17 Burst results for "Sadako Sasaki"

"sadako sasaki" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

08:41 min | 3 months ago

"sadako sasaki" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"For those in the audience who don't know Sadako Story, Sadako Sasaki was a really little girl who survived the bombing of Hiroshima at the age of to she and her family were fairly lucky. They survived largely unheard. They lost the grandmother in the attack. She went on to develop radiation induced leukemia. Nine years later, at the age of 11 in the hospital, she followed a Japanese tradition that if you fold 1000 Origami paper cranes. You are granted health long list. The crane is a sign of life in Japan, Sadako folded 1300 cranes, but sadly, she died of leukemia in 1955 at age 12. There is a monument to Sadako and to all of the Children who were killed or sickened or wounded by the bomb in here is James Peace Park today. Wesley's teacher, Rosemary Barilla, didn't just give them the book. She taught them Japanese culture. She taught them Japanese history. She took them to a Japanese restaurant. They folded cranes in class. They had a tea ceremony. I came home one afternoon from work and found Wesley in the living room, wearing a kimono with green tea and sushi laid out on the coffee table behind him, So she and Wesley brought all of Japan into our house on subsequent anniversaries. Of the bombings when Japanese journalists called looking for a comment from a member of the Truman family, I mentioned that story. I mentioned that we had read Sadako story together, and I told Wesley at the time that I thought it was important for him to understand his great grandfather's decision his country's point of view, but also to understand what that cost the people of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Wesley said that he enjoyed the book he remembered as a child enjoying the book and He said, was that it was different from all of his other Children's books, and then it did not have a happy ending. Well, I think it was in 2005 I had a call from Japan from Masahiro Sasaki Sadako, his older brother, himself a survivor of the bombing. He had read. Japanese journalists account of read the interviews that they had done with me and asked me if if we could meet someday if we might be able to work together, and I Yes, it took us five more years We did not meet until 2010 and New York City, Masahiro and his son Yuji, We're visiting the 9 11 museum. The 9 11 tribute Center to donate one of Sadako shows last original cranes as a gesture of healing for the 9 11 terrorist attacks. During that interview, Yuji Sasaki took a tiny crane from a plastic box that he carries on dropped The Rain into my palm and told me that that was the last crane that Sadako had folded before she died. And at that point, he and his father asked me if I would consider visiting Hiroshima and Nagasaki and going to the ceremonies, and I agreed, and our guest is quick interment, Daniel and we're selling video from that 2012 visit video that we had is part of a program with you in that year in 2012 we're going to get more from that in just a moment. Would you want to make sure that folks No. Our phone lines are open to 027 for 8000 for those of you in the eastern Central time Zones to 027 for 8001 Mountain and Pacific for those of you, our World war two veterans or families. The line is too low to seven for 8002. And Japanese Americans welcome your calls on 2027 48,003. During that trip, Mr Daniel, You spoke to several survivors. I wanted to play the video shot by your son. Am I? Am I right? Your your son shot some of this, right? Yeah, that was Wesley. I want to. I want to show conversation. One of the survivors telling his story and then we'll get back to your comments by digging around the area and I managed to remove a felled tree. But in the front, the concrete foundation of our house was Covered with a big pillar, and then I couldn't go forward and mother was lying face up about a meter away, and her eyes were bleeding says I couldn't make it to her size. I asked her. Can you move? She says No. Unless you can remove this stuff from my shoulder. I can't move. But I couldn't let you go if I was a military realistic boy, and I knew Japan was cornered and going to lose soon, So I was always dreaming every day that I would get on a plane and throw myself directly on to the U. S battleships. I never imagined such a horrible thing would happen to me. But I have to say to my mother. The fire is spreading so fast that I can't help you And my mother said Get away from here quick! And I said, Go visit my father who passed away in May I'll follow you shortly, so I went away from the scene, leaving my mother. Knowing that she was going to die in the fire. Clifton Truman. Daniel. How did those stories and your 2012 trip change your perspective on the bombing of Hiroshima? Obviously, I think your viewers will also agree that those air hard to listen to Wei listen to and they call it testimony. Survivors give testimony. My family and I listen to more than two dozen on that trip in 2012. But as hard as it is for me to listen to, you have to remember. I have to remember that is much harder for the survivors themselves to relive it. And they do day after day after day when they tell those stories, and they're committed to doing that again, so that we understand the horror of the nuclear attack and prevent it. Don't do it again. I was struck by the survivors by that, that kindness that generosity that they're willing to To retell these stories over and over again for our benefit. Not one of them came to me and anger or recrimination or in anger or recrimination. They simply wanted to tell me those stories and asked me at the end of each interview that I would help keep telling those stories again in the in the name of disarmament and peace. And those those survivors, obviously no. Eight years older. What do you see? It is your role as those Those survivors die pass away. What you see is a cz your role in telling the Hiroshima story to keep telling those stories to keep open land, honestly telling those stories on both sides telling the human story of and and the atomic bombings, the decision, the effects, the reasons to keep being open about that and keep telling those in the name of honestly and an accurate history. The rule for you at all to be in the room, knowing that that that decision was made by your grandfather know and I will credit the survivors for that survivors and monster hero Sasaki and his son, Yuji, who were my hosts and companions through that. No, they were. The atmosphere was respectful, again. Open blunt, factual but respectful on on both sides. I was I was Not uncomfortable in that regard at all. We have plenty of calls waiting. Our guest. Clifton Truman, Danieli grandson was grandson of former President Harry Truman. And on the 70 75th anniversary our line for those of you, our World War. Two vets or family members. William in Boynton Beach, Florida. Good morning when I was I landed on an organ, Our unmaking year old boy. And at that time in college,.

Sadako Sasaki Hiroshima Wesley Mr Daniel Japan Clifton Truman Yuji leukemia Nagasaki Truman family President Harry Truman James Peace Park New York City Florida Boynton Beach tribute Center Masahiro Wei
"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

03:30 min | 3 months ago

"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Houston Matters

"What she's so all those kids there were burned and the people they were looking for water and they jumped in the world. Deeper because you're is built on Delta in, there are seven reports and the jumped in the river and the day die. and. So she told me all about experience. And A. Younger daughter. So my mother's younger. Sister she was only nineteen years old and she was working in here. New Guys Stay Education Section as as secretary, and she had to go back from. Union past state to home. Where my grandmother Willow and she's so all those. People who are bond and the dying and. She never forgot it's high coach Korean she always had nightmare she venturi has over talk stay of the tranquilizer. she never thought she can get married and have children because of that experience. You mentioned that survivors of the bomb experienced. Increased rates of cancer chronic diseases in that, we see that to this day. In Elementary School, you had a friend who got sick and died of cancer. What should we know about SADAKO SASAKI? I went to an elementary school and the. Same Age and the Sadako was same Great. But we used to compete Rodney also We are very fast runner. She used to. With me and she was fast the me and that was nine years old and. Then folowing year she started to have some Shelton as abreast and She was found to have a name. Yeah, and the do Kimia she was. At the suburbs of here. Shema. she was exposed to comic foam and she was two years old and then she developed Cutie Grand Your stick do my coaching us do. which was not common for the children. the most Komo acute lymphoblastic leukemia but this was related to the exposure to the atomic phone and she died when she was eleven years old. And she really really wanted to survive and she fold Origami birds if we could have fold One Thousand Origami cranes we could recover from illness and shit tried but she could have made it only four hundred forty and she passed away and that's at the time I wanted to do something about that do Kim Yeah or Kansas Fisheries and I I was so sad about her. Death, and I decided to make some memory a monument for her..

Rodney Elementary School SADAKO SASAKI Kim Yeah Willow acute lymphoblastic leukemia Shelton Delta secretary Komo Kansas Fisheries Kimia
"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Racism so the idea that this voter id law was racist was not something that we made up out of thin air and it was not something that we just sort of throughout their willy nilly it was extensively documented in the court the court documents the sorts of questions that had been asked in the framing of this law and the the very clear patterns in wit which pieces of idea were allowed witch boating schedules stayed in place that kinds of things so uh if any of the folks who are still really angry or still listening to the show after that came from for the folks who maybe didn't send us angry letters but were kind of wondering how i wonder what was up with that law because the stuff you missed in history class host don't usually use words lightly now you now if you would like to write to us about this or any other podcast we are at history podcasts that how stuff works dot com and we're also all over social media missed in history and that includes facebook and twitter and instagram and pinterest you can come to our website wishes missed in history dot com or you will find a searchable archive of all the episodes that we've ever done you'll find show notes for all the episodes holly and i have done together have the uh uh the total list of sources for everything that we have talked about today so you can do all that and a whole lot more at missed in history dot com and you can send you can subscribe to our show on apple podcast schuylkill play and wherever else you get podcasts.

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"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Uh a lot of those angry letters are from people who told us they're not gonna listen to the show anymore so they're not going to hear this explanation the thing that people are really i mean there are several things that people are angry about the one of the things we've heard about over and over as that we talked about a north carolina voter id law that had been struck down by a panel of the fourth us circuit court of appeals who described it they described as voter id law as made to target african americans with surgical precision and we've just had a whole lot of people who have written to us and been like but you have to have an id to cash a check why don't you have to have an idea to vote and i wanted to clarify that was not the point uh what this particular voter id lauds it was that lawmakers gathered lots of information about how people were exercising their right to vote in north carolina so when where people voting where they go into early voting were they using absentee ballots what kinds of id where they're using when they exercise their right to vote and they specifically asked for that information to be broken down by race and then when they wrote that new voter id law they got rid of the forms of id and the early voting methods and lots of other holes for exercising their right to vote that were disproportionately used by black residents of north carolina so we had a whole lot of people that were so angry saying it's not racist to ask somebody for id that's not really what was happening here they specifically were no longer allowing the forms of id that that black people were using more often than white people and that is like a text book definition of.

north carolina
"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Five at the age of 12 after her death an autopsy revealed that she had thyroid cancer as well as leukemia and later on doctors would establish a link between abomb exposure thyroid cancer as well it was also after her death the doctors discovered that sotico had been looking up her own blood test results that the nurses statium and keeping track of them for months on a scrap of paper hidden in her bed so even though no one had told her what she had it became clear that she had known for a really long time that she was dying and despair them from the pain she hadn't let anyone else know that she knew sadeq classmates started to hear that she had died at school and thus mostly spread from student to student in the halls since a lot of households in hiroshima didn't have their own phone it was then reported in the newspaper as well a lot of her classmates went to the temple where her body was placed and then they attended her funeral and then after the funeral sadeq owes family gave the classmates who were there some of the cranes that she had fold did after saudi goes death she and her cranes inspired a movement for peace and we are going to talk about that but that's going to happen the in our next episode fuel listener male sort of uh i have a thing i wanted to generally address from a previous episode that we have done which is our two parter on the wilmington q we've gotten a number of very angry letters about something that we said at the end of that episode.

thyroid cancer leukemia sotico hiroshima wilmington
"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Parts of the world as well japan was not the only place where people were folding paper for some reason friedrich fro will known as the father of kindergarten father use of folding as a teaching tool particularly because of all of its connections to geometry and math and the late 1800s fro froze origami like folds and patterns were introduced into japan and put to use in japanese classrooms so eventually japanese origami was being used as an education tool outside of japan and these german folds are being used in japan they all wound up influencing each other for centuries almost all origami followed the same traditional shapes and steps that have been documented in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries a cure a yoshizawa is credited with expanding the form in the 20th century creating the symbols eros and diagrams that are still used today along with developing new holds and techniques his work sparked a resurgence in origami all over the world starting in the nineteen 50s today in addition to the frogs cranes boxes and other traditional models artists use origami to make all kinds of work all along the spectrum from realistic to abstract the move onto cranes in japanese culture cranes particularly red crowned claims are significant their symbolic of happiness and long life and according to legend they live for a thousand years turtles are revered as well there's actually a saying that the crane lives for a thousand years while the turtle lives for ten thousand years the number one thousand itself is considered to be auspicious this is like layers of good fortune and positive things a string of one thousand origami cranes orson buzzer roux is said to bring luck or to grant a wish so strings of one thousand cranes have been traditional gifts to honor things lake weddings in births the string of a thousand cranes that sadako sasaki received in the hospital had been.

japan friedrich sadako sasaki thousand years ten thousand years
"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"The thousand origami cranes that botoco sasaki received in the hospital connect several pieces of japanese history and culture together so we're going to walk through all of them starting with origami paper was first invented in china in about the year one hundred five buddhist monks introduced it to japan in the sixth century and for centuries paper was really expensive and quite difficult to obtain so it was mainly used for religious purposes the eto period began and sixteen o3 and by then paper was far less expensive and people were using it to make all kinds of art we talk about the art of japanese woodblock printmaking in our past podcast on coetzer sheikha who kousei printmaking allowed artists artists to mass produce and distribute paper copies of their artwork and there are prints from this period in museums all over the world today the first concrete evidence of paper folding in japan comes from the eto period as well people were likely folding paper into shapes before this especially in ceremonial and religious uses one book written in sixty four documents ceremonial folds the sammarai used on wrapping paper which changed depending on what gifts were inside the first written instructions for what we'd probably recognize as origami today came with accu soto reito's simba's drew orrick hotta four thousand two crane folding and this was first published in seventeen ninety seven so orekhova means folded shapes and for a while it was almost used interchangeably with origami which comes from ori name meaning folding and commie meaning paper more written instructions followed the seventeen ninety seven publication although people today describe origami as using one flat sheet of paper with no cutting these early japanese instructions included various cuts in different paper shapes as a side note you'll see a lot of the same subjects had both woodblock prints amd origami including lots of flowers birds and other animals and there are also lots of woodblock prints that depict origami models and people folding origami paper folding was becoming common and other.

china japan soto reito botoco sasaki eto
"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"The best the doctors could do was to give sotico transfusions of healthy blood along with a drug called methotrexate which lowered the number of fight blood cells but didn't do anything to address the condition itself this care was very expensive and there was no insurance or statesupported medicine and no central blood banking system faimilies were responsible for finding blood donors themselves and if they could in for buying blood from the local blood bank and after buying blood they still had to pay for the transfusion itself sadako sasaki family put all of their money into her treatment eventually even selling their home and their business in her oshima and moving into a barracks to try to save money the red cross hospital didn't have a separate pediatric word so sadeq as fellow patients included children and adults and see became really beloved by both the staff and other patients she was always really optimistic she very rarely complained about the pain that she was then or the other effects that leukemia was having on her body a string of one thousand origami cranes was delivered to sotico in a hospital in july of nineteen 55 we're we're gonna talk more about these cranes in exactly what they represented after we first have a sponsor break hi this is john roderick from the rock them a long winters and i'm ken jennings i'm a writer and former jeopardy genius why do you get to be two things that i'm only one thing because i'm twice as accomplices i left things out john that still not true we have a podcast now called omnibus under this is going to be launching on december seven that was a dead at formerly lived in infamy and now is a day of rejoicing we are taking it back a new episodes will follow thereafter on non infamous days every tuesday and thursday listen on apple podcast or wherever you get your podcasts whether that's at the grocery store seat of laying on the side of the street we're not gonna judgment hang hangover telephone wires like houston just me she subscribe so you never miss an episode that's right subscribe listen to me now so you never miss an episode.

leukemia john roderick ken jennings writer john methotrexate sadako sasaki red cross hospital houston
"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"The typically kimia rate in japan was two to three people out of every one hundred thousand but among hiroshima survivors it was closer to thirty out of one hundred thousand people who had entered her in the days and weeks after the bombing had doubled or tripled risk for leukemia as well after they learned that she was l fat coz mother wanted her to have a traditional kimono if sadeq oh had a disease and was going to have to be in the hospital pacheco wanted her to have the experience of having a beautiful komono first so after getting the call from the hospital she and her husband went to pick up sadako from school and they took her to pick out fabric she chose this cherry blossom pattern for her komono they told her it was a tree because she was going to need to be in the hospital but they didn't tell her that she had a bomb disease or that it wasn't curable sat echoes mother and her aunt's worked overnight to make this komono so that she could have it and where it before she was admitted sadako entered the red cross hospital in her ocean on february 20th 1950 five that is just two days after her family was notified on the way she stopped at school to say goodbye to her classmates there were sixty one other students in her class even though so many people had been killed in the bombing her school was still overcrowded because of the return of japanese nationals from the empires former territories after the war throughout the school year her teacher had been encouraging the class to develop a culture of always looking after one another and taking those lessons to heart after sadako left her classmates organized themselves into a rotation to visit her in the hospital in groups of two or three today leukemia is far more treatable than it was in nineteen fifty five the fiveyear survival rate for children with acute lymphocytic leukaemia today is about eighty five percent and for children with acute myelogenous leukemia that's a it's about sixty to seventy percent but in nineteen 55 there was no treatment for the disease itself.

leukemia pacheco red cross hospital sadako japan hiroshima eighty five percent seventy percent fiveyear two days
"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"There's developed much later in general japanese people didn't trust the abc they associated with the american military and really its purpose was to study the effects of the bomb not to provide medical treatment or care to the people who were so affected for about a decade sonacos checkups and blood work at the abc we're all normal in november of 1954 though she caught a cold and noticed a swollen lymph node under her ear she didn't have a fever so the family wasn't particularly worry the even though survivors of the bomb dreaded the possibility of what was known as a bomb disease eight under disease was a catchall term for a variety of cancers and conditions that were induced by radiation exposure during the bombings of hiroshima and nagasaki people who were close to the blasts or who entered heroux chevallier nagasaki soon enough afterwards to be affected were called 'hibakusha or bomb affected people move most of these are japanese citizens but there are also significant numbers of koreans who had been forcibly relocated to japan essentially as slaves sotico continued to feel a little run down over the new year holiday and the swollen lymph node got worse so she went to the doctor who initially thought she had a virus and when she still didn't improve after treatment her parents took her to the abc see where she got extensive work ups on january 28th and february 16th of 1950 55 on february eighteen third parents got the call 'psycho had a bomb disease her specific condition was leukemia which is a cancer of the parts of the body that make blood cells most types of leukemia caused the body to make too many white blood cells which means the body produces fewer red blood cells and platelets since the red blood cells carry oxygen and platelets are involved in clotting this imbalance in blood cells causes a range of other progressive health problems.

fever abc leukemia nagasaki heroux chevallier nagasaki japan
"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"The fatah goes the factory was born on january seven 1943 her mother fujiko at her father sergei sagako owned a barber shop see also had an older brother named masahiro they lived in her roche ima in a threestory wooden mortar him one point six kilometers from the hypocenter of the atomic bomb blast sonacos father was drafted during the war and her mother kept the business going while he was away on the morning of august six 1945 sonacos two and her brother was four fujiko sasaki was at home with both of them along with one of their grandmothers when the atomic bomb exploded over hiroshima at about feet sixteen a m it blew the roof off the sasaki family home most of their neighbors were killed fujiko sasaki was not injured but masahiro had a head injury and the force of the blast had thrown sotico from where she was sitting in a box for a moment family thought that she had been lost her grandmother's arm was injured as well fujiko bandaged everyone up and as a fire spread throughout their neighborhood took all of them toward the nearby river they were rescued by a neighbor who loaded about ten people into his boat and took them to the middle of the river and they waited there until the flames subsided unaware that they were being exposed to massive amounts of radiation their weight with horrify this boat wasn't big enough to hold so many people and say where they were afraid that it would sink or capsize an oily black precipitation started to fall and this black rain with a mix of radioactive fallout particles and particles from smoke that was blanketing the remains of the burning city they could also hear people all along the banks of the river he were unable to escape the fire to either burned to death or drowned trying to get far enough into the water after the flame subsided and they were able to get back to shore what they found.

fatah sergei sagako masahiro fujiko sasaki hiroshima sasaki six kilometers
"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"End of japan's imperial occupation of multiple other areas including korea manchuria and french indochina and of course all of these places have their own complex histories after this point just over ten years later sadeq hosts asaki died of radiationinduced leukemia as a result of having been near that heroux shamma bombblast and we are going to talk about her after a quick sponsor break this episode of stuff you missed in history classes brought to you by stamps dot com if you have a small business here is a new year's resolution you can actually keep you can add stamps dot com to your business and save lots of time and money this year stamps dot com brings all the amazing services of the united states postal service right to your computer it's a better way to get postage because you can use your computer to print official us postage for any letter or package any class of male there's no running out of stamps there's no having to go to the post office to pick them up then just let the person who delivers your mail pick it up from you you don't have to leave the office you don't have to lug your mail to the post office there is a lot hassle stamps dot com saves each time and money because almost everything you can do at the post office you can do right from your desk plus stamps dot com has postage discounts can't get at the post office stamps dot com makes it easy by sending you a digital scale that automatically calculates exact postage right now you too can enjoy stamps dot com with a special offer that includes a fourweek trial plus postage and a digital scale sir ready for a happier new year go to stamps dot com click on the microphone at the top of the home page and type in stuff that stamps dot com and enter stuff.

japan manchuria indochina united states korea asaki official ten years fourweek
"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"All of that heroux shamma specifically was chosen for maximum shock value it was the city of more than three hundred thousand people but it hadn't yet been targeted or damaged by the incendiary strikes that had stricken so many other major japanese cities the surrounding terrain was also hilly which scientists believe would focus the blast and cause even more damage in the end the bombing of hiroshima destroyed about ninety percent of the city and killed at least eighty thousand people instantly most of them civilians tens of thousands more died in the aftermath from radiation poisoning and radiationinduced diseases the united states had expected that japan would offer an immediate unconditional surrender after the atomic bombing of hiroshima that that surrender did not come and on august eight th the soviet union also declared war on japan the soviet union deployed roughly a million troops into manchuria which is now part of china on the ninth and then also on the ninth the united states drop a second atomic bomb on the city of nagasaki instantly killing at least forty thousand people estimates of the final death tolls of the two atomic bombings are all over the place in part because the bodies of many of the victims were destroyed along with the buildings that held all the records of their existence but the combined death toll of the bombings of hiroshima and nagasaki was at least two hundred thousand people before this point japan had only discussed conditional surrender options like trying to include guarantees that japan wouldn't be subject to military occupation or that the imperial family and especially the emperor himself would be protected but on august ten th japan finally started moving toward an unconditional surrender it was formally announced on august 15th after a failed military coup meant to stop it from happening japan's formal surrender took place on september ii 1945 this ended world war two it also led to the.

hiroshima united states japan soviet union manchuria china nagasaki ninety percent
"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Evans straight at an almost fanatical fight to the death mentality the list of war crimes committed by japan during world war two is long and horrifying and this just did not seem like a fighting force that would ever surrender no matter how certain defeat seemed to be so under this train of thought continuing the war especially if it involved invasion of japan itself would cost far too many lives on both sides so the allies needed to take decisive dramatic actions or bring the war to a faster and ultimately preventing that loss of life and it was the latter point of view that led the united states to drop an atomic bomb on the japanese city of harare sonoma on august six 1945 which point of view was correct and whether the use of nuclear weapons was justified continues to be the subject of debate the whole subject is contentious enough that in 1995 the smithsonian national air and space museum cancelled an exhibition on the enola gay which was the plane that dropped the bomb on hiroshima this cancellation came after five rounds of revisions between museum curator and veterans groups the museum staff wanted to focus on the first use of nuclear weapons in warfare as a global turning point one that connected to the nuclear arms race in the cold war the veterans groups wanted to focus on sacrifice and on the atrocities that have been committed by the japanese that led to the first use of the bomb the peoples of the two respective countries involved also do not agree about whether the use of atomic weapons was justified according to a 2015 report by the nonpartisan pew research center fifty six percent of americans believe the use of nuclear weapons was justified and thirty four percent say it was not meanwhile in japan just fourteen percent say the use of nuclear weapons was justified seventy nine percent say it was not regardless of.

Evans japan united states harare sonoma space museum pew research center seventy nine percent thirty four percent fifty six percent fourteen percent
"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Anuary of 1944 in august of 1945 in tokyo alone more than a hundred thousand people died in a firebombing over mark's ninth and tenth 1945 in addition to the deaths these incendiary attacks were incredibly destructive japan had started to westernize its architects her in the late nineteenth century and at the same time a lot of japanese buildings that were still standing we're historic wooden structures that were extremely flammable during all of this ordinary japanese citizens face huge hardships including a critical food shortage this stemmed from disrupted supply chains crop failures and destruction of its merchant marine fleet in the summer of 1945 much of the population on the japanese home front was facing starvation the japanese government had to continually work to convince its civilian population that the war was still in the nation's best interests in spite of all of this on july twenty six ten days after the first successful test of a nuclear bomb the united states issued the potsdam declaration calling for japan to surrender unconditionally or faced quote a prompt and utter destruction as we now know this was a threat to use nuclear weapons which at the time were still a military secret and there are two main trains of thought about this point in the war one is influenced by how dire conditions were in japan and how destructive the firebombing campaign had been and how japan was increasingly out of options this train of thought is that japan was headed toward surrender although not necessarily in unconditional one and that conventional methods could still bring the war to an end the other point of view was influenced by western perceptions of japanese culture and the tactics that had been used by the japanese military during the war for example the japanese military included kamikaze suicide bombers and an infantry that day.

Anuary mark japan japanese government united states tokyo potsdam twenty six ten days
"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Zhang's into chinese territory and then into other parts of southeast asia this included the horry fake nanjing massacre in which a japanese troops killed as many as three hundred thousand people most of them civilians and raped or sexually assaulted tens of thousands of women japan and germany were allies and after france fell to germany and 1941 the vichy government agreed to allow japan to take control of the colonial territory of french indochina today that's vietnam laos and cambodia and in response to the japanese occupation of french indochina and in the hope of checking its advance into other parts of southeast asia president franklin delano roosevelt froze all japanese assets that were held in the united states other nations followed suit and the united states ordered an embargo of steel and oil exports to japan as well he's where major sanctions and the goal here was to pressure japan into backing out of french and to china and stopping its imperial expansion into other countries instead it really had the opposite affects japan continued its push attempting to reach territory that could supply with these resources the capital that it no longer had these sanctions are also cited as one of the factors that led japan to attack pearl harbor hawaii a little more than four months later on december seventh 1941 fastforward to 1945 at the end of world war two the allies accepted germany's unconditional surrender on may eight of that year ending world war two in europe but the war with japan continued as we discussed in our episode on the uss indianapolis by the summer of 1945 most american troops believe they were preparing for a fullscale invasion of japan itself meanwhile japan's navy was nearly destroyed and the allies had started firebombing major japanese cities its estimated that more than three hundred thousand a japanese citizens were killed in firebombing attacks between j.

europe china president asia cambodia vietnam germany nanjing horry uss indianapolis Zhang hawaii japan united states franklin delano roosevelt indochina vichy government
"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"sadako sasaki" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Maybe even a thousand total responses there were a lot and a lot of them were just was a someone said something one time but a few things came up over and over in one of those repeat submissions was the japanese tradition of folding a thousand origami cranes or maybe the story of sadako sasaki who died of leukemia after the bombing of hiroshima and her efforts a full two thousand cranes became part of a grassroots peace movement among japanese children and that was the would we decided to do from there's repeat requests that we got this is ultimately a hopeful story because a thousandth episode seems kind of like a little bit of a celebration and it did not seem right to have a complete downer we did get some very very tragic requests that we thought seemed a little too heavy today's episode number nine ninety nine though does start off with some horrific wartime details and we're gonna be talking about a child with cancer um um but episode 1 thousand is a is more optimistic in its tone and just for the sake of clarity generally and japanese names are typically presented with the family name first and the given named second in english their often presented the other way around so in these episodes we've used that western order of given name first primarily because of how they were presented in the japanese resources that i had that were either written in japanese and translated into english or written by japanese people in english so although uh sadako sasaki story begins with the bombing of hiroshima we really need to go back a little bit further than that to put that bombing in context in this to the second sinojapanese war this is generally marked is stretching from 1937 to 1945 and then in its he later years it became the pacific theater of world war two the second final japanese war started after years of japanese incur.

sadako sasaki hiroshima