even although they they they have been somewhat successful but brands are are saying the their their publics are not to plan travel to go outside that day you have very strict travel restrictions inside and they're basically a warning people that they are they believe there will be a second wave which is what we're hearing from the US and the U. N. by the way which is where I'm based just extended the remote work entitled July one so using a lot of people think this is at least here going through through the end of the summer hi tam before I let you go let let me ask you one question what about Sweden people are looking at this the herd mentality approach that they're taking I understand they're starting to see the virus they have over a thousand deaths which apparently is a high number for that country now is that correct for what we see yes yes we know has done very well are there very low on the list in terms of overall numbers and they have contained they they you know they're starting to good to come down now this is in a very strict travel restrictions and part of that is that they've been able to contain how people move in and out so yes they they are but they are they

Pamela Falk Analyst Europe CBS
Calling Tennis Remotely, with Ravi Ubha

No Challenges Remaining

06:42 min | 5 months ago

Calling Tennis Remotely, with Ravi Ubha

"Welcome to new challenges remaining. I'm Ben Rothenberg as millions of folks around the world enter their third month of adjusting to working remotely I thought this might be a good time to share the experiences of what it's like to work remotely in tennis when tennis is a sport that sts professionally which doesn't really currently and much of the world feed commentary on the tennis matches you watch at home is delivered from a world away from the courts where the matches are taking place and one of the Veterans of this craft is. Ravi who also works on site at tournaments as a freelance reporter. So foot both the close the distant kind of work in Tennessee. So Ravi will describe here what. It's like working in broadcasting rotely at lifestyle of being distant from the courts and the challenges of creating atmosphere. A place that you're nowhere near so hopefully you will find this interesting. Maybe a little bit resident in these times of distance working that we're all living in and general distance. This interview was recorded near the end of this year's Australian. Open as you'll be able to tell but hopefully it has some some meaning residents or something in our lives. Today here is Ravi. I'm thrilled to be joined on this episode by my friend Robbie who is aware of many different hats in the tennis world. He is this week at the Australian Open. As we record this on my I'll and the pressroom and I'll made of mine as we walked back and forth press conferences and whatever else and share reactions to whatever missed overheads and such happened at once. He's one of those voices in unison gasping and signing and also a voice that I hear actually on the TV and watching at home as a frequent world feed commentator tennis Ravi. Thank you for being here. Ben My pleasure. Thank you for people who maybe more or less with you. Just how did you get into tennis? I in your life. How did you for make the jump into doing it as a career? In my life I grew up in Canada so It surprises me that I actually got into tennis. Because as you know. It's a big hockey country at my earliest memories at home when I was a little kid. Four or five watching the US Open in the background was on TV. Washington handle who? I think. He's my idol. When it comes to sportsman was younger so it started from that Played my whole life. Love playing very regularly and then got into it You know my profession and when I moved to London I was in the early two thousands. I is really a writer and thereafter going into the booth and doing You know share a picture of of commentating and TV work also. So how'd so the writing we've got a lot of show or other writing side of its. I'm more curious about how you make that. Jump how you go from being on the page. What was your first time being behind a microphone? I remember it well. It was a two thousand nine. I was asked to do a Davis Cup tie between Russia and Russia and Romania And so I did that s skew. Kinda thing. Yeah it was actually victor. S Q in McCall usually my first match. Oh I remember well and I think it was because they were looking for people who who just new tennis and covered tennis and as somebody who grew up broadcasting also. I was reported in Montreal where I grew up doing TV. I think they knew that. And they just stick. Okay let's Let's bring him in on something I wanted to do. So it really started from my point. According I've done a lot of tennis radio. Color Commentary. Saddam that different from doing TV. But I'm curious what as you got more into? Tv having been a writer having been a reporter. What skills are translated into what once? Don't translate what he to learn on that new in this new role well it For example the attention to detail that you have in imprinted writing. I think that's very helpful when it comes to being in the booth you know when digging up statistics knowing where to look and knowing how to get them to look for the inside stuff rather than just the basic statistics. I saw you antennas abstract on your computer just nine. Yeah for sure a great website. That's that's something that I bring with me. On the print side things that are different You know you know went to jump jump in and out to in went to Q. Out I'd also just broadcasting is a different is a different also voice. Really when you're as to when you're talking somebody like as we're chatting but now it's it's a different voice you put on. You also have to learn. Went to kind of hit your spots when it comes to nailing down for example phrases after a particular matches. Done you WanNa with a big extra It's not exactly the lead on when it's so important for peace pace but it's kind of the big finish in broadcasting so that there are little things like that they're different is that. I think you become more accustomed to as you do more shoe and actually imprint. They really don't emphasize most editors or papers or publications don emphasize ending so much. Onto a real sign off they most articles fade out or some editors sort of cut from the bottom which is frustrating when that happens because the idea try to put endings on Surrey generally. Bs that when did. When did it become a more full-time thing for you? And how did sort of adding work in that particular line? Is it same as other freelance work or is it different? Yeah no it's pretty much since the I would say two thousand thirteen fourteen and I I would say it's become more of doing that Rather than writing than before it was kind of opposite. He's been more of the writing than the broadcast. I always say since two thousand and thirteen and fourteen. I've lucky enough to to do a lot and it's something I love doing. I mean I sat on the air sometimes tournaments that you know. It's such an honor privileged to be doing it because as a tennis fan my whole life you know. Don't consider it a job. I'm very lucky doing something I really really love. And that's all really can ask for you. Mentioned sort of how the attention to detail in the writing can help the TV. Tv helped the writing effort to go the other direction too. Well helps in the sense that I get to watch a lot of tennis I believe and so I think I have a pretty good grasp of the players so it helps to foster ideas because you know for example. I'll give you an example I was watching an accommodated a master on the Brazilian player. A couple of years ago Eliane Pereira And I was digging up homework doing research for her master when she was playing at home. And I just read Interesting stuff about her. How she grew up in really extreme poverty you know. She didn't have a bathroom in her house. She had her bathroom in kind of the back garden. And so I thought well that'd be nice idea to do a longer feature a long story on inside that Saranda presumably written for the time. Remember that So it does help I mean and I think Ben as you know the more you homework you do on any subject on any play you realize that every player has a great story or has a story to tell I think that's the lesson that I learned. I try to bring them in the booth especially at times when a match is getting out of hand when it's not it's not as dramatic in oak at six one five two or six one three love. Matt out of Control. I think you want to sprinkle in those nuggets Talk about other stuff rather than you know the rallies techniques stuff.

Tennis Ben Rothenberg Ravi Reporter Australian Open Writer Tennessee United States Canada Eliane Pereira Robbie Saranda Hockey Saddam London Montreal Matt Surrey
Saint Laurent’s is ditching the traditional Fashion Month Calendar

Fashion No Filter

06:49 min | 5 months ago

Saint Laurent’s is ditching the traditional Fashion Month Calendar

"Get down system news breaking news this week. I was pretty at. He can aback by the SUNOL announcement. Picking them back in a good way. Ya was although I guess in the last episode we'd been wondering whether big changes were actually going to end up happening so I guess there's your proof that's your answer so for anyone who doesn't know son. A Hall has decided to drop out of Paris fashion week and set its own pace for showing collections direction of the year. And it's going to pivot to adapt to the corona virus crisis and has said they told. Ww W D Saddam will said in a press. Release wd conscious of the current circumstances and it's waves of radical change. Santa has decided to take control of its pace and reshape. Its schedule creates Dr Anthony. Vaccarello said the violent impacted covered nineteen outbreak. Which has forced the closure of most of Santa Stores meant business as usual was not an option chief executive officer Francesca Valentini. Hinted that the brand famed for its spectacular outdoor women's catwalk shows set against the backdrop of the Eiffel Tower in Paris could still age a physical show at some point this year. But his favorite formats. They're more intimate and closely aligned. The final customer room. What do you think that means? It's such big news. I think that a house as respected and that does such exceptional job also needed such an exceptional job for its Shows has decided to to step down. Because that's a really really positive meaning that others will feel other smaller. Brands will feel like they can do the same without sounding like their brands in an unhealthy state. Because I feel like a lot of people will be worried about the way to investors and stuff at the same time as So that's also something to take into consideration when you're canceling big show and some of the big names of doing it gives a lot more room for others. I mean the rose also says that that's what they're going to be doing next season and I think this is a really positive outcome. I do that like brands. Moving away from the long lamented fares suck in place flashing. Schedules is a good thing. There is part of me. Worries that with brands. Big Sahel if they're off schedule but still in Paris are still gonNA maybe in completely off the mark with this that people are still gonna fly to Paris from other places to see that. But they're saying they're not showing. Well are they saying they're not showing? Yeah they said they're not doing a show could still stage a physical show at some point this year. Yeah at some point means one show instead of like the fashion week schedule. Which basically these three shows. Because that's two women or four shows to women's and men's which is from going from four to one is a big step. It's a big step back totally and I'm totally in agreement with that but I just worry that everything is going to become cruise collection competition e where big brands compete to have a more extravagant location or timing or whatever and then we're all just going to have to be on airplanes all the time in random directions and if that's what's going to happen? I would just rather we stick to the fashion week schedule because at least you just take one flight and then you go to Paris and you see the shows you know. That's the devil's advocate but bear in. Mind that that's if international flights have resumed. Which for the time being. It isn't the case and bronze will not have healthy budget. They used to fly people around on a whim as much as they used to. And I feel that for example a brand like Santa Hall would make sense to host an event of some kind in the form of a show. Something else every year in Paris. Because that's whether the house is located and you do have to find a way to promote and showcase what the designers creating certainly certainly so there is you have to be able to allow for some kind of formats. I think it's positive to see that it's going to be less than than it was and I really liked the idea of rethinking a system. That was so wrong but yeah I agree with you until we see what the outcome is. Exactly we can't really speculate county yet. No I assume you know what it occurs to me that some of our listeners might not beyond the fashion week circuit. I feel like I'd love you to go into a little bed and you're really up -cluded on the stuff as well. What about the fashion calendar is has been so wrong for so many years but especially in recent years? Can you speak to you kind of just touched on it? I think the competition for each brand to do bigger and better viral. Basically shows has become completely out of hand plus the fact that there are an increasing number of brands increasing number of people wanting to attend shows. Because it's good for positioning or like people just want to be seen their raw than the because they're actually you know helping promote the show itself and I also feel that we talked about this before. It's always fashion week somewhere and whereas they used to be only one week for each city it's now becomes so long and there's men's could chew and crews and then all the minor fashion weeks like Copenhagen and button and all the others that I can't think of the top of my head right now but I know there are loads of them. Do we really need a show format in an era which is increasingly digital. And when actually sitting front row to show would only be important if that show. It really is a proper added value to the brand. I think partly because of how exhausting has become for everybody and by everybody. I'm not talking about myself. I'm talking about people who really work super hot during that time. So the bias. The brands you work super hard juryman time. Yeah at the end of the day. I'm just that to report I'm not Like I feel like there's a lot of pressure during those those busy busy busy times and having so many shows back to back over a period of a month then Rick 'cause two three times in Aghia and where every single time you have to travel to a different city and attend just absolutely absurd amount of events and shows parties all in the name of promoting a brown and it just turns into a ridiculous exercise which is actually quite just quite cringe and especially after everything. We've gone through in last in the last few weeks. I think it would be quite distasteful to return to

Paris Sunol Eiffel Tower Santa Stores Santa Vaccarello Saddam Dr Anthony Santa Hall Chief Executive Officer Francesca Valentini Sahel Rick Aghia Copenhagen
Designing With Empathy with Sophia Ahamed

The Futur

05:57 min | 5 months ago

Designing With Empathy with Sophia Ahamed

"I think for me My journey through kind of getting a deeper understanding of empathy and you know my role Not just in terms of career but and how I like to help others kind of their business growth. I'm developing more empathy as well Came from you know directly from my experience of losing my parents Since it's been about two two and a half years now within But you know my mother almost almost your life you know at at that time looking in my late twenties at that time and Life is just became very very difficult. I think that when you are in a situation where you're about to lose a think a very important person in life And you're not sure where that pendulums Swin It's almost like life concedes up and just become very where you just have very heightened awareness of yourself Your interactions with the world. The people around you and not in starts to come see it. It's not such a life. It's not a near life experience for me personally but it was more like You just start to become very hyper aware and I think during that time I experienced a lot of other people suffering through illness. You know my mother put her in a hospice for awhile. Because she just wasn't get an investor at that time was I go to work six. Am in the morning. And then I'll get get out of work around six PM. A hospital Tempe until the kicked me out. You know In you know you'd see people just waiting to die people who just need help but you can't help them any. It's very helpless feeling. I think that at that time I was working opposite. Just wasn't Saddam me in any way shape or form and you just become hyper aware fact that you know. I don't have wherever I was in late. Twenty S. How long have left to to do all these one do another ten years? Twenty thirty bucks. Michael Very big number now so is definitely put me in the state of awareness Does she have a terminal illness? No my mother Luckily she she did recover to the point where she didn't need to be in the hospital where she's just Heart failure so It was very touchy though. And that's GonNa last with us for live maintenance fee monitor for us for life But yeah that's that's pretty much just a bit. She's still alive today. Yes yes yes very very grateful for what mom you know. She's not going to be able to be mom. She was before flat on grateful again. Hyper awareness right. You just grateful that my mother's alive and that's very very important to me. In the way that you set that up I was like oh my gosh what what is going on. I'm trying to sort it out my head. I thought you said I had to do with losing my parents of like you lost both your parents at the same time in two years. Hold my gosh. So did you lose your dad or I did. Yes so just around the time of about mom back a stable position to be at home. He Edge Rearrange. The Bima sisters Arranged alive like my mom can't be on her own It's not that's just not going to happen But that's fine like I said I'd rather have my mother live and spin and be with her and spend time with her then then want to have anything else But a year from that. My Dad died Again very suddenly Knowingly expected this and so I in a way I kind of lost in both in in one way or you lost the mom. The you'd new in the now she kind of have to help her to care of her and she's no longer going to be the caretaker view. Right yeah I think that you know even though I think that you know obviously all adults and you don't need our parents to take care of us and that can wait you tensioness going home appearance job retention this holidays when people are like. Oh On see dad. I'M GONNA go see mom or my mom went for what you'd miss the little things and I think that's again since a piper awareness but also fuel for the work because you you get into smoking feels very singular. You know you don't have that person call on phone became an advice or hey dad you know whatever the awesome. That's just Kinda gone. So I think you know again. This bit heartache articulate because I think I'm still very much in that process of understanding my own kind of needs and wants and had fulfilled them but luckily I think a career path. That is very fascinating to me. You know being able to dive into work and have a great sense of empathy for the clients that work with A governor standing to needs and wants and also at the same time it gives me fulfillment and joy. You know. Perhaps I am in a way lacking at times because I'm still trying to navigate through this process

Tempe Michael
Big trades coming including Trent Williams

Podcast Central

00:46 sec | 5 months ago

Big trades coming including Trent Williams

"A couple of big trade seven time Pro Bowl left tackle Trent Williams goes from the residents of the forty Niners in exchange repair picks at the forty Niners said receiver marquise Goodwin to the eagles the best players according to ESPN to go undrafted or Trey Adams of hunter Brian out of Washington at liberty hill from Michigan the patriots pass on every quarterback in the draft and that leaves Jarrett Stidham as next season's likely successor to Tom Brady and coach bill Belichick on Saddam and veteran Brian Hoyer lawyers and we run a couple times and I think you know he certainly gives a very small level and and you know we have our confidence in him and hello and a good year last year improved law and we'll see where that takes him so that's sports stroll strewn in BC news

Trent Williams Niners Marquise Goodwin Eagles Espn Trey Adams Washington Michigan Jarrett Stidham Tom Brady Saddam Bill Belichick Brian Hoyer BC
Did Covid-19 Coronavirus Escape From A Lab In Wuhan?

Mark Reardon

05:55 min | 5 months ago

Did Covid-19 Coronavirus Escape From A Lab In Wuhan?

"The house will vote today on another coronavirus relief bill right now because I I do hear from folks pretty constantly about the we have lab and investigating we have left to party right about this in the Washington examiner he's a resident fellow at the American enterprise institute the author of a book called alienated America Tim Carty welcome to candle wax our you doing well how are you doing I'm good I I approach the you know the information about the lab with caution but as you point out in the piece it would maybe be irresponsible to at least not look at this and what happened in this lab considering via the fallout globally right now so what what do we know about what happened in that lab well we know that it was a lab that investigated among other things corona viruses now did I mean that corona virus we never use the word before the spring obviously but scientists Dr is that the words for all a whole family of viruses that include the common cold and they are so this was a lab that investigated those investigated those that originated in the back as well and most scientists actually agree that the the corona virus sweeping the world right now the pandemic is one that probably originated in a bat the other thing we know about this lab is that when C. U. S. state department officials visited there because they said that the security the safety the cleanliness all of that was not what you would want from people who are handling a very contagious virus and very contagious diseases and so all of that adds up to sanction I wonder if some of the work the scientists were doing there is still some sloppy action the virus came out of that laboratory and ended up infecting somebody in will on now it in again you point out here you're not saying that it was made in this land right back right now that's that's your thing that's an easy confusion to make if you say that seem out of the lab that can sound like it was made in the lab and in our editorial when we say investigate the lab what we're suggesting is that it rather than some guy who bought a pangolin that had been cooked on buy it back that might have been how it happened but it also might have been that is the is research facility which again was noted to have so the poor safety techniques and methods that this research facility allowed it to escape why is that important because China's government has steadfastly denied it and if this is a government lab if China's government through its own sloppiness let this out and then lied to the world about it well that would tell us a whole lot more about well about a Chinese state but it might also be able to tell us something about the nature of the virus we're conducting experiments on it they might know more about it will be out to if Saddam assigned to share might be able to know more about it than we do now when you say pangolin that's the that's sort of the anti that's that's like an ant eater right that's the connection to the back that's that's that's gets worked with scientists basically say you know I think the the sort of the gas of the sort of natural way but the virus enters the human population with somebody bought either eight or touched a pangolin which is a scaly little it looks like it's an acorn and an anteater had a baby what it does here it's very prehistoric looking bizarre now it it does seem like you want to time that somebody bought something like that which is a very rare animals sold in some of these markets and in China and that bad bad bad bad tangling have probably been infected by it that that's the best gas that scientists looking at the DNA X. cetera are are making right now and this is all going to be guess work because this is our first time encountering but again there's a possibility that if that if there were experiments done on this particular strain of coronavirus if that were shared with more of the world then we would be able to better fight than we are now all right so let's let's kind of stipulate that were operating from that perspective and say yeah this is certainly worthy of an investigation but how with the Chinese in particular we move forward and get real answers that you can trust well that's that's a very good point because this is every game that is famous for covering up and so we certainly don't believe that it would be as easy as the F. B. I. showing up in you know going through the at the cash register of the a mop around troops store or something like that their ability to cover up their ability to completely deny anybody from outside their government to inspect would be pretty strong but right now the simple demands that there be an investigation trying to pressure the W. H. O. to ask for an investigation using diplomatic pressure to press on investigation board at least reveal a little bit of where the Chinese government St Thomas and it's possible that we could do an investigation and just getting bad off the hook or maybe it was not even sloppiness but just the sheer bad luck accident that had to happen and it wouldn't even be China's fault but it still could tell us something about it or if we knew we came from a particular animal that could also tell us something the closer we get the more we get in Wuhan whether it be in the wet market or the lab the more we know about it is right I mean think about all the things that are mystery about this paper saying it cannot do as well in the hot weather maybe if they're different strains of it maybe yeah a lot of I think you're right types of people and so the more we know about it the better we can

Interview With Rabbi Daniel Lapin About The Coronavirus Situation

Glenn Beck

10:26 min | 5 months ago

Interview With Rabbi Daniel Lapin About The Coronavirus Situation

"All right let me go to rabbi Daniel Lapin because I I have a religious question for the rabbi and it revolves around jubilee and I was thinking how do we get out of this mess without just scrapping the entire worlds to adapt to that no one could ever pay is we're already there rabbi welcome to the program our area hi Glen good to be with you again and before we've even going a little further let me just to congratulate you and thank you for being the only one to deeply and honestly probe Ted Ross Adams links with the Chinese to address Saddam of course being the first ever non doctor head of the World Health Organization yeah and and covered some of the things you have yeah we we we just it's a main story now on the blaze dot com or you can you can watch this from the blaze yesterday I did a bit of a monologue on it this guy is was you know part of the politburo he is deeply in bed with China part of the the the the the political party the communist political party that he was a part of it will it was deemed a terrorist organization and he's the head of the WHL I mean it's insane insane it really is and and is distortion of the early weeks of the corona virus just prove whose pocket he's in bed it is happening because the Chinese have successfully colonized Africa to a fall great and also to the phone and to to a far more extractive way than the British and the Germans of the Belgians ever did in the nineteenth century yeah exactly right exactly right so rabbi Lapin I have a question on jubilee because we are racking up the debt the world is the rich you're going to get richer on this the banks are going to get their money everybody's making money except the actual people and it and there's no way to pay any of this back it's making all of the people into slaves all around the world and I remembered there was some sort of a system in in Jewish law that like loans had to be repaid by seven years or something like that and then every twenty five years or fifty years there was something called the jubilee world debt was wiped out and might even close on that yes no you you're definitely close and you and I spoke about this years and years ago and and you're exactly right there is it is a fifty program bad it's not quite the socialistic dream that some of our left leaning friends might my dream off because they will ways to make certain that business loans were exempt from this pay back and the reason was because business would have just slowed to a standstill for the last few years of the jubilee cycle because who's going to extend credit to and will close wiped out so A. as a sort of band aid to to irresponsible behavior in the proceeding is didn't didn't quite work that way and and also it it it didn't extend to the return of mortgaged land that is being developed how many undeveloped and so there again as it goes back really to to the big idea which which really were exposed to the very first time in the fourth chapter of genesis where god punished Cain for murder and and because the punishment is supposed to fit the crime in in guard system of justice and unity spectacle what was the punishment to train and the punishment was interestingly enough to fold most people only remember part of it people familiar and remember the best way god says well you have to be a wonder you never gonna be able to stay in the one place in any waiting periods of time but the second part of it was that you'll never be able to grow anything because whatever you trying point will not yield its strength to you so now it gets kind of interesting because what's Kane is being told is Hey you there are only two uses of lands the good lord made a certain amount of land and this two uses human beings can put it to agriculture and development we can grow things will build things mining falls on the ground so those are really the only things you can do now if the land is not going to yield to you then you compliment anything and if the land is is he is not going to be available to because you have to keep moving well you can't really build a skyscraper if you Constantinian one place long enough so somehow or another god is saying to cane use sort of that the secret to wealth acquisition was getting rid of the competition in a useful to begin to get rid of able and now you're gonna be able to have everything and guess what your land is worthless without other people it doesn't mean anything land the land in unpopulated areas of Somalia and Ethiopia for that matter is cheap really really cheap but there's a good reason it's cheap the location he wants to be there Landon very populated Hong Kong Switzerland is very expensive that's where people want to be and so one has to be very cautious when tampering with this divine system of human economic interaction and obliteration of debt is is a huge huge problem because of the blow that it strikes to the system of confidence on which all economic and and financial interaction depends so I you know wouldn't when you say it it can never be repaid well unfortunately there are many people in government or think it can because and that this is a professor at the state university of New York who was not adviser to the to the Sanders campaign who said this there's nothing the government can do it just prints more money no problem yeah you know right right literal failure to understand that that's just another way of stealing our money ever the citizens money and so this is this is unquestionably a huge problem but you know look England came out of World War two huge debts Germany came out of World War one and two with huge debts eventually impact the lost installment of one of these that's was paid I think as recently as the nineties so you does he eat it if we don't get paid that can get paid it'll just take a long time and and if it's not done very wisely and you can precipitate another crisis Texas is that system that is the situation at the vin diesel is that Yukon's destroy the system economic development and the big picture that AB it's been extraordinary to watch is that the default position is people will happily exchange freedom for security and so big organizations get big and I think we're all very concerned about the alacrity with which authorities have seized extraordinary power certainly questionable whether it's constitutional it's certainly not American tradition you know that something which is admittedly there's this there's there's a disease that's a problem it's kind of the salt yeah there was aids was the problem they found solutions he borrows a problem there's a vaccine flu is a big problem there's a vaccine you know I don't know when or what or how but it's going to be solved and the the problem here is is that we are we're not just training our liberty for security but we are we're actually flipping the sense of rights on its head you don't have a right to be safe from all things that that that that that's not even possible right in the Sony's acts and not a right right and so the government is is taking are enshrined rights and taking those away to prop up a right that doesn't and cannot exist and you you're probably on top of this as well but as is obsessive James Dwyer at William and Mary college I mean Michael one of the very old school in America who just recently wrote that the the rights that parents have with respect to the children all grounded by government and that's all it is pretty extraordinary so you know you thought you have a special relationship with your children know that depends on whether the government wishes were you retain that right with respect your children so the the fearsome and terrifying alacrity which with which people seem to accept this extension of in many cases all the tree application of governmental power such as the woman in the pocket and me my goodness the the speed with which you know the cop on the beat used to be your friends he was the one your kids could turn to if they will last and now what are you becoming a terrifying instrument of of applying state power it's easy it's it's frighteningly quick and

Daniel Lapin
A Conversation with Civil Rights Attorney Rabia Chaudry

Asian Enough

05:42 min | 5 months ago

A Conversation with Civil Rights Attorney Rabia Chaudry

"The story that works. You know I've had thousands of people over the years reach out. It's not just me not saying we read this book or we listen to this. We Watch this. And we didn't even realize some of the assumptions we held or the prejudices. We had about Muslims until we heard your story and was like Oh my God. You're just you're just like any of us and and you know it made it much more self aware I think storytelling is one of the most powerful aspects. Storytelling is what changes people's hearts and minds really. Nothing else works. What were some of the stories that I made you feel that like even growing up. You're always like a writer at heart. What were the stories that I took hold in you? Where did you get them? You know the stories growing up as an American Muslim when before nine eleven honestly a lot of people had no or maybe before the Iran hostage crisis. I'm trying to think of what international event made me realize that I'm a Muslim probably the first the first Gulf War. I remember the Gulf War. I was in middle school and the war began in the middle of the day and teacher came over to me and said hey tell your uncle Saddam Hussein to back off or something and I said who is it. Almost saying I'm not era. I don't even know what's happening and I was a kid. But you know a lot of the stories really just came from like my parents handing down stories like stories out of our religious traditions cultural tradition as an adult. I realize what's problematic with a lot of the stories? They're wonderful stories of very heroic stories but they also set up this false like idealism. That didn't allow us to feel like if you're a Muslim you can also have false. You can make mistakes. You can screw up because all the stories were told. Were about people who are just incredibly honorable. Did the most amazing things. And that's what you aspire to And that's what you're supposed to be What's an example? Gosh I mean one example is like my name so I'm named after medieval century like Muslim female saint one of the only Muslim female saints I best known I think she lived in the twelfth century. I don't even know Rubio other. We and you know the story I was told about her growing up. Was that you know she was incredibly right. Just and pious and she spent her days worshiping God in the evening she would go out and teach people and she had so much faith in God that she she just kind of stayed cloistered in this little space that she told people. Don't bring me any food. Because will deliver me. Sustenance and food would appear out of nowhere so for a little kid to be like okay I got like visas does incredible role model and And she says she was an amazing saint from what we know. But of course over the years you don't know what's been added to the tradition and it was just kind of this this really high expectation of piety and religious righteousness. That is really almost impossible to meet. Because you tell us a little bit about where you grew up your born in Pakistan and ended up in Maryland right. Yeah so I thought this was only like six or seven I was. I was under one when my parents came over here. Fundraising United States and my dad worked for the US Department of Agriculture. He was a veterinarian. And a lot of people don't know there's like this huge Boccassini veterinary like a whole gang of them in the US Department of Agriculture. They all came over in the seventies what we grew up in very small agricultural towns because of that. Because my dad had to work where you know where there was agricultural business oh Kansas Delaware Lancaster County Pennsylvania just very remote places where we were often the only people of color not just the only Muslim but really there were there. Were places where there were no other black people know. They're black families so very small town America. Then when I got about high school is when we kind of moved to a slightly bigger town with with diversity in it so but most of my formative years in adult life. I've grown up around the beltway. Northern Virginia or Maryland. And that's where I am. Now you've written on your blog that your parents know how to be quote critical of where we've been and where we are without throwing the baby out with the bathwater. Yeah I guess I just wanted to know how your parents raised you and how that shaped you my parents you know. They left boxes on one thousand nine hundred seventy nine hundred seventy s block. Assad never left them so as time moved on their idea of what's culturally appropriate for us was forever one thousand nine hundred seventy something bucks on. Meaning you know my dad would be like. Why don't you have your hair? Your hair should be in two braids and it should be well oiled and dress a certain way and you should at home. We always wore a boxing enclosing home. You know we only eight bucks any food at home but the funny thing is we would visit Baucus on like in the eighty s and ninety s people over there would be like all the women have their care cut and permed and look really cute and they'd be like what is wrong with you people. Why do you look like like? You're from a blast from the past. But you know my my parents are. My Dad is a very spiritual person. He's not like a a religious person. Like ritualistic my mom is much more religious. My mom raised us with some really strong values. And look the one thing that we heard and over and over again is the whole purpose of your life is how you're going to serve other people like what are you. GonNa do with all the education. The time the health the wealth the youth everything you have is basically like a test like we're being tested for. What are you GonNa do with it? That's the whole point of being here and so you know I. I always appreciate that because I think that's the one thing that's driven me to always feel like there's more there's more to do. There's a lot more to do.

Us Department Of Agriculture United States Maryland Saddam Hussein Iran Writer Pakistan Kansas Delaware Lancaster Coun Rubio Assad Baucus Boccassini Virginia
"saddam" Discussed on Mike Drop

Mike Drop

16:37 min | 1 year ago

"saddam" Discussed on Mike Drop

"Forces wealth management insurance and banking industry. Were Trust is the key element name one. That isn't yeah go on for Awhile. Yeah that's that's pretty awesome. What are the what a neat transition of using some pretty specific life skills or I guess military skills and transit transitioning over into a civilian or business application. That's fucking awesome. I'm happy for it's great. You do any consulting as it relates to teaching Ching interrogation or anything like that. I do so I've spit. I'll spend three hundred and twenty days a year in Abu Dhabi. Oh well I've done that for the last two years and I train. What is their Intel officers serves on interrogation? So they're dealing with Yemen situation right now they don't have any experience at war and they certainly have no experience in an interrogation so I actually just got back ten days ago. Oh go there for five weeks at a time and I love it because they basically gave me the school they said Tele- in five weeks. Your way you're techniques teaches however you want to teach us and that's such a great feeling. Yeah I mean it's sneath they give you that kind of flexibility to just fuck and run with it. That's a rare but refreshing and in two days ago so Tuesday I spent all day Eh in Washington. DC training the so. WHO's the DOD Invest I G Whistle Blowers investigators? No so oh it's any opportunities rain turn would you say it's about fifty fifty in terms of keynotes civilian business speeches verses Training meaning of government interrogation type type stuff or what's the balance it's probably eighty eighty percent Keno. Because there's way more money in it. Let's be honest ain't got the lag it is. I mean I can welcome to America companies a lot more money than uncle. Sam Lanka Sam's gotta the fuck town is just not going to give you very much. He's going to take a lot. You know and I will tell people which really interesting is a keynotes and our trainings eight hours. Yeah for some reason. That industry of keynotes the premium is up here in training your commodity nine. You can get that anywhere. I do. Nowhere near seventy. I do usually a handful of keynotes a year and the same thing. I'm just like Holy Fuck. I don't mean it's mind boggling. You know that that the whole process but Smoke if you got him. How can people get a hold of you if they want either a keynote or have you come train people how to interrogate? You can get a hold of me Eric. AT AROMATICS DOT com. You can go to my website Eric. MADDOX DOT COM. That's MADD radio X X one. E R I looked at the cover of the answer. I E R I C A do X.. And then you know I've got a facebook page and Kinda put videos about techniques. I have again not at your level. I have smaller podcast. Creating eating influence in you can kinda listen to that my facebook pages Eric. Maddox in so I kind. I just I try to stay out there and try to give information on. How do we make people talk? How do we get transparency if you wanted to? How their line? Here's how they're lying. The the most important message is in a relationship. How do you build trust? Yeah I like it. Have you thought about writing a book that centers around that is opposed to the story. So I have thought about it Mike. I feel so much more comfortable in verbal communication that I do written communication that this that was hard for me right now. I'm not saying I'm an imbecile. I can right but I feel like I I really am and good verbal communicator. I don't feel like a great written community so we'll give you that quick opportunity. Can you give us the thirty second elevator pitch on on how to build trust yes real quick. Trust is not about seeking to understand. But if you're talking mm someone every person every conversation you've ever have they're measuring you. Are you looking to fulfill your own needs in your own objectives taxes and quail your own fears or you looking to help me. And there's a measurement and if you can listen at a certain of so most people listen to twenty five percent you have to get it up seventy five percents you seventy percent people go. Will you send me way more interested meet and you ourself but the only way to fifty is you must seek empathy. That means you must seek understand the point of this conversation at this moment from their perspective. And if you do that there's no great away dangerous. Yeah Yeah I mean it's it's remarkable again the parallels it's very different with dogs in terms of how you do that because everything's nonverbal and body language oriented under mostly you can use resources and environment environment to kind of steer those those relationships and manipulated a little bit frankly but But to me that's one of the biggest problems I see whether it's social media or personal relationships business. Again coach athletes teacher students boss Awesome -ployees whatever is on both sides is is not listening to respond and not listening to understand you know and So so few people have have an innate ability to listen and really thank like well. How is the other person viewing this conversation? You know maybe I should try to understand where the fuck they're coming from. Maybe I should understand how they view me right now. You know giving example. Yeah please do how long we been talking not long enough but a little over three hours all right. If I'm listening to this conversation I like you but I like me and it's not because I don't have a cold store and I'm willing to sit here in feed right like all on doing his talking. This whole thing is about me because I'm a guest right. I'm coming one and done but honestly honestly you're the one that's be announcing being attractive in a sexual or you can go that route sexual. You're the one that that's more interesting. You're the listener. You're the one that's responding on the talk. This is about me and it's it's it's it's a little bit repelling at the in May Americ- what you're feeding these cool. I'm getting informed. What am I drawn towards you? I trust you. You know why because you're listening to me I'M GONNA leave. It'd be like really cares about. Wow and he was asking some goals. We should stay in touch. We're not going to leave here and go. I feel connected to Eric. You probably go. Who is talking about himself and I get it? I know but I'm a guest on your show. That's what I have to do do but I'm sitting here like I'd rather be in your seat right now and that's the example. That's just an example. It's like you're the listener. That's more intrigued. That's more tractive. Yeah I mean I guess it's enormously refreshing to hear that perspective from you. I I certainly try to make it that way where I give you know the guest of an opportunity to talk far more than me and just ask the questions that I think. Whoever's listening is is also going to wonder and things things like that that they're gonNA find intriguing fascinating or whatever but I appreciate saying a I think to push back a little bit? I think your story is incredibly incredibly fucking interesting and very cool and I could sit here for several more hours asking little little pinpoint questions. There is one that I actually forgot to ask that. I did want to throw in real quick just because again it ties in so heavy to what I do. How big of a role body language play in your interrogation allegations because again with dogs? It's every fucking thing I bet it is so it's it's semi important okay. So so body. Language is very very important but it's also something that could be definitely taught not so. I use a person's body language but it's so easy at this point in the game that it's not critical cool like it's critical. I don't know how to use it but it's so simple to me to understand body language in neural linguistics. That it's it's now I will just flow right. How important is reading education? I mean no you gotta be no. It's not it's foundation but once you get it down you which is read at that point. You're essentially taking it for granted the same way you would body lay okay so I think people just need to be careful about somebody just real quickly only if you WANNA talk about linguistics how people are lying right. Will they the the cap this and that and if if I'm over in this direction I'm probably being pretty accurate right if I'm continued do up here right like I'm nightly fabricating promise. I'm talking to the prisoner. I've talked to him fiber. He's been talked to interrogate five or six times. Your five or six weeks. Maybe he was creating their picture to fabricate. Hey the lines but after a while he's start looking over here because that's the story he's remembering so people get really tied up on that going. No Man he was telling the truth. I know he's telling the same story that he's remembering that at one time he was creating so I would just say be careful with. Don't rely on it too has no. Oh that's cool shit to me. It'd be it'd be really awesome if you did write a book. Anna talks about the intricacies of of those things and getting more in the weeds leads with the psychology. And the you know the framework behind interrogation and lying and things of that nature. I think it's IT'S PRETTY NEAT ship but Anyway before we wrap it up. Here's anything you'd like to add or talk about. I created a new way to interogations. And it's not because I'm smarter. I don't know it's because there was interrogation techniques that used to work the battlefield changed changed and we have to change with the battlefield. Any industry any CEO's or lesser managers out. There you tell me an industry that hasn't changed over the last five years and it's not that we are smarter than the people before us but we have to build a culture that cultivates our subordinates. Listening to our people listening to our clients and customers knowing we we have to check the world's changing it would be easy to do the things the way we always have. Only it's critically important. Do we go wait a second. Let's do things differently and I'm seeing. Why don't we have a culture where we embrace the idea of change? Not just for the purpose of change but under steamy amy it the battlefield changes we have got to change. I'm just going to say this. I take a lot of credit. I have no problem. Somebody wants to see me so much credit. I'm like okay ethic credit. I think I deserve but the one thing I will say is there is a Delta culture bright when you walk into that building they have a standing rule. If you you see something that can be done better. You have responsibilities. Speak Up. And it's not Haley here. We have a tip jar right some things. I might read them or all right. You got one on strike or not. You have one silver bullet. It's like none of them. Don't come in here. If you see anything we can do better. You have to speak up. How empowering hiring of a culture that is if you're the cook or you're the gardener or you the Chinese Mandarin linguists who never done an interrogation before that says you know what I didn't try out for this group I didn't make I'm not an operator but while I'm here I am one of them in? I am part of this family and I have the right to speak up that is. That's their power. I don't care what they get the baddest dudes and they're the most resources that's their power limits and it's is not specific to rank either right it's top to bottom it's everybody yeah they don't care if you show five the first one out the door. Yeah Yeah that's great I love it. that mentality. It's awesome a couple it with also don't bitch unless you have a solution you know so as as they say if you see something we can do better you have a responsibility to come through next line is don't bring us some stupid like I don't WanNa hear some stupid nece but come on me. We're here to get better and you know I always tell people do role plays in your the job. Do this do a ours. People don't WanNa do you know who does a ours J. Sock if there can do if they're willing linked to do a are after action report you civilian Dick's it basically says we're done with an operation or mission or a job. Let's take a look and see what we did. Good bad what we can do better. Yeah Oh we do role place yeah. They're called their walk. throughs right if the best of the best can do them. Yeah come come on. Yeah no I agree. I think that's how you learn. You know again the learn as much from your mistakes as you do. Your successes in many ways more That's it that's what I want to say. All right fascinating shed I I want to just say thank you again for common. It's been great having here Remarkable story no no less fantastic than I expected it to be in appreciate Sharon so much intricate detail with his process and In the story the book is called mission. Blacklist number one authors Eric Matic's again at highlights everything that we've just talked about in an even more in depth about the Hunting down and ultimate capture of Saddam Hussein. Who at that time was? I may argue. That he was the he was tied for the most. Those wanted man because Sherman bin Laden you know..

Eric Matic facebook Abu Dhabi Intel DC Yemen Ching Washington DOD Sherman bin Laden Sam Lanka Sam G Whistle Blowers America AROMATICS DOT Maddox Saddam Hussein Mike Dick CEO
"saddam" Discussed on Mike Drop

Mike Drop

13:00 min | 1 year ago

"saddam" Discussed on Mike Drop

"It's like their families pushing saying we gotta get this raid before Matt leaves. Our team believes we were tracking. We gotta the fishpond nothing to fishermen done. Let's say goodbye C.. Bam Bam take the prisoners. The analysts are like good acres. CIA informants as prisoner things. Not Working out so I think all my prisoners back to Baghdad with these fishermen. They're like all right. We're going to release the fishermen tomorrow so I had one night. Got These fishermen interrogate took them back and forth took thirteen hours. One of the fishermen breaks so that worked from home. Good evening catch fish river but upon cool Fishman says my cousins his deputy number two guy cool where they go simple. Two days ago Mohamed evening in his cousin deputy came and got an address for the fisherman's aunt and uncle. In fact then he said I think they got the address going to house. The map got sketched told the team in Baghdad. Can you go hit the raid in Baghdad. You know like Doc. May We'll put her on the list. My flight leaves the country in three days. December thirteen two thousand three. My flight leaves at eight in the morning. One o'clock in the morning on December thirteenth bag that in causes it. Slow night degenerate in finding Bahama debriefing on there we got. Some prisoners brought Prophet prisoners back to the morning flight. Leaves Eight started the interrogation of the person at the House. That dude is not from decree. I mean he's not not from Baghdad he's from decree took me and I'm the deputy I'm the deputy of Hamady took another hour. He says yeah no worries. He's in this. You gotta you gotTa. I'm like what he was sleeping next to me when you already the house. There's no way he got away. I'm like there's no way he got away so I got all the prisoners from the raid. Never Seen Mohamed. Ibrahim did have a picture. Nudist was looked. Like start looking. Hoods is last hood. They're I news face and I'm like Oh my God i. It was a significant weight. Gain that Oh Who's Chin he's supposed to have? I was told he was going to have at home on his chin and somebody a prisoner Jewish. It looked just like John Travolta's Chin in Before he got the hood off there's this Chen and I'm like that's him. Six o'clock in the morning flight light leaves they started. The interrogation. Wasn't going well. He knew he knew he knew he knew I knew he knew but he couldn't break break and he's getting emotional and some forty five the base you're out of here so I- colorist and I'm leaving. I'm not messing with you. I'm leaving and nobody thinks he's into cre- except for you and me put you in that prison. They're not going to give you another shot and I'm leaving so I need it now. He said I can't can't. I'm like you're going to change your mind. I know how the story ends and I'll be gone when I'm going make somebody come talk to you. I said no one's GonNa come talk to you he's foursome. Come talk to you. Go crazy put him in his cell left went to my coach. Had packed grabbed my stuff that had been under this for five months. They're driving across the tarmac in the senior interrogators. Would you do that. I didn't do anything keep going. He's like what did you say the prison among. I didn't say anything. Why he's like freaking out? They think your guys trying to kill him so like he wouldn't stop banging his head against the wall so and I'm like Oh gosh he just broke ran. Corrupt jumped out of the truck rain across flight lines like hold the plane grainy and grabbed the prisoner brought him out and he looks at me. And he's like you gotta go like domestically man. Where where is he? He's like he's in. He's in a little village. Called avoir at the farmhouse of a man case. Naming Jesse drew sketch got map and he's looked now. The prisoner Mohammadi brings looked at me. Go we've gotta go me and we cannot mess around let's go Saddam's right hand guy basically these the the one guy. They're only one person knew where he was. The one guy who knew where he was we had him. He said. Let's go right now. They so bad didn't think he was into Crete when the team comes back on like just broke and they're like cool me you'll get on track. I'm like no yours team. Ed like no no no. He knows in the senior Interior whereas he said he's into heels man you'll get on the Dadgum. AM truck and I gave the stuff. And I said please call Ma'am please. I love of God call. Bamyan took me the flight. You know. WHO's on the fly? Admiral Mc. Make your bed right. GotTa fuck with them. Admiral mcraven on the fly in his whole crew. When I was leaving leaving because the one point nine million I had to give all these briefings gave one to the Task Force Commander Admiral mcraven who I really awesome still? I just love right. I was like you're coming to Doha with me on the thirteenth. And your briefing that link Diagram. So here's our flight. Totally exactly Marine Corps Interrogators Cirque in. I've always thought maybe it's the jet awash. But what it truly was is. When you're a one-star with this task force in an e six comes and says a guy just broke he can take us to Saddam? Somebody on your chaining somebody in your team's gotta be the one that's gonNa tell you that. Not The the staff sergeant so we flight flight takes off lands by this time when it lands posse waiting on a pull him moth pull into a room. He comes out and I'm like what happened last night. I said we got Mohamed. Ibrahim and he's GonNa take to Saddam. He's like awesome. We're turning the flight around. He goes reduce it up. I'm going back and now it's on. He goes you have to give the briefing tomorrow. Because you're stating how big of a kick in the fucking balls was that I mean I I get your explanation like you know the reality was. They didn't need me anymore. But God Damn Damn I just wanted to be a clear indicator they still thinks in secrete and they operated Baghdad. In Admiral mcraven did not operate with a task force that I used interrogators like Bam Bam then never been done before. I'm care you you can go back and US history Bam. Bam was the first person to say the interrogation are taking the spearhead. And so why would they admiral mcraven though that I was I was just like every other interrogator in his mind. Yeah I guess that makes sense. He did he just didn't know. But do you still keep in touch with Bam Aminul. I've seen him warrants. Yeah get along all right. Oh I mean I don't know she still on active duty. No Jesus all right. He's everybody got promoted. I don't doubt it becomes a hero. He's my hero and he's general you from Canada General. Oh He's a major. He was a major. Okay it's thirty three years old. I was thirty one so the next day I had to go to hospitals to give this brief next day. Anything they write all briefings or cancel. We'll get out of here. Yeah so you didn't even give it well. The person okay an e. five was going to escort. Admiral mcraven mcraven in Doha. I need you to understand admiral. mcraven was going on that trip to Doha for Arnold Really. That's how close they thought they were to Saddam Hussein so we when he turns that plane up and goes back the e five looks at my marine buddy and I said hey man. I'm a mcraven had dinner reservations. He on are you want his reservations for the next day right. Yeah we're drinking beer. I would love to have admiral mcraven on here and get from his perspective this process. It'd be it'd it'd be interesting you know what I I can assure you. Every single thing is exactly the way it went down. It's a lot easier eared. Remember the details of the story because you were living in. But I'm curious if he remembers having that nonchalant attitude attitude towards him being in to create or not. If you'd be willing to admit that you know I wonder too and I can tell you this. Okay I'm going to give him. Credit heated serve tons of great right. When I got back with the fishermen the head of Intel he loved what Bambi was doing because the money and he said man we got these Intel analysts they need a briefing on to cree right? So all these aimless show so while I'm waiting for the three days hoping they're gonNA do my last rate in Baghdad. Getting Ready to leave a table of. Let's say twelve aimless there the task force think-tank. I think they sit around six. I'm falsely because they're exhausted. Nobody gives a flip. I get done. Swear all sitting like this like bullshit this six get up with and we walk away and he goes. I don't care what they think he goes. You're GONNA go brief. The Admiral he tells the admiral ammos cuts his time and gives me get full hour at breaking full hour. And he's like I have to go once whatever once a quarter back to headquarters and briefed the progress of Saddam. He's like you're going with me. Your briefing he goes. That's our briefing. So he believed the problem is when I was giving the briefing. I didn't say hey I've got your next hit I've got I've got your thing. So as we're leaving they did the capture will if they could tolling that morning got Mohammed covering. They know it when I figured it out. It's too late well. It wasn't it's just the right person didn't tell him. Yeah well so all right so the radio. That's the politics of. Yeah no I mean should have said I'd love to get a mcraven on here. Not that I probably ever would. But I'm curious so the so the raid happens. Where were you actually at your in Doha? That night when the raid took place we actually got him and so the next morning you do the brief you end up going back and you go. You are on your way home at that point right I was they sent me to DC. Yeah so that's when the world my world change but the in the intro the book if you could talk about when you actually when it was made public and where you were sitting those comedy comedy story so I knew in Doha. Yeah but we're not allowed to tell anybody nobody knows and we. I slow from Doha to Heathrow. We have a layover in Heathrow. And that's when it's popped and I'm like okay here we go and I'm standing in the bar are you. If you've been to Heathrow. There's right in the middle of the terminal there are and there's two Brits in I mean just as bright as they convenience like L.. Whatever ever they had him the whole time they just pulled him out for the elections and it was the first time in my life from like mother? Though I actually know the truth of something like I don't know if conspiracies exist in the world I don't I don't but I'm like there is no conspiracy. Chrissy yeah that had to be weird as fuck sitting there with that amount of knowledge surreal feeling surrounded seeing it on TV surrounded by you know Brits. It's talking shit and knowing what really happened in being an integral part of that is just. It's fucking wants Wyoming. Can I tell you what was the coolest surreal feeling is I call.

Admiral mcraven mcraven Baghdad Doha Saddam Admiral mcraven Ibrahim Bam Aminul Admiral Mc Saddam Hussein CIA Fishman Matt Bahama Intel John Travolta Task Force US Canada
"saddam" Discussed on Mike Drop

Mike Drop

13:00 min | 1 year ago

"saddam" Discussed on Mike Drop

"It's like their families pushing saying we gotta get this raid before Matt leaves. Our team believes we were tracking. We gotta the fishpond nothing to fishermen done. Let's say goodbye C.. Bam Bam take the prisoners. The analysts are like good acres. CIA informants as prisoner things. Not Working out so I think all my prisoners back to Baghdad with these fishermen. They're like all right. We're going to release the fishermen tomorrow so I had one night. Got These fishermen interrogate took them back and forth took thirteen hours. One of the fishermen breaks so that worked from home. Good evening catch fish river but upon cool Fishman says my cousins his deputy number two guy cool where they go simple. Two days ago Mohamed evening in his cousin deputy came and got an address for the fisherman's aunt and uncle. In fact then he said I think they got the address going to house. The map got sketched told the team in Baghdad. Can you go hit the raid in Baghdad. You know like Doc. May We'll put her on the list. My flight leaves the country in three days. December thirteen two thousand three. My flight leaves at eight in the morning. One o'clock in the morning on December thirteenth bag that in causes it. Slow night degenerate in finding Bahama debriefing on there we got. Some prisoners brought Prophet prisoners back to the morning flight. Leaves Eight started the interrogation of the person at the House. That dude is not from decree. I mean he's not not from Baghdad he's from decree took me and I'm the deputy I'm the deputy of Hamady took another hour. He says yeah no worries. He's in this. You gotta you gotTa. I'm like what he was sleeping next to me when you already the house. There's no way he got away. I'm like there's no way he got away so I got all the prisoners from the raid. Never Seen Mohamed. Ibrahim did have a picture. Nudist was looked. Like start looking. Hoods is last hood. They're I news face and I'm like Oh my God i. It was a significant weight. Gain that Oh Who's Chin he's supposed to have? I was told he was going to have at home on his chin and somebody a prisoner Jewish. It looked just like John Travolta's Chin in Before he got the hood off there's this Chen and I'm like that's him. Six o'clock in the morning flight light leaves they started. The interrogation. Wasn't going well. He knew he knew he knew he knew I knew he knew but he couldn't break break and he's getting emotional and some forty five the base you're out of here so I- colorist and I'm leaving. I'm not messing with you. I'm leaving and nobody thinks he's into cre- except for you and me put you in that prison. They're not going to give you another shot and I'm leaving so I need it now. He said I can't can't. I'm like you're going to change your mind. I know how the story ends and I'll be gone when I'm going make somebody come talk to you. I said no one's GonNa come talk to you he's foursome. Come talk to you. Go crazy put him in his cell left went to my coach. Had packed grabbed my stuff that had been under this for five months. They're driving across the tarmac in the senior interrogators. Would you do that. I didn't do anything keep going. He's like what did you say the prison among. I didn't say anything. Why he's like freaking out? They think your guys trying to kill him so like he wouldn't stop banging his head against the wall so and I'm like Oh gosh he just broke ran. Corrupt jumped out of the truck rain across flight lines like hold the plane grainy and grabbed the prisoner brought him out and he looks at me. And he's like you gotta go like domestically man. Where where is he? He's like he's in. He's in a little village. Called avoir at the farmhouse of a man case. Naming Jesse drew sketch got map and he's looked now. The prisoner Mohammadi brings looked at me. Go we've gotta go me and we cannot mess around let's go Saddam's right hand guy basically these the the one guy. They're only one person knew where he was. The one guy who knew where he was we had him. He said. Let's go right now. They so bad didn't think he was into Crete when the team comes back on like just broke and they're like cool me you'll get on track. I'm like no yours team. Ed like no no no. He knows in the senior Interior whereas he said he's into heels man you'll get on the Dadgum. AM truck and I gave the stuff. And I said please call Ma'am please. I love of God call. Bamyan took me the flight. You know. WHO's on the fly? Admiral Mc. Make your bed right. GotTa fuck with them. Admiral mcraven on the fly in his whole crew. When I was leaving leaving because the one point nine million I had to give all these briefings gave one to the Task Force Commander Admiral mcraven who I really awesome still? I just love right. I was like you're coming to Doha with me on the thirteenth. And your briefing that link Diagram. So here's our flight. Totally exactly Marine Corps Interrogators Cirque in. I've always thought maybe it's the jet awash. But what it truly was is. When you're a one-star with this task force in an e six comes and says a guy just broke he can take us to Saddam? Somebody on your chaining somebody in your team's gotta be the one that's gonNa tell you that. Not The the staff sergeant so we flight flight takes off lands by this time when it lands posse waiting on a pull him moth pull into a room. He comes out and I'm like what happened last night. I said we got Mohamed. Ibrahim and he's GonNa take to Saddam. He's like awesome. We're turning the flight around. He goes reduce it up. I'm going back and now it's on. He goes you have to give the briefing tomorrow. Because you're stating how big of a kick in the fucking balls was that I mean I I get your explanation like you know the reality was. They didn't need me anymore. But God Damn Damn I just wanted to be a clear indicator they still thinks in secrete and they operated Baghdad. In Admiral mcraven did not operate with a task force that I used interrogators like Bam Bam then never been done before. I'm care you you can go back and US history Bam. Bam was the first person to say the interrogation are taking the spearhead. And so why would they admiral mcraven though that I was I was just like every other interrogator in his mind. Yeah I guess that makes sense. He did he just didn't know. But do you still keep in touch with Bam Aminul. I've seen him warrants. Yeah get along all right. Oh I mean I don't know she still on active duty. No Jesus all right. He's everybody got promoted. I don't doubt it becomes a hero. He's my hero and he's general you from Canada General. Oh He's a major. He was a major. Okay it's thirty three years old. I was thirty one so the next day I had to go to hospitals to give this brief next day. Anything they write all briefings or cancel. We'll get out of here. Yeah so you didn't even give it well. The person okay an e. five was going to escort. Admiral mcraven mcraven in Doha. I need you to understand admiral. mcraven was going on that trip to Doha for Arnold Really. That's how close they thought they were to Saddam Hussein so we when he turns that plane up and goes back the e five looks at my marine buddy and I said hey man. I'm a mcraven had dinner reservations. He on are you want his reservations for the next day right. Yeah we're drinking beer. I would love to have admiral mcraven on here and get from his perspective this process. It'd be it'd it'd be interesting you know what I I can assure you. Every single thing is exactly the way it went down. It's a lot easier eared. Remember the details of the story because you were living in. But I'm curious if he remembers having that nonchalant attitude attitude towards him being in to create or not. If you'd be willing to admit that you know I wonder too and I can tell you this. Okay I'm going to give him. Credit heated serve tons of great right. When I got back with the fishermen the head of Intel he loved what Bambi was doing because the money and he said man we got these Intel analysts they need a briefing on to cree right? So all these aimless show so while I'm waiting for the three days hoping they're gonNA do my last rate in Baghdad. Getting Ready to leave a table of. Let's say twelve aimless there the task force think-tank. I think they sit around six. I'm falsely because they're exhausted. Nobody gives a flip. I get done. Swear all sitting like this like bullshit this six get up with and we walk away and he goes. I don't care what they think he goes. You're GONNA go brief. The Admiral he tells the admiral ammos cuts his time and gives me get full hour at breaking full hour. And he's like I have to go once whatever once a quarter back to headquarters and briefed the progress of Saddam. He's like you're going with me. Your briefing he goes. That's our briefing. So he believed the problem is when I was giving the briefing. I didn't say hey I've got your next hit I've got I've got your thing. So as we're leaving they did the capture will if they could tolling that morning got Mohammed covering. They know it when I figured it out. It's too late well. It wasn't it's just the right person didn't tell him. Yeah well so all right so the radio. That's the politics of. Yeah no I mean should have said I'd love to get a mcraven on here. Not that I probably ever would. But I'm curious so the so the raid happens. Where were you actually at your in Doha? That night when the raid took place we actually got him and so the next morning you do the brief you end up going back and you go. You are on your way home at that point right I was they sent me to DC. Yeah so that's when the world my world change but the in the intro the book if you could talk about when you actually when it was made public and where you were sitting those comedy comedy story so I knew in Doha. Yeah but we're not allowed to tell anybody nobody knows and we. I slow from Doha to Heathrow. We have a layover in Heathrow. And that's when it's popped and I'm like okay here we go and I'm standing in the bar are you. If you've been to Heathrow. There's right in the middle of the terminal there are and there's two Brits in I mean just as bright as they convenience like L.. Whatever ever they had him the whole time they just pulled him out for the elections and it was the first time in my life from like mother? Though I actually know the truth of something like I don't know if conspiracies exist in the world I don't I don't but I'm like there is no conspiracy. Chrissy yeah that had to be weird as fuck sitting there with that amount of knowledge surreal feeling surrounded seeing it on TV surrounded by you know Brits. It's talking shit and knowing what really happened in being an integral part of that is just. It's fucking wants Wyoming. Can I tell you what was the coolest surreal feeling is I call.

Admiral mcraven mcraven Baghdad Doha Saddam Admiral mcraven Ibrahim Bam Aminul Admiral Mc Saddam Hussein CIA Fishman Matt Bahama Intel John Travolta Task Force US Canada
"saddam" Discussed on Mike Drop

Mike Drop

15:05 min | 1 year ago

"saddam" Discussed on Mike Drop

"How do you do intelligence collection with that goat rope like you're stuck with twenty people you don't I don't know anything so it's a problem? That's like hurting hurting cats on ice skates while fireworks. Going whichever which sounds like a fucking good youtube video while you bullshit and all right. So you start interrogating many of these suspected resilient regime sympathisers family family members bodyguards etc.. If you could kinda describe the process in the in the infamous information train that you built during that time as you start as racking backing them up you know what I started doing. I had the prisoners that I had available and I was able eventually to get them to say one target or to target what I always wanted to do once. I hit the the tar when I wants to teen rated and they brought back the prisoners. My first goal was to figure out. Was it a good here. Can I trust trustmark prison in then. Okay I had this prisoner. Just keep me one more time and so it was a slow building linked diagram and what you do do then. I started to realize wait a second. They may take me to a target. That's bad guy but when I really need other facilitators the people that are safe houses people they trust relatives so now had this link died in the game. Very three dimensional rank. It was very linear with bad people. But where the dynamic nine Hamic and the g the meet Caine was all the relationships around this person and that now you created hundreds thousands thousands and aims. So you could understand the guy name of this city as it pertains to bodyguards with regard to the insurgency and I to get my arms around that. Yeah you mentioned whether or not I can trust a informant or not. was there a process that you had to determine that was a gut feeling was dependent on the personality process. I'm GonNa give you one shot. You're GonNa take me to house if I get there air and the person there and they are bad. You're my gosh. How much money do you need? Typically you would get there and the person had not been there and weeks. I went and found. Why did you think they were? They were there six weeks ago. Oh I could have asked that question I I think I did ask. That question was last time. You're there and you said well I thought this so I give him a shot. I figure out what the problem is. I try to improve communications vacations with my informant. Maybe get a second shot. And then they're out so two things on you know that that trust in easy way to verify if they're trustworthy is give give me a tip and we go hit at how. How many times? How much did you run into examples of either? Just they didn't like somebody and wanted to fuck with them or it. It was a fucking trap for your guys. And they're like Oh yes guys here and they're waiting for you. Did that happen. Never Attract I. It's not gonNA be trapped. It's just not okay. So let me also clarify. I rarely used informants that work at one point a prisoner. They always were a prisoner. And I'm in and out going. Okay go find me these guys know. How do I trust them if I capture a Bagai a kid who's in the insurgency urged a catcher's two brothers? I'm gonNA tell the brothers. y'All are semi innocent but you knew what your brother was doing. I'M GONNA keep your brother and you to go and get his bosses. Once I get that scored way I'm GonNa let him go by the way I better here from me. I'm come back and get you. Oh You WanNa Leave Your Dad's at home. I'm GONNA get him. Let's let's be clear what's going on here. I know your world I'm GonNa give you a shot to work your way out so much. Form it or yeah you got some work to get out of the situation then create for you. This is not a hostage keeping situation just leveraging their their relationships against them which you know is obviously excuse me obviously increased. What I'm seeing you can trust? They're not going to set up an ambush. What I couldn't trust is they weren't just giving me something hoping he may not check? But yeah no I I get that I guess the there were elements of like. Hey I can't stand my fucking neighbor down the street that shot one of my cows. LemMe say he's a fucking bad guy. That happened pretty off absolute. Yeah now I did actually actually some of that in the book. Yeah so so what I could do that is I started out. How early November? I created this process where I could actually take an informant that I- semi trusted in go enough circles in their story to figure out. Is this ironclad yeah. Is there a secondary motivation because of insulin. My commander name is Bam said. Hey you your main goal air part is well. These walking's walk INS are a problem Figure out for this is going to be stupid. Are we wasting our time. So that was a process to if there were guys that were already in custody that gave you bad tips like that to go fuck with somebody. They didn't like. was there a punishment for that. yeah. Can you describe sure so stapler nuts to the chair. And I'm GonNa make much worse than that right so what I do Mike as I stay within the law because I think that ethically that's what I said I was going to do so. I stay within the law. Aw I realize I'm smarter than that and I know how to solve this problem right. So here's what I do if I have a prisoner. Who says there's bad guy over here? Go you go to the house bring the person back realize oh my gosh. This person is in the same business is his brother and he's trying to take down. You know something like that what I'm GonNa do. I WanNa grab the person I captured. I'm GONNA bring him in front of the prisoner and I'm GonNa say me we your house. This guy gave us the information. Do you know him. He's in competition. I need you to go and everybody. You know that. This guy's rat mouse people for his own benefit and then I let them know. I think that personal fields. No yeah now we got real. You're using the Americans solve your personal problems. Yeah that's way worse than any tape would that Would that message resonate through the prison. Where other guys knew that would happen if they did that? And helped curtail So typically you can always control what resonates to the prison. What the description I gave you very blatant I could just since messages? Maybe have a conversation it makes this prisoner heard it. Maybe wouldn't directly in front but just enough subtlety to where it's like. Oh my gosh. Did you hear what's going on because people because I was trying to use a negative to my advantage through through the negative. They said we have to keep prisoners because they talk to each other prisoners. Talk to each other. Why do I use that for my information campaign? Yeah wait a second if you released guy. He's going to say what he knew it here. I'm like wait a second. Maybe releases guy. He's GonNa say what he heard me. Why don't I control that narrative and to me that's awesome and so that makes me wonder then if you're letting some of that take place are you? Do you have the ability to to monitor that Obviously to some degree but was there any really unique ways. They were communicating things that you kind of caught them doing that. You weren't expecting you're like Holy Shit. Like how did they pull all this off. I thought it was fascinating the way they would. So if you have have a prisoner and you release them at persons like Kryptonite Everyone who ran the e flip. Es spot seeing Texan you get away from me. In the way that the enemy could slowly start testing bringing some food up to a relative Bring the I mean it was very four five days before anyone and then get them get them. I mean they were so careful to not because they were like okay. We're going to release you not me. We're GONNA release you and when the enemy comes call us. We'll capture the. They're not GONNA do that. You East these guys are stupid okay. Well then we're releasing. He won't join the enemy. Oh he could if you're not they have it's just A. It's a vetting process process. It's awesome the way they do. That's a fucking remarkable and I think it speaks to different than prison systems here. The ingenuity that exists. It's in that environment is fucking astound. War is such a great Creator for entrepreneurship. It's crazy crazy ship. I mean saying the prison. You know selling fucking soup and shanks whatever All right so you you wind up You know as you're building your resume of people you're interrogating you run into a really interesting arresting cat named Tisch Shin Tashin that's Saddam Servant And I I thought it was really neat. Some of the things that you learned about Saddam Dom that proved incredibly valuable from somebody that that you know. Unquestionably a Lotta. People may think is less valuable than you found the cook. Yeah could you talk to some of the things that you learned that people would find interesting especially if there's something that maybe you didn't mention the book that you gleamed from From I'm him. So this was Saddam chef and he cooked every meal for Saddam Hussein for did he drags nuts across food. mcdonalds-style Louis taste them. He didn't think it was that big of a deal that he was Saddam's cook. He was he was very whatev- about the whole situation He basically said there is a dish. That's very unique to Iraq. It's a fish. They should dish called. Maas goof anybody who's listening might be rocky. You know that dish Moss Goof. It is way up. It's the type of preparation in in a little bit of the spices. But it's cooked in an open fire and over the certain way of a fish and the chef said I make the best MAS goofing world. I'm famous Hussein's Cook. It's his favorite meal so then he says a couple of pieces. I don't know if I put this in the book or not. Saddam late twice a day. Saddam did not stay in a different place every other every other night Saddam never ever had doubles really ever for Shit never had doubles. And that's the biggest misconception. How many times have you gone after an att? Mike and they're like Oh this person. What is it that they have to take insulin? They have to take bags and bags. Insulin they're about to die and if they're going to have probable and you get like they don't I don't know like just not true and there's rumor mill so the number one. Saddam only stayed in about five places and ninety percent from the time he stayed in three palaces and this guy knew he cooked every single meal motion. It didn't have a double Salami twice a day and he absolutely love this fish to integrate. Yeah he ate it all the time. That's why the guy was was was this guy cooking while you you know after the invasion of that was it. It was done right like he's in. That was a very interesting point to me was was the guy said a couple of days right before we we announced when we're coming a few days in advance Saddam brought people in and there were these group of bodyguards to to Mia Mike like somewhere. It here is the group you know who is in. That group was Muhammad e bring Omar Muslim guy. WHO TOOK US to Saddam? He was one of the eight or nine people but at that point point they released the staff. They said Go. Don't do go. We'll call you when we're back in action we're up. It's I get it. We're we're going to have a hurricane. Hunker Down Yeah adds some fascinating shifts. That is really surprising that he had no double and didn't go all all over the place because those are the two most common you know now that we know misconceptions about him. I'll tell you what he did what he did. News at three levels of bodyguards level. Three hours all there permanently at the palaces. They're they're fixed security level to two eighty sixty eighty level twos. They would be the mobility team and they would go PRI PRI recon and secure an area where he was going to what he did do is he would send them off to the I five different locations so you never never knew which one he was going. Okay but then his inner circle they were always with him and that was about thirty to the thirty two and they operated in teams sixteen sixteen for forty seventy two hours at a time. Seventy two hundred seventy two off foul and those thirty two were his most trusted asshole for his boys and so the the advantageous yet the advanced teams that would go to these five locations than they would report. Yeah it's clear go this route. Or whatever. And then his inner circle of of those thirty two would would use whatever info they needed to go to the place that they actually we're going to go. They were his immediate. PTSD odd Mahmoud Black. He was the ace ace below the sons. He was the ace of clubs. You know he was always with Saddam trust gap but guess what we captured turned him in Psalm. Winning where near. Yeah so yes. Oh so. Basically once they scattered three sheets the wind was Kinda. All bets are off. And we didn't know who Saddam picked to be his handful and tell her okay all right so one thing than another thing I found pretty fascinating as you. Observe others interrogating within your kind of field office and you notice a pretty stark contrast between your style. And there's and I wanted to read another excerpt here that That kind of highlights that that I thought was valuable for.

Saddam Saddam Hussein Saddam Dom Mia Mike youtube Caine Bagai commander Iraq I Muhammad Tisch Shin Tashin PTSD Bam US Maas Mahmoud Black
"saddam" Discussed on Mike Drop

Mike Drop

15:05 min | 1 year ago

"saddam" Discussed on Mike Drop

"How do you do intelligence collection with that goat rope like you're stuck with twenty people you don't I don't know anything so it's a problem? That's like hurting hurting cats on ice skates while fireworks. Going whichever which sounds like a fucking good youtube video while you bullshit and all right. So you start interrogating many of these suspected resilient regime sympathisers family family members bodyguards etc.. If you could kinda describe the process in the in the infamous information train that you built during that time as you start as racking backing them up you know what I started doing. I had the prisoners that I had available and I was able eventually to get them to say one target or to target what I always wanted to do once. I hit the the tar when I wants to teen rated and they brought back the prisoners. My first goal was to figure out. Was it a good here. Can I trust trustmark prison in then. Okay I had this prisoner. Just keep me one more time and so it was a slow building linked diagram and what you do do then. I started to realize wait a second. They may take me to a target. That's bad guy but when I really need other facilitators the people that are safe houses people they trust relatives so now had this link died in the game. Very three dimensional rank. It was very linear with bad people. But where the dynamic nine Hamic and the g the meet Caine was all the relationships around this person and that now you created hundreds thousands thousands and aims. So you could understand the guy name of this city as it pertains to bodyguards with regard to the insurgency and I to get my arms around that. Yeah you mentioned whether or not I can trust a informant or not. was there a process that you had to determine that was a gut feeling was dependent on the personality process. I'm GonNa give you one shot. You're GonNa take me to house if I get there air and the person there and they are bad. You're my gosh. How much money do you need? Typically you would get there and the person had not been there and weeks. I went and found. Why did you think they were? They were there six weeks ago. Oh I could have asked that question I I think I did ask. That question was last time. You're there and you said well I thought this so I give him a shot. I figure out what the problem is. I try to improve communications vacations with my informant. Maybe get a second shot. And then they're out so two things on you know that that trust in easy way to verify if they're trustworthy is give give me a tip and we go hit at how. How many times? How much did you run into examples of either? Just they didn't like somebody and wanted to fuck with them or it. It was a fucking trap for your guys. And they're like Oh yes guys here and they're waiting for you. Did that happen. Never Attract I. It's not gonNA be trapped. It's just not okay. So let me also clarify. I rarely used informants that work at one point a prisoner. They always were a prisoner. And I'm in and out going. Okay go find me these guys know. How do I trust them if I capture a Bagai a kid who's in the insurgency urged a catcher's two brothers? I'm gonNA tell the brothers. y'All are semi innocent but you knew what your brother was doing. I'M GONNA keep your brother and you to go and get his bosses. Once I get that scored way I'm GonNa let him go by the way I better here from me. I'm come back and get you. Oh You WanNa Leave Your Dad's at home. I'm GONNA get him. Let's let's be clear what's going on here. I know your world I'm GonNa give you a shot to work your way out so much. Form it or yeah you got some work to get out of the situation then create for you. This is not a hostage keeping situation just leveraging their their relationships against them which you know is obviously excuse me obviously increased. What I'm seeing you can trust? They're not going to set up an ambush. What I couldn't trust is they weren't just giving me something hoping he may not check? But yeah no I I get that I guess the there were elements of like. Hey I can't stand my fucking neighbor down the street that shot one of my cows. LemMe say he's a fucking bad guy. That happened pretty off absolute. Yeah now I did actually actually some of that in the book. Yeah so so what I could do that is I started out. How early November? I created this process where I could actually take an informant that I- semi trusted in go enough circles in their story to figure out. Is this ironclad yeah. Is there a secondary motivation because of insulin. My commander name is Bam said. Hey you your main goal air part is well. These walking's walk INS are a problem Figure out for this is going to be stupid. Are we wasting our time. So that was a process to if there were guys that were already in custody that gave you bad tips like that to go fuck with somebody. They didn't like. was there a punishment for that. yeah. Can you describe sure so stapler nuts to the chair. And I'm GonNa make much worse than that right so what I do Mike as I stay within the law because I think that ethically that's what I said I was going to do so. I stay within the law. Aw I realize I'm smarter than that and I know how to solve this problem right. So here's what I do if I have a prisoner. Who says there's bad guy over here? Go you go to the house bring the person back realize oh my gosh. This person is in the same business is his brother and he's trying to take down. You know something like that what I'm GonNa do. I WanNa grab the person I captured. I'm GONNA bring him in front of the prisoner and I'm GonNa say me we your house. This guy gave us the information. Do you know him. He's in competition. I need you to go and everybody. You know that. This guy's rat mouse people for his own benefit and then I let them know. I think that personal fields. No yeah now we got real. You're using the Americans solve your personal problems. Yeah that's way worse than any tape would that Would that message resonate through the prison. Where other guys knew that would happen if they did that? And helped curtail So typically you can always control what resonates to the prison. What the description I gave you very blatant I could just since messages? Maybe have a conversation it makes this prisoner heard it. Maybe wouldn't directly in front but just enough subtlety to where it's like. Oh my gosh. Did you hear what's going on because people because I was trying to use a negative to my advantage through through the negative. They said we have to keep prisoners because they talk to each other prisoners. Talk to each other. Why do I use that for my information campaign? Yeah wait a second if you released guy. He's going to say what he knew it here. I'm like wait a second. Maybe releases guy. He's GonNa say what he heard me. Why don't I control that narrative and to me that's awesome and so that makes me wonder then if you're letting some of that take place are you? Do you have the ability to to monitor that Obviously to some degree but was there any really unique ways. They were communicating things that you kind of caught them doing that. You weren't expecting you're like Holy Shit. Like how did they pull all this off. I thought it was fascinating the way they would. So if you have have a prisoner and you release them at persons like Kryptonite Everyone who ran the e flip. Es spot seeing Texan you get away from me. In the way that the enemy could slowly start testing bringing some food up to a relative Bring the I mean it was very four five days before anyone and then get them get them. I mean they were so careful to not because they were like okay. We're going to release you not me. We're GONNA release you and when the enemy comes call us. We'll capture the. They're not GONNA do that. You East these guys are stupid okay. Well then we're releasing. He won't join the enemy. Oh he could if you're not they have it's just A. It's a vetting process process. It's awesome the way they do. That's a fucking remarkable and I think it speaks to different than prison systems here. The ingenuity that exists. It's in that environment is fucking astound. War is such a great Creator for entrepreneurship. It's crazy crazy ship. I mean saying the prison. You know selling fucking soup and shanks whatever All right so you you wind up You know as you're building your resume of people you're interrogating you run into a really interesting arresting cat named Tisch Shin Tashin that's Saddam Servant And I I thought it was really neat. Some of the things that you learned about Saddam Dom that proved incredibly valuable from somebody that that you know. Unquestionably a Lotta. People may think is less valuable than you found the cook. Yeah could you talk to some of the things that you learned that people would find interesting especially if there's something that maybe you didn't mention the book that you gleamed from From I'm him. So this was Saddam chef and he cooked every meal for Saddam Hussein for did he drags nuts across food. mcdonalds-style Louis taste them. He didn't think it was that big of a deal that he was Saddam's cook. He was he was very whatev- about the whole situation He basically said there is a dish. That's very unique to Iraq. It's a fish. They should dish called. Maas goof anybody who's listening might be rocky. You know that dish Moss Goof. It is way up. It's the type of preparation in in a little bit of the spices. But it's cooked in an open fire and over the certain way of a fish and the chef said I make the best MAS goofing world. I'm famous Hussein's Cook. It's his favorite meal so then he says a couple of pieces. I don't know if I put this in the book or not. Saddam late twice a day. Saddam did not stay in a different place every other every other night Saddam never ever had doubles really ever for Shit never had doubles. And that's the biggest misconception. How many times have you gone after an att? Mike and they're like Oh this person. What is it that they have to take insulin? They have to take bags and bags. Insulin they're about to die and if they're going to have probable and you get like they don't I don't know like just not true and there's rumor mill so the number one. Saddam only stayed in about five places and ninety percent from the time he stayed in three palaces and this guy knew he cooked every single meal motion. It didn't have a double Salami twice a day and he absolutely love this fish to integrate. Yeah he ate it all the time. That's why the guy was was was this guy cooking while you you know after the invasion of that was it. It was done right like he's in. That was a very interesting point to me was was the guy said a couple of days right before we we announced when we're coming a few days in advance Saddam brought people in and there were these group of bodyguards to to Mia Mike like somewhere. It here is the group you know who is in. That group was Muhammad e bring Omar Muslim guy. WHO TOOK US to Saddam? He was one of the eight or nine people but at that point point they released the staff. They said Go. Don't do go. We'll call you when we're back in action we're up. It's I get it. We're we're going to have a hurricane. Hunker Down Yeah adds some fascinating shifts. That is really surprising that he had no double and didn't go all all over the place because those are the two most common you know now that we know misconceptions about him. I'll tell you what he did what he did. News at three levels of bodyguards level. Three hours all there permanently at the palaces. They're they're fixed security level to two eighty sixty eighty level twos. They would be the mobility team and they would go PRI PRI recon and secure an area where he was going to what he did do is he would send them off to the I five different locations so you never never knew which one he was going. Okay but then his inner circle they were always with him and that was about thirty to the thirty two and they operated in teams sixteen sixteen for forty seventy two hours at a time. Seventy two hundred seventy two off foul and those thirty two were his most trusted asshole for his boys and so the the advantageous yet the advanced teams that would go to these five locations than they would report. Yeah it's clear go this route. Or whatever. And then his inner circle of of those thirty two would would use whatever info they needed to go to the place that they actually we're going to go. They were his immediate. PTSD odd Mahmoud Black. He was the ace ace below the sons. He was the ace of clubs. You know he was always with Saddam trust gap but guess what we captured turned him in Psalm. Winning where near. Yeah so yes. Oh so. Basically once they scattered three sheets the wind was Kinda. All bets are off. And we didn't know who Saddam picked to be his handful and tell her okay all right so one thing than another thing I found pretty fascinating as you. Observe others interrogating within your kind of field office and you notice a pretty stark contrast between your style. And there's and I wanted to read another excerpt here that That kind of highlights that that I thought was valuable for.

Saddam Saddam Hussein Saddam Dom Mia Mike youtube Caine Bagai commander Iraq I Muhammad Tisch Shin Tashin PTSD Bam US Maas Mahmoud Black
"saddam" Discussed on Mike Drop

Mike Drop

13:43 min | 1 year ago

"saddam" Discussed on Mike Drop

"Yeah but this was the first time I'm white. Thank goodness I don't have to live my mill. I don't believe the rest of my life saying I didn't go right so juiced and they asked. Would you be willing to go out with the team's on their raids and I'm sure absolutely so. There are teams out there right in their areas where everyone assumed Saddam is the assumption was. He's in Baghdad. Active I'm telling you so the the the current interrogators or five of them. They wanted to go on missions with Baghdad. The last thing they wanted to do to create to create team calls. We're going on mission. I can we get an interrogator chat. We got the guy for you. Yeah so they said hey we got up to create. I might awesome. This'll be great Chinese Mandarin Lewis's taking the stupid mission into Curry Curry. You'll be home tomorrow. Well I I knew I WANNA stay. I didn't know if I was GONNA stay. I knew I wanted to win up there in the middle of the night right in quickly within an hour. We're leaving the wire and we're going on right and it was everything I wanted it to be right like you talking. It was right out of the movie. It was stupidity. There were definitely some miscommunication. Certainly when the team's fault but they're miscommunication mutations on driving through sectors of military you know we got lit up my fourth. ID fifty cow. I mean in and then we go in the house. The Guy Opens up an AK and he said well. I thought it was being robbed. So you're like we're not dealing with war here. We're dealing with guy who thinks he's being raw. Ah Yeah so it's all these stupid stuff but we went from one to the second two thirds three raids in one night. Yeah were you using the Intel and actionable. We'll show you gathered from raid one to hit rate to e kind of so I gotta be honest. I'm not sure what until we're using the hit house one. 'cause I got right there. Yeah but it was definitely an informant and it was cluster right like we went to a house of a former regime member. People had already been to the house now once we were there. A nephew of that guy said Oh. No I know where it's real houses. So so yeah so we go there. We'll guess what we already been there too. So we're going on raids of places that the military had already been in in the likelihood that personal return to almost nil. Yeah Okay if you could talk about kind of the the initial phase into that from a timeline timeline standpoint Because for the kind of context of the listener this is in summertime of three July. Twenty eight two thousand three three when I get to Iraq okay and then just so so. The reader knows everything that we're going to talk about for the next power long couple of days probably is the span from that time until December thirteenth which were not Saddam so just just for reference for the listener. All Right Mike so I get to secrete. We go on those three missions next day I am told I'm told this while you're going back to Baghdad. The team that was there there had an operator is named Jeff White and Jeff said you know what I am the liaison. Jeff said Jeff's the liaison as on between the team and agencies case officer in Jeff at had it with agency. I Dunno if you experiences but yeah I would never do in the agency. Do not get along out there. There's a there's a dispute jar who's got the bigger Dick. That's exactly right. Alright so I was not I wanNA threat and Jeff have so irritate with agency. And he hated their sources. He aided their informants that he said you know we got a bunch of prisoners. which what do you say you? Would I start doing an interrogation like sure. What are you can't trust trustees jackasses guarantee the report stuff up the chain not telling us right same Allston so I'm like yeah so jeff told his boss A by the way this Guy Lebron that was it i. I didn't leave so I start doing interogations Jeff White. The operators sitting in and from that moment is sort of when I began the interogations and then Jeff's also sitting in agency meetings the operator now so so he's come to me go. Hey by the way here's what agencies working on so I'm getting fed that ban. That was the beginning right. That was the beginning of my interrogation career and a had an advocate in this operator. Jeff and I didn't quite understand what true actual intelligence agents was like. I didn't know the fidelity was needed to give but he loved the way I questioned and he likes the way that I- piece things together. Yeah now do you still talk to him at all. He's one of my best. No Shit. Yeah we're actually doing event together September eleventh in AC man. That's awesome hearing you start to explain that process. It made me think back to you. Know again from a gateway they sent you up there in terms of in your background with infantry going through ranger school pushing them out to that unit but I am curious. If if kind of the general consensus of the of the country as it relates to in the the intelligence agencies et Cetera were all relatively or primarily convinced that Saddam was in the Baghdad area. Why I get that? You're not the Arabic speaker and whatever but why bring you country and push out to somewhere where they think he's not there well he worry was they thought he was in Baghdad. In looking back on it I'm convinced people. They get intelligence from where their sources to gather intelligence exist. The majority of agency case officers were in Baghdad. Yeah so it was is the draw there now. There was already a team into creek. But I can tell you. That team was seeking to relocate tobacco. Go anywhere anyway. And here's how here's how I know the Task Force knew he didn't thank. You was decreed halfway through tour into Crete. There was one agency case officer he got shot. It was stupid it was a two. Oh three Roy Moore the team guy. Yeah they want his real name. Yeah a little fragment goes in. He had to go exploratory. He Agency had fifty case officers in country. They couldn't replace one in Decree no because he said he went into cre- Gotcha you're looking for the most part of the world. Yeah and you have fifty case officers and you won't one. Let's go 'cause they didn't think he was there but to two questions Russians was was there actionable. Intelligence or corroborated enough intelligence to give them the idea that he was in Baghdad Baghdad or was it just he must be here because it's Baghdad. They did so many raids every single day in Baghdad. The problem is when a raid was wrong. The t-o-n would dick would drop the prisoners with the interrogators. What you never saw at least four days I was? There is the team or whoever there was never a a conduit that would say let us know why it went wrong. You just were told we didn't get the PC the precious cargo. Yeah tell us what to do with these prisoners. Are they innocent release or should they obligate because if you know why you fucked up. That's that's as important as if you know why you screwed up. Then you know that informants not reliable. Yeah Yeah but there was such a disconnect between agents Israeli Mormons hits and the follow up the interrogators saying hey this was just the wrong guy. What happened yeah? No it makes sense The other question I had and I don't know if you know can speak to it once he was caught Is there a general consensus or idea of you. Know from this March seventeenth the day that the work kicked off what his path was from one when he went underground. Is that known I can you. You share yeah. He was hiding in the Tacoma area at he'd stayed in one house like so right away. Lead up to Crete. Yes yes series up through the whole fucking time. It wasn't bouncing around and no. He was one of three farms in to create the whole damn time. Yes Shit. Now would I tell you what he would do. So I don't know if anybody's watching but are you can see but if you look at the town of Secre okay. There's a river. The Thi English River runs right so new tube assholes go to youtube and watch it but it runs right through the Middle City on the west side of the cities where the people are on the east side of cities where the farmland is yeah. There's one single bridge that goes across And you can see it from the rooftops of the decree palace correct. You can see it for me. It's right right there. Yeah I've seen that you so you know what I'm talking about well if all. US forces are over here because the population is he was pretty free to navigate through here especially especially after curfew so he would kind of he would look they drive him around and they saw somebody on Siro they'd pick them up give Mariah and he would he would he would say stay with the fight. Believe we're coming back but he kept his presence in the room meal of these people enough to go in gone. I don't think he's going to protect them or just. Don't think if you're if you're putting all eggs in the American basket. Yeah I'm gone yet. And they're scared. He had enough of an iron fist. Just that little bit of he was in this zone the eastern side the river all nine. Yeah it's interesting because you know we'll talk about my experiences and to create but I was really fucking close to where he was then which is interesting. We'll we'll get into that here in a minute so as as soon as you get into your first interrogation which I'm assuming was a follow you want from the the triple raid. I night or very soon. Yeah I thought that it was. It was really neat the kind of the synopsis that you provide of of the after action the things that you learned and you end up the guy that you interrogate is a nephew of Saddam a bodyguard nephew of Saddam. If you could explain who he was in the importance Of of him so in the very first person was a guy named Roffe. Itam Ebrahim In when you say nephew you'd be careful to say it wasn't like Saddam's brothers kid right not like you hear a distant relative relative but Saddam trusted all members only members of his family. All of his bodyguards were from to creep in Saddam. Had I'm GONNA say ED probably at one time at any given time you have two hundred bodyguards. But he had inner circle Middle Circle third. Well this was a second circle. said he was Thurbers. The second circle bodyguard and he knew the dynamics of a social network which was Saddam's uh-huh body guard network. The could not be explained by rank. It's just there were family ties. And connections that gave the power now. He didn't lay that out for me but it was clear this nobody nobody. He had information that we need. I just I. At that time I wouldn't nothing terrier to get it really out of him yet. You talk about you know your lessons learned from that. First interrogation irrigation. I want to read the first excerpt from from your book that I pulled out as as I thought it was a pretty apt. The conversation you say as I sat alone alone at the table I reviewed all the mistakes had made over the last several hours. I had asked unnecessary questions. Let Rafi see where I was going before I got there lost my temper when I should've stayed calm and vice versa. I now had firsthand experience in some of the many ways to screw up an interrogation. I couldn't tell myself that I wouldn't make the same mistake twice ace but at least I knew what the mistakes were slowly. I was beginning to learn how to keep the details straight how to close out the pass of evasion and how not to let a prisoner see the traps traps. I was laying for him. I was beginning to understand. Not just how to ask questions but why I was asking the questions. Raw Information was less important than what the the information told me about. The prisoner was questioning what he was thinking what he was afraid of and what he had to hide..

Baghdad Saddam Jeff White Baghdad Baghdad officer Crete Curry Curry Intel Iraq Guy Lebron inner circle Middle Circle Tacoma Mike Rafi Roy Moore Allston US youtube
"saddam" Discussed on Mike Drop

Mike Drop

13:43 min | 1 year ago

"saddam" Discussed on Mike Drop

"Yeah but this was the first time I'm white. Thank goodness I don't have to live my mill. I don't believe the rest of my life saying I didn't go right so juiced and they asked. Would you be willing to go out with the team's on their raids and I'm sure absolutely so. There are teams out there right in their areas where everyone assumed Saddam is the assumption was. He's in Baghdad. Active I'm telling you so the the the current interrogators or five of them. They wanted to go on missions with Baghdad. The last thing they wanted to do to create to create team calls. We're going on mission. I can we get an interrogator chat. We got the guy for you. Yeah so they said hey we got up to create. I might awesome. This'll be great Chinese Mandarin Lewis's taking the stupid mission into Curry Curry. You'll be home tomorrow. Well I I knew I WANNA stay. I didn't know if I was GONNA stay. I knew I wanted to win up there in the middle of the night right in quickly within an hour. We're leaving the wire and we're going on right and it was everything I wanted it to be right like you talking. It was right out of the movie. It was stupidity. There were definitely some miscommunication. Certainly when the team's fault but they're miscommunication mutations on driving through sectors of military you know we got lit up my fourth. ID fifty cow. I mean in and then we go in the house. The Guy Opens up an AK and he said well. I thought it was being robbed. So you're like we're not dealing with war here. We're dealing with guy who thinks he's being raw. Ah Yeah so it's all these stupid stuff but we went from one to the second two thirds three raids in one night. Yeah were you using the Intel and actionable. We'll show you gathered from raid one to hit rate to e kind of so I gotta be honest. I'm not sure what until we're using the hit house one. 'cause I got right there. Yeah but it was definitely an informant and it was cluster right like we went to a house of a former regime member. People had already been to the house now once we were there. A nephew of that guy said Oh. No I know where it's real houses. So so yeah so we go there. We'll guess what we already been there too. So we're going on raids of places that the military had already been in in the likelihood that personal return to almost nil. Yeah Okay if you could talk about kind of the the initial phase into that from a timeline timeline standpoint Because for the kind of context of the listener this is in summertime of three July. Twenty eight two thousand three three when I get to Iraq okay and then just so so. The reader knows everything that we're going to talk about for the next power long couple of days probably is the span from that time until December thirteenth which were not Saddam so just just for reference for the listener. All Right Mike so I get to secrete. We go on those three missions next day I am told I'm told this while you're going back to Baghdad. The team that was there there had an operator is named Jeff White and Jeff said you know what I am the liaison. Jeff said Jeff's the liaison as on between the team and agencies case officer in Jeff at had it with agency. I Dunno if you experiences but yeah I would never do in the agency. Do not get along out there. There's a there's a dispute jar who's got the bigger Dick. That's exactly right. Alright so I was not I wanNA threat and Jeff have so irritate with agency. And he hated their sources. He aided their informants that he said you know we got a bunch of prisoners. which what do you say you? Would I start doing an interrogation like sure. What are you can't trust trustees jackasses guarantee the report stuff up the chain not telling us right same Allston so I'm like yeah so jeff told his boss A by the way this Guy Lebron that was it i. I didn't leave so I start doing interogations Jeff White. The operators sitting in and from that moment is sort of when I began the interogations and then Jeff's also sitting in agency meetings the operator now so so he's come to me go. Hey by the way here's what agencies working on so I'm getting fed that ban. That was the beginning right. That was the beginning of my interrogation career and a had an advocate in this operator. Jeff and I didn't quite understand what true actual intelligence agents was like. I didn't know the fidelity was needed to give but he loved the way I questioned and he likes the way that I- piece things together. Yeah now do you still talk to him at all. He's one of my best. No Shit. Yeah we're actually doing event together September eleventh in AC man. That's awesome hearing you start to explain that process. It made me think back to you. Know again from a gateway they sent you up there in terms of in your background with infantry going through ranger school pushing them out to that unit but I am curious. If if kind of the general consensus of the of the country as it relates to in the the intelligence agencies et Cetera were all relatively or primarily convinced that Saddam was in the Baghdad area. Why I get that? You're not the Arabic speaker and whatever but why bring you country and push out to somewhere where they think he's not there well he worry was they thought he was in Baghdad. In looking back on it I'm convinced people. They get intelligence from where their sources to gather intelligence exist. The majority of agency case officers were in Baghdad. Yeah so it was is the draw there now. There was already a team into creek. But I can tell you. That team was seeking to relocate tobacco. Go anywhere anyway. And here's how here's how I know the Task Force knew he didn't thank. You was decreed halfway through tour into Crete. There was one agency case officer he got shot. It was stupid it was a two. Oh three Roy Moore the team guy. Yeah they want his real name. Yeah a little fragment goes in. He had to go exploratory. He Agency had fifty case officers in country. They couldn't replace one in Decree no because he said he went into cre- Gotcha you're looking for the most part of the world. Yeah and you have fifty case officers and you won't one. Let's go 'cause they didn't think he was there but to two questions Russians was was there actionable. Intelligence or corroborated enough intelligence to give them the idea that he was in Baghdad Baghdad or was it just he must be here because it's Baghdad. They did so many raids every single day in Baghdad. The problem is when a raid was wrong. The t-o-n would dick would drop the prisoners with the interrogators. What you never saw at least four days I was? There is the team or whoever there was never a a conduit that would say let us know why it went wrong. You just were told we didn't get the PC the precious cargo. Yeah tell us what to do with these prisoners. Are they innocent release or should they obligate because if you know why you fucked up. That's that's as important as if you know why you screwed up. Then you know that informants not reliable. Yeah Yeah but there was such a disconnect between agents Israeli Mormons hits and the follow up the interrogators saying hey this was just the wrong guy. What happened yeah? No it makes sense The other question I had and I don't know if you know can speak to it once he was caught Is there a general consensus or idea of you. Know from this March seventeenth the day that the work kicked off what his path was from one when he went underground. Is that known I can you. You share yeah. He was hiding in the Tacoma area at he'd stayed in one house like so right away. Lead up to Crete. Yes yes series up through the whole fucking time. It wasn't bouncing around and no. He was one of three farms in to create the whole damn time. Yes Shit. Now would I tell you what he would do. So I don't know if anybody's watching but are you can see but if you look at the town of Secre okay. There's a river. The Thi English River runs right so new tube assholes go to youtube and watch it but it runs right through the Middle City on the west side of the cities where the people are on the east side of cities where the farmland is yeah. There's one single bridge that goes across And you can see it from the rooftops of the decree palace correct. You can see it for me. It's right right there. Yeah I've seen that you so you know what I'm talking about well if all. US forces are over here because the population is he was pretty free to navigate through here especially especially after curfew so he would kind of he would look they drive him around and they saw somebody on Siro they'd pick them up give Mariah and he would he would he would say stay with the fight. Believe we're coming back but he kept his presence in the room meal of these people enough to go in gone. I don't think he's going to protect them or just. Don't think if you're if you're putting all eggs in the American basket. Yeah I'm gone yet. And they're scared. He had enough of an iron fist. Just that little bit of he was in this zone the eastern side the river all nine. Yeah it's interesting because you know we'll talk about my experiences and to create but I was really fucking close to where he was then which is interesting. We'll we'll get into that here in a minute so as as soon as you get into your first interrogation which I'm assuming was a follow you want from the the triple raid. I night or very soon. Yeah I thought that it was. It was really neat the kind of the synopsis that you provide of of the after action the things that you learned and you end up the guy that you interrogate is a nephew of Saddam a bodyguard nephew of Saddam. If you could explain who he was in the importance Of of him so in the very first person was a guy named Roffe. Itam Ebrahim In when you say nephew you'd be careful to say it wasn't like Saddam's brothers kid right not like you hear a distant relative relative but Saddam trusted all members only members of his family. All of his bodyguards were from to creep in Saddam. Had I'm GONNA say ED probably at one time at any given time you have two hundred bodyguards. But he had inner circle Middle Circle third. Well this was a second circle. said he was Thurbers. The second circle bodyguard and he knew the dynamics of a social network which was Saddam's uh-huh body guard network. The could not be explained by rank. It's just there were family ties. And connections that gave the power now. He didn't lay that out for me but it was clear this nobody nobody. He had information that we need. I just I. At that time I wouldn't nothing terrier to get it really out of him yet. You talk about you know your lessons learned from that. First interrogation irrigation. I want to read the first excerpt from from your book that I pulled out as as I thought it was a pretty apt. The conversation you say as I sat alone alone at the table I reviewed all the mistakes had made over the last several hours. I had asked unnecessary questions. Let Rafi see where I was going before I got there lost my temper when I should've stayed calm and vice versa. I now had firsthand experience in some of the many ways to screw up an interrogation. I couldn't tell myself that I wouldn't make the same mistake twice ace but at least I knew what the mistakes were slowly. I was beginning to learn how to keep the details straight how to close out the pass of evasion and how not to let a prisoner see the traps traps. I was laying for him. I was beginning to understand. Not just how to ask questions but why I was asking the questions. Raw Information was less important than what the the information told me about. The prisoner was questioning what he was thinking what he was afraid of and what he had to hide..

Baghdad Saddam Jeff White Baghdad Baghdad officer Crete Curry Curry Intel Iraq Guy Lebron inner circle Middle Circle Tacoma Mike Rafi Roy Moore Allston US youtube
"saddam" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"saddam" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Okay. We all know the story of Saddam damore. Right. Take and the angels. Come and they're like, we just gotta try to. We just gotta try one person. Can you show me one? All right. So they're walking down the street and lots sees them. Now, I'm gonna just I want to give you the story. And I want you to listen to angels arrived at Sodom in the evening and lot was sitting in the gateway of the city when he saw them. He got up to meet them in bow down with his face to the ground. My lords please, turn aside to your servants house, you can wash your feet and spend the night and then go on your way early in the morning. No, they answered we'll spend the night in the square, but he insisted so strongly that they did go with him and entered his house. He prepared a meal for them baking bread without yeast, and they ate, but before they had gone to bed all of the men from every part of the city of Sodom both young and old surrounded. Lots house they called to lot. Where are the men that came to you tonight, bring them out? So we can have sex with them. Okay. So here's the demand of the radical revolution sexual revolution. Okay. Bring him out loud went outside to meet them and shut the door behind him and said, no, my friends don't do this thing. This is a serious metoo violation over talking about here. Look, I have this part of the story of never understood. I'm like, wait a minute lot. What are you doing? Don't do this wicked thing. Look, I have two daughters who have never slept with a man, let me bring them out to you. And you do what you like with them. But don't do anything to these men. They have come under my my under protection and under my roof. Your like a lot's daughters must be like, dad. What do I told you cleanroom say cleaning teenagers? Okay. So I never understood that let me phrase this with an offer to compromise. We'll find some middle ground. Okay. This is not good for me. I don't want to do this. But let's just compromise here. Okay. What happens get out of our way, they replied, this fellow came here as a foreigner. And now he wants to play judge talking to what you who. Are you to judge us? Get the hell out of our way. The false claim. You're judging me, we'll treat you worse than them. They kept bringing pressure on lot move forward to break down the door. But the minute side reached out and pulled lot back into the house and shut the door. So they have the meanness the threats coercion. You must participate. You must participate. It's not about sex. It's about you are not going to disagree with us. You're not going to judge us. You're not going. There is no compromise. We don't care about your daughters. You are not telling us what to do. Okay. Now. This story strangely is also found in judges, but not about Sodom and Gomorrah. Judges nineteen. You're welcome at my house. The old band said let me supply whatever you need only don't spend the night in the square. So we took him out to the house and fed is donkey's after they wash their feet. They had something to eat and drink basically the same story while they were enjoying themselves. Some of the wicked man of the city surrounded their house pounding on the door. They shouted at the old man who owned the house bring out the man who came to your house. So we can know him have sex with him again, the demand of the sexual revolution. The owner of the house went outside and said, no, my friends don't be so vile since this is my guest, don't do this outrages thing. Here's my virgin daughter, and my concubine, I'll bring them out to you. Now, you can do whatever you want with him as you wish. But don't do this.

Saddam
"saddam" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

Behind the Bastards

06:24 min | 2 years ago

"saddam" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

"Dress. So that's the kind of man Saddam Hussein was to his buddies. I wonder if he's like insecure in any way. If anytime you catch a fish, it's like who's basically he's just like, well, who's dig is bigger than just like ads them go and way the fish. I don't know. I mean, that sounds a kind of a fun way to torture a frenemy. Yeah, you know, yeah, only I make catch fish. So as the years after the Gulf war drew on Saddam gets more and more paranoid he's constantly afraid of being poisoned. And so he has all of his food which is mostly fresh lobster, fresh fish flown in daily and inspected by nuclear scientists before being fed to him. I think the nuclear scientists, the nuclear scientists. Well, I don't know if they're feeding it to them, but they're inspecting food, Jesus Christ. Okay. Because they're not working on nukes anymore. You got to do something with your scientists. Right? I mean, if you're WMD is not popping this, you know, that's I mean, keeping people employed, make sure this lobsters fresh. He passed a lot of time reading books about Joseph Stalin who was his hero and very gel your spare time and watching movies his some of his favorites where the godfather enemy of the state and the day of the jackal seems a little on the nose. Throw in some. What if it was like he loved enemy, the state the godfather and like all About Eve things say hate about, you stop watching that movie. He he had us offside. No, he's not a subtle man in his sixties. His doctors advised him to start getting two hours a day of walking exercise since he was Saddam. He did this in the craziest way possible. I'm going to quote from an Atlantic article called tales of the tyrant. Here. He used to take these walks in public, swooping down with his entourage into neighborhoods in Baghdad his bodyguards, clearing sidewalks and streets as the tyrant past anyone who approached him unsolicited was beaten nearly to death, but now it is too dangerous to walk in public. The limp must not be seen so Saddam makes more unscripted public appearances. He limps freely behind the high walls and patrolled fences of his vast estates. Often, he walks with a gun hunting deer era it in his private preserves. He is an excellent shot, jeez, okay. He's just extra. On every single day. Doesn't a little bit similar to like when they were trying to hide. The fact that like Roosevelt was like paralyzed like we're just gonna go way out of our way to make sure that people don't know. The ruler has a lamp like, but also by calling attention like he could have just rented a place. Yep. No, I think I think going on limping walks with a gun and murdering random animals is the better way to get exercise needs. Listen, he can't go somewhere without a gun. He was basically born with a basically with a gun in his hand. So one of the things you get when you study Saddam and you read his writings is it seems like he kind of started to sour on being in charge of Iraq during the late nineteen ninety S he started taking more naps and playing hooky and government meetings. His former vice president said it sometimes took three days to get in touch with him. So what was Saddam doing with all of his time now? What was he doing? He'd become a novelist. Reading is a theme that kinda runs through Saddam's entire career. And while the standard like Arab hero thing is to be a poet like that's the thing that they really emphasize Russians. It's your novelist. If you're if you're an Arab hero, you're poet Saddam instead chose to write trashy romance novels. Wow. Yep. And we're going to get into those trashy romance novels and exactly what happened with Saddam's careers and author after the break. But first we have more ED's for things that you can buy or things that can buy you. I don't know how ads work. Here. We go. From how stuff works in the Grammy museum. This is required listening here from the biggest musical artists on the planet every week. Tell me a little bit about from your perspective with the difficulties that artists face in the rest of their lives because they're chasing, they're chasing that muse. Yeah. It's it's the one. It's the muse keeps us alive and probably helps kill us to. One of the things I love about my partner, Neil young is that his relationship with the music music is really insane. I mean, I think he talks to her on a daily basis and he follows his muse and sometimes it's difficult for people, but you must, you must admit that that that Neil particularly follows his music required listening is the place to hear everyone from legends to emerging artists, discuss their inspirations and their struggles, make sure to subscribe now on apple podcasts for exclusive access to the biggest musical stars on the planet. We are back and we are talking about Saddam Hussein, dictator, murderer, pipe, wielder, and romance. Novelist just further proof that there really is nothing more dangerous in this world than a failed artist real like there's so I mean, limitless examples of failed artists doing something truly hellacious to the world. One of the weird things I found because we're, we're doing a podcast that touches on stolen later is that so like Saddam is a novelist and, but like the like the traditional Arab warrior hero thing is to be a poet as well as a warrior. Joseph Stalin wrote poems and the standard like Russian men of substance things to be a novelist. Right? Just weird to me that they just, yeah, Saddam is a big fan of Stalin and they kind of wind up ships in the night babes in the night. They would have been great friends. I'm sure it sounds like Saddam is a little bit like fan blowing out over over. Stalin for sometime it will be could call him a stolen nerd. He's a little bit of Stalin, STAN will. All right. So Saddam Hussein publishes his first novel is a Biba in the king in two thousand. It's an instant bestseller in Iraq and sells millions upon millions of copies under his regular name. No, under the name that it was published under is basically he who wrote the book.

Saddam Hussein Joseph Stalin Iraq Baghdad Grammy museum vice president Roosevelt Neil young STAN partner apple three days two hours
"saddam" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:36 min | 3 years ago

"saddam" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"As sailed away on that little boats ahead of them than by some chance found a bottle in my first and they are i stood nicely madison rama whitney but the passengers will bow to resume as for the people said you way iran the heavily jumper lal said the way it'd be weighed scholarship at the devil will drag you wonder by that fasting tied round you wickets roads etc etc etc etc stronger iraq inaudible and as i laugh that those messages that have a math a great big wave came and blew me all the ball hard and i am i saying and i have someone say that's the moment i woke up michael laudrup and i said to myself saddam saddam was rocking the boat said to myself sit down sadat on dividing the vote for the devil will drag you wonder whether seoul so have you never floats in saddam saddam saddam saddam rocking the boat surround rocket about saddam saddam saddam saddam besieged spike lesser 939 fm wnyc this is another a year we've had a few of them rolling of a lot of important use icl losses primarily in the world of rock music and gregg allman is one that certainly stands out here is a beautiful jazz approach to something that's already jazzy in its original form this is john pits rally and company and in memory of elizabeth three uh absolutely mm hmm and athens mm boom oh the boom the boom mm boom boom no bent two then the ooh the mm two woo cave the new yes the oh the no man oh no and hello and and never.

rama whitney michael laudrup sadat seoul saddam saddam saddam saddam iran lal saddam saddam gregg allman john pits elizabeth