23 Burst results for "Sacco"

Psychonauts 2 and Aliens: Fireteam Elite Reviews!

Kinda Funny Games Daily

01:27 min | Last month

Psychonauts 2 and Aliens: Fireteam Elite Reviews!

"To use weird and wonderful wonderfully written story of interesting nuance characters. That i instantly fell in love with most of its fresh ideas. Go a long way toward elevating the second thoughts formula into the modern era. Though it's enticing new equitable pin system can be a little little too stingy. Double fine has also done a great job of expanding. This universe toward both grander and more intimate threats without losing the joyous childhood adventure vibes of the original. It may bring a bit of that. Mid-2000s action platformer clumsiness. Along with it. But second thoughts to you is still just about everything i could have hoped for from a sequel to one of my favorite games. Andrew reiner given former gave it a nine out of ten and says over. Sixteen years have passed between sacco games but not much. Time has elapsed protagonist response Okay raza quavo. His scratchy high pitched voice still screams of youthful inexperience and his actions. Almost always show an eagerness to learn. That's precisely what developer double fine productions has also done over the years. Time is allowed this art house studio to hone it. It's platforming craft sharp already hilarious wit and creates a sequel that shows off the tremendous complexity of the human brain and the thrill of unearthing. it's wonders i adored. Almost every second or second to it achieves something. I don't often seen games a continual sense of all as each of its worlds and falls. It took sixteen years. It took sixteen years to reach release but double fine has delivered incredible sequel. I hope we get a third installment that doesn't take nearly as long to create

Andrew Reiner Raza Quavo Sacco
Racist Abuse Targets 3 English Players Who Missed Penalties

BBC Newsday

00:11 sec | 2 months ago

Racist Abuse Targets 3 English Players Who Missed Penalties

"The shootout. Now. After the game, the FAA said they were pulled by the racist abuse and Marcus Rushford, Jadon, Sancho and Boko Sacco all three miss penalties and that one in British police say they're

Marcus Rushford Jadon FAA Boko Sacco Sancho
"sacco" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:29 min | 3 months ago

"sacco" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"The question of <Speech_Male> if soko and vans <Speech_Male> eighty were actually. Guilty <Speech_Male> is a very different <Speech_Male> question than if they <Silence> received a fair trial. <Speech_Male> Upton <Speech_Male> sinclair came <Speech_Male> to boston vehemently. <Speech_Male> Sure that soko <Speech_Male> and vince. Eddie were innocent. <Speech_Male> As <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> he began interviewing people <Speech_Male> to write his book <Speech_Male> he began to have <Speech_Male> doubts about their innocence. <Speech_Male> After <Speech_Male> their execution <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> he spoke privately <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> with their defense <Silence> <Advertisement> attorney. Fred more <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> during <Speech_Male> this discussion <Speech_Male> more confessed that <Speech_Male> soko inventory. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> We're actually guilty. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> And that he <Speech_Male> had helped create an alibi <Silence> for the two men. <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Male> confession shook <Speech_Male> sinclair deeply. <Speech_Male> He changed <Speech_Male> his book. Such <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> guilt or innocence <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of the main character was <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> ambiguous. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Many soko and vince <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> eddie. Supporters were <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> angry at sinclair <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for making this choice <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> but he never publicly <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> spoke about <Speech_Male> what he had learned. <Speech_Male> It wasn't until <Speech_Male> his private letters <Speech_Male> became public <Speech_Male> after his death <Silence> that this became known <Speech_Male> anarchist <Speech_Male> leader. Carl <Speech_Male> truscott said in one thousand <Speech_Male> nine hundred eighty one. That <Speech_Male> sokha was guilty <Speech_Male> and vans. Eddie was <Speech_Male> not by. <Speech_Male> This meant meant that sokha <Speech_Male> was the trigger man <Speech_Male> but then zeti did <Speech_Male> take part in the robbery. <Speech_Male> In nineteen <Speech_Male> fifty two. <Speech_Male> Anthony ram gulia. <Speech_Male> Who was a boston <Speech_Male> anarchist. In the one thousand <Speech_Male> nine hundred ninety s confessed <Speech_Male> that he was <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> approached about providing <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> an alibi for soko <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> invents eddie but <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> he couldn't because he was <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in jail on the day in question <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> man named giovanni game <Speech_Male> barra was a member <Speech_Male> of the same boston <Speech_Male> anarchist group <Speech_Male> in which soko vans <Speech_Male> were members <Speech_Male> confirmed. Trust <Speech_Male> goes account <Speech_Male> before his death <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in nineteen ninety-two. He <Speech_Male> admitted that sokha was <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> guilty. And ben said <Silence> <Advertisement> he had taken part <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> ballistics <Speech_Male> tests. Were run <Speech_Male> in nineteen sixty one. <Speech_Male> After the technology <Speech_Male> had improved which <Speech_Male> indicated that the <Speech_Male> bullets which killed the men <Speech_Male> came from sacco's <Speech_Male> gun. <Speech_Male> None of this information <Speech_Male> could have been used <Speech_Male> in a trial as <Speech_Male> it's all hearsay. And <Speech_Male> the confessions of his <Speech_Male> lawyer was a violation <Speech_Male> of attorney client privilege <Speech_Male> even <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> if it happened after the <Silence> <Advertisement> death of his client <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> end <SpeakerChange> the sako <Speech_Male> and vans eddie case <Speech_Male> is a troubling one. No <Speech_Male> matter where you stand on <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> things. <Speech_Male> It was a highly politicized <Speech_Male> poorly <Speech_Male> argued <Speech_Male> poorly defended <Speech_Male> case violating <Speech_Male> many of the modern <Speech_Male> norms for a criminal trial. <Speech_Male> Yet <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> there's a very <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> good chance that the men <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> were in fact <Silence> <Advertisement> guilty. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Your <Speech_Male> social producer of <Speech_Male> everything everywhere. Daily <Speech_Male> is thompson. <Speech_Male> If you'd <Speech_Male> like to support the show <Speech_Male> please donate over at <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> patriot. Dot com <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> there's content <Speech_Male> only available <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to supporters <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> merchandise <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and even opportunities <Silence> <Advertisement> for a show producer. Credit <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> if you know someone <Speech_Male> you think would enjoy the show. <Speech_Male> Please share with <Speech_Male> them. Also <Speech_Male> remember if <Speech_Male> you leave a five star review. I'll read a review on the show.

five star nineteen Carl fifty two Anthony ram gulia Eddie one thousand giovanni two men truscott nine hundred ninety s zeti nineteen sixty one sokha boston Upton nine hundred eighty one nineteen ninety-two eighty Fred
"sacco" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:25 min | 3 months ago

"sacco" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"The crime itself took place on april fifteenth. Nineteen twenty a security guard named allesandro bernardini. And a paymaster named frederick param mentor were delivering the payroll for the slater. More shoe company factory in braintree massachusetts. The men were carrying two large steel boxes full of cash when they were approached by two men and shot dead in the street. The two men took the boxes of cash containing over fifteen thousand dollars and fled in a waiting car to make very long story short. The police suspected italian anarchist based on previous similar crimes. When running up a lead on the getaway car they found connections with people who had weapons that mashed the ones used in the crime. This led them to sako and vans. eddie when asked about guns. They said they never owned any yet. They were carrying firearms on their person at the time they were placed into custody and charged with murder on may fifth and the trial began june. Twenty second i'm vastly over simplifying the case at this point and how they were arrested but suffice to say they were arrested and this is where the real story starts. The trial was a mess on many different levels. The prosecution relied on ethnic differences between the italian defendants and the jurors. There were conflicting testimonies. The witnesses claimed that they saw different things and they had different stories for each defendant. There was conflicting ballistics testimony. The defendants politics were also brought into the trial to prejudice the jury against them. It was also brought forward that both men went to mexico. Nineteen seventeen to escape the draft for world war one. A defense committee was founded soon after their arrests. But they didn't really help during the trial vans eddie. At one point claim that their defense was so bad that they might as well have been working for the prosecutor's on september fourteenth. The jury took only three hours to find both men. Guilty of murder after the indictment. It's believed that the galliani organization began a bombing campaign in retribution in addition to a series of mail bombs sent to us embassies around the world. They were also responsible for the wall. Street bombing of september sixteenth. That bomb killed forty people and injured one hundred and forty three. It was the deadliest terrorist attack in american history up until that point at the same time of the trial. Most people in the country still hadn't heard of soko and vans eddie. The trial itself was really only reported on boston. It was only after the trial when the reports of how these men were treated were made public that the men became a cause celebre.

north america nikola soko bartolomeu vans eddie over ten years italian Nineteen twenty two men a few weeks later travel photography academy one of the most controversial
The Trial of Sacco and Vanzetti

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:25 min | 3 months ago

The Trial of Sacco and Vanzetti

"The crime itself took place on april fifteenth. Nineteen twenty a security guard named allesandro bernardini. And a paymaster named frederick param mentor were delivering the payroll for the slater. More shoe company factory in braintree massachusetts. The men were carrying two large steel boxes full of cash when they were approached by two men and shot dead in the street. The two men took the boxes of cash containing over fifteen thousand dollars and fled in a waiting car to make very long story short. The police suspected italian anarchist based on previous similar crimes. When running up a lead on the getaway car they found connections with people who had weapons that mashed the ones used in the crime. This led them to sako and vans. eddie when asked about guns. They said they never owned any yet. They were carrying firearms on their person at the time they were placed into custody and charged with murder on may fifth and the trial began june. Twenty second i'm vastly over simplifying the case at this point and how they were arrested but suffice to say they were arrested and this is where the real story starts. The trial was a mess on many different levels. The prosecution relied on ethnic differences between the italian defendants and the jurors. There were conflicting testimonies. The witnesses claimed that they saw different things and they had different stories for each defendant. There was conflicting ballistics testimony. The defendants politics were also brought into the trial to prejudice the jury against them. It was also brought forward that both men went to mexico. Nineteen seventeen to escape the draft for world war one. A defense committee was founded soon after their arrests. But they didn't really help during the trial vans eddie. At one point claim that their defense was so bad that they might as well have been working for the prosecutor's on september fourteenth. The jury took only three hours to find both men. Guilty of murder after the indictment. It's believed that the galliani organization began a bombing campaign in retribution in addition to a series of mail bombs sent to us embassies around the world. They were also responsible for the wall. Street bombing of september sixteenth. That bomb killed forty people and injured one hundred and forty three. It was the deadliest terrorist attack in american history up until that point at the same time of the trial. Most people in the country still hadn't heard of soko and vans eddie. The trial itself was really only reported on boston. It was only after the trial when the reports of how these men were treated were made public that the men became a cause celebre.

Allesandro Bernardini Frederick Param Braintree Eddie Massachusetts Galliani Organization Mexico United States Boston
"sacco" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:01 min | 3 months ago

"sacco" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"The show notes. The trial of nicholas okoh bartolomeu events at he is one of the most significant moments that the legal history of the united states in the twentieth century. The trial became a divisive issue in american and world politics. And what you thought of the guilt or innocence of sacco and vans had more to do with the political beliefs at the time. Then it did with the actual merits of the case before we get into the case itself. It's necessary to understand the climate in which the case took place in one thousand nine hundred nine. There was a series of anarchist bombings in the united states. In april three dozen bombs were sent via the postal system to various political and law enforcement officers across the country. The packages were designed to explode after being opened however they were mostly ineffective in june another series of bombings took place again targeting judges politicians and law enforcement officials. The bombings were organized by italian. Immigrant and anarchist luigi delaney delaney believed that murder and assassination were necessary to overthrow government institutions in june bombings. Each explosive device was delivered with a note which read quote war class war. And you were the first to wage it under the cover of the powerful institutions. You call order in the darkness your laws. There will have to be bloodshed. We will not dodge. There will have to be murder. We will kill because it is necessary. There'll be destruction. We will destroy to rid the world of your torrential institutions unquote. There was one person in particular who is the target of both bombing attempts won a mitchell palmer attorney general of the united states. He instituted what became known as the palmer raids which were targeted at anarchists and communists most of whom were italian or eastern european immigrants. Luigi delaney's organization. What's considered at the top of the government's list of dangerous enemies. Soko and vince eddie. Both known anarchists and followers of delaney. The crime itself took place on april fifteenth..

Luigi delaney delaney vince eddie april fifteenth Soko luigi delaney delaney april twentieth century Both first one person Each explosive device one thousand nine hundred nine nicholas one june both bombing attempts three dozen bombs eastern united states
"sacco" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

05:16 min | 11 months ago

"sacco" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"That is a really good. He's just talking about the importance of being a rigorous self editor, but I think it's such good advice. No matter what you're doing. I know in even in that quote. It was astounded by because even that quote contains a different layer of advice because what he's really doing in that moment is avoiding cliche and so making you hear the advice in a different way because normally we say kill your darlings, right? That's the that's normally the writing class script punch-up meeting cliche. Oh, you've got to kill your Dolly's you've got to kill your, but it actually makes you hear it again when he says life. Cut The throat of you're beautiful swans and I'm like, yes I have to plan a swan massacre descend descend send. For that, how does that work you know and a avoiding cliche is another really important part of rigorous self editing and I'm about to be going through that process and it was just a a good reminder to go through and weed out all the dead language and replace it with something more expressive. I really enjoyed the fact that the two of you discussed the particular challenge of managing the emotional aspects of his work. Right when you think about photo journalist who it is to capture horrific scenes to stand on the sidelines to document the worst of the world without participating without helping. This comes at a cost you know drawing is not photography of course, but in his role as a journalist Joe, sacco is looking at the world and it's not always pretty..

editor sacco Joe
"sacco" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

05:58 min | 11 months ago

"sacco" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"It. With Joe Sacco. Thank you so much for joining us on. And your process, it was a real pleasure. Thank you, Isaac. Isaac. I happen to know that you're in the midst of a book project of your. Own. So I wonder if you were struck as I was by the way that Joe talked about the particular crisis of reaching the middle point of project, you know he talked about this new book being born of a magazine assignment desire to make something bigger and then he found himself, you know running out of money losing steam in the weeds. Joe. Mentioned the imperative to listen to who he was when he made the initial decision to pursue this book to listen to his younger self I. think that is so interesting. Yet man I was like taking notes when he said that I am you know when the listeners are listening to this episode listened to it the day at airs. I'm like three weeks away from turning in of the first full draft of my manuscript to my editor as you are listening to this and I've been working on it for a couple of years, and sometimes it feels like my book and iron like a real big fight. And one of the big adjustments I had to make and switching focus from directing for the stage to writing books is this kind of sprint versus marathon thing in directing, you do a lot of pre production work..

Joe Sacco Isaac editor
"sacco" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

04:37 min | 11 months ago

"sacco" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"I had to sort of learn to work that out of my. Drawings, and that was just by looking at the drawing and saying, no, this isn't this isn't good enough just keep trying I could never get into I could never be photo realistic and I'm not sure if that's even a good thing to be photo realistic I'll always be glad I have some cartoony elements to my work. But Is just being. It's just over the years just learning little by little well, I mean one reason why I ask is that the level of detail in the drawings of paying the land is. extraordinary. I mean. Sometimes, you're looking at a drawing of dogs pulling a sled and it feels like you can see every hair on that dog clearly part of the decision in this book was to push that level of detail further I feel like and was wondering what it was like to try to include. Such, such a large amount of detail in your drawing particularly compared to pass work. I think all my drawings of being I've always tended toward detail and there'd be times of even tried to remove that from my drawing, but I cannot I mean it's just in my hand and it's sort of what comes out the most comfortably. But particularly in this book paying the land. It's about indigenous people who say that the land owns them and they are part of the land. So in a way drawing them as accurately as possible during their clothing, drawing their tents, dog sleds correctly enjoying the land itself. In detail was kind of my way of honoring therapy. Vision Of the what they think of the land and what they think they think of themselves in the land I wanted to sort of reflect. That love of the land that they feel how did you find the story for this book? How did you wind up in remote Canada reporting on and indigenous people and their their relationship to land? Another accident in a way. I mean. Like a lot of people I started thinking about you know a book about climate change a lot. Maybe I should do something about this this interest everyone I think. And I thought I would do a book about resource extraction and where does that happen always happens on the peripheries it always happens around indigenous indigenous people live, and at first, I thought of doing a comparative study. Different places and it just so happened that a few years before someone had contacted me from. Yellowknife and she's a character in the book Sean a Morgan the One, who helps me drives me in.

Yellowknife Canada Sean
"sacco" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

05:52 min | 11 months ago

"sacco" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"Joe, Sacco. Thank you so much for joining us today I'm working my pleasure. Great to be here. So. When you meet someone and they ask you oh, Joe what is it that you do? How do you like to answer that question? I generally say. I'm a cartoonist. And I mean if it was at a party, I just leave it at that and they'd have a little giggle and say like Garfield. Right. But if it was in a work situation, I would explain. That I'm going to be telling people stories through through my drawings and through my comics. I usually bring a book along with me to show you know the people I'm talking to they get an idea of what I'm trying to do yet. Totally, and that's a good idea because sometimes I ask a lot of visuals questions yet. There's not that many folks out there doing journalism in comics form. How did you discover that? That was what you were going to do with your? Life. Well, you know I studied journalism so originally, I want it to be a hard news writer. And I have a degree in journalism. And after school, I couldn't find a job in a newspaper at all. So I sort of fell back eventually I mean over the years I sort of fell back on comics. Art Drawing which is something I'd be doing as a kid. And I was living Berlin doing rock posters album covers t shirt designs and doing a series of comics that were kind of autobiographical. But you know because I studied journalism. I did. So because I'm quite political in my outlook I think a lot about what's going on in the world and I decided to go to the Middle East to do a series of comics, which I thought would be sort of autobiographical. In a way or let's say travelogue. And it turned out when I got there. I just began asking questions and I realized this journalistic thing just started kicking. Kicking into sort of this, this shape of how I was approaching the subject and I found myself behaving like a journalist and asking questions like journalists looking for the story, and so you could basically say it was accidental. I mean, that's what basically getting..

Joe Garfield Middle East Berlin writer
"sacco" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

01:57 min | 11 months ago

"sacco" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"Yeah. I. Don't think that physical beauty is there for its own sake and you'll hear Joe talk about that about why you know he sort of worked so hard on what the imagery of the book was going to be and how that relates the medically to the subject matter. Is the before we get started I'm curious whether you read a lot of comics and I know that you have a kindergartner in the house and I wonder if she's discovered that particular joy of graphic form like I think it's really a thing for kids today in a way that it wasn't when I was a child but I still think there is some lingering snobbery about the genre that may be reading a graphic novel which many kids do especially kids your daughter's age and like my younger son's age. that. Maybe it's not the same as reading a book that's just comprised of words with the occasional illustration. snobbery drives me nuts at the same time. You know Iris's just learning to read. So we haven't quite like made the jump to a lot of graphic novels. There's a couple that we've read with her, but I'm very much looking forward to her doing. So because I love comics, I, Love Them I don't have as much time to read them now as I used to because of how much reading I just have to do for various jobs but. You. Know I was really lucky in this respect to graduate from college in two thousand one and to be working in a bookstore a couple years after that, which was during this real boomtime almost a speculative bubble of graphic novels and comics works for adults. You can think of Chris ware doing major work during that period Dan Clouds Alison Bechtel, a lot Kyle Baker. A lot of important artists were doing really fascinating groundbreaking work and Joe was absolutely one of them. His most recent book before paying the land of footnotes in. Gaza is really I think kind of like the crowning achievement of that moment of the market has changed since then it's very different but but I, absolutely love comics..

Joe Iris Gaza Chris ware Kyle Baker Alison Bechtel Dan
"sacco" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

04:08 min | 11 months ago

"sacco" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"I'm sure things the way people see them when people see someone on the street who is alcoholic or is homeless they make assumptions about that person and so I'm taking it from that point of view where you make a judgment about people, you're seeing the effects. It's only when you like scratch a little deeper, you talk to that homeless person you begin to understand the systematic reasons why they might be there. What to working I'm your host remodeled. And I'm your other host Isaac. Isaac. We just heard the voice of Joe Sacco who's your guest this week. Let's talk a little bit about Joe. He's someone who I think as a journalist is indeed he is, but he's.

Joe Sacco Isaac
"sacco" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"sacco" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"sacco" Discussed on Today in True Crime

Today in True Crime

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"sacco" Discussed on Today in True Crime

"The world..

"sacco" Discussed on Today in True Crime

Today in True Crime

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"sacco" Discussed on Today in True Crime

"The pair simply pulled their triggers. Fred Parmenter and Allesandro Berar Deli went down. This was Pearl Street. Quiet but not deserted. Bystanders stood appalled as the assailants grabbed the payroll boxes. Out of the Feldman's hands. They watched frozen as a car pulled up to the curb and they barely had time to note the plates before the killers through their boxes into the car and sped off into the afternoon. The quiet town of braintree was appalled. They whispered about who the men might have been. They looked Italian but no one knew for sure. And it wasn't until two days later when investigators found the getaway car abandoned in the nearby woods that the police thought they might have a lead on the killers they the car to a man named Mike Kubota suspected of a similar crime in another Massachusetts town but Boda new. The police were coming for him and before they could get their hands on him. He fled to Italy two of his associates however were apprehended by police. Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vans Eddie. Neither had records at the time of their arrest. Soko worked at a shoe factory. Van Zeti was a fish peddler but both were carrying loaded guns at the time of their arrest and that made all the difference. The particular weapon of interest was Soko's a thirty two caliber handgun. The kind used at the braintree crime. Plus it was loaded with bullets from the same manufacturer as those studying parmenter and bear our Delis bodies. This did not look good for Soko Van Zeti. They were charged with murder. But these two men were anarchists. They believed social. Justice would only come with the destruction of governments and they weren't about to take the US government's flimsy accusations lying down. They put up the fight of the century and make sure the public knew they were fighting for more than their freedom. This was a battle for the rights of radicals around.

Soko Van Zeti braintree Allesandro Berar Deli Fred Parmenter Bartolomeo Vans Eddie Nicola Sacco Feldman US Mike Kubota Massachusetts murder Italy
"sacco" Discussed on The Jason Beem Horse Racing Podcast

The Jason Beem Horse Racing Podcast

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"sacco" Discussed on The Jason Beem Horse Racing Podcast

"And just hurting the horses resume but now after the Gotham I was dead short. We wouldn't touch this works out and we got you know. We got serious with them to map. This out properly is mother is a sprint stakes winner and He's got the body of middle distance. Worse we have a couple of other horses like King for day and Belle harbor that are to turn big robots courses and. He's just not one of them. I remember Belle harbor I was calling the Salvator Mile filling in for frank and He had that horrendous break and I really honestly thought turned for home. He had a big shot to win that race. It was a little too much to overcome that day but He ran another big one later in the year last year. But he's he's a real capable or settlers. No we like them. He's at red farm now. We gave him a break. After the Cigar Mile it was a race that was wasn't on our calendar and we ran a minute and just didn't run away that we wanted him. Were expect them to but he came back at sound that he was just Requesting some time off He's at Red Oak now. He's in. Training is actually GonNa make his comeback start. If everything goes according to plan and there's no miscues leading up to it but back in the Salvator Mile and may the horse is doing absolutely phenomenal. That Woodward Race I think you know put him on everybody who map up at Saratoga. That pizza for preservationists. But he's doing super really look forward to that horse this year with the proper spacing between races. And and he's very sound hoarse and he forces doing super recycler joining us for an excuse me for a few more moments here. Morse racing podcasts force. Read out the the stable for the Brunetti family of of highly fame and used to work at highly right. I did I. Did you know I? I went from the back side of a barn with my father and my brother which I was doing my whole life. My Grandfather Joe. Sacco BUILT A farm in New Jersey called Mama's Stud and my brother races when he owns horses under that name but I had a son early on when I was about twenty three years old and they just could not be part of moving from track to track and I left the barn and got a job but highly a park. Mr Bernie senior hired me and I started in simulcast department and worked my way the Vice President general manager. And if I remember right you hired a young Frank Mir Monte right I hired Frank Maher Mahdi's first real live racing meet call Super Guy. Very talented very colorful. I hired John. Heinsohn my press box. Who's now the racing secretary MOMS Bark? We hired a lot of people's interesting times at highly and the casino now is thriving. The grounds are beautiful and I Elliott Park if anyone gets a chance To visit and come see it absolutely all renovated and gorgeous right now. Yeah I was. I was filling in down at Gulfstream West in November and made a day trip out to highly and check out the poker room and and kind of walked around. The grounds are are still pretty amazing and I have to think that racing. They're back in. The day was was some kind of an event because it just it has a real special feel that place. It really does know. It's Kinda it's an awesome piece of real estate. You have two hundred acres in the middle of Miami five minutes from the airport. Ten minutes from downtown. The demographics of Miami of all changed your minutes from Coral Gables. Which is the University of Miami College campus? I'm the whole area like I said there's national builders Lanar in highly right now building. Six seven hundred thousand dollar homes Times are changing and For the better but Highly is two hundred acres. It's almost like central park. If you're up in helicopter often you look down and see two hundred acres in Miami. Uc highly park and two hundred acres. And I waited too looking down on central park this oasis in the middle of a major metropolitan city. They I still run the the quarter horse races there. Do you think there's any chance that they'll run the thoroughbreds there again? Or is that just a bygone time the Times change? There's no more call. There is no more Gulfstream Park West. You have goals stream park. That's in dire need of working on its turf. Course and capital improvements air rating that turf course and preparing and the proper way for championship me. You cannot continually run on turf course year round and expect good horses any worse for that matter but to have a championship. Meet Goals Stream on a turf course. Non-existent is not good for racing. I agree rick. I really appreciate you taking some time for some best of luck with all the horses going forward this year and thanks so much thank you. Thanks guys all right. We'll be right back at the short term. Be WORSE RACING. Podcast brought to you by twin. Spires the Jason Beam horseracing podcast brought to you by twin? Spires is your home for daily thoroughbred horse racing conversation. Join host Jason Bean. Has He discusses racing from.

frank Salvator Mile Miami Belle harbor I Elliott Park Gulfstream Park West Gotham Spires Jason Bean University of Miami College Gulfstream West New Jersey Frank Mir Monte Brunetti Saratoga red farm Morse Sacco Lanar
"sacco" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"sacco" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"Well there's a lot to look forward to Greg. Sacco always a pleasure and congratulate. Everybody involved and I can tell we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA talk early and often there's year. Thank Steve I hope so Greg Zakho and The BRUNETTI also succuming of course involved the with mind control and I was I guess it was at Saratoga. It was yeah it was at Saratoga before the I guess it was before the wasn't the was it before the Jerkins we had seth and I had had Ceylon and I'm trying to remember the maybe it was maybe it was before Belmont or maybe when when he was a two year old might have been when he was a two year old. Actually I think it was. I think it was in eighteen gene. We had saw that day and he had just bought in to my control and a came up and he said I don't know we're going to run and the hopeful and whatever solace salt sounds like Sounds like the Lucky Lucky charm. He's like the leprechaun on and on the cereal box. It's unbelievable take a break here and of course the Pasi does that was a funny funny situation situation. I've ever those guys asked me. They asked me King of the fossils are all excited. They're running Joe via the Belmont so I don't know they didn't. I said God bless him. I thought it was. I thought it was a ambitious spot. Hot and then they get rewarded with just I mean as hard trying a.

Greg Zakho Sacco Joe BRUNETTI Ceylon seth Steve
"sacco" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"sacco" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"Well so lots of and lots of good stuff and a good Monday holiday Monday as road. So what does that mean. It means Nick Tamra. We'll get a nick visit in our two after Johnny. So what are we got greg. Sacco Joe Sharp Johnny Dean Nick. Tamra John Y Markazi so far so far it may may slip one more slip one more. Visit Listen speaking of you know what speaking of where we got. A couple of minutes with amusing We got the results from the sale to tail wrapped up mentioning. Gabby work in the the microphone up to the stage. But since I mentioned those stakes at Laurel twelve what a summer todd beattie with victim of lots Tommy Tommy town on the on the east coast interesting. She was third in the safely. Captain turned the table. So you pay twenty one dollars in the what a summer. What is summer champion? Sprinter maryland-bred maryland-bred Nice that they honor what a summer. Tony Rotor wants right. Tony tells that story. You got to pick up mount something he would. I asked Tonio Thursday right. Tony told that story before. Leroy Leroy was mad at whoever whoever the Leroy was annoyed at whoever had been riding riding. Whatever and Tony? got a pickup mound in a Like a handicap event. I'm not sure if that was the year. She was champion or not she was. She had that one spectacular year. She won the the fall highway twice. Then just missed winning a a Vasbert too but she was what a summer Interesting interesting horse. That the firestone's bought after milk pollinger at Dies Paula farms very important Maryland. Breeding breeding entity from in fifty sixty seventies died and what a summer went through the ring in a dispersal as a as a racing prospect. And that's how the firestone's got her it and that was when there was only one sprinter mailer four female. Look that up. Seventy seven seventy eight. Anyway now I got sidetracked. We'll take a break greg. SACCO STARTS US off talking with.

Tony Rotor Leroy Leroy Nick Tamra Sacco Joe Sharp Tonio Johnny Dean Nick Tamra John Y Markazi greg Tommy Tommy firestone todd beattie Maryland
Why Are Macadamia Nuts So Expensive?

BrainStuff

06:22 min | 1 year ago

Why Are Macadamia Nuts So Expensive?

"First things first macadamia nuts are not actually ups. Yes I know it's ridiculous. It's right there in the main for goodness sake but much like Brazil L.. Nuts again what is it with. These misleading names. The Macadamia is in fact a seed and although they've become a signature staple of Hawaiian Agriculture Macadamia. His are actually native to Australia. We spoke with Glen Soko an economic development specialist with the Hawaii County Department of Research and development he explained leaned Macadamia. Nuts are originally from Australia but much of the early research breeding work quality development were done by the University of Hawaii on the island of Hawaii. These cultivars are suited for the Hawaii. Climate and do not produce the same high quality nut when grown in foreign conditions cultivars is short for cultivated varieties and these are specific types of plants selected and cultivated by humans. In this case. The plant is a large bushy tree that starts producing macadamia nuts spy the time. It's about four or five years old. So how exactly did these Australia cultivars and up in Hawaii for that you can think. One William Purvis office. Who planted the first Macadamia tree on the Big Island in eighteen? Eighty one purpose didn't initially intend for the tree seeds to be a hit. He planted the trees as wind breaks as for the sugar cane fields. The plants were functional and also happens to be quite pretty but he didn't suspect they could bear such delectable and profitable. See it's about a decade later. One are Jordan planted some macadamia trees on Oahu. The trees that researchers think is the ancestor most of Hawaii's trees and the not quickly became a popular snack among businessmen who came to Hawaii to profit off of sugar plantations in the early nineteen hundreds. The Hawaiian Agricultural Experiment Station was established published to get new crops growing on islands since this newly established United States territory was relying almost exclusively on sugar following the collapse of the coffee market. In the nineteen twenties. The government offered a five year tax exemption on land that was used solely for Macadamia production. But most farmers were interested. That is until roasted it. BECA Damian that's started popping up in stores and consumers went wild demand finance went up and the number of trees planted for nut production more than doubled from nineteen eighteen thirty two to nineteen thirty. Eight sales slumped a bit after that. But by the Nineteen Fifties Hawaii was turning out macadamia goodies to stack fans throughout the world and major companies. Ladies were making a pretty penny off of them speaking of why are Macadamia so expensive while Macadamia is clearly have an interesting past. And they've tastes taste heavenly coated in thick layers of chocolate. Do they really merit they're often exorbitant price tag after all around twenty five dollars a pound. They're considered the most expensive have nuts in the world. So what's the deal. A bunch of factors go into the price but a lot of them. Come down to the fact that Macadamia can't be grown effectively. On the continental dental United States and shipping them in from Hawaii is costly and growing things in Hawaii is costly to begin with because it's a small archipelago that some three thousand miles title. That's nearly five thousand kilometers away from anything in two thousand. Eighteen Macadamia has made the news for a seventeen percent price. Increase which sacco attributed to Hawaii's fixed harvest acreage and a higher global demand. Furthermore Issaquah said it takes seven years for a Macadamia nut tree to produce a crop. Demand remains high and prices are up to a dollar twenty per pound despite this. There's tremendous pressure on the industry. The agricultural labor shortage continues and that's caused wages and benefit costs to increase invasive. Pests continue to affect the Orchard Health and production. The Hawaii land prices are so high. Hi Orchard Expansion is too costly and producers can't wait for seven years therefore the production acreage remained steady despite the increased demand for the nuts. Okay so that explains the cost but are they actually good for you. High fat foods used to be the most demonized of all kitchen staples basically because of a very effective and sort of insidious marketing campaign put out by the sugar industry but thanks to current research and slightly Leila systemic marketing hype such things as nuts oils and seeds are getting their due as healthy options. We also spoke with registered Dietitian than yell. Birger she said Macadamia nuts are high in monounsaturated fats. Low in net carbohydrates and a good source of copper manganese and thion monounsaturated unsaturated fatty acids have been shown to lower. LDL cholesterol levels. The bad kind especially when they're used in place of saturated fats and refined carbohydrates in one's diet it net carbs are important. Consider because it clues you in on how much fiber something contains in relation to the amount of total carbohydrates present. Having we're fiber is crucial to gut health copper assists with iron absorption and transport in the body while manganese and vitamin are central for carbohydrate metabolism. And while all of that sounds sounds great we still live in a society that tends to obsess over numbers. So at two hundred and three calories and twenty one grams of fat per serving a single serving being just ten to twelve nut kernels. and that's just nuts. Nuts dust chocolate are macadamia is really a wholesome snack. Birger said Ed. Although nuts are high in calories they're also packed with fiber heart healthy fats proteins vitamins and minerals essential to our diets. Having a small handful is a filling rolling nutritious snack to tide you over between meals or can be used as a way to round out a meal on top of a Salad or yogurt bowl. They are particularly good substitute for packaged packaged. Ultra processed snacks. Like potato chips calorie-for-calorie. An ounce of chips than outs of nuts are equivalent but the protein and fiber in the nets will keep you energized full. Oh and focused. She said don't fear fats. They're essential for hormone health optimal brain function and absorption of nutrients and end. According to Sacco Macadamia. Aren't just a delicious treat for humans. They can be healthy. Snacks for rodents to he said some pet owners by the nuts in the shell L. to give to the rats to not on this wear down the rats teeth.

Macadamia Hawaii Sacco Macadamia Australia Hawaii County Department Of Re University Of Hawaii First Things First Birger William Purvis Glen Soko Hawaiian Agricultural Experime Big Island Issaquah United States Orchard Health Jordan Damian
"sacco" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"sacco" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"For you and for rick and the brunetti sal everybody the whole bar. Where's where's. Where's stephen taken everybody tonight. Actually we're going to play some branch. It's been a staple there <hes> called casa kameda most of the guys or hispanic to work for us when pasta or mexicans. The vote was mexican so that's where we're headed. I love it. I i tell you i didn't get a chance to talking. I've been laid up with this idiotic eye surgery so i can't come out but <hes> we had had the trip down for the haskell the food down there. I mean you you can't you can't go wrong and in fact the jersey shore is packed with restaurants where we went to the cards. I got the card sitting on the corner of my desk. Have you been to that semolina in red bank. No i haven't i've been there but i think my brother and steve they liked. It and we also the next night we went to <hes>. Speaking along branch went to traumas traumas pretoria. Yes that's not a good spot at the end. There's a place called in the last tonight with the families at end jellicoe cheap right. That's a that's an institution you but you gotta know somebody. How do you get in you. Gotta be actually actually unit we either you either need a we need a sacco or lou ferigno to get in there uh-huh passionate about knowing the owner i <hes> i said ray ocean city. It talked as a great. I don't know the president again. That place is what's. It's aw up spots. <hes> it's great great spots the jersey shore really we'll have have a wonderful time tonight and <hes> everybody so deserving and you come up to the spot and take home the money mind control adds a great one as a three year all to his success here in the hopeful greg congratulations and continued success. Thank you very much was replaced talking to you today absolutely absolutely greg sacco and the nice <hes> story of mind control the brunetti family. What can you say comes back and that was thrilling. Finish on a day that had nothing but thrilling finishes and outlandish performances we covered off quite a few we still got more yet rick hammersley standing by to try to reach each day as he makes his way to kentucky nouns announced and he reminded me when i was talking about all the great action saturday opening day. A kentucky doubts on saturday hammer. Where are you well. Put it this way. I just this past the dude ranch so <hes> gasol getting close to nashville absolutely you're you're. You're zeroing in impose. You've you've torn up the track. You left on throwing wow. I i roll pretty good. I had two great days of weather and then boy yesterday yesterday <hes> coming into oklahoma city road closure and a little detour and then <hes> near little rock yesterday i mean i'm telling you i just i got hit. By this hellacious thunderstorms for you know sir i can handle fifteen twenty minutes of it but it was about an hour of white knuckle forty mile an hour driving <hes> you know watching the white line and i said that's it. I pulled over. I was hoping to make yesterday but <hes> smooth driving today a little rain. Ain't i hope to be in kentucky downs in an hour. So tell you the truth. <hes> good run well done. I'm one of those one of those. That's actually pretty loves to be out on the road drive and so it's <hes> it's good and and i'd say listen to i get to listen to the replay the sport and then the the whole show makes the driving go pretty good so congratulations to to shug as you said and drake sacco to kinda kinda good and and i was <hes> watching the i guess it's legal i was watching the races and i was driving puts the bets in cruise along ny as so anyway it's been it's been a good trip well. I'm glad glad we caught you and we'll start to anticipate the weekend opening day. The five day meet presented by run. Happy at kentucky downs hammer hammer safe last section of the drive. I glad we caught job. Sounds craig entries are tomorrow for opening day so <hes> right back into and reaction of ready for it awesome those of you that.

greg sacco rick hammersley brunetti kentucky downs casa kameda stephen drake sacco sacco pretoria president shug steve lou ferigno gasol ny kentucky nashville oklahoma city Ai fifteen twenty minutes
Dementia and assisted death in Canada

The Big Story

12:02 min | 2 years ago

Dementia and assisted death in Canada

"Nobody wants to think about the end of their life or about saying goodbye to their loved ones. Most of us are lucky that we don't have to do it, but not everyone. Some of us know early enough that we have to talk about death at length, and we have to make a call because medicine can tell us what's coming. When candidate passed Bill c fourteen which allows chronically ill patients to access medical assistance in dying. Some of those conversations got easier, but not all of them today. We're going to talk about the chronically ill patients that nearly every assisted death legislation in the world has left behind people who are diagnosed with dementia. This isn't about whether or not you believe in assisted death in Canada. It's the law, this is about who has access to a service, that's intended to ease end of life suffer the questions, it raises are literally, some of the biggest ones we can ask as humans. How do we define life and joy? How does that change as our faculty start to desert us? If I know I'm going to lose my mind later, can I decide now to end my life when it happens who decides when enough of my mind is gone that it's time. And how can we ask someone to do that for? I'm Jordan heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. Shannon proud foot is a writer at Maclean's, who has spent a lot of time on this issue. I shanna. Why don't you start by telling us? How the issue of death and dementia came to your attention in the first place. Yeah. So I've been writing about it. I guess for about four years now. So I, I got into the issue in twenty fifteen. I wrote a long profile of a man who lives in who lived in London named Joe Aubin and, and Joe I mean with unbelievable. Rarity was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in his late thirties. He had a genetically inherited form. His mom had had the same illness. It was awful. It was unbelievably awfully a really really hard road for he and his wife, Robin. They are extraordinary people to write about and work with a I don't know if I should Zuma head until you the end of Joe story is that he actually passed away, just this past fall quick. Suddenly when I, I kind of started talking to Joe in Robin for the first story back in twenty fifteen Joe very much wanted to access assisted death. He, he knew what lay ahead for him. He had seen his mom spend years and years in an assisted living facility for him. He absolutely did not want that his priority was to avoid living in a nursing home of any kind and at the moment that we were talking and doing that story that the situation was that the supreme court of Canada had had struck down. Canada's prohibition against what we've now call medical assistance in dying. So the acronym is usually made throat, if I use that term. That's what I'm talking about. So we were kind of in this purgatory where the supreme court had said, it is not constitutional to prohibit, that, we're going to give parliament a year to sort it out as it turned out they needed about sixteen months to actually kinda get a lot together in past. So I was talking to join Robin in kind of that in between zone where Joe knew what he wanted he knew what he didn't want. And they were talking to a lawyer to try to see if there was some way that they could set up something some kind of legal mechanism where because his his faculties in his capacity to consent were already kind of being affected by the disease pretty profoundly. And so as part of my reporting on that story, I called a man with dying with dignity, whose name is Nino of Sacco, Pat, and he was sort of a kind of. Client services and also a psychotherapist super super interesting guy who subsequently became my second story on medical assistance in dying, and so, I called Nino because he was sort of the guy on the ground that if you had questions in this Grey's own where the law hasn't come in yet, if you wanted to know what your options are what you could do if you wanted to take things into your own hands, where, if you simply wanted someone to listen to you talk about that, and not freak out was the guy who would call. And so I called him and kind of laid out the situation for him not knowing at the time I was entirely naive. I, I didn't know anything to sister death. I certainly didn't know how it would play out for people with dementia. And so I said, so here's what Joe wants here is his situation. What is available to him. And I'll never forget, just flatly said nothing. There is nothing available for him and not because the law hasn't come in yet because he has dementia. And so that was sort of look what launched me along for years now of writing about made particularly, but also as it pertains to dementia because. It's a it's a really. I mean it's obviously a massive public policy issue that, you know, is profound in terms of what it touches on life and death in our relationships with people in our responsibilities to each other, and what we ask of the medical profession and all these things. But I think all of those issues are really, really heightened and sharpened when it comes to people with dementia, and what's, what's known as advance requests. So the requirements for for made for other Canadians irregular, Canadians are that they be suffering, grievous and irremediable medical condition. And, and there they, we sort of let people decide the fine for themselves, what intolerable suffering is right that their death be reasonably foreseeable, and that they have capacity to, to understand what they're asking for it, and also that they give final consent. So immediately before doctors, you know, you, you are assessed by two doctors you go through the whole process. There's a lot of bureaucracy and safeguards, but immediately before a medical professional would administer the life ending medication to you. You need to be in a state of capacity to consent so that they can ask you right before they give you the medication. Are you sure this is what you want, and you confirm with they call final consent, obviously, with people with advanced dementia? Those things are no longer possible, and the sort of hitch, or the kind of awful catch twenty two is that if you were diagnosed with dementia. I mean, there's a few other kind of complications there that I won't get into, theoretically, you could get made earlier in the progress of the disease when you still are capable of consenting, but most people with dementia, that's not when they want their life to end, obviously, have a lot of good quality of life than they would want it to be in the advanced stages by which point you can no longer if consent. And so even as Canada pass this law in two thousand sixteen and we've had a few years of practice with it. We're still pretty young made regime globally people with dementia, and that, that is not the only case where advanced requests would come into play. It also could come into play with something like cancer if you had a metastatic cancer that was in. Your brain that could eventually affect your faculties there or even heavy pain medications that could affect your lucidity. There are other cases where you might want an advance request. But dementia seems to be kind of the place where it has become the biggest sort of point of public debate, where there's the strongest desire for it where, that's what condition that people fear, a lot, if you sort of look at polling if you can ask people, what possible diagnosis, or future condition would distress them. The most dementia is pretty high up there. And so that's kind of where the debate over advance requests has been located when you talk to people like Joe and his wife, but also some of the other people that you've met well reporting this, what do their loved ones say because presumably if they're hoping for advanced consent to be able to receive assisted death after the disease, progressed. It would be those people making the call of, of, I guess, when it has progressed far enough when they've when they've passed the threshold that They'd they. indicated that they, they wanted to go. Yeah, it's a good point because there are there are sort of different camps. I almost think of and I don't mean that in an adversarial way, I think about the different groups of people who are affected by this, if advance requests were to exist and the burden that is placed on them. And one is the doctors. But another is exactly what you mentioned family. It just happens that of all the people, I've sort of interviewed anecdotally to talk about this who were in favour, who were themselves had been diagnosed with dementia unwanted advance request all of their close family members were part of the story were very supportive and were aligned with what their loved one wanted. I am sure there are families where that is not the case in that's an additional level of, of, you know, sort of emotional difficulty. But interestingly, so, and Canada, the loan twenty sixteen. There were three what they called complex circumstances that they left out, which is advanced requests, which is the one that has by far gotten the most attention mature minors. So, so kids, who would be considered mature enough to consent and the possibility of made for. People who Seoul, underlying diagnosis, is a mental condition and what they said is we are going to study this for the next two years. And we're gonna come back with big reports to sort of informed parliament on how to think about this. Those were tabled in December, and they were they were written by different into interdisciplinary teams of academics and experts and they're actually like remarkably compelling clear reading if anyone has an interest in his area. I would I would actually recommend reading them. But one of the things that came out of those is, so there are only four countries in the world, that allow advanced requests, they are Belgium than other Lund's Columbia in Luxembourg, Colombian, Luxembourg, effectively have never done it. So they have no practical experience. Because look at Belgium doesn't keep very good records is not a lot of evidence there. So almost all of what we know about how this works in practice comes from the Netherlands, and what that tells us is. There's really interesting evidence about family members being in favour in theory, and they ask them sort of in studies, you know, your loved one has dementia. They have an advance in, in, in those countries, they call them advance euthanasia directives. But just for the sake of consistency. Will call them advance requests like we do in Canada. Are you in favour and the family members by and large say, absolutely? Yes. This is what my loved one wanted. They did not wanna live like this. They have laid out their conditions for when they want their lifetime. We support that. And then when they look ahead at actually following through on it between two thirds, and three quarters of them, actually asked Dr not to do it when it comes time to actually put it into practice but feels so natural to me. I think it's does. That's how that's how I would imagine myself feeling. It's, it's a lot and people sort of will say, well, we have we have advanced care planning. We have advanced directives for other medical procedures, like wheat people have do not resuscitate orders where they say, you know, I don't want her roic measures I have a bunch of health problems. I don't want you, you know, thumping on my chest putting defibrillators on me and putting tubes in me. I want you to just let me go gently and. And families are more comfortable are comfortable following through on those and sewer doctors. There is something very distinct though about kind of the proactive nature of made it is a different thing than not giving someone antibiotics or nutrition knowing that in a week or two their life is going to end. It's, it's the activeness of ending their life with made that kind of changes the way families, and doctors seemed to respond to those orders. Again, the Netherlands, being the only place, we sort of see this in practice and Ken can kind of look at how it plays out. Well, what about doctors who mentioned them a couple times now? Yeah, Dan favor. I, I don't want you to speak for them as a group or anything. But, but where do they come into play on, on advanced requests, especially in, in cases of mental deterioration? That's been sort of one of my areas of fascination because I sort of thought, I think it was about two years ago. I did a big feature on a palliative care doc who decided to offer me to his patients, which is actually a fairly unusual decision in the palliative care community, because just philosophically palliative care is about. Relieving symptoms and one of their tenants is to neither hasten death nor prolong life. And so for palliative care docs, a lot of them think made his very odd fit for their kind of philosophical approach so anyway, doctors became kind of an area fascination for me.

Dementia Canada JOE Robin Netherlands Bill C Alzheimer Shannon Jordan Heath Rawlings Cancer Nino Belgium Seoul Zuma Joe Aubin Joe I Writer London DAN
"sacco" Discussed on The Pat McAfee Show 2.0

The Pat McAfee Show 2.0

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"sacco" Discussed on The Pat McAfee Show 2.0

"And then like I said earlier he was very smart coach because he hired me after I was done playing college coach, he respected my football IQ, which you have to respect a man that does that cost Sacco for me. I was a soccer player. Everybody knew me as a soccer player. I didn't start playing football until my junior high school. So I wouldn't go to practice just show showed up on Fridays. Visiting away game. My mom actually, drove me to a couple of games because I was coming from a soccer game. So all the football coaches didn't even talk to me, basically, he was just like that. That's that's our kicker. That's McAfee is soccer guy. Would it's kinda. Let them be. However, you'll be in coach Sacco was defensive coordinator, he used my actual first football coach he was the only one who came over to me on the bus you if I was on the bus. He would come sit next to me if I was on the sideline before the game. He would come talk to me coach me up. If I did something during the game. He would coach me up about the unwritten rules of football about how to earn respect in the locker room, and he really shapes my he shaped a lot more in my life than I think he could ever imagine in he passed away. So sudden and so young it was just a shame. So we're going to go pay our respects for sure I might I might be crying last night. I don't know I've been seeing a lot of dead bodies daily. And I don't appreciate don't like I don't like it. This is the worst part of this whole life thing. But also on flipside very much a perspective putter. I mean, the the details haven't come out fully, but they're saying at heart attack and just dine on Sunday just passed away on Saturday. He had no idea that was coming. I did. This. Party with him last week. So he was fine. And he had no idea. He was just enjoying his life. Evan. No clue. That's something to think about if you're out there. You're just like like if you're just a miserable. You have no clue what's coming to change it change, whatever you're doing. If you don't like it change it, and I'm not going to get to hoity toity here until you guys to go change your life. But if you're not happy, you could be dying tomorrow legitimately could die tomorrow. Think about that would be worse whenever you make your decisions on what you wanna do each day. Remember that this could be your last day, and it's been happening. It's been in close to home, but it's a real thing. And with that being said, we're going back to Pittsburgh. I'm definitely going by Rudy's. And every time I go there you like five six AM. And I don't know if we're going to have enough time to sneak them in there. But the move I made of sending people to other Rudy's down the street. Still one of the most legendary food service moves of all time genius. Gotta respect it got a respected. And I do appreciate the fact that that is probably what this sandwich places now that I think. Show it sold out to build a buzz. Hundred. Hey sandwich place. It's always bread. How can we help? You. We says we're out of bread you. Call twenty five thirty minutes ago, though. Got a hell of a same about that. But now you got to go down the street to the other one maybe tomorrow callback earlier this weekend. Huge huge. Jonah slate of games that we should all be looking forward to I cannot wait to watch the NFL figure itself out here. Which is what's going to happen? Got to talk to Chris Ballard after the interview dares Leonard back in his war room. And I just talked to them about how this the NFL is the greatest league. I it's so good. You have no clue. What's going to happen? Shitty teams out there. But they're shitty teams can still win at the end of season. Fuck somebody over completely the NFL is a.

football soccer Sacco NFL Rudy junior high school defensive coordinator Chris Ballard Evan Pittsburgh Jonah slate Leonard twenty five thirty minutes
Why Google’s Weirdly Specific New Rule for Android Phones Actually Makes Sense

Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

02:43 min | 3 years ago

Why Google’s Weirdly Specific New Rule for Android Phones Actually Makes Sense

"All these years later Shah's is been on season seven, seven, and you guys have done my show together. That's because I'd like to parse you out. Like I feel like I'm on vacation when each through and I was wondering who said you on Bethany or Carol Bethany, Terrel girl. You better call. That's in the I'm coming for you. I'm sorry. No, it's more like Carol and everybody else. I'm sorry, Carol. I'm on her side. Radzi needs to call Bethany stat. And sorry. No, because the wrong what Ramona said she was right when she said, when Bethany is not in control, blah, blah. Ramona was right. Exactly. Let's go to Alexa from buffalo. Hey, Alexa. What's your question Alexa? What's your question. You know how many times I actually get that on the so sorry, it was such a lame, Joe, it's okay. People think that I'm actually named after the electric. I thought you all resin of. They have to save my mom, and I have like shots sunset, like little bonding. And we love you. So. So my question is for actually both of you, which is, do you think that Mona a Nema are two closer being siblings? Who will they were separated at a young age and then reunited and their relationship looks at times a little like. Angelina jolie. Yes. The brother with Angelina. Jolie's brother. Yeah, you're kidding. Not at all. And. Hinge Alina Monica Lewinsky. From coins, I'm going to. I'm putting my yearbook on EBay. Friends with Monica? I was not, but she did move into our building. She's a nice girl. She did start borough moslo day goes to a genius who used his airline luggage allowance to bring two trash bags full of ships on board. Okay. I have a feeling that he is a member of the mile vary. Hi. What I'm saying tonight Sacco goes to Google who plans to stop Android phones for planning to stop suggesting my face when users type sit on. You know, I don't have an Android phone, but if I did, this would be extremely upsetting because it would mean that all of my tax would take twice as long. I wanna make nj..

Carol Bethany Alina Monica Lewinsky Alexa Bethany Stat Angelina Jolie Ramona Shah Terrel Ebay Sacco Mona Google JOE Radzi Buffalo Monica