35 Burst results for "Sada"

"sada" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:59 min | 2 months ago

"sada" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Out of.

"sada" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:18 min | 2 months ago

"sada" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"In for the first time here's the deal every weekday or telling the stories of women from around the world and throughout history will you may not know about but definitely should each month is being this month. We're talking about troublemakers recovering. Stories from across the spectrum from women who made good trouble to women who thrived and illicit industries to villains in the truest sense of the word. All of the women were covering a major impact on the societies in which they lived women just like men have played good and bad roles in human history took loss over women who we may find less than inspiring is to accept diminish an inaccurate place in the historical record. today's episode is about a villain. If you're listening with young children you may want to went out. Our woman of the day today was a japanese murderer from the nineteen thirties. Who was convicted of killing her lover. Her case became a national sensation in japan where it took on associations and captured the minds of a country in the ramp up to world war two. Her story has since been adapted and interpreted by filmmakers artists novelists and philosophers. They've depicted it as emblematic of a woman trying to follow her own desires in a society built on false morality and depression. We're talking about sada obey. Sada ave was born in may nineteen o five in tokyo japan to middle class parents. She was the youngest of seven children. All but three of whom died during childhood that point in time japanese society still put considerable stock in the gender norms of the former feudal caste system in which women were expected to play a subservient or secondary role. Satis older brother shintaro was a well known. Ladies man who was constantly stealing from the family to pay for his lavish lifestyle this their parents mostly tolerated. But when sata's older sister to route go was accused of promiscuity. Their father sold to ruko into indentured servitude in a licensed brothel there to ruko languish for two years until their father bought her out of her remaining contract. This was apparently a common punishment for daughters at the middle class. Who went to stray. When sato was fourteen she was sexually assaulted by an acquaintance though. Her family was initially supportive. Society in general was not and the trauma in subsequent depression eventually led saudi to drop of school. She found work as a maid but was accused of theft leading to our first run in with police that up with yet another way were daughter as he saw it. Satis father arranged to sell sada into service in a geisha house and yokohama. At seventeen years old sato was too old to become a full geisha. As geisha training generally began in the early teen years still. she was popular with clients. Three or four years later at the age of twenty one sack contracted. Syphilis disease was incurable at the time. But saddam was legally allowed to continue working as a geisha as long as she submitted to regular health checks. These health checks were generally only required. State license sex workers known as showbiz and not geisha who weren't explicitly sex workers when santa realized she now faced the same requirements is showbiz but for less pay. She decided to leave the geisha house and join their ranks. Unfortunately saad quickly learned that shoghi earned more but their lives were much worse. Showcase didn't have the protections geishas did and were subject to significantly more. Saturday took out in revenge on disrespectful clients by stealing from them but was eventually caught and punished following her punishment. Sada attempted to get.

Satis Sada ave time japanese society sada shintaro japan depression tokyo sata sato Syphilis disease yokohama saudi saddam shoghi santa Sada
"sada" Discussed on Blue Lotus Buddhist Temple Podcast

Blue Lotus Buddhist Temple Podcast

04:26 min | 4 months ago

"sada" Discussed on Blue Lotus Buddhist Temple Podcast

"Please bring palm together in front of your heart. Make a strong diminish into practice this meditation day may peace. Be with you mayo. All the win beans be be happy. Bp spun thank you very much. Please open your eyes. Please stand together bitch number. Poll more thus Baga otter hottle some mom some does namaliu thus bog berthel awda harmful some mom. Some booed the novel costs Baga it'll oughta hartl some some thus with don sada on gut tummy dumb mung sada on gut taw me song. Sada nong got.

Bp hartl don sada Sada nong
Using Peptide Therapy to Reverse Autoimmune Disease With Dr. Amber

Break The Rules

02:02 min | 7 months ago

Using Peptide Therapy to Reverse Autoimmune Disease With Dr. Amber

"If you could just briefly introduce us to who you are really what got you doing the work you're doing in the world absolutely. Yeah so Thank you for inter. thank you for having me. It's fun to be here So essentially my journey started When i was premed to what i thought would be. Md school and really wanted to was really passionate about nutrition and women's towels and struggled with health issues eczema and you know some definite Emmy indus regulation. A kid didn't really know what was going on at that point in time did know what to do about. It grew up on a standard american diet and sada about a lot of information as i got into high school college about nutrition about a Detox and some of the fundamental pillars botanical medicine all of these herbs things that we can use from the earth really can change in support physiology in so as premed Go the md route job. Shattered a couple of practitioners really just kind of witness system. That was set up and You know i hesitated. That planet time is really disorienting for me because you know the doctors that i had worked with during that period of time they were. They had big hearts. They were incredible individuals but they were stuck in this kind of system of medicine. These fifteen minute appointments were. They had to be in out with patients. And we'd have somebody come in on six medications and walk up the room on a seven in. It was just a really brief visit. I felt like i didn't have time to do the work that really wanted to do. With patients and And so i thought my plan and you know switch to my major for a quarter and was just like. I don't know if i wanna do this. And and then found out about naturopathic medicine which re-routed the course of my life really became passionate about it

Md School Sada Eczema
"sada" Discussed on Ultimate Guide to Partnering™

Ultimate Guide to Partnering™

05:55 min | 8 months ago

"sada" Discussed on Ultimate Guide to Partnering™

"Mail like for international women's day month and february. They sent us. These snack. boxes from women owned businesses and in terms of like investments certifications and all sorts of stuff. So i can't say enough amazing things about the culture here at sada. They invest in people and help us grow in scale. And i will say in the nine months that i've been here. I have grown so so tremendously and it has everything to do with the fact that leadership really puts value in their people and gives them those opportunities to grow. And let's says yes to some things that some crazy ideas right that maybe leadership at other companies wouldn't be so keen to do so. I can't say enough great things about working here and just the culture that they've been able to build especially in remote covert world. Will you bring up a really good point. I was thinking about this as well as like you know. We have all had to learn to work very differently. You and i were talking about this before we got started today. Working remote requires a different level of focus and attention to the people in your organization than it did back in the day. It sounds like you're doing some really innovative things this and it has been time like no other for all of us has been over a year now since this all started. What else are you seeing. Now that you didn't expect to see since this time began also say specifically in kind of my role in my day to day. Something that's really really interesting is the ability to build and develop new partnerships in this remote world. It's something had you asked me a year and a half ago. Can you build out a partner program from scratch and scale it without being able to travel or meet people in person. Have these types of get to know you conversations. I would have said no absolutely not..

a year and a half ago today nine months february women's day sada over a year
"sada" Discussed on Ultimate Guide to Partnering™

Ultimate Guide to Partnering™

04:54 min | 8 months ago

"sada" Discussed on Ultimate Guide to Partnering™

"And then of course alliance management which is so incredibly important having that goto point of contact to be the internal champion for these solutions internally. At sada google. I find that refreshing because i work with a lot of organizations and some of them struggle with partnering and seems like you're doing some things here specifically to optimize the partnerships you're investing resources go to market. It's so important to get down to what i call. The rubber meets the road right. You can say we have a great alliance but then what does that mean. It sounds like you've invested in headcount as well. Yeah now absolutely. I think that's very important right. Like need to have have somebody. Who's there and focused on making these partnership successful right like obviously we have everybody here at zodda focused on on the google partnership but we need to have people who are focused on the partnership with these other third parties in. Isv's to make sure that they're successful because throwing out a joint blog and saying we're partners doesn't necessarily always mean we're gonna see some joint success. There definitely is a lot of legwork involved in getting a partnership off the ground and so having the resources in terms of funding and headcount i think is is so important and we're already starting to see some great success from this program that we just kind of soft launched it and q. Four of last year and officially launched publicly here in q one of twenty twenty one. And we're already seeing some great success in terms of collaborating on co marketing and driving pipeline. And actually one of our alliance sales reps closed their their. I deal yesterday. So we're very excited about that. And i think you actually know that person by i don't know do i know anybody gets on well for for full disclosure. My son is an employee. it's outta systems. I have to come out and say that dickie had thank you for mentioning his big win. So yes i was. I was i was so so happy about that..

yesterday google last year zodda one twenty one dickie sada q one q. Four twenty
"sada" Discussed on Ultimate Guide to Partnering™

Ultimate Guide to Partnering™

03:00 min | 8 months ago

"sada" Discussed on Ultimate Guide to Partnering™

"Back to the ultimate guide to partnering. I'm vince men's zone. Your host and for this episode of the podcast. I was delighted to welcome nikki. Harley the director of strategic alliances at sada. i've gotten to know sada through my friendship with its founders. Going back to my early days at microsoft and in full disclosure. My son is an employee at saad in this episode. You'll learn more about sada's atop google partner. How nikki's team is building out their own alliances and partner's strategy and why sada is a great place to work. I hope you enjoy this. Informative interview as much as i enjoyed getting to know. Nikki harley nikki. welcome to the podcast events. Thanks for having me very excited to be here. Well i'm excited. Have you as well and welcome to to partnering. You're the director of strategic alliances for sada one of google's preeminent partners so i'm delighted to have you today to discuss working with google sought a success and how you're continuing to integrate to drive growth through.

nikki microsoft Harley saad google sada Nikki harley today vince one
Can I make an audio-only learning course?

Side Hustle School

02:55 min | 10 months ago

Can I make an audio-only learning course?

"Hey chris josh. I'm from oceanside. And i've been listening to the show for a while now. These days online video is more popular than ever. Youtube gets billions of us every day and tiktok is huge but as a podcast listener. I prefer audio. It's more convenient to me. And i can take you wherever i go after. You can't watch videos in the car. Unless someone else's driving it seems however that most online courses and information products prioritized video over audio. Could it actually be a benefit to be audio. I thanks josh. What's up man. Thank you so much for listening This is an interesting topic. Your question is could it actually be a benefit to be audio. I i think absolutely it certainly could be benefits. I think you have to look at what else is out there. is the topic that is crucial because some online courses really do require video or lease. They're going to be severely handicapped without video. But if it really is somebody who's just kind of presenting something that doesn't require a lot of visuals or demonstrations. If it's something you could just listen to as you're going about your day perhaps sada or some other great podcasts. Then it could be a benefit or at least it could not be a hindrance right so couple of thoughts here. Several companies are offering audio first courses. Now i don't think any of them have really broken out in major major way yet but just for example one of them is listenable dot. Io if you go and take a look at that website. Listenable dot i o on their homepage like they have a bunch of audio courses that you can listen to. There's an app of course as well on that homepage. There's a place where you can pitch them on doing. A course of your own. Like if you're an educator or you want to be an online educator at the bottom of that side at least at the time i'm recording this it says teach on listenable earn money. Share your knowledge. Build your personal brand. And when you click that you get some more information why teach on listenable again. Grow your brand get paid etcetera And just in case they happen to not be around forever. I hope they will but just in case they. Aren't there others like this as well. I've seen at least two or three others so far. Perhaps more to come so you could cinema note and say here's what i wanted to teach. What do you think now. Of course you could also make something entirely on your own. You don't need to go through a platform like that if you're not using a distributor like listenable or something like you to me for course that uses video then there's no reason at all not to try audio. I if you think it makes sense for your topic and the intended audience. I personally would be curious to see how it goes. I really really do think it depends so much on that topic. And that's kind of what. I'll come to the listener questions from somebody who's like should i have a podcast. I have a youtube channel. i can only do one. What should it be. I tend to think well. What does the audience want. What is best for them and also what is best for you because obviously doing something with video does require a lot more effort and not every topic needs it. So that's the key point. Could it actually be a benefit. Of course let us know what

Chris Josh Oceanside Sada Youtube Josh
"sada" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

06:35 min | 11 months ago

"sada" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"This is the financial exchange with Chuck Sada and Mike Armstrong. Chucks out and Paul Lane filling in for Mike Armstrong. Today in stocks are being stocky. That's how I'll describe this on basically what went down yesterday. Back up today. What went up yesterday? Back down today We've got the Dow up 556 big points the S and P s up. 63 the NASDAQ up 156 s so basically if you did nothing over the last two days You're down on these indices like a half percent, So it comes back to one of my golden rules of the market. If you don't know what to do do nothing, and it generally ends up working out better than if you're trying to time things on a daily basis. Uh, Paul. In terms of what we're seeing today, anything catching your eye in particular in terms of individual market movers are just this market overall again. This is a market that you know what's interesting. I had a number of people, you know, texting email me yesterday, saying, Oh, this is the beginning of like the big move down, and it could be like that again. There could be, you know, a correction that's coming here. But I guess when I look at this, the things that I think still are a true threat to this market. I think you're still questions and rather than certainties, And those questions primarily revolve around the fact that economically Our growth is going to be tied to Do the On these new variants rather than day trading in, you know, individual stocks and things. Yeah, I want to make that very clear separation or divide. You know what stood out to me over the Last couple days. Chuck is that I've heard from or people who don't typically fault. The market. Stop and all the stuff. If that we talked about in the first hour that is very separate from the over echo overall economic concerns in the S and P 500, the Dow Jones which are much more tightly tied to where is GDP going to go, which we'll talk about in a second jobless claims and all these other items out there are very different and don't have as much correlation to what we've seen over the last Couple days in the retail side of things, it's It's a very separate issue. Let's talk a little bit about. I want to skip the jobless claims we cover member week and honestly, they're not really moving right now. So they're still not good there. We covered it. Let's talk a little bit about I'm I'm curious what your Reed is in terms of anything in here when you will get any of the components. Anything. Stand out on your end, You know, little disappointing to see a bit under what the analysts expectations were were still time to climb back from the hole that we had created for ourselves back in March. With this estimate of 4.3. We were supposed to be relatively close to Making up for you know, some That downturn that Intern. If they need For their homes. They've already you know, They bought the swimming pools in the boats last year if they could afford them, too, you know, vacate in different ways than you know, going toe Wherever the heck they were going to go anyways, So it's like The folks who have money right now and again. There still is this huge divide between haves and have nots We get next. We got $4.5 trillion sitting in checking accounts, but we've also got almost 20 million people either out of work or not making as much as they were previously. So it's like There's this huge divergence here, but the folks with money they still can't do a ton. And they're also, I guess choosing because of you know some of the increasing covert cases not to do as much to show you. What's happened to T s a throughput. We have seen this bump around New Year's largely because of Christmas travel, you know, up above a million people going through T Essa checkpoints on three straight days, the 2nd, 3rd and 4th of January. The last two days. 1,004,000 leg. It's It's pretty clear there was a holiday travel bump. And then people are like yup. Gonna hunker back down and not really do a whole lot for the next little bit, which Think like in light of the fact that we're getting close to the end of there's light at the end of the tunnel on these vaccines. Think being like, Hey, let's just chill for a month or so while we wait to get vaccinated. Great idea, Okay. You have no problem with that. The question is gonna be Hey, as we start getting more of the population vaccinated. When does that start creeping into activity? When two people start saying Yep, on vaccinate and I can start going out and spending money again. It's gonna take some time at the pace that we're at. You know, we're effectively At this pace. We're fully vaccinating about 68% of people on a monthly basis, and so you know, it's it's a path right now. We hope that we see that increase. But I think it's probably again April Maze where I think we start seeing significant enough numbers that you could start seeing that consumer spending number coming up, and that's the number that really drives the U. S economy in the long run, right. We've talked about that a lot that GDP about two thirds of it is made up of consumer spending and the stats regarding the amount of cash that people Have stashed away Chuck we've talked about before at the firm here over $2 Trillion in the last two years has been added to checking savings accounts. I think that was the stat we had touched upon. Correct. First three quarters of 2020 compared to that of last year. So there's all this money in checking and savings account that's just ready to be deployed and ready to be spent. I know personally that I am dying to take a vacation or take a trip somewhere, and that sentiment is felt..

Chuck Sada Paul Lane Mike Armstrong Intern T Essa
Yellen Makes Case for Sweeping Stimulus Package

Financial Exchange with Barry Armstrong

01:04 min | 11 months ago

Yellen Makes Case for Sweeping Stimulus Package

"Millions of Americans who are out of work due mainly due to the covert virus, and Janet Yellen is making a case for a sweeping stimulus package. But there's going to be well skepticism and opposition. I would think by both within the Democratic Party and certainly among the Republicans. What do your thoughts on what another round of stimulus would look like Chuck Sada? From what perspective? Are we talking? Well, I'm looking at it and I'm saying You know, I'm not sure that firefighter, a cop, a registered nurse, a guy like me are you know people who haven't been adversely affected. I'm not sure they need additional stimulus. They I think they're doing okay. But the end of the stimulus package that is being proposed is basically helicopter money that everybody's going to get a check and it's going to be based on their income. Not sure that's the best approach. That's that's I guess my biggest concern at this point.

Janet Yellen Chuck Sada Democratic Party
A Compas Christmas

Los Compas Lounge: a PSA for Brown Men

06:54 min | 1 year ago

A Compas Christmas

"This is known this year. My name is relevant and this is a podcast about brown men talking about issues that matter to you we talk about things that we don't usually talk about in the brown communities we're just three regular compass sharing our experiences to inspire positive chains. Combine pool proceed. We have one ready for you. Welcome back to another episode of las compa sludge in this episode. We're going to be talking about christmas. The christmas traditions with they mean to us and how we celebrate their and how things have changed from when we were literally to now will we hope to pass onto the next generation to. What does christmas to go pass christmases man. I remember it would take for every for christmas to get to arrive. Like i remember my first christmas that i remember i got hey was like a little hammer and pigs that you would just nail through like pat pat and it's like that was one of those things that it was like like. I just remember waking up and like oh this is for you this for you and it was like. I didn't even know what was going on. You know that was the first christmas. I remember after that. I remember when christmas would come. It's like me and my brother's like we always try to wake up as early as we could to try to go under the christmas tree and for us our tradition was dead. We put her a shootout there. We put our shoe by the christmas tree. And then whatever. Santa claus brought for you. It was the your should be on top of it and so then so my parents they got some gifts and then whatever was for me had my shoe wa. I know with my parents but hers mus was was fun. Man has a as a little kid. You know as a little kid until like ronnie eight you know. It was really fun because we were still living in texas and in the desert it snows so we literally have. You know the white christmas island and know we'd have our fake christmas tree from sears. Up you know and Yeah i remember know. I'm the youngest of two. So you know. I was the baby so i would love like antipates. A sort of just didn't like the anticipation. Because i wanted open. I wanted to open up the gifts right there. You know but but you know but it sort of became a game for me and And and it was fun you know with with my mom my father and my brother you know christmas day and our dog On our dog bullet you know opening up the president's Having at the model is and was fun for me was then going over to the us house or My godfather's house. you know. And and continuing the celebration there you know and You know so and and it really wasn't even as a little kid and you really wasn't about the presence of your the presents. Were really good the wrong. The presents were weren't always good but the presence for the presence. But it was just knowing that i was loved. You know And knowing you know that was my family and with my extended family you know with my So you know our our god or godparents and everything you know and seeing the slow you know fall down from the sky or you know already on the ground melts enough to to have snowball fights. Yeah yeah on on certain certain years would you know and We wouldn't my brother. And i would actually build our little stolen. I think my mom took photos of us. You know building are awesome and everything. Yeah yeah so. I mean the really young years was fun man and the la years They were interesting. You know Because you know we you know our economic status you know went downhill. You know so The gift part wasn't wasn't fun anymore. You know but but the family was was was was really beautiful. You know being with my with my name was over here and my elite dan. Yes so here in california you know that was that was beautiful. And then the the tradition of the mollis you know and make you know that became really really big. You know so christmas Was was a beautiful time in you know and a time of family you know i can agree with both of you. That was my most favorite holiday. Probably outside of halloween. Because i like. I used to like dressing up scaring people but as a little kid like you guys said you know. We wake up early in the morning because you want to open up your presence or even sometimes they will let us open up the presence like at midnight. You know so we would try to fight to stay awake. And then when christmas day came we would open them up because as you guys know at least for an our family and most latino mexican families. We celebrate christmas on christmas eve. That's the yeah shabangu. There's christmas eve right and my mom and dad especially my mom's really religious so we they will go hard core mandible sada's and and The singing and and the in a would prey and the rosary and and at the and it was it was beautiful. That's what i grew up with. It was totally awesome. But the the best part of it is being being. The best part was being a little kid. It just enjoying unwrapping the presents waking up early and just remembering that. It was all my cousins because we were the party house. Everybody would go to my mom and she was. She cooked pretty pretty well as you could tell my my wake. She's she got down with. Everybody will come to to my mom's house so our house was the party house. christmas For sure you know my mom would do. The prasada said and we will go to different cousin's house in different help france homes cousin's house to do the posadas with them and you know i didn't like that part of it because then you had to sit down and or get on your way and and i was like dan. Can we just get to the ball. The ball was a little boy. All right the was the little snack bag or money or whatever it would be like. I just wanna i just wanna do that or i want to be played football outside tag or whatever kicked the cat but the cousins. Yeah and it was just beautiful. Because you're innocent. You're a little kid. And you're you're experiencing this and it's awesome

Pat Pat Santa Claus Ronnie Sears Brown Shabangu Texas DAN LA Sada California Prasada United States France Football
A Compas Christmas

Los Compas Lounge: a PSA for Brown Men

05:37 min | 1 year ago

A Compas Christmas

"Welcome back to another episode of las compa sludge in this episode. We're going to be talking about christmas. The christmas traditions with they mean to us and how we celebrate their and how things have changed from when we were literally to now will we hope to pass onto the next generation to. What does christmas to go pass christmases man. I remember it would take for every for christmas to get to arrive. Like i remember my first christmas that i remember i got hey was like a little hammer and pigs that you would just nail through like pat pat and it's like that was one of those things that it was like like. I just remember waking up and like oh this is for you this for you and it was like. I didn't even know what was going on. You know that was the first christmas. I remember after that. I remember when christmas would come. It's like me and my brother's like we always try to wake up as early as we could to try to go under the christmas tree and for us our tradition was dead. We put her a shootout there. We put our shoe by the christmas tree. And then whatever. Santa claus brought for you. It was the your should be on top of it and so then so my parents they got some gifts and then whatever was for me had my shoe wa. I know with my parents but hers mus was was fun. Man has a as a little kid. You know as a little kid until like ronnie eight you know. It was really fun because we were still living in texas and in the desert it snows so we literally have. You know the white christmas island and know we'd have our fake christmas tree from sears. Up you know and Yeah i remember know. I'm the youngest of two. So you know. I was the baby so i would love like antipates. A sort of just didn't like the anticipation. Because i wanted open. I wanted to open up the gifts right there. You know but but you know but it sort of became a game for me and And and it was fun you know with with my mom my father and my brother you know christmas day and our dog On our dog bullet you know opening up the president's Having at the model is and was fun for me was then going over to the us house or My godfather's house. you know. And and continuing the celebration there you know and You know so and and it really wasn't even as a little kid and you really wasn't about the presence of your the presents. Were really good the wrong. The presents were weren't always good but the presence for the presence. But it was just knowing that i was loved. You know And knowing you know that was my family and with my extended family you know with my So you know our our god or godparents and everything you know and seeing the slow you know fall down from the sky or you know already on the ground melts enough to to have snowball fights. Yeah yeah on on certain certain years would you know and We wouldn't my brother. And i would actually build our little stolen. I think my mom took photos of us. You know building are awesome and everything. Yeah yeah so. I mean the really young years was fun man and the la years They were interesting. You know Because you know we you know our economic status you know went downhill. You know so The gift part wasn't wasn't fun anymore. You know but but the family was was was was really beautiful. You know being with my with my name was over here and my elite dan. Yes so here in california you know that was that was beautiful. And then the the tradition of the mollis you know and make you know that became really really big. You know so christmas Was was a beautiful time in you know and a time of family you know i can agree with both of you. That was my most favorite holiday. Probably outside of halloween. Because i like. I used to like dressing up scaring people but as a little kid like you guys said you know. We wake up early in the morning because you want to open up your presence or even sometimes they will let us open up the presence like at midnight. You know so we would try to fight to stay awake. And then when christmas day came we would open them up because as you guys know at least for an our family and most latino mexican families. We celebrate christmas on christmas eve. That's the yeah shabangu. There's christmas eve right and my mom and dad especially my mom's really religious so we they will go hard core mandible sada's and and The singing and and the in a would prey and the rosary and and at the and it was it was beautiful. That's what i grew up with. It was totally awesome. But the the best part of it is being being. The best part was being a little kid. It just enjoying unwrapping the presents waking up early and just remembering that. It was all my cousins because we were the party house. Everybody would go to my mom and she was. She cooked pretty pretty well as you could tell my my wake. She's she got down with. Everybody will come to to my mom's house

Pat Pat Santa Claus Ronnie Sears Texas Shabangu LA DAN United States California Sada
The Sodder Family Tragedy: 75 Years Later

Extraterrestrial

04:50 min | 1 year ago

The Sodder Family Tragedy: 75 Years Later

"Local officials could explain what had happened and help them understand how they'd lost their house and their five children. But jenny and george were deeply dissatisfied. When the coroner's inquest was conducted it ruled that the fire had been caused by faulty wiring. But this didn't make any sense. Because jenny and george knew for a fact that the lights had been working that night so it seemed impossible that an electrical problem had sparked the blaze. They were also confused by the latter that had gone missing on the night of the fire. They could have used it to rescue the children trapped upstairs. If they'd been able to locate it later. Someone found a ladder. Sixty five feet away from the house in a ditch. The solders never learned why it was moved. Or who had done it without the latter georgia and his sons had tried to use their to coal trucks to climb into the house and rescued the trap children. But lo and behold neither truck would start even though both had been working perfectly the day before and that wasn't all a witness claimed that he saw a man taking a block and tackle from the scene of the fire for context. This is a system of hooks and ropes. That can be used to remove an engine from a car. The thief was later found to be a local man named lonnie johnson as it turned out stealing the block and tackle wasn't the only crime. Lonnie johnson committed that night. Lonnie also admitted to cutting the sada's phone line just thirty minutes before the blaze broke out at this point. It wasn't much of a stretch for jenny. And george to believe that someone may be lonnie had intentionally burned down their house after all lonnie was skulking around their property committing vandalism and theft if he was capable of that arson didn't seem like too far a leap. The problem was they couldn't prove anything. Sure lonnie confessed that he wanted to rob the house but that didn't mean he'd lit the flames. The sada's couldn't even prove the fire had been set on purpose but tips kept pouring in and they seemingly confirmed george. Jenny suspicions for instance. A bus driver came forward saying he driven past a solder home late on christmas eve. He claimed that as he went by he saw someone throwing quote balls of fire onto the roof. If the bus driver was to be believed someone had intentionally set the solder house. Flame perhaps using a molotov cocktail or another explosive. If true this meant that their children hadn't died in a tragic accident they'd been murdered. The surviving solders were still grappling with the possibilities. When they returned to the site turned memorial a few months later it a somber moment for the family a chance to grieve and remember the source of their pain but two year old baby. Sylvia was too young to understand what had happened or why her older siblings had disappeared. Blissfully unaware she played in the yard until she found something that was decidedly. Not a toy it was in olive. Green hard cylindrical rubber object after examining it george determined it was an explosive device and napalm pineapple bomb to be exact if it was indeed an explosive that would explain the balls of fire. The bus driver had seen being thrown onto the roof and it was consistent with the loud thump and rolling. Sound that jenny up in the middle of the night in short lonnie johnson's suspicious behavior. The napalm bomb and the lack of human remains made the saunders. Sure of two things one. The fire was set intentionally and two. They weren't getting the full story about their missing five children. Jenny conducted a series of informal experiments in her wood-burning stove hoping to understand why her sons and daughters had turned to ash all of her tests left bones behind which gave her an odd sense of hope. It meant that her children couldn't have died in the fire. They might still be alive somewhere but with the stakes so high she couldn't only rely on her own amateur investigation. She took things a bit farther to confirm her suspicions. Jenny consulted with an employee at a crematorium after all who would know better

Jenny Lonnie Johnson George Lonnie Sada Georgia ROB Sylvia Saunders
"sada" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"sada" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Lot of ways of America's history, its values and ideals for American Indian mothers have tied quarter Chinese in quarter white So you are that's why you America's Soon Tiger has been world famous for decades, and his story It comes with many chapters. Groundbreaking achievements on Tiger Woods is the 100 U. S Open champion in history. A shocking fall from Grace. I am deeply sorry for my irresponsible and selfish behavior. He was on Mount Everest. And now he that the bottom of the river mean and of course, what many believe is the greatest sports comeback of all time. Many doubted we ever see it. But here it is returned to glory. Central Exchange with Chuck's out of and Mike Armstrong your exclusive look at business and financial news affecting your day your city your world stay informed and up to date about economic and market trends, plus breaking business news every day. This is the financial exchange with Chuck Sada and Mike Armstrong. Well as we round into the 11 o'clock hour here on the financial exchange, we've got the Dow off 118 points the S and P off just six and the NASDAQ, actually in positive territory of 53 points in what is somewhat of a reversal of the trend we've seen over the last.

Mike Armstrong Chuck Sada America Tiger Woods Mount Everest U. S Open
The Metformin Recall

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

05:57 min | 1 year ago

The Metformin Recall

"With a blood pressure medication. Losartan scientist had an online pharmacy was screening products for potential carcinogens when they saw an alarming pig in a probable carcinogen and Nitro Sada methylamine off India May levels. They'll Sergeant was recalled in July of 2018 and it was followed by the recalls of five other India, May contaminated medications, November 2018 the off-chance and two receptor blockers irbesartan and losartan September 2019 and January 2020 the over-the-counter reflux medicines Ranitidine and not seeing those recalls started hitting closer to home between May and October 2020 when the FDA recalled 179 batches of Metformin ER, So what is India May 1st what it's not ndma is not nmda. Nmda is well known in Psychiatry is the limit ergic receptor involved in the mechanisms of medications that antagonize the nmda receptor things like ketamine and Lamotrigine experimental antidepressants like amantadine resolved. Mantine dextromethorphan and drugs of abuse like PCP alcohol and two that have both therapeutic properties and abuse potential MDMA and ketamine these all have to do with an MDA which has nothing to do with ndma. These drugs reduce the effects of excess baggage automate which is toxic a little bit of glutamate in the brain is good, but too much is toxic. Back to ndma, which is also toxic but in a different way, it's a carcinogen that causes mutations in DNA and it is directly damaging to deliver even small amounts of deadly and there have been several prominent homicides where ndma was used as a poison resulting in death through hepatotoxicity on the other hand and the amazed everywhere. It's a byproduct of wastewater treatment with chlorine and that water flows through our tap into the soil where the ndma collects in the plants and vegetables that we eat. And EMA is also one of the reasons that were warned against eating grilled and charred meets. It's one of those cancer-causing nitrosamine is that forms when meat is grilled or smoked it's particularly high in smoked sausages nitrosamine Czar also found in beers. Cheese's sausages bacon and cheese. Foods that are smoked or pickled in salt. So how much India May these recalled medications producing with Ranitidine ndma levels Rose nine-fold higher than the odd for safety level four medications, but that's safety level which the FDA set for medication seems very conservative 0.096 micrograms per day. The typical diet is about twice as much ndma. And if you're drinking a lot of alcohol or eating Smoked Meats, your typical diet will have a lot more indirme in it part of the reason the safety limit is set. So low is that the FDI assumes that the ndma four medications is on top of the ndma already present in our daily Foods a pound of steak has three times as much ndma as the upper age limit for medications, but what really matters is cancer there the FDA is given us some data on the first recalled medication Valsartan if eight thousand people took those starting at the dog Some dos for four years while the drug was contaminated there would be one additional case of cancer. And remember that's at the max dose which is important because in Psychiatry, we certainly don't use the max dose of Metformin. We don't have numbers like that format form in yet. So that one in 8000 number might be slightly reassuring but when we're talking about things like cancer and lung damage, it's not exactly reassuring and we still don't know the cause of all this ndma contamination. The best guess is that it's a byproduct of the manufacturing process, but the proper points towards a troubling Trend in drug quality as manufacturing has shifted overseas in the past two decades. We are seeing more problems with medications right now about 40% of medication to the US are manufactured overseas and even when they are produced in the US around eighty percent of the ingredients come from abroad So what's wrong with going overseas? Well historically the US has had the tightest regulatory control of manufacturing safety and medications. The FDA has been the gold standard wage, but it's difficult for the FDA to regulate overseas manufacturing because they can't do what they do best surprise visits to get into another country. They have to work through governmental agencies and plan their trips to arrange these inspections and that allows the drug companies precious time to prepare for the inspectors. Most of the problems have come from manufacturers in India and China and if you're interested in this Kathryn even has detailed all the Gory details in a best-selling book bottle of Lies. We're going to be interviewing her sometime next month. The original Valsartan contamination came from a Chinese firm Sweet Pea this firm changed their manufacturing process and 2011 and am supposed to announce that to the FDA because it can create byproducts and things that might be damaging and would require new inspection but against regulations they did not announce the change in manufacturing jobs,

Ndma India FDA Losartan Cancer EMA Valsartan Lung Damage United States Kathryn Sweet Pea China
"sada" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"sada" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"With Chuck Sada and Mike Armstrong. So we've got green on the Dow. We've got green on the S and P. We've got green on the NASDAQ. As we kick off the 11 o'clock hour close. The markets stopped the trading. Let's end with a positive day today. It's Chuck, Mike and Tucker and we're here on the financial exchange and after the You of Monday and Wednesday. We're into positivity here. We've got the Dow up. 62 points the S and P s of 23, the NASDAQ Up over 1% 120 points. We got oil still selling off. Might be the care in the coal mine. Hey, this isn't gonna last too long down to 36 a barrel 10 year Treasury. Those selling off saying, Hey, maybe this is going to last. We got a little bit better than expected economic data this morning from both q three GDP. As well as the weekly jobless claims of the Massachusetts claims, Still disappointing, unfortunately rising in the state of Massachusetts and gold Continuing its sell off the last couple weeks. Down 18 71 per ounce, Right now Down 7 50 s O Overall. Mike today looks like somewhat of a breather. I don't know that it does a lot to allay fears that you might see some continued selling pressure over the next few weeks here, but at least for today. I got a little bit of green on the board and that is worthy of balloons. As we said nothing is fundamentally changed since since Monday when the startup business sell off started, But there are plenty of investors out there who say Okay, mark. It's fallen by 6% in the last three days, and that's that's a by signal to them, and we're seeing some of that today, but it's 11 07. So let's see how things look at 4 P.m.. Talk a little bit about Social Security. This is our top story for the hour. Mike. Have you applied for Social Security at? No, No, I'm a little bit of ways from there. Okay, Tucker. What about you? Uh, yeah, of course. I don't know. Okay, so Tucker, Mike and I are in the demographic where At least my outlook Mike being that it's going to be multiple decades before I collect Social security. I'm of the opinion, and I think a lot of folks I talked to in our demographic are kind of similarly. If it's their great, but we're not really banking on it being a key pillar of retirement. Is that fair for both of you as well? That's fair, something that I pay into but never expect to actually receive and don't build into my retirement plan. That's a fair description. So to all of you who are, you know, listening who were collecting Social security right now. You're welcome. You're welcome. Like marijuana. You're welcome. Enjoy, enjoy mooching off my taxes. No, I'm only kind of kidding. But so in all honesty, so security, we know that it has problems prior to the pandemic. The estimate was that the Social Security trust fund would be exhausted. It was pretty much going down by one year every year. 2023 or 2020, 2033 2034 So about 13 to 14 year problem in terms of what we are seeing now. Ah The current math is that if nothing is done to change the program, then benefit checks would have to be reduced. Not 13 or 14 years from now, but about 11 years from now, and maybe sooner if we continue to see worsening tax receipts into the soul security program, so this number got slashed for obvious reasons, right when nobody was really expecting unemployment, Teo, you head up to the highest rates we've seen since the Great Depression in 2020 that came as a surprise. Is and therefore, you know, with decreased security tax collections, that number gets pulled forward a little bit. You know, this is now This is now an issue that is directly in front of you as a politician. I mean, maybe not as a politician because they don't like to deal with anything unless it's literally three days in front of them. But if we're looking at this realistically, 11 years that that goes by like nothing. Evan, this is not a financier, business question shot, But just as a general, you know, thought here. What does it do? To the Social Security funding. And how did people vote? If you like you mentioned people our age, do not bang on Social Security existing when they get to retirement. What does that do to how we treated and how we vote on it In the future? A millennials are now the largest generation in this country, while they don't turn out to vote today in terribly high numbers compared to the boomer generation. They are, you know, potentially huge, swaying vote when it comes to programs like this. Yeah, And I think that when we talk about Social Security and the program the first thing T keep in mind do either of you know how many people currently collect Social Security? Ah, quarter of the population. Some four forms our security. It's so when you include the when you include the security disability program and Survivorsbenefits. It ends up being in total host 70 70 million people, so just shy of a quarter, it's about 20% of the US population. The retired workers specifically about 46 million with about 3.1 million dependence, and then six million survivor benefits that are paid out, Okay. In terms of you know what people actually receive. Average benefit about $1500 a month for people in the retirement program, and 50% of married couples and 70% of unmarried persons received 50% arm or of their income from Social Security. So for half of households for married couples. 50% or more of their income is coming from Seoul security if it is a unmarried person, whether they're widowed widower or simply never married. 70% of that group receives over half of their income from Social Security. So there's this..

Mike Armstrong Social Security trust Tucker Massachusetts Chuck Sada US Seoul Treasury marijuana Survivorsbenefits Teo Evan
Protect & Assist - An Interview with the Head of the Australian Cyber Security Centre

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

03:41 min | 1 year ago

Protect & Assist - An Interview with the Head of the Australian Cyber Security Centre

"As you've said, I hit the styling Sada security security center. Now am missions pretty. But it's also pretty simple. It's to Mike Strategy of the safest place to connect. Online and do business online and out at prime responsibilities really to protect old parts of the Australian economy from the beginning of business to government critical infrastructure provides small medium enterprise and individuals and. Families get on with life online, which as we know in Grad example is the way that wearing gauging today is an increasingly important very much. In Lock wise I agree with we wouldn't normally have reached out to you. So readily you've come from that mentioned a bit about your background you've been in the role to six months and you came from the National Bushfire. Recovery Center of go committee ought not to show that the Prophets Dada was, but you've come from a, is it across? into. What we obviously absurd at the same time as I saw across the. Up Tyke in Saada crime and saw active duty during covid nineteen has the right thanks I fire. I'm assuming you're Ri- You're enjoying it or you're funding it the challenge that was made to be it's I have to say the people that work here who mice distractions. made to ever speak to some of the most incredible human beings having encountered by in terms of their incredible. Personal drive towards that mission and really advancing Australia's interests but also the technical capability which is second to none. You. You mentioned I had come from the National Bushfire Recovery Agency, actually not a dissimilar function in the sense that you're trying to engage h very different sectors of of the community who've been affected by That's materialized and assist them to get back up on their fate again, actually to build resilience, it's just the context he's. Prior to that I was the head of the national. Security Division Prime Minister and Cabinet had some timing critical infrastructure. Yeah. In High McVeigh's and. Inaugural Chief Risk Officer for the Department of Homeland Phases Wales. Postings looking after Europe and sub Saharan Africa region it sounds like a WIG background but look the headline is this a love a good crisis? Could us a find that the same skill set? Of Translating. Deriving problems into their various segments responding to each one of ours always having a plan or campaign or or an operational approach assists in obviously having a a a defense background helps that way and and and of course, the May you quite rightly point out. I don't have a long technical history but. I said twenty million constituents across the economy. The vast majority of dying Ada semi bottom line is if I'd. It how customers and I think that kind of balance swelled.

National Bushfire Recovery Age National Bushfire Saada Department Of Homeland Phases Security Division Mike Strategy Prime Minister RI Chief Risk Officer Saharan Africa Australia Mcveigh Europe Cabinet
Mahmudr in the Geluk and Kagy Traditions

The Wisdom Podcast

08:24 min | 1 year ago

Mahmudr in the Geluk and Kagy Traditions

"Maybe we'll start with. Way Your interest in Mahamoud. Way Did that how did that come about? When was that? So since by had? I probably I got interested in Mahamoud per se early in Grad school or perhaps a little bit before that might regional interest in Buddhism back in high school days early in college was mostly in San and I always expected that would be the form of Buddhism than I ended up practicing but the as says avid my then girlfriend now wife and I ended up traveling overland India in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, three into nineteen, seventy four, and then ended up at coupon monastery just outside. Katmandu where we studied where Rama Tipton yesterday in London Lumberton. And those famous co concourses which are still ongoing by merrily introductions allom Rim to the stages of the path of course. Llamas, OBA has a particular particularly in those days maybe a little. So I don't know He had a particular teaching style wary if you're at a month course, you could pretty much be sure that half the time was going to be spent in the lower rounds. So he did delight in. Those and Mama yesterday would, of course come in and remind us that we all had put a nature. So it was kind of A. Tough. Cop Nice cop routine and away. And you know he was he was a it was kind of overwhelming for me despite my interest. But as despite my having majored in religion in college and so forth. But. All the complication you know both the details of rim, how Karma works all the different realms, the scholastic arguments back and forth about beginning less mind an emptiness and so forth all of it was incredibly impressive. They were particularly impressive as practitioners as people who lived out what they had studied on what they were teaching but I I also began in in the few the few hours that were that I had hadn't disposal to to read. I think it was probably some poems by Miller wrap up where Branson book by John Blow Fouls, which just had a little bit of discussion. Mahmoud. and. The way the way I took it brightly. At times this reminds me a lot of ZAP it a bid, it short circuits all the detail, all the ritual, all the scholasticism. All those kinds of things that just tells you to realize the nature of your mind. So it appealed to me. Even that? Sort of a a hidden card. Yuba. Lurking inside this is fledgling gay look back. And I kept that in mind when. Year or so you're a half later I ended up graduate school at the University of Wisconsin, studying under shapes up SOPA. who was the first as far as I know the first Betton tenure at American University, certainly the first Tibetan guess. Who was tenured at American University and again to to study with guesses OPA both in the context of the graduate program that Wisconsin and at the deer park would a center as it's now called. Founded. In the mid seventies was too steep yourself in again are a great deal of the the complexity, the ritual, the richness, certainly of of the gaylord actual tradition and once again. The. Reading Mamo drawn decide what kind of balanced helped balance things out for me. So the number of the papers I wrote at Grad School, you know we're on the Mosit- as of India or or soccer punditocracy critiques of Mahamoud, draw various topics like that. So I, you know even in Grad school I I had this interest You know it sometimes said about Chinese practitioners. They're confusions during the day and Taoists. At Night I. Think a part of me that's was during the day and At night. Of course went when I began to discover that was that there was a whole Gaelic tradition of Mambo. I'd been vaguely aware of because it was a little translation that had come out at the library of Tibetan works in archives and. I read through that and So you know after I got Grad school sort of begun by my teaching career. I. Along with rank, of course, bring my dissertation into book form of pretty much everybody wants to do at some point are almost everybody wants to. Buy began to again sort of on the side begin to begin to investigate Gaylord Mabul dress, and so that's at least in terms of the genesis of this I. Guess That's That's how I would I would explain it. In a this dungeon have any. Teachers. Teaching. Mahmoud to you know you know during we went and saw on trump shays league. Once in Chicago he was notoriously late. He was typically drinking soccer when he was typically brilliant. So you know everything we had heard was true. And I think later in the seventies and into the eighties I began to to go occasionally to cognitive teacher but no, I did not have a regular. Teacher and I. I guess it's fair to say that I really never had a sort of regular teacher although in more recent years I've studied some weakening. European. Fortunately for us has his world had ordered in Minneapolis just. Just a few miles from where we live. So now, my my interest I mean I was interested in cognitive because if you're interested in mom will address even from the Gaylord stand going you clearly have to begin researching. Kogyo because. Even, some texts presents the. Is Fine Llamas. Book with. Alex. burs. The gala argue slash kagyu tradition of Mahamoud address. Implies that it's a kind of a sing credit tradition or a synthetic traditional might be a slightly better word So you and it's very clear that the first Panchen Lama who was one of the tutors of style on one of the truly great figures Gael history. He clearly was familiar with cargill literature and and it would seem with some Kogyo practices so. In my in the process of beginning to research, Ma Gala Mambo. Dry Inevitably had to begin reading at least a lot in In the calculator corresponded with scholars argue. Of various sorts Michael. Roy. David Jackson others. Of course the way these things work you you've you dig into you want your insulin gay look initially you dig into the cog you and then you get into the cockpit realize Oh God. All this comes from India and you've got to go back and look again at Sada. High and the other message you gotta look at the time. TRAS. Very, clearly, the textual a kind of sources for Mahmoud to discourse and behind that. Then of course, always these claims that there's a Sutra Mabul dry and so you begin digging around in sutures that may mention the word or may talk about ideas that are similar and so. I ended up going down this kind of rabbit, hole. That led me deeper and deeper back into Indian tradition and it started out as really odd. I'll do a few little translations and right any production suddenly was this Gargantuan projects that threatened to be about just about everything in. Indian. In Tibetan. Buddhism. Because in a weird way Mamo Dra, it was said, could be found everywhere in India, wants about bottles.

India Grad School Mahmoud. Mahamoud American University Gaylord Mabul Mahamoud Per Katmandu Mamo Dra Rama Tipton SAN Mamo London Lumberton Soccer University Of Wisconsin Panchen Lama Ma Gala Mambo Mama Gaylord Chicago
Cyber Power Index highlighting Australian Governments gaps in cyber capability

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

06:22 min | 1 year ago

Cyber Power Index highlighting Australian Governments gaps in cyber capability

"Like any INFO Technology Sector security has plenty of indexes flooding around or get. Indexes collided by vendors and people trying to sell things to us I thought this for Senate index was. Useful because it doesn't come from I accompany product. It say independent academic attempt to benchmark Com, sub security capability and intent from nation sites It appealed to make per couple of reasons may not have had A to do with Bill Center in the past spend a little bit of Thanh. Talking to their academics in previous roles and particularly locked the way that This report sets metrics that up designed to objectively major subsidy maturity in nations So it says what are the kind of things that we could judge the intent of a nation in the obscurity spice and one of the kind of things that we could use to objectively major capability. And it tells an interesting story in Australia Australia's categorized in the higher intent, low capability quadrant and the reason for that is because when the the objective metrics this reporter applied to the statements made by by government ministers by government departments, entities about what our intent is. Assab security spice. Where about the most ambitious nation in the world for ask security attend? But. Then when you look at what our actual capabilities against that intent on again measured in a series of objective metrics. We fold anti sixteenth in that space. So, FA May that told a pretty familiar story because this over promising on delivering stories. One that I think is familiar to a lot of. People in the Strand security sector. In the context of these trying government's actions since the twenty six, Day sub, security strategy. A lot of announcement to be my bet when you follow up way those announcements. In the years after that have been made you say less deleted then was announced to the media. Will what's on the industry? Kodak in the two thousand, sixteen strategy that was undefended at least out of the Prime Minister's office. This one is looking out at a ten years. The two thousand twenty strategy is looking at at the ten year timeframe. And proposing one point six, billion, dollar funding. Backdrop, but a lot of that is going into law enforcement and as you say might be into that capability. What's your take on the strategy itself? Overall as you say, it's it's another announcement is on the strategy whether it's not as another thing but certainly yet your thoughts on the strategy itself and where maybe else we could have been in twenty twenty from the twenty six danes strategies. Have you have you seen that the two thousand twenty strategy's building on the twenty, sixteen or? Taking a completely new direction. While the that, you can certainly say the why the two thousand twenty strategy is reaction to experience the twenty six strategy That the twenty sixteen subsequently strategy had a very large number of of objectives and Nisha announced under it. I think the government found the experience of trying to implement those very large number projected initiatives again, adopted under outcome Tambo's prime ministership around the breathing bruising exercise because the twenty twenty strategy dramatically rationalize is temptation I'm say that the broad spread of of initiatives and objectives under the strategy a kind of a toddler. Your decide that the Gospel confessed about ninety percent of the funding. Associated with these twenty twenty strategy he's allocated to security agencies So it goes into building. Capabilities with particularly the is day but also other security agencies on. Enforcement agencies like the the I pay, and that's well and good We have I think outstanding internationally recognized capabilities within is. and this is the conduct that you have to keep investing in order to. Maintain those capabilities in my time that that international ranking. Suppose big Criticism that that libraries had is one that we've been exploring for at the loss twelve months and that's really When you look at security policy to strike the problem is the ability to project those capabilities out of the silos of how defense and security agencies. To the problems in Australia Com in terms of lifting a bench, mock the baseline up security security. Brazil and Sada resilience across the Australian government trying economy You know there's a lot of examples of that. Wall is day is absolutely world standard. Saab resiliency combined entities is as at the government's own description reminding at relatively low levels. you know the is days top full became mandatory in the. Seventies ago now. had a slew of a straight national ordered office inquiry since then. when you type them all up on like twenty nine percent of Kamal entities compliant with all the top four. Seven years after theoretically became mandatory say interesting. Is Connect between very high capability. Inside Is Day lower levels of saga resilience and more broadly throughout government not to sign story that we see in the corporate sector unites now at banks and Al. Telcos, absolately will class intends to their sub security posture. But you only have to sort of take one stiff through the down. In the I six navy top fifty. And you start seeing. Very, different levels of resilience.

Info Technology Sector Senate Bill Center Australia Australia Kodak Australia Prime Minister Saab Tambo AL Nisha Absolately Reporter Brazil
Drew Barrymore confirms rumor that her grandfather's corpse was 'stolen'

Colleen and Bradley

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Drew Barrymore confirms rumor that her grandfather's corpse was 'stolen'

"Drew Carey lore has confirmed that her late grandfather, John Berry, more fit one final party into his social schedule after its 1942 death, thanks to some of his friends, So during a Q and a session, Drew was asked the following. Is it true that your grandfather's body was stolen from the morgue by W. C fields, Errol Flynn? And Sada Kichi Hartmann so that they could prop him up against a poker table and throw one last party. Are you kidding? And did she say Yes to that, Colleen. I'm here to say she said yes, And she said not only yes, but there have been cinematic interpretations of that, she said. Related Bernie's. Well, yeah, and also the Blake Edwards film S O B. That's the movie where Julie Andrews takes her top off, she said. That's just brilliant and fun Toe. Oh, my goodness.

Sada Kichi Hartmann Errol Flynn Drew Carey Colleen Julie Andrews Blake Edwards John Berry TOE Bernie
Right Mindfulness

5 Minute Dharma

04:33 min | 1 year ago

Right Mindfulness

"Buddha said. Now, this is the noble truth with the path that leads to the of suffering. It is simply this noble eightfold path that is right view right intention right speech right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right meditation. Today. We WanNa talk about right mindfulness. So the next question is obviously what is right mindfulness The Buddha said, and what is right mindfulness it is when a practitioner meditates observing and aspect of the body or an aspect of feelings or an aspect of the mind or an aspect of experience being ardent, attentive, and mindful putting away worldly longing and distress. This is called right mindfulness. So, we want to look at this passage, a little closer I. The four things that he mentions are actually called the four applications of mindfulness. There's a whole a Buddhist scripture dedicated to that. The mudgee Cayenne is number ten, Sutin number ten it's called the Sada Patana Ceuta. Saudi is the word for mindfulness is translated mindfulness. It means to remember to be present with what's going on. It means to look at experience as it arises. So. There's four things that you apply your mindfulness to the first is observing aspect of the body. So that's the physical body that would include your breath, your seating position, the the walking that you do the city in the lane down different postures, things of this nature so that be the first. The second is observing an aspect of the feelings. Feelings might better translated maybe feeling tone. Basically, there's three there's pleasant, unpleasant and neutral. These are the feeling tones. So in everything that you encounter, you get a feeling tone from it. It's built in as a as a response to stimulus. So you think thought you get a feeling tone you see an object, you get a feeling tone you smell something tastes something any of those things produce a feeling tone. And those feeling tones are one of three kinds pleasant, unpleasant, and neutral. The pleasant ones we attached to the unpleasant ones we are averse to and the neutral ones we tend to ignore. The third one is observing in aspect of the mind. So this is the quality the mind the leaning of the mind whether DHS deluded contracted things of this nature. So you're trying to pay attention to the how the mind is its quality and the last one is observing an aspect of experience. So this is probably the translation that most people would find odd or unusual. The Pali Word as Dhamma and Dhamma has multiple applications and basically what it sane is. It's asking you to compare to observant aspect of experience and compare it to the Buddhist teachings. So, you're trying to see the aspects, the four noble trues in your experience you're trying to see the factors of awakening you're trying to see these aspects. In your experience, and then that also tells us how to pay attention. It tells us to be ardent which means to be dedicated. It tells us to be attentive that means to be focused to to to keep your mind there and mindful means to be observant. Not, just aware are not attentive it means to be more aware it means to really take it in. To observe it to notice if will. and. The last one is putting away worldly as long and distress that basically saying non distraction. Longings, desires things at the state your for things of the world.

Buddha Cayenne Sada Patana Ceuta DHS
"sada" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"sada" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"This is the financial exchange with Chuck Sada and Mike Armstrong. Far 11 o'clock hour, and I got a beautiful little rally taking place as we kick off the week here. Tao, currently up for 114 points, the S and P is up 43 the NASDAQ up 1 94 Before we go further. Mike, I need to talk about what's going on in the NASDAQ a little bit. Do so. Have you seen what's happening to Tesler today? It's insane. What's going on? It's up 14% to $1767 a share. Uh, so this company I know As of last week, it was larger than Ford, GM and Fiat Chrysler combined. I wonder if we've taken on another automaker at this point. Like it's beyond that. If Tesla were in the S and P 500 right now, it would be the 11th biggest company. What Yes. That sense about what are we going to do this year, like 780,000 vehicles, and they are the What did I say? The 11th biggest company by market cap that is incredible, $328 billion company and by the way, the reason that they're not in the S and P is because they've never had 4/4 in a row of profits. So I say this look, I say this partly because I got some sour grapes. I own a little bit of Tesla's stock At the beginning of the year. I sold it when it got, like, 900 cause. I'm like this is not sever who have blamed you, Chuck. And then it doubled again. Hey, Chuck, it could be worse. You could be a short seller of Tesla. I could be so but I always go back to the old J. P. Morgan, quote. This is from the actual J. P. Morgan, the man, not the company. How'd you get so rich? I sold too soon. That's my That's my mantra in life. I want to sell too soon. Yeah, that's fair. Okay, uh but yes. So Tesla up 14% today, And that's why the NASDAQ is rallying so strongly, obviously, look, you got the usual suspects Google apples, so on that, well, we're on 1/2 percent to do, too. But the other thing, by the way, and this is as of, I think Yeah, this says of today as well. Yuan musk with his new stock options that he's been granted. Is now worth more than Warren Buffett. Yeah, well, Warren Buffet also gave away how much money What? Recently to charity, And I think he just gave away 0.9 billion, 2.9 billion recently. Yeah, I think that's for the gates found Friday or something. So yeah, but Elon Musk, Ah, and his Yeah, and his amazing compensation package now richer than Warren Buffett. It's just I I don't know what to say. Like again. I I don't know what to say. Here. It doesn't make sense. It kind of does, but it doesn't. But let's move on because otherwise we'll just spend the entire day talking about youand. Well, by the way, check.

Tesla Warren Buffet Chuck Sada Mike Armstrong J. P. Morgan Elon Musk Tesler Tao Ford Fiat Chrysler GM Google
Gold

PODSHIP EARTH

06:09 min | 1 year ago

Gold

"Since one thousand nine hundred sixty. California has officially been known as the Golden State. And that's because as the plaque reads California's development and remarkable prosperity began with the discovery of gold humanities. Love of gold is fairly bizarre of all the hundred and eighteen elements in the periodic table. Gold is the only one which we humans have always gravitated towards gold was used earliest currencies. Gold joined us in marriage and was used to produce most precious artifacts. Maybe the secret to our love of gold is simply that it's beautiful and never tarnishes in eighteen. Fifty-three my father's great grandfather Henry. Cohn traveled from a tiny stelle. In what is now Poland to Hamburg where he boarded a boat and six months later. After walking across the isthmus of Panama Henry ended up in San Francisco. Henry Cohn was part of the Goldrush the largest mass migration in American history bringing about three hundred thousand people to California. It all started in eighteen. Forty eight when James Marshall found gold in his piece of land at Sada's mill in Coloma. The News of gold quickly spread around the world. At first the gold could be picked up from the ground but later on it was recovered from the streams and rivers with the use of panned. The gold rush peaked in eighteen fifty. Two and after that the Gold Rassoul getting thinner and harder to reach soon largescale and more environmentally damaging methods of traction cold hydraulic mining were employed. One hundred and seventy years later on the environmental legacy of the gold rush a significant and yet acknowledged as we'll discover in today's episode mercury which is a deadly neurotoxin was elemental to the process of gold-mining today large quantities of mercury from the gold. Russia's still polluting California posing a risk to every kind of living organism including us. I travel up to California's gold country to meet with Izzy Mountain. Izzy is a community organizer and environmental advocate with over forty years of experience working in rural communities to economic and environmental justice. She is what with a wide variety of constituencies from tribal leaders to Maynas and from farmers to forest is is. He first entered local politics. Nevada County Planning Commission at during the nineteen ninety s and later while serving on the Nevada County Board of supervisors. Miss Martin led the fight to put the South Yuba river into the state. Wild and scenic river program is he became. Ceo The Sierra Fund Sixteen years ago she conceived of and led the effort that resulted in the publication of the Sierra Funds. I report on the impact of the Goldrush mining's toxic legacy and has worked for the last decade to bring attention to golds dark shadow on a very hot day. Is Ian. I climb to the top of a damn standing above the angle. Bright Damn A army corps US Army Corps of Engineers Dam on the main stem of the river. Where is that though in Nevada county? We're about halfway between Tahoe. And Sacramento. A little north of that would not actually in Nevada. Nope we're in the state of California and we are standing right between Nevada County and Yuba County and we're standing on the beautiful Yuba River which flows down to the feather. And then the Sacramento from there down into the San Francisco Bay in the ocean. So you were a county board of Supervisors member when you first came here. Tell us about your first experience with this. Damn down a few different times over my life had been here my whole life. It was built and commissioned in nineteen forty seven by the Army Corps of Engineers so that people could resume hydraulic mining blocks hundreds of miles of potential fish passage for fish. Come from the ocean and go up into the high sierra to lay their eggs so when I first came to the damn understanding that the state of California had targeted this spot em federal government as maybe the best place to restore passage at the very first meeting we went to the. Us Geological Survey stood up and said you can't do anything to that. Damn until you look at the material behind it is holding back a whole bunch of mercury and that was the very first time I had ever heard anything about mercury and the state of California and its role in the goal rush. Or how long have you lived in this part of the world? My family came to California as part of the Gold Rush. We were quakers. Escaping the east coast. Ten violent religious oppression moved out to become farmers I was raised in Concord California on that form and in one thousand nine hundred five. I married a farmer and we moved to Nevada county beautiful organic farm in a place called Penn Valley. Tell us about this county and just its history and the gold rush because it is a lot of history here. Nevada county was ground zero of the California Gold Rush. Far More gold was taken out of this county and specifically this river that we're standing above than any other place in the state of California. It's where the very destructive technique called hydraulic mining which is using power water monitors to to scrub mountainside. Looking for gold is where that was invented. They started to dam the rivers and convey that water over to these huge hydraulic mining activities. Which were recovering thousands of of gold but millions of tons of sediment not material here from Nevada county rolled down the river and kept flooding the Sacramento Valley and eventually the farmers downstream who are really tired of having their houses filled with all this debris sued and stopped the activity known as hydraulic mining.

California Gold Nevada County Us Army Corps Of Engineers Nevada County Board Of Supervi Nevada County Planning Commiss Henry Cohn Sacramento Nevada South Yuba River Golden State Yuba River Yuba County San Francisco Concord California Izzy Izzy Mountain James Marshall San Francisco Bay Poland
How Animals Get Color Without Pigment

Curiosity Daily

02:34 min | 1 year ago

How Animals Get Color Without Pigment

"There's more than one way to make it color when humans one address. Something up with a splash of colour. We almost always rely on. Paints dyes or some other form of payments nature uses pigments too but after a few billion years of trial and error it also has another trick up its sleeve. It's called structural color. And it gets it's not from chemical properties but from physical shape so like. Have you ever wondered why humming birds have such vibrant colors? I mean they're not just bright they are iridescent. But if you took a hummingbird feather and grounded up into powder you wouldn't get that beautiful hugh that's because their color comes from the physical structure of the feathers specifically incredibly small pancake shaped structures. The colors we see are the result of light physically interacting with those stacks of Nanno skill flap. Jacks scientists have known for centuries that tiny structures? Were probably responsible for the IRIDESCENT Shimmer of peacock feathers and butterfly wings. And it's become clear over the last couple of decades that colorful micro and Nano scale structures give colored to living things across the natural world in everything from insects to fish to plants. Sort of backup. Pigments get their color because their molecules absorb certain wavelengths of light and reflect others structural colors on the other hand come from the physical properties of the material itself so in nature. These are usually something like cellulose. Collagen Keaton and Carrington. But if you look closely enough at the carapace of a beetle or at the berry like fruit of the herb paalea Camden Sada. Then you'll see a complex micro structure far more advanced than anything. Human engineers have ever designed. Take that herb polycondensation and it's metallic blue berries. While naturally occurring pigments tend to FADE OVER TIME. There are forty year old specimens of these berries. That haven't begun to fade but try to extract blue pigment from the fruit. And you'll get nothing. That's because the metallic blue comes from the wafer. Thin strands of cellulose are arranged in the berries. Cell walls the tiny threads are stacked in zillions of Helix Shapes and in arrangement that allows blue light to be reflected why Elat of other wavelengths passes through scientists are studying structural colors in nature to try to make some themselves in a field called synthetic photonics. In fact this field has given rise to technology. You probably know pretty well like Blu Ray but nature did it

Blu Ray Hugh Keaton Carrington
Ali Alizadeh

Published...Or Not

11:20 min | 1 year ago

Ali Alizadeh

"Offers an intense perspective on the issues and feelings most prescient in the poet's mind to that end Ellie Ellie Sada's latest collection towards the end challenges a range of concerns troubling our contemporary world today. So Ellie welcome back to three. Ci Thank you. Thanks for having me Nev- it. The title here. Seems a little ominous towards the end leading to the end of the world as we know it but the world as we know it I you know I think as I was. Finalizing the book Earlier in the year. And I'm thinking well. This is a bit of a melodramatic title. And then I turn on the news now. Actually I just step out at you know to the back yard and I can't breathe because of the ember storm you know. This is interesting learning new language. Courtesy of the Times. We live in so there. Is You know parts of Australia. Burning soon have another of the horse. Men of of the apocalypse disease being unleashed in Wuhan China. At exact same time we had you know trump trying desperately to start the Third World War by by killing that Iranian General I thought well the four horsemen are here so my title was in to a to an in some ways necessarily see the physical demise here. It's it's more for the values and concerns that we hold dear if I may I'll just read the first poem and we can discuss it in a little more detail. It's called the singer. This is how I croon my son singing Humpty dumpty a melody. He screams out in the absence of my song. I wasn't nearly as loud toddler. My voice vanished from the void of my father's car father's es sorry. I remember him having vaguely while driving wrapped up in his own world in mind. My son's medley moves onto Jack and Jill recalling the tune. I whistled yesterday. Did it ever exist? Did I ever have a voice? Even as an infant to seek to mit a whimper. Our member dad crying out the lyrics of an old Persian. Dirge wobbling from the speaker's not long after moving to Australia homesickness. Haunting his larynx like ghost howling in a haunted house. So much for parenting the loss of the music I never could muster. I'm here for my son's nursery rhymes to enact the presence unsung words now. My interpretation and this is the thing about poetry. It's open to all sorts of possibilities. The music the music of the child the music of the father and the music of your father and your music seems to get lost in there somewhere and your voice. Because there's your father recollecting purge at the music is a wider connect with these past life your son Humpty Dumpty Jack and Jill vs the medleys all Utah of the future. So but this is my interpretation. But I'm just wondering if that coincides with your intention but also then the question Your Voice. Your music Great I just want to say that you read it very well and I think I would like you to do all my readings from here on if that's okay look into. I guess I wouldn't call it an ironing. It's too weak word but I guess the contradiction is that it's actually written in my voice. The whole poem is actually in my voice. It's a little bit like Plato in the Republic. Saying all this nasty things about art but the Republicans written as a play with characters. So you know there's that sort of again i. I guess this is paradox. I guess is the word so so here is a Paul supporters. You know saying I don't have a voice but it's actually nothing but the poet's voice I think that that's sort of the lost there and it's something that identify in the rest of the collection is not so much for voice of personal you know emotional autobiographical identity. But one of something deeper something more more meaningful which are identified to be the voice of universal human subjectivity. Now that's one of the oldest things that poets tried to do scene at a time of the great epic poets. They want. I wanted to speak on behalf of humanity. Now this is something. A modern poetry mob has certainly rejected strongly beginning with romanticism. Which says look you know. It's just you the lyric I expressing your feelings. All the way to sort of like postmodernism and which says the lyric is bad but any mention of we is also not okay. Only he only express the immediacy of language. And that's all you ever do and I kind of feel like well. I don't I mean I I mean that's a tall these traditions but the quest that I guess I felt as I was putting the poems in this book together on a road some additional poems and arranged upon where particular wide at Kinda tells of sort of a story and is not so much about finding my personal voice. You know how do I how do I express myself? But it's about well. What is the voice? That's is needed for our times. And I think that's the kind of the big universal question which is perhaps even a political question. Wouldn't you raise some very mighty topics vertical philosophical social There's one called saga the more obscure and undesirable the more palatable. Ice Scowl still bothers me. And she's been dead for at least a decade. Her husband comically defendant. A downtrodden man wants a Communist. How much more fascinating radical with? My grandparents emigres escaping style and coming to Iran to found a trotskyite cell instead of Banal Matriarch and dull ethics patriarch immersed in gossip and religion. As a child. I hated any a few things more than being left alone with him. He once believed in the dictatorship of the proletariat when he died. I couldn't some in a single tear from my added on to his grandson. He'd being so simple meaningless as for Anna perhaps not really possible that she migrated as a teenage girl from Baku to Iran for more exceptional reason than giving birth to a son. Who'd made a woman who didn't give birth to me? Jeans are poor substitute for the fable of revolutions that universal family. Thank you but this notion of needing a viable needing a sag that's momentous and yet the irony or the opposite is the sort of mundane Mundane missive life Yeah totally I mean. I think you know this is my third book of poems. I kind of exhausted. That's sort of like Again reflection on the personal and familial and the mundane I know. That's what a lot of poets do and they do. Well you know since I mean who's to say that William Williams was wrong to talk about her red wheelbarrow on K. Good not yourself that and I've done that but I kind of feel like especially the Times though was writing this collection of putting it together and I kind of begins around the time that I live into by and this is two thousand and eight and I see the global financial crisis at that really impacts me and I feel like perhaps there is a tradition of poetry that is much more easily impacted by what's happening in the world by the economic social and political. Then there are other traditions. You know the the great sort of I mean this is this is again. It is also paradoxical thing we think about romanticism. We think well. It's the poetry of you know some some English Dandy wandering around and looking at daffodils. Okay it's that but it is also the poetry of the same Dandy as a young person going to be a part of the French Revolution. So so you know that sort of again. I feel like there is a a traditional poetry. That is more public. That is more We can talk about its political. Buddy and what what sense of the word is as as people listening to this and listening to your excellent readings of my poems that. I'm not a preachy person. Nevertheless these are poems that express a desire for universality of the human experience. I mean you've got some lovely lines at times. I mean the economy's manifest destiny and that juxtapose -sition manifest destiny was part of the American agenda expansion prearranged by God over an indefinite area and yet now applying that to the economy as that he's now want is determining allies those sorts of images and juxtapose that you've created. I forget which one that was in their alphabet city Alphabet yeah so that. That's sort of those the images that you're able to provide to make us think more profoundly more deeply. Yeah thanks I I mean I mean you know it's Yeah it's a kind of again referenced. Historical things look as you said manifest destiny but that that particular Isabelle a cafe. They used to being in North called alphabet city. And and and you know I mean I. I was away from Australia for some time. Then I came back and didn't move back to Northcote. Couldn't afford it but but eventually when I went back and also well I go to this cafe where I used to hang out and it's just not there anymore and and I will on why you know what what is happening here. Look really and I thought well. It's there is to concreteness of the city. Being being pulverized due to the forces of capital and nobody I mean. It's it's an absurd thing to say what I don't want this old. You know cafe to be knocked down and replaced by auto residential flats built with you know to to enhance the value of capital for investors. Who Am I to say no to that? But I mean that's a very symbolic and visible way in which our lives are being impacted by this extraordinary juggernaut of capital to use a Marxist term the jagged of capital in many ways destroys the spirit of a place. I mean one of the things I've noticed in my son is that when I first moved in the dwellings were sort of seventies style and such like and now they being pulled down and two story brick mausoleums going from fence. Lan Events Line What is the old quarter Acre block and the veggie patch in the back? But it's it's a Y Y of how life is represented we see as leading allies and it's being destroyed in many

The Times Australia Ellie Ellie Sada Humpty Dumpty Jack Jill Wuhan China Donald Trump Iran Baku Paul Utah Isabelle Anna William Williams K. Good
"sada" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"sada" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"About the things he did he had a lot of patience. I remember him on my part to call me from IBM the queue is like your men get to see me now and it seems like a cool you know but I would take some about him going into is kidnapped and taken to give. he's gonna walls of ownership. yes. I'm about to me they've come here you know sound good to you know you know we really takes no money you know if they can. I was like you know you go you know you know me hood I about to be saying that he can call me he did exactly what you've done the kicker we say your small enough he's really small he's really smart. and a lot of people don't know like you know never read they will be. bold things you know like for him even had a first. take store here yeah you know you like he was how do you do get come a full year you know second cells hi how does that work you don't say anything is is like I don't want to look at it today they are just. you know he said the people don't know you're working to your phone what she was doing. but when I went to his funeral I was proud to lower case a I was proud to be a part of his legs I was proud to sit in the studio white place right. they have conversations with him because one thing if these everything he raps about yes we were saying in another thing he didn't do sada followed the. what was that the crowd stood on his own still by so we stuck to his co respect that of a man we got Jeez in any or just take around our radios Big Boy. so it's. of course. we still. because of the Maastricht. yes..

IBM sada
"sada" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

07:45 min | 2 years ago

"sada" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Joining the conversation is Dr Mick Sada, vascular surgeon who recently performed the first a Arctic aneurysm repair with no incision at the medical center. Dr Mick, Santa is a board certified general, vascular surgeon. She's an associate professor of surgery at George Washington, hospital and assistant professor of surgery at Georgetown University hospital. Dr Seton is also still in studio with us Dakata. Thank you for joining. Thanks, gloria. It's great to be here. So it's all about men's health. Duck makes what are some what are some ways that men can improve their health? Well, I think in our last segment, Dr Seton brought up some great points about cardiac disease and. Men being at high risk for coronary artery disease and having a heart attack as vascular surgeon, when I do is deal with that same disease atherosclerosis, but other parts of the body. So the same at risk for a heart attack are also at risk for a stroke, and also win loss from Athas grosses the best way really to treat. This is to prevent it from happening. You want to get to the point that she don't need to see me. We want to prevent you from getting to see me the best way to prevent a really risk factor modification. And that's what Dr season was already alluding to the main risk factors are diabetes and making sure that your blood sugar stays well-controlled, high cholesterol, making sure that your cholesterol, stays well-controlled, and high blood pressure. Also, when the main risk factors is smoking, and I think I can't I spend most of my day telling people to quit smoking, and really if you can quit smoking, and do nothing else for your health. It'd probably be the best thing that you could ever do and probably would never end up needing to see me. What are ways to help with all of this really diet control watching what you eat? Keeping your weight well-managed keeping a BMI less than twenty five exercising every day. I usually recommend trying to exercise about thirty minutes today. Not everybody has to do two hours a day, but thirty minutes a day of just light walking or moderate, exercise really helps improve all of these numbers. So from a surgical perspective, actinic, SATA, what are some of the damaging effects smoking calls to the overall body, why when the major misconceptions about smoking is most people think smoking causes lung disease, emphysema lung cancer, and a lot of people miss out on the fact that actually causes atherosclerosis. So it does contributes to heart attack and death, right attack. But in my line of working tributes to stroke. and also limb loss the other thing actually causes andrew i think that's something we'll be talking about a little bit later that you just performed the first arctic aneurysm repair with no incision obviously the surgery was success because it's mentioned in your bio but talk to us a bit about aneurysm screenings among men why think this is a very important thing for men reach about the age of sixty to sixty five and again with any history of smoking in the private community not the the men that reached an age that begin medicare can have a welcome to medicare screening exam where we can screen for aneurysms issue with aneurysms are is that it's a silent killer and that's what concerns people people have aneurisms without even knowing it and when the aneurysm ruptures they don't make it to the doctor and they pass away at home in bed at night and never make it to the hospital so the most important thing about aneurysms as i knowing when an aneurysm is which Is a weakening of the blood vessel. And then to knowing how to prevent it from rupturing, and that's basically knowing how to find an aneurysm people risk for aneurysms are usually men over the age of sixty with a history of smoking. This is where the VA can come in and help out, these men and the regular private world patients that begin Medicare, can get a welcome to Medicare screening exam where they can ultrasound of their aneurysm. The same thing can be done at the VA in our vascular lab. Most primary care physicians will recommend screening to our veterans when I hit the age of sixty five they have any history of smoking and, again, it's very important because this is a symptomatic disease and without an ultrasound, we wouldn't know that this exists, once we do find out that a patient has an aneurysm when it does reach a certain size. That's when it's time to repair it to repair it before it ruptures, because again, once an aneurysm ruptures, it's very difficult to get the patient to the hospital and actually having survived the rupture. Now doctor Satan. How often do you experience veterans, presenting to the emergency department who possibly may need to Dr mcdonagh? At some point. We'll see that all the time and we refer all pisses to that side of cardiovascular team to see this is very high tech Nakata. So tell us what are the call this, and the what's the role of weight management? Well, weight management is very important again when you are overweight, which for us, us states, VM migrated twenty-five puts you increase risk for diabetes high blood pressure, high cholesterol, so by losing weight. If you are above way, it's an help you manage all of that, again, I tell my patients that they should exercise even if you can't get down to be my twenty-five even losing five to ten percent of your body, weight will help improve all of these numbers, and I actually do it myself every day after work, I go to the gym. So I try to practice what I preach and not just tell everybody to do it. Not do it myself. But I think you know again. Weight management. And smoking cessation, along with exercise probably the most important things in any man listening to this radio show can learn from this, and hopefully prevent ever needing to see myself Dr season. So Dr Satan from a male perspective, what is what give me some more health tips? Wh what should I really look for if I'm a man and I you know, I really don't like going to the doctor. Yes, I'm going to say one do away with tobacco. Doc Masada mentioned that Sierra smoking is associated with so many conditions on conditions in men. So do over this. Okay. And have seven to nine hours of sleep missing Horton. The next thing is eat healthy physically out of vegetables, do it with a red meat in a has high, this hiding cholesterol as well as a preventive medical tests wanted to test that men need to do is to have the doctors to a PSA prostate specific oxygen. So that's important for man's prostate health, Dr jump right in tell us what from a female perspective because he does. Sometimes we see things at the mental health. I think the most important things is don't be afraid to go to the doctor a lot of people I think worry that they're fine. And then they went to the doctor and the doctor found a bunch of stuff wrong with them. And I think that, you know, line of thinking, really does need to change because the doctor may find something wrong, but we can treat it. And when you treat it hopefully you're gonna prevent something really bad from happening. So it's a lot of silent things out there, diabetes can be silent. High blood pressure can be silent high cholesterol. Can be silent. But the end stage of is having a heart attack, or losing or leg or having a stroke. So it really is important to know what's going on with your own body to help prevent it. And I think the women in men's life, along with taking care of themselves, to help encourage their men to go to the doctor, see the doctor and realize that the doctor is your friend, not your enemy and anything found again. Most everything can be treated as long as you know, about it. There's a lot of silent disease out there that you don't know about until you go to the doctor doctor Satan..

vascular surgeon doctor Satan Dr Seton Dr Mick Sada Dr Mick VA Georgetown University hospital associate professor of surgery Dr mcdonagh assistant professor of surgery Dakata diabetes Athas George Washington Medicare andrew Doc Masada Santa
"sada" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"sada" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"I I'm almost finding Nick Sabin three or story Chris to to be doing parodies on Nick Sabin. I mean, the Weather Channel joke. All these other words, he's now making fun of himself. You know, what there is at Sada him that he does it just showed everybody in back to what you said a minute ago, Nick saban's well aware, nobody needs to remind him that they've lost two of the last three to Clemson. So so don't think that's not sticking in the back is crawl as far as getting back not letting buddy pass in Bob. No, he can be he could be pretty hard on himself, and he likes to pick fun. The only person he pokes fun at more than himself is mysterious because I asked him I said why guarantee she's running the show now that you're sort of cooped up. He says, listen, this does it change things. She's always run the show. Sort of laughing, but he's he does like to do that. And he he's one of those guys, and I've never had a chance to go. But I've talked to many parents who have gone to that karaoke session that he has for parents recruits official visits recruiting weekends. And they say there's nothing back. You're good buddy lane kiffin is described in graphic detail to me there's nothing like seeing Nick out on the dance floor dancing to the karaoke. And even seeing some carry. That finally remember two years ago, he showed up at media days. And he said, you know, I'm not gonna we can't we're not gonna waste a failure it paid off. They won the national championship. What do you think? It's going to be having spent time with them having talked to him. I mean, we're now into that spring to summer before football phase of the year where we start thinking seriously about what what are the edges, and and what are the motivations? We we know that twenty eight points. But what what do you think we're going to hear from him as we move forward? Just the the whole entitlement. Just because we've one doesn't mean we're going to keep winning. And I think a part of that too Paul is a stat look at the entire overhaul that staff, I think a lot of that is not him correcting some things, but sort of getting the balance back with his staff, you look at some of the veteran guys now and his staff last year staff was the youngest he'd ever had abandoned. But some of the veteran guys who've worked for him before I think that was out of it's not by coincidence. Put it that way. And I think he likes the anytime there's chains anytime there's a challenge now that you he needs rejuvenating because he's always one hundred miles an hour. But I think that sort of sense of entitlement that he felt might have crept into the program last year that they'd want so much. I think that's what you'll hear in doing it the way they've always done it and getting back to playing Alabama football, which is blooding your nose and being better and more consistent every down and everybody else is and it helps when you recruit at the level. They. Crude and develop players that the way they have years, but I love the whole Daboh dynamic the clause in his contract that it goes up..

Nick Nick Sabin Nick saban Bob Paul lane kiffin Sada Clemson Alabama official football Chris two years
"sada" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"sada" Discussed on KCRW

"Organ going there. No, one of the Sada's so much body. See that. Creating. when veterans at risk of hurting themselves go missing, but one vet who was found through the system said he felt violated by the experience it probably helped find me. But I don't know if it helped me Tonight. if that makes sense when.

Sada
"sada" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:09 min | 2 years ago

"sada" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I Nelson Chang and Mary Louise Kelley in recent days, the Fox News channel and some of its corporate siblings. Have come under renewed criticism for their rhetoric on Muslims. Emigrants advocacy groups have launched a fresh wave of boycotts against FOX stars such as Tucker Carlson and Janine Pirro, FOX is controlled by media magnate Rupert Murdoch and his family now in an exclusive interview with NPR, a former senior executive for the company says he quit because of the rhetoric at FOX and our media correspondent David Folkenflik has the story Josefa Zam joined Rupert Murdoch's News Corp in fall two thousand fifteen and it was something of a homecoming. I started up practicing in Manhattan as a lawyer and actually my office at News Corp looked over a corner near Rockefeller Center where my dad used to sell newspapers Zam now thirty seven is in many ways, the embodiment of the American dream. He was born in Afghanistan and brought to the. United States by his parents is a toddler a Muslim immigrant and war refugees seeking safety after the Soviet invasion. He says he knew the controversies that define Rupert Murdoch and his media properties. But figured it would be fine. As an says, the coverage was much worse than he had prepared for scaring, people demonizing grants, creating a fervor anxiety about what was happening in our country. Zam was a senior vice president at Murdoch's News Corp, the chief compliance officer for its corporate headquarters, the Wall Street Journal and the New York Post among other properties, and what does AM saw from his colleagues on Fox News and reading the pages of the post and the opinion pages of the journal upset him my issue with this isn't as an American Muslim as a refugee Sada's immigrants as an American executives at Fox News and News Corp, all declined comment for this story, yet Zam says it's gotten worse in recent days and months, Fox News has faced new outcries take Janine Pirro. Think about it. Omar, where's the he jab here? Pure was earlier this month talking about US Representative Ilhan, Omar, Omar remarks on Israel sparked controversy and condemnation, but Peres singled out Marseille's Lama, faith and Vale is hurried Harris to this is llama doctrine indicative of her adherence to sharia law, which in itself is antithetical to the United States constitution after an outcry. At Fox News declared Pero did not reflect its values. She was off the air last week, and we'll be off this week as well. The liberal group media matters found a trove of offensive comments. Fox's Tucker Carlson. Meet on a shock jock radio program some years ago, such as this guy about Recchi's in two thousand eight Iraq is a crappy place filled with a bunch of you know, semi literate. In case. It was hard to hear Carlson called Iraqis a bunch of semi literate primitive monkeys crossing and FOX brushed off. The controversy is a free speech matter. Critics say it fits in with his anti-immigration line on his time. Show on FOX our leaders demand that you shut up in accept this. We have immoral obligation to admit the world's poor. They tell us even if it makes our own country poorer and dirtier and more divided a Muslim producer for Sky, News, Australia resigned last week citing that network's coverage of Muslims. It is owned by News Corp, Fox News is technically part of a separate company. The slimmed-down FOX court yet, both NewsCorp and FOX Corp are ultimately controlled by Rupert Murdoch and his family a point. That was underscored when exam gotten a Twitter exchange with FOX's Tucker Carlson in June twenty seventeen crossing asked why America should absorb quote, tons of people from failing countries Zam shot back that Carlson should quote comp stairs to where all the executives who run your company sit and find me by ams account. His boss advised him he was crossing a line and Zam deleted his tweet. But he found it hard to take I live here. I have kids here. And it worries me that you know, what's being put out into the universe. Could actually create a lot of risk for them by December twenty. Seventeen as am had resigned. Saying he could not reconcile his employer's apparent values with his own David Folkenflik, NPR news, New York. A study published today counts the number of pregnant women in prison in one year one thousand three hundred ninety six it seems like a simple thing to do. But numbers like this haven't been gathered. In decades, we need to know these numbers because when we don't know the numbers that means that no one's looking and anything can happen to these women. That's one of the authors. Dr Caroline suffering of Johns Hopkins School of medicine, they can be shackled during childbirth they can be placed in solitary confinement. They can have their complaints of contractions bleeding labor. Complaints ignored and deliver babies in their jail cells or prison cells delivering and sells is a worst case scenario, but it does happen as for shackling during birth. I spoke to suffer in a few months ago on this program about that. It's something she has seen firsthand. She. Worked as an OBGYN in jail for six years where she cared for incarcerated pregnant women. So for her this work is very personal pregnant incarcerated people are one of the most marginalized, and forgotten groups in our country and the way that I think about it is that this is a reflection of the notion that women who don't count don't get counted and women who don't get counted don't count. I mean, you know, this really startling statistic. That there are now seven times more incarcerated women in prison than there were in nineteen eighty and yet prison facilities and the medical care offered to these women have not seen to catch up to that reality, right? And it's highly variable the kind of medical care that any incarcerated person, but especially a pregnant incarcerated person would receive despite a constitutional mandate that prisons and all institutions of incarceration provide health care to people inside. There is no set of mandatory standards there. Has no mandatory oversight that these institutions must follow. And so you get a wide range of some places that are actually providing relatively good pregnancy care and others that are providing harmful neglectful or absent pregnancy care. So let's get into what your report covers. It's in American journal of public health. So from two thousand sixteen to twenty seventeen we had twenty two state prison systems across the country representing a geographically diverse range of states as well as the Federal Bureau of prisons reporting to our study database every month for an entire year. And each month. They would report variety of outcomes how many pregnant people were admitted how many births there were miscarriages abortions stillbirths maternal deaths, and that's how we collected the data. And I noticed that Florida, California and New York were not included in this report, and they have some of the largest prison populations in the country. That's right. Those three states along with Texas and Ohio had the largest populations of female prisoners in the country, Texas and Ohio. We're in our study, New York, Florida and California declined to participate participation was voluntary. But despite this our data represent. Fifty seven percent of females in prison in the US, some more than half more than half know, something that you're study doesn't get into is that there are ripple effects from these births that are happening in prison. There are babies separated sometimes immediately from their mothers and never see their mothers again. That's right. We know that children who are separated from their mothers because they're in custody. They are more likely to end up in the foster care system, even from birth and everything is stacked against them already and their opportunities for emotional stability and support stable housing education. And they're also more likely to be incarcerated themselves in the future. So the impact of these pregnancies on the next generation on families on communities, particularly communities of color is profound. That's Dr Caroline suffering of Johns Hopkins swell of medicine. She's the author of jail care finding.

Tucker Carlson Fox News Josefa Zam FOX Rupert Murdoch News Corp United States New York ams NPR Janine Pirro David Folkenflik Omar FOX Corp Zam Fox Dr Caroline
T.J. Dillashaw gives up UFC title after failed drug test

Five Rounds with Brett Okamoto

01:50 min | 2 years ago

T.J. Dillashaw gives up UFC title after failed drug test

"Have to talk about what everyone is talking about on this Wednesday morning. And that is the news that was broken by T J dillashaw himself, very early this morning at around eight o'clock, a m eastern time he posted this on his Instagram and Twitter to all my fans. I wanted to be the first one to let you know that you sat up and the New York. State Athletic Commission. Have informed me of an adverse finding a test taken for my last flight while words can begin to express. How disappointed I am at this time. Please know that I'm working with my team to understand what has occurred and how to resolve the situation as quickly as possible out of fairness respect to the rest of my division. I've informed you have see that. I'll be voluntarily relinquishing my title while I deal with this matter I want to thank all of you in advance for the support. So that was the big news that broke shortly thereafter, I found out that the New York State Athletic Commission has suspended TJ dillashaw for a year retroactive to that January nineteenth date, and they've also fined him ten thousand dollars. They have not said what he has tested positive for and just moments ago. I received this statement from you Sada in light of Mr. dillashaw social media post this morning. We can't confirm that an in competition. Test conducted by you Saad on January eighteenth. Thousand nineteen. So just note. This is my note that was the day before the Henry pseudo fight in Brooklyn, which he lost in just thirty two seconds. The first round resulted this back to the statement resulted in an adverse analytical finding in. This instance, we are able to confirm the finding to Mr. Dilshad public statement. The presumption of innocence under the rules vital part of an effective anti-doping programme ended his only fair that Mr. dillashaw be allowed due process before any conclusions are

Mr. Dillashaw New York State Athletic Commis State Athletic Commission New York Saad Twitter Instagram T J Mr. Dilshad Brooklyn Ten Thousand Dollars Thirty Two Seconds
Morocco, Saudi Arabia And Tunisia discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

03:38 min | 2 years ago

Morocco, Saudi Arabia And Tunisia discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"Do you see as the primary signals that these Arab spring movements and protests sent to autocrats in the region about the dangers? Democratic movements posed to their own stability and rule. So when the uprising in Tunisia succeeded ousted Zena, Lebanon, Bonelli Tunisian, President it sent a message to protesters around the region that maybe this is possible in our countries to. But as you mentioned also sent a message to autocrats around the region that we need to figure out a way to avoid collapse. And so some autocrats learned how to weather the storm. And so you saw for instance, in Saudi Arabia and the Gulf monarchies that they were able to draw upon their oil wealth and provide economic concessions very quickly and large enough to satisfy the protesters. So you saw Saudi Arabia, for instance, allocate some ten billion salary increases and subsidy increases other monarchs such as in Morocco in Jordan couldn't rely on their oil wealth as they did not have any so they had to rely instead on political concessions. So you saw in Morocco in Jordan that they learned to get ahead of the protests by initiating constitutional reforms to. Hold relatively competitive elections. And even in Morocco. Those elections led to an opposition party coming to power an Islamist party informing the government. So those monarchs were able to survive through that combination of oil wealth and structural advantage of being able to even allow an opposition party to come to power in a monarchy in a way that didn't threaten the king as he didn't have a ruling party that he needed to continue winning could allow an opposition party to win the republic's on the other hand didn't have either of those oil wealth or that monarchic advantage. So they had to learn in a different way, which was for the most part to rely on repression as opposed to concessions, so for instance, in Syria and button, and you saw the autocrats instead turn to their militaries to try to repression crust these protesters you saw similar attempts in Libya and Yemen. But in those cases, those military's fractured leading more to civil war than to audit critic survival as in Syria and Baden, an Egypt and Tunisia the concessions were not great enough. And. Military sided with the protesters in the end ultimately dooming, those dictators there remember at the time. A big part of these protests was the use of technology is considered the Facebook inspired revolutions everyone on the streets was on their cell phones. Coordinating meeting points at the time technology is seen as advancing. The will of the people. Do you see technology as playing and enhancing role of the power of the autocratic regimes in the region as well? Absolutely. I mean, the autocrats also learned to use social media to their advantage right on the one hand, it sends a message also to the autocrats where the protests are going to be on the other hand leads Sada Kratz to repress right to censor Facebook, Twitter and social media, generally. So I mean, the autocrats were able also to learn that we need to do something about social media in a way that they hadn't before. So to flash forward to present day. Skip ahead. Eight years it has been eight years since the Arab spring movements rocked the Middle East and the Arab world. And there is a narrative which says that the Arab spring was a time of euphoria and hope a time when leaders such as President Obama said the Arab spring was a moment when the people have spoken their voices have been heard other commentators said Egypt will never be the same. And in the years since this hope has a road into a reality of cynicism and disappointment parts of the region are in a seemingly. Endless state of evil and turmoil.

Morocco Saudi Arabia Tunisia Facebook Egypt Bonelli Tunisian Jordan Syria President Trump President Obama Middle East Zena Lebanon Libya Gulf Sada Kratz Baden
Why Do Coffee Drinks Often Have Italian Names?

BrainStuff

06:30 min | 3 years ago

Why Do Coffee Drinks Often Have Italian Names?

"Hey, brain stuff listeners instead of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about new podcast. I think you might dig for my friends, Robert lamb, and Joe McCormack, you might already know them from the weird science podcast stuff to blow your mind. Their new show is called invention each episode of invention examines different technological turning point and the people and cultures the provoked the change they consider the origins and impact of everything from the guillotine to the vending machine. Chopsticks to sunglasses. Braille to x-rays and lots more new episodes of invention come out every Monday, listen and subscribe to invention on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you happen to find your podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, bring stuff on Lauren Vogel bomb. And if you can't start your morning without a Cup of Joe, you're certainly not alone. I'm right there with you. But Americans consumption of coffee is up. It's the highest. It's been since two thousand twelve and global exports are up to according to the International Coffee Organisation world coffee exports increased by seventeen percent from October two thousand seventeen to October of two thousand eighteen and overall global shipments were four point two percent higher year over year, clearly coffee has become an important daily ritual for many Americans which begs the question, why are so many coffee lovers? Ordering those drinks using Italian words from lattice Tamaki autos. How did this happen after all coffee doesn't have its roots in Italy legend has it that the great being originated in the Ethiopian plateau and was discovered by goat herder who noticed his goats veritably danced after eating a certain plant. It's spread throughout the Arabian peninsula and adjacent areas before Europeans encountered coffee in the. Seventeenth century, nevertheless, many of the coffee drinks, we know today and popularized by Starbucks more on that in a minute do originate in Italy, and it has everything to do with the invention of the Espresso machine. Espresso doesn't refer to a particular type of coffee bean. It's actually a coffee preparation method, and it was first developed in Italy in the nineteenth century because brewed coffee could take up to five minutes to make coffee lovers. Sada way to shorten the time between ordering and drinking the first Espresso machines were bulky and difficult, but by the early twentieth century Milanese manufacturer Luigi bizarre had developed a single shot Espresso the produced one Cup of coffee in seconds, though. It did take a while for the machines to improve in terms of ease of use and flavor of the coffee produced we spoke with Paul Bassett former world barista champion, he said, the Espresso machine kind of revolutionized coffee to some extent. Everything was centered around the way Espresso was made the way it was consumed as well, he explained that with the Espresso machine. Coffee could be made on. The spur of the moment and was intended to be drunk immediately after being served typically standing at a bar Italian coffee culture grew and Espresso as we know it today became popular in Italy and France in the nineteen thirties, the nineteen fifties beatnik movement and its coffeehouse culture launched Espresso craze in the United States. We also spoke with Mike Ferguson with OEM specialty coffee, he explained early in the specialty coffee movement authenticity meant Italian in the nineteen eighties. Many if not most coffee houses had Italian names and adopted as much Italian as possible into their cafe menu. So the trend continued the coffee drinks, they served also retained their -talian nomenclature because they were specifically made with Espresso the names referred to what is added to the Espresso, for example. But the word Mark Jato into Google translate and you'll get stained or spotted so the drink name refers to the spot of milk that stains the Espresso Bassett said, I think fundamentally Espresso is directly linked to Italy as beverage and the way it's part of their culture. It's been transported all around the world and reinterpreted despite reinterpretation, the drinks with talion names have an Espresso base. And typically, some kind of milk added. For example, a cafe latte usually just called a lot in the United States consists of Espresso milk and milk foam. It's not brewed coffee with milk. Although that's the literal translation to be fair ordering an Espresso with milk and milk foam doesn't sound as catchy the distinction between Espresso and brewed coffee is important consider the Americano which was named for Americans in Italy who sought a drink. Similar to the brood or filtered coffee. They drink at home because it emerged in Italy and is made by adding water to Espresso, it retains its talion title. So this answers the question about coffee drink names. But what about Starbucks use of sizes like 'Grande inventing, which are also talion words, this sizing nomenclature short tall and 'Grande was introduced when ill Nali opened its doors in one thousand nine hundred six and the venue size came in the early nineties ill. Denali was the name of the coffee houses launched by Starbucks chairman emeritus Howard Schultz during his mid eighties hiatus from the company the company's website states. That sheltered been quote captivated with talion coffee bars and the romance of the coffee experience a tradition. He wanted to bring to the United States he returned to Starbucks and purchase the company in one thousand nine hundred seven and that branding now extends to fo- Italian product names, like the Frappuccino, which is a trademarked name and not actually Italian word by the way bonus back to the episode the caffeine in coffee that perks. You up is considered the most commonly used drug in the world. Today's episode was written Vicary, Whitney and produced by Tyler claiming for I heart media, and how stuff works or more on this and lots of other peppy, topics. Visit our home planet has to work dot com. You know, people say necessity is the mother of invention. But that's not always true. Sometimes the mother of invention is advertising. Yeah. Or pure accident. How about ego maniacal delusion? Absolutely. Or just a desperate longing. To be cool. I'm Robert lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick. We're the host of the science podcasts stuff to blow your mind. And now we're branching off into the exploration of invention. Invention is the story of human history told one piece of technology at a time the things we made and how they made us invention publishes every Monday, listen and subscribe to invention on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you find your podcasts.

Italy International Coffee Organisat Starbucks United States Apple Robert Lamb Paul Bassett Ethiopian Plateau Lattice Tamaki Lauren Vogel Joe Mccormack Europeans Mike Ferguson Joe Mccormick Sada Luigi Bizarre Howard Schultz Mark Jato Google Chairman Emeritus
"sada" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"sada" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Sada Alto who's currently starring on ITV's dancing on ice that is dance with three exclamation marks and that is from her album wild wild wonderland is an incredible red <unk> incredible album which every Eurovision Fan Muskat is awesome and he'll some fantastic tunes like that great to working out at the gym too as well or even driving along to is fantastic right now. It's time to go live and K._k.. Yes live and.

Sada Alto ITV
"sada" Discussed on The Fighter And The Kid

The Fighter And The Kid

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"sada" Discussed on The Fighter And The Kid

"Hear that on substantial assistance to Sada, he provided substantial assistance to Asada. Do. We know what that means. That's that's why they're being kind of like shady about it. Discussing me tough for him to make friends and that Jim if he's informant and Novitsky goes. Cejka? So we don't really, I don't know. Exactly what it is. I can't. But the point is that the second was on hold on don't skip over that. Don't see up over that. He'll reason why he's sentence was less. This is from Novitsky look this up because John agreed to cooperate. You Sada on giving them information who makes the choice is it the commission or is it you saw that. Isn't it the commission who decides no? They go. If you're going to help you saw to catch other people short send these out with the committee together. Yes. Do we know that I know that that's why sentences short? Okay. That's so what no also only murder. Maybe I misheard some be. Yeah. If you're in a cocaine drug ring, right and your inform it do you think you know, about cocaine? Sure. Yeah. Otherwise what information I'm not. I'm not it's not my contention that Mr. Jones has never done a performance enhancing drug. I'm not saying that we're we're in agreement here that yeah. I don't I don't think he's juicy. I don't think he was juicing Saturday night. Right. I think is from correct sorta why? And so so in my opinion to me to me a failed test, especially when with his history, it it's very black and white to me because other people having these problems say against Hagen with him feeling that test with his history. Yeah. It should be taken more into consideration. If you're if you fail three of them in The Fourth Way, like dude, it's just another picograms like hold on. So which can keep giving past the problem is that the PICO gram we there's a lot of evidence scientific evidence that the picograms since this is new stuff that the PICO Graham may be a result of stuff. He did almost two years that has to be taken into account. Disaster. He's been sanctioned for that violation. True twice. Right. But here's another thing. Be some people believe that that peco Graham, they know he's gonna flack for is masking agent for microdosing, they do, but we can't go with some people. We have to only go with with the people that actually make these decisions and the independent labs. Like McLaren the lab, we that's all we can go on. There's not enough research done on it. So there's only one report that they're talking about tough. They still new stuff and also said this should is so detailed now because these labs are trying to outdo each other than that. It's swung the other way a little bit. It's it's. Yeah. So I was impressed with Novitsky, by the way, I'd like to I like the way he was talking. He on Rogan. I think he has. I think he has everybody's best delectable even John speaking about it even afterwards and everything, but I still think at the end of the day. Let's be let's see I think he is part of the sport. If getting judge John just based on everybody else making a huge mistake. I do think he's thirty. I do think Novitsky he's employer. The is trying to do is best to do damage control. I think he knows John you stuff in the back in the day. And now they're trying to figure this out here, Nevada Athletic Commission, just isn't going to lose millions of dollars because a PICO grandma's in a big deal that if they're like this is weird man for it to be larger from the other two we look more into this. The reason why. So the reason why there's an asterisk because because John Jones did pop for dick pilled ahead. What estrin block or something else? And And then. then it's ready to dick penalty. We don't exactly so. You test for banned substances, and then he fought fraternal ball. And there's no way they find out in any of the supplements. He had no nothing at all to show that where it came from think about that. But there I've been athletes have been athletes, according to Novitsky Olympic athletes that have tested for picograms. And and it literally be. Yep. Chlorinated substance. So that's all. You never know..

John Jones Novitsky Sada McLaren Rogan cocaine Asada PICO Nevada Athletic Commission PICO Graham peco Graham murder Jim dick pilled microdosing Hagen two years