17 Burst results for "Sacagawea"

"sacagawea" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:09 min | 7 months ago

"sacagawea" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"He is the man. Hi, Eric. This is question number three. I am listening to your interview with Michael wilkerson on my iPhone using the Apple app. Using the Apple app. That's your first mistake, okay? I have heard two PSAs for COVID boosters during this interview. I am positive that this was not your idea. Just giving you a heads up, love your show and your stance for the truth. A woman named joy wrote that. Well, that some of this stuff, I guess I have to find it funny. You're listening to my show as a podcast and you're just going to get whatever. Everybody knows my stance on the vaccines. I've lost friends over this. I said early on, not early enough. I wouldn't get this, I wouldn't get these vaccines. The information that I was getting on them was just not good. Plus, they overplayed COVID. I mean, they would not give you the things that could make you better so people initially were dying. They were like, look, people are dying. We need the vaccine. Anyway, you know the whole story. But if you're listening to this as a podcast on Apple podcasts or wherever you're listening, I don't know what they're going to play for ads, but you can bet your bottom dollar that I'm not in favor of getting the booster, God forbid. If I drop in Bud Light, let us know. Okay, question number four, what do you think of the article in The New York Times that said, U.S. history scores for 8th graders plunge? Is this a result of the pandemic? What do you think can be changed in our school system? Well, most American school systems are not worth dealing with at this point. I would say most people might strong urging to people would be homeschooling or if there's a good classical Christian school in your area. Those are my first strong first and week second choices. There are very few public schools today that have not been infected by the woke virus that have not effectively been destroyed. And so the idea that U.S. history scores rate creators plunge. I mean, certainly the pandemic would have something to do with that. Look, the pandemic thing masking kids up in class. I said it at the time. This is going to be something for generations for decades. We're going to look back on these kids are going to be talking about this for the rest of their lives that stupid, ignorant, usually well meaning parents allowed their kids to go through the trauma of whatever weirdness for nothing. And I'm just here to say, I'm sort of glad that this score is plunged because it's a metric that says, hey, maybe we need to change anything. It is interesting that the question is U.S. history scores. I mean, do they teach USA? You know what? That's exactly what I was thinking exactly the same thing. Like U.S. history, what are they teaching? About it. Maybe we don't want them to the only positive thing that they could mention would be sacagawea..

Eric Michael wilkerson iPhone first mistake pandemic today first USA joy COVID decades second choices U.S. American first strong Bud Light 8th graders The New York Times Apple two PSAs
"sacagawea" Discussed on Bear Grease

Bear Grease

07:47 min | 7 months ago

"sacagawea" Discussed on Bear Grease

"All right, pocket knife. Cover that one pretty well. At least it would get to the other pocket. But until we do, what else is in the old right front pocket? Chap stick. Now here's a disclaimer. Down here, we call lip balm chap stick. Regardless of the brain, but we never call it lip balm. Hey, I don't make the rules. I just live by them. That's the end of the disclaimer. ChapStick. Not much you can say about that. Sure you can. You can dive it on a cut to help stop bleeding. You can use it to moisturize, dry skin. Hank, you can even use the help with. Building a fire and keep you from having chapped lips. My dad told me a joke when I was a kid about an old cowboy that rode into town from out on the range, instead of rushing into the Sloan to get him a cold drink. He hitched his horse up and pulled a brush out of his saddle and started brushing himself off. The mayor of the town was watching him as the cowboy cleaned up as best he could, straighten his clothes, wash his hands in the trough and tuck the shirt in. The mayor was impressed and started walking toward him to welcome him to the town when the cowboy walked around to the back of the horse, poked his finger in the horses behind and rubbed it on his lips. The mayor was shocked. But he welcomed him anyway, and he said, I appreciate you cleaning up when you got here. We got a lovely little town, and we want to keep it that way. But man, I only got one question. Why did you poke your horses behind and rub it on your lips? Though cow more looked at him, he said, my lips are chapped. In the mayor said, oh, does that cure in the cowboy? He said, no, but it keeps me from licking him and making it worse. Tote some chap stick with its smaller than a horse cheaper to feed, and there's no bad aftertaste. The right front pocket is done. So what's an old lifting? Loner pocket knife, a book, and a sack of your wheel, $1 call. The loaner knife is for your friend that doesn't carry a one, but finds himself in the need of one on occasion, which is the very reason you don't want to begin with. And if he doesn't tote one, he didn't got enough sense not to use your good one in a manner that it wasn't designed. All these things I'm about to say now go slap out the window when it's emergency. When it's life and death, nothing else matters. However, when it ain't, and you need a wire cut, a screw tightened, or prabha, don't look at me and ask to borrow my pocket knife. It's something to be respected, taking care of, maintained, and sharpened regularly because a dull one is of no service to anyone. Now I'm not going to tell you what the brand of my loaner pocket knife is because it don't matter. It ain't a case. It's a well made pocket knife, I assure you. But I'm talking about what's in my pockets and what I like the best. You may hate case pocket knives and like something totally different. I don't care. That's fine with me, but you ought to be in jail if you do. Just kidding. Not really. What about that sacagawea $1 coin? Well, I can tell you it was mended in 2000. Monetarily it's worth whatever a dollar will buy you, but my wife gave it to me. And if you don't know who sacajawea is, do yourself a favor and look her up or better yet, read undaunted courage by Stephen Ambrose. That book is thicker than the cat head biscuit, but worth the effort and just as easy to digest. She was an invaluable guide and interpreter that helped Lewis and Clark found their way across the wilderness and back when our country was young, and we didn't know our behinds from 15 cents about anything west of St. Louis. The coin serves as a symbol for my wife to me that when I'm out on a hunt or a long journey, that can always find my way home. She's my sack of jail. She's a whole lot more, but she's not much on skin and stuff, though, and I have a feeling sack jalea was anyway. That's why I told it. The Buckeye, if you've listened to any of the bear grease render podcast, you may have heard me mention it. I'll tell you about this particular one in a minute. First, I want to talk about why you'd have one to begin with. Aeschylus pavia, Kamala referred to as the red Buckeye that is the most prominent variety of the two known grow to Arkansas. It produces a nut, which is actually the seed and it grows in a pod that matures in late summer. Now folks have been toting them in their pockets for luck for generations. There is an old saying that you'll never find a dead man with a Buckeye in his pocket. I don't know if that's because you don't find a lot of dead men laying around or because it wouldn't be too cool to peel for through their clothes if you did. My family, close friends and I would give them to each other as tokens of good luck for hunting. Somewhere in our family's past, it was dictated that one hunter had to give it to another for it to work. You couldn't just find one and put it in your pocket and reap the benefits. I think how that works. Now I'm not superstitious at all. I just firmly believe that if I was to lose the one I got in my pocket, that I would never have another successful hunt. The one I have I've been caring for close to ten years and it means a lot to me. First time I met old clay bow, he'd asked me to come film a bear hunt for him and the watch towel mounds in Arkansas. He and the majority of his youngers took me around where he grew up hunting and we wound up on a mountain in the area, and I saw a Buckeye bush. I told him the story of how my family traded him back and forth, and handed him one and in return, he gave one to me. I'm still touting it to this day, and I have every day since that hunt nearly ten years ago. Glaze always amazed when he asked about it, not take it out of my pocket and chill it to me. He told me he lost the one I gave him before we got off the mountain that day. He didn't kill a bear that year either. Coincidence. We'll never know for sure, but no, absolutely. Not a coincidence. In the bib of my overalls on the right side, I carry my bill fold, all my folding money. Inside that Bill fold is a fashion ten year quarter. A quarter minute in 1976, my dad had jars Fulham, so along with everything else that, part of my uniform, I told one of those in remembrance of him. And until I started thinking about all my everyday carry items to tell you all about, I never really seen how much connection there was to the members of my family who passed away. But now I do, and talking about each one of them makes me smile. I've always fancied a good pocket watch, and on one Father's Day, my wife and little girl Bailey gave me one. It came all the way from London, England, and it keeps time like a man possessed. It has a decorative silver coon attached to a short chain on the other end that hangs on the outside of the bib overalls. Now for all those that have a pair of overalls, real overalls, and you never quite figured out what that slit was above the bill of the pockets, and the small hidden pocket selling into the same on the bib. If you didn't know what that was for, stand by for news. It's for your pocket watch, Jane, and your pocket watch. The watch is obviously for telling time, but the fog tails everyone a little bit about you. It makes a statement without making one. I like to think that when folks see mine it, they see a country boy that's proud to where he came from, proud of the folks who raised him and even more proud to share these stories. Thank you so much for listening.

"sacagawea" Discussed on Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

07:22 min | 7 months ago

"sacagawea" Discussed on Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

"So that train is a huge sweeper. The reason I think that it's a swear is twofold. I think that's part of the reason that I have never really pushed that string because I get to the point I don't know how any of that works, but I don't want to find out how any of that verb. So I don't push that strain, but then also because it's CBD, it's lowered PHC people don't understand the hype and the very longest time. We're still kind of stuck in that. I would people think that THC is what those THC content so the rosemary does not sell as well as it should, but the feedback that I get from that is 90% positive and there's people that tell me that not that strain changed their lives. They can function because of it. Yeah. And I unfortunately didn't I grew it out once and that was it. I did not, I don't remember because it's been a few years ago, but I don't remember led to the events that I wasn't able to carry it forward, but that was one. I was like, oh gosh. A bunch of those if you ever want. That's awesome. Yeah, that's cool. You still got some. You probably still got all of it, don't you? Most of it. I do cycle through the mothers. What I will say is that I still have the AC/DC mother, which is what makes the rosemary seed. So I can produce more of the time. That's cool. Yeah, that's nice. That's nice. I did AC/DC with tangy. Which I don't know. Is that an oxymoron to kind of like do a CBD with a. Sativa? No, but I like that just because of the flavors. I did the flavor with the tangy and the AC/DC 'cause that's one of my favorite of the CBDs. Nice. So that's what you got for the future then, right? You said the exodus and the sacagawea, the skunk one. That's one thing. That's a natural part of future too. Going into 2024. That's what I'm going to be working on through this year. But right now, we just are being DJ just did that collaboration thing with this kid 55. And that interesting because that was an unreleased stock from his blue line. I don't want people to think that that rare advocate, I think he's at like 30% of his library has been released so far. So we can go on for years. You've never been released, and they're going to release their money. And that is the truth. I was working on the K 45, and then that got released. And so the interesting thing behind that was that behind that is that, you know, when we release a new branch from his library, how that will influence the gene pool or what people will be able to create with that as yet to be seen. So that's been kind of fun. And that's where these now. And then we're also simultaneously we're working on this that I have to focus on because the testing has been completed for that. I'm cataloguing the information now. And that, I don't know, that will be up to DJ when he decides to release that bat. It's just going to be my whole world has changed after this project. This talking about intent. And part of the reason I stopped working with DJ stuff around 2019 was in the last project I did with him last main project I did with opening up his shit was the case where he and this is gonna be a good opportunity on being in business with your father's kind of interesting. But I think there was some miscommunication between him and I as to why I stopped working with his dog in 2019. And the reason the main reason that I did was because I could keep back up well. I didn't have the space to keep those damn backup phone. I was in a situation where I was getting 24 hour notices from my landlord and shit, you know, like, so I do remember that, and I remember it was stressing you the hell out. I mean, I'll take this moment to give it a little virtual hug anybody out there who's dealing with that. And then a little activate activism of speech that they like, we need to change that. The housing situation in this country is just fucking bullshit. This should not be happening. This is inhumane. But I wasn't able to keep the mother's life that I wanted to keep alive and in order to work with his heirloom stock echo heirloom stock his stuff is just harder to grow his dad. It's something that I think needs to be addressed. His stock is harder to grow and in order to hunt his stock, I need to keep that more back up than I do with this hybrid shit that I work on in my company. And I wasn't able to do that and I was losing plants that I wasn't able to but I couldn't afford to lose. Not that I couldn't afford to lose them. It's just that talking about intent, you know, I know his seed stock is limited as library limited. I don't want to lose seat because, you know, I'm afraid to keep a backup. So I said, I said, fuck it. I stopped. And not only that, but the results of my project were projects were suffering. I can't do this anymore. It's too disappointing to not have the correct resources to work with this shit. So I stopped. And then now we're here, and then that now we're least in that case, 45 project, and then now we're doing the work for this cocoa kush. And I did a bunch of outcrosses without as well that those are in testing right now. I had just finished up testing for one of those and that was fucking phenomenal. And I also finished up or go ahead. I just wanted to because you're talking about the coco. I just wanted to kind of get in there. That's the F 6. Is that the that is what we will be releasing yes. Okay, and the reason the reason I ask is I'm glad you're talking all about this right now because it's a good time to jump in. I did have some listeners respond and everything to my post. So but one of the main ones was talking about the K 45, the coco kush F 6 and their crosses. So go ahead, sorry about that. And what was the question? It wasn't a question I wanted to keep going talking about. I was just letting you know that I did get some feedback on some questions that some listeners had. A lot of them that came back through to my DMs was for you to have you talk about the K 45, the cocoa kush F 6 and its crosses. So I just want to let you know that that's great. That's what they wanted to hear. So go

"sacagawea" Discussed on Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

07:25 min | 7 months ago

"sacagawea" Discussed on Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

"So, you know, I can smell it in there and whatever is in that stock, that sacagawea stock and this is the important part of the conversation. We were just trying to have is that whatever is in that packaging we have stock, I can find nowhere else. And it also, it falls in line with the samples that everybody else passes off as active as cheese and smoke one. So that's the stock that I, you know, your reserving for a while. I've got a couple other things a couple other. There's an exodus cheese back cross to Corporal, what was the other one? I don't know, I've got them in the other room there. It's just about to take another bomb hit. Push the envelope. Go for it. Well, I'm going to pick your brain on. You keep mentioning the sacagawea, you're working with that it has the characteristics that you would think of as a skunk. What are those? Can you describe those characteristics just so I understand? The actual physical characteristic I'm not sure I would be able to do because I'm not familiar enough with the original stock to I think that some of the characteristics I think I'm familiar with such as like the bulbous swollen. Fraction characters and stuff at leafy, but in between the leafing the bud to fire ratio is a little bit higher. Aside from that, I think that the structurally I think it's more leafy than a lot of the other cultivars out there. But what I'm really more familiar with than I think I'm more familiar with any ways is that the Turks, which are getting the hard to describe I wouldn't know what I'm comparing them to. But for me, go ahead. I was just going to say, do you know where the term then roadkill skunk comes from? Because I hear a lot of people, quote unquote, breeders throughout, oh, it's the old roadkill. I mean, is that something different? Yes, the roadkill spunk is, in my opinion, from what I understand very different from the skunk one that I'm working with. Anything at all. So my understanding of where the term the roadkill stunt came from, that really was only a term to differentiate between the skunk one. Because what was flooding the market at certain times was skunk one, and that was being passed off as the roadkill skunk or as scum. And all these people who would go through these exuberant efforts put in the leg work to find the skunk kept getting skunk one, and they were kept getting pissed. Me was basically this. And what kept happening to me. And so finally I got to the point where I literally would go over to my dealers have to be like, no, not that shit. That shit that smells like the skunk on the road. That's what I want. A roadkill gun. Do you have any of that? It became a term. So essentially, you bring in that to the blueberry line. Is that how I understand it? No, not the roadkills. I'm working with the skunk one. Well, I didn't mean the road. I apologize. I didn't mean the roadkill. I just meant that the lineages that you're working with the sacajawea, the exodus, whatever the skunk one, incorporating that into the blue line then, the blueberry. Yeah. I see. More important. Actually, with the second degree, there's a velvet rope, Motown lockdown, a strawberry recent, but so what I'm looking for now is the skunk in the accident, male, so that I can bring that male to other lines actually. Ah, okay. What happened was I made that back of candy because most of them on Instagram. And when I made that candy, I realized the value that was in that so I could do a stock that's crumple in stock that's missing from the gene pool. And so if I could, I realized I was like, well, if I can recreate that stock of candy, I know that there's a lot of other things that I could make as well that would be also unique. So it's not just the blueberry line actually. I'm trying to do take it outside of the blueberry line. Well, I mean, I kind of thought that would have been something that you either would have been working on or would do. This seems like a natural evolution at some point or whatever. I'm excited to see all the stuff that's coming out. Are you releasing anything coming soon? Or is it something where you're still working on things or you got stuff out? You want to explain all that? No, the skunk stuff back to the stuff that will be next year probably towards the end of next year. It's going to take me a little while to find that mail. It's going to take me four to 6 months to find that mail. And then another four to 6 months just to do an initial testing. I'll test out one or two of the progeny probably two of the progeny to see if the male is producing hemp or herms or leaf and then if he passes that test, then at the same time, I'll pollinate a bunch of different things, but I only test that two of them initially and the two pass the test and we'll release those who will consider releasing those and then jump under the other stuff. It just depends on what type of value that male brings to the market, which brings up a whole other conversation, which is that the market is currently in the process of being restructured, so there is currently the kitty. Stray cats. In the field. I'm not coming back from that. I'm sorry. Oh no. That's a cute cat. All right. The market is collapsed. Not collapsed, but it's being restructured. So we don't know the value that that male will bring to the market. So if that male brings this really high value to the market, figuring out how to restructure those into the market is going to be difficult because basically, I'm at a point where I'm a breeder now. I have I'm a reader now and my work isn't for free anymore. So I can't, you know, I can't do what I did previously. Well, not only that, I mean, it's being a good breeder, just like you said, it takes a lot of time. I mean, months, years. To really work lines and find what you're looking for. It will take me a solid year just to pawn chuck some things into market from this excess cheese. And I want to refine that, which I don't think that the market will bear that, but if I find the passion to do that, and then yeah, so it's just everything's different now and I'll just keep looking at the cat and that was a good distraction. I've been trying, I've been here a year, you know, and I can't feed it.

"sacagawea" Discussed on Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

08:09 min | 7 months ago

"sacagawea" Discussed on Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

"A ride, I'm back with JD short from second generation genetics. Welcome back brother. It's been a long time. Yeah, thank you. It's been like what, two years, two years, and some days. Maybe I don't know. I'm not good with time. I'm a stoner. Ah, yes. Was it pre-pandemic? I think it was pre-pandemic, I think, right after that, we lost our studio and then the COVID hit and yeah, I think at the time you were switching houses or something or having some trouble there. So I think we were all in kind of like a limbo at that time. Yeah. Well, we're back. You were back. And I see, I've been following you, obviously, and you're always doing work. I see that you kind of done a lot of breeding work in the last, I guess, a couple years. You want to catch us all up? Sure. Yeah, so last time we talked, I actually listened to the last episode a couple of weeks ago when you said, you know, you wanted to do another one. And so I was like, all right, where did we leave off? So we left off, I was actually, I was just in the, in the process of being evicted from my home. Yeah. Yeah, and we discussed that. And so I resettled now, but that was last year in February every settled. So I've been settled now for just over a year. And in that course of that year, I got back on the tracks so to speak and doing a lot of hunting and made a couple new crosses and doing some collaborations with DJ and lots of stuff going on. I see that in it seems like you're doing a lot of specific intentional breeding. It seems. I mean, I know that sounds funny. It's all intentional, but you've been picking some specific lines and actually you've asked your followers for a couple inputs too as well. And what's behind that? What's your reasoning for the strains that you're starting to work with here? Sure. We had, I think, I think it was with you that I mentioned before. I don't remember hearing this on the last episode of be honest, I skipped around a little bit. They're long episodes. But I think it was with you that I had mentioned that I previously because of my living insecurities and my housing insecurities, I was never able to actually open up seeds that I wanted to or that I wanted to risk losing. And so since I have reestablished myself in my house, those housing and securities are gone now. I'm buying this place. So I am now opening up feeds that I want to, and I'm doing projects that I want to. So that intent is there. It was there before, but it was kind of scrambling along a little bit. One of the I used to love me using the term, the limp along projects, those pre 2022 most of my work consisted of limp along projects. I just would throw things together as best I could and in the last year, I'm still limping along. I'm not going to lie. But there's definitely more intention to what I'm doing. Currently now when I'm working on now behind schedule, but that's okay. I'm finally that's the intent, like there's no schedule with these plants before there was a schedule, but now I'm behind schedule, but the project now is to open up these skunk one feeds. William on your skunk one exodus seeds and look for a male in those and play around with that. I've been that I'm rainbow now, but I'm stoned. And so here we are. I've been holding that stock that exodus stock and that cheese stock for a while. So we'll see what I can do with it. Now that exodus that cheese stock, you mentioned skunk two as well. Am I hearing you right on that? Yeah. Okay, now that's something that I've been searching for for a few years. I know in the last couple that people, it became a trend where people are really trying to find some either good skunk or original skunk. I'm referring to is actually stump one. Okay. I'm not sure if you're familiar with the difference. Or actually if I am familiar with the difference, I don't know if anybody is interested the damn name game is just it got out of control, especially skunk is the perfect strain to approach this issue with because of how much it's been. White label, as a matter of fact, my understanding of the difference between skunk one and skunk was was that I believe that Scott Juan came up because somebody tried to pass it off as a skunk and the communities that know that's not come so then they had to call it comp one. I don't know. I mean, I don't know, I don't follow the hype and the stories and stuff. So I just go by my intuition, what I assume, so I could be totally off base there. But I had that conversation with people online before and other people and community, and that's our understanding of how it played out as well. Is there any other stories that, I mean, what are the other theories behind it? Do you know? No, I do not. I don't know, we're just, I'm rambling now again, where to even start that conversation or where to go into that conversation. If I remember correctly, and again, I don't follow these names in this highly stories often because they're so full of inconsistencies and mistruths and I just don't waste my time following them or the hype, which is the double edged sword I wish I had more time to do it for these purposes. These conversations are here, but if I remember correctly, the skunk one was Sam's function or you know, isn't it? I mean, they're dying right now listening to us. I know they're probably got all the stories. I don't know. I'm just a searcher of information right now because for me, I know I've had it. I know I really like it, and I know I'd like to find it again. What's original, what's not, where it came from, skunk one. I mean, if I remember correctly, it was Sam's Compton was the one that if that's the name, you know, it's a voluntary side a little bit, but if I remember it with dance gunk, and so the difficulty I had with some of the lore behind the skunk one was that I left off trying to follow the story was that Sam supposedly, and this is the flight on Stan. I don't know, Sam, I just, this is just how I interpreted the story was that suppose that he was credited as the creator of the stump one, but then when he was pushed to he said that he had this view original feedstock, but then when he was pushed to prove it, he claimed all the time that he could recreate it and then I don't know if he ever tried to recreate it. I'm assuming he did. I don't know why he wouldn't, but I would assume if he did try and recreate it. The community didn't agree that that was the skunk one that they were chasing. Similar to probably how the community feels about a lot of the commercials about DJs and blueberry. And I only bring that up again to just make sure that people understand this isn't a slight on Sam or DJ or anybody like that. This is just my interpretation of these stories and none of that really matters. All I know is that so the skunk one stock that I'm working with as well is that sacagawea, I got from Sonny chiba. There's skunk in that lineage and whatever the selection T did to bring that back into YouTube fruition. In my opinion, really skunk one heavy. And

"sacagawea" Discussed on Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

08:40 min | 8 months ago

"sacagawea" Discussed on Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

"Yeah, and I've had long COVID symptoms since then. I get short of breath. This is like way more talking than I usually do. No, you're fine. Just slow down if you need to. Okay. Yeah, I've got me on an inhaler. So it's been wild. And I basically had to stop gardening altogether. I had projects that I was trying to do, that just stopped dead in their tracks over the course of that year of just sort of deterioration physically. And I ended up with like one plant this pink roasting flat in the mail that I'm about to pollinate some stuff with, like, just to kind of tie it back to the cannabis world. I ended up with this one male print. It's cool that it's a male plant, right? Because then I can kind of bring that into everything else and it's not limited to like having the female cut that I have to keep alive forever, right? I mean, pollinate some stuff with it. Yeah, yeah. Kind of continued his journey that way if he dies one day. But yeah, that's a big part of what's been going on. I mean, I've been homeschooling my two kids. They're both on the autism spectrum also. And they have like ADHD sub type. So things are pretty rowdy and busy around the house a lot. But yeah, I mean, that's just sort of. Well, it was a long road of recovery, too, wasn't it for you? Yeah, after I stopped taking the anti anti fungals, I had to taper off of the steroids. So that was I'm pregnant for like 6 months straight besides a little burst. And yeah, I mean, since then I've been, I mean, I got to probably like 70% recovered late last year. So I'd say after about 32 to 33 months, I felt like I was like kind of plateaued, like 70% of my pre 2020 abilities. Then I got COVID again and December and ended up on steroids in the ER for lung inflammation. Most of the lung inflammation. Like I got diagnosed with long COVID on top of long COVID. So I mean, recovery is an interesting thing because I think for a lot of people that, you know, and this isn't even like the COVID thing, people have had post viral issues. I mean, forever, like the 1918 flu did that to a lot of people. There were a lot of lasting conditions from that. So I mean, it's nothing new, but sometimes you're going about your life and you get sick with something and your road to recovery last until you stop breathing. And I think for a lot of people right now, there's so many people that are getting sick. That's just sort of, there's what you got a 90% chance of recovering without getting long COVID. So like, you get infected with COVID every 6 to 12 months for how many times does that leave before we're up there and above 99% chance, right? Yeah, I don't know. I do have a friend that's going through some similar things with that. So it's tough, man. It's not linear, I guess it was my point, you know? I mean, in a lot of senses, like a lot of us are just always recovering from something, right? You know? It seems like a matter of perspective. What goals you set that sort of let you define when you're recovered that's kind of why I use the first percentage thing like 70% then I got knocked back down again and then I got to like 90% of that 70%, you know and then I got sick again like three or four weeks ago and I'm back down and trying to I can water my plants still but like I can't like carry stuff makes everything ten times as hard, I imagine. Dude yeah, everything changed. Like my whole life changed. Like super fast and it's at the point now where like you know I can do stuff like spray a gallon of pump of, for example, ask them just add water, compost, tea I don't know how that works, but I can spray you that, but then after like a gallons worth of pumping and springs, I get this thing where my heart beating all fast and I'm sweating like crazy I have to take all my clothes off and go sit in front of the fan and stuff and you know he's buying halo and it's just everything is different now. Luckily my wife will help me in the garden otherwise I wouldn't really I just wouldn't be able to do anything in there. Besides maybe pops and seeds and water and but you know. Yeah, I had I was diagnosed with something called adjustment disorder and I think I'm out of it because I've kind of just come to terms with everything, but there was a while there where I just really wouldn't accept like, you know that thing changed in my abilities changed dramatically and out of nowhere unexpectedly. That black rose F ten number three it's the same one that JD uses for Oregon cut throughout. It's the same mom. Pink rose by pollinating that plant with sacagawea Mayo, which was bred by Sony chiba. The sacagawea is across the blue magoo. So Williams wonder across the sea dish or blueberry and Sony is the skunky skunk email. Which was in uzbekistani hash plant across with a skunk number one. So he made the pink rose and he did this whole pink rose like Poland really, right? But while he was doing that, he had a couple plants that were super resonant that all the pollen was like going from and like, he let me take some pollen from just the resonance ones and I was like just a little bit just he was like dude you can't just go and take the good pollen out because he was all sharing it with people, you know? But I just took like a little bit. This one, that one and that one. I think there was like three of them. And it was just enough to pollinate like I want to say like 6 or 7 different plants that I had in like solo cup. So I got like maybe 20 feet of each one, right? And one of them was platinum girl scout cookies. So that's where the paint platinum came from. Okay. So then I went and I popped those all open and it was like 20 22 or something and there was this one male that had this long middle finger so like as soon as he started growing, I just noticed him because every time they would pray it looked like he was flipping me off you know like just this super long middle finger like why like an indica but super long but it's really weird and morphology. I ended up selecting him not because of that but he stood out from the start. I selected him because of his kind of like peppery berry chirps and the resin that he put out mostly. Okay. He was highly resonant. So then I pollinated one of the females that JD had collected when he made that pink growth crop. He grew out the males collected the pollen. He also grew up in the females and there was this number 5 female which was like a really like she looked a lot like the black rose, but I don't like smoking that particular black rose mom. She tastes like burnt crayons. Number three. So this kind of

"sacagawea" Discussed on Trivia With Budds

Trivia With Budds

04:39 min | 8 months ago

"sacagawea" Discussed on Trivia With Budds

"Is the first female prime minister of the UK. And number 11 for two points, amazing women, what Puerto Rican E got winner, Emmy, Grammy, Oscar Tony winner, appeared in films like singing in The Rain and the king and I, what Puerto Rican E got winner appeared in films like singing in The Rain and the king and I. Those are all your questions on amazing women in history. We'll be right back with the answers after this. We are back with the answers to this round on amazing women. Let's see if you got them all correct. Number one, which European scientists was the first person of any gender to be awarded to, Nobel Prizes that was, Marie Curie, Marie Curie. Number two, which British mystery writer is considered the bestselling novelist in history with total sales of more than 2 billion copies. Even though it says mystery writer, lots of people at my live trivia nights wrote, J. K. Rowling. But the answer is Agatha Christie because she wrote more mysteries. Number three, about 200 years after her birth, which Native American was given the title of honorary sergeant in the U.S. Army, sacagawea, seka Julia. Number four, what artists received the inaugural billboard millennium award in 2011, beyond say, Beyoncé. Number 5 in 2021, Amanda Gorman was part of the U.S. presidential inauguration, her job is poet. U.S. poet laureate, one of the youngest ever. Number 6, Catherine Bigelow directed what film starring Keanu Reeves and Patrick Swayze point break point break. Number 7, how old was Amelia Earhart when she went missing 33 36 or 39? Well, she was in her 30s. The 39 39 was the answer. She was 39 years old. Number 8, who holds the title of longest serving First Lady of the U.S., Eleanor Roosevelt, Eleanor Roosevelt. Number 9, what southern celebrity said, you'll never do a whole lot unless you're brave enough to try, Dolly, Parton, Dolly Parton. Number ten, who is the first female prime minister of the UK, Margaret Thatcher, Margaret Thatcher, and the bonus for two points, what Puerto Rican E got winner appeared in films like singing in The Rain and the king and I Rita Moreno. Still acting in stuff. West side story original and remake Rita Moreno. All right, that is it for today's episode. Hope you had a good time playing along with this round on amazing women. Remember you can advertise on this show 2000 to 4000 downloads or listens a day and as many as a 138,000 in one month that was march of 2023, email Ryan buds at Gmail dot com. Let me know what you got going on. Your fact of the day is Jennifer Lawrence has an H2O tattoo to remind her to drink more water. It's on her wrist to her hand. If you look it up, that's a good idea. I need to drink more water as well. Oh, and almost forgot to do the geek out challenge card. Let's see if I can do all these for movies name three movies with talking robots. How about robots? The movie robots with Robin Williams. Oh, and by Centennial man with Robin Williams, was he in three movies with talking robots? Oh, I wonder if there's a third one that I can't think of. And how about the jetsons meet the Flintstones, which is not a theatrical movie, but an animated straight to video, VHS movie from the 80s, I think it was. And Rosie, their robot she talks. Okay, for television four office characters, we've got Stanley. We've got Kevin. We've got Angela. We've got Oscar. And for books, three Archie characters. I do love Archie, so how about jughead? Betty and Veronica. In 5 Broadway musicals, we got cats, book of Mormon, wicked, west side story. That's gotta be a Broadway musical, right? Not just a movie. And beetlejuice is a Broadway musical right now. And miscellaneous four sports with no ball, hockey, gymnastics, and that's tough. I was gonna say I was like boomerang. Wait, that's not a sport. That's the thing you throw in maybe the outback. Sports without balls running and javelin. You throw that javelin and there's no ball. As far as I know. All right, I did it. Kinda, right? Thanks for listening. Thanks for telling a friend. And we'll see you next time for more trivia with buds, cheers.

"sacagawea" Discussed on Life Transformation Radio

Life Transformation Radio

07:57 min | 1 year ago

"sacagawea" Discussed on Life Transformation Radio

"I love this spiritual angle. I love the intensity of it and the intention of it. And to really transform the podcast, listening experience and on the other side, the podcast or experience because as podcasters, we don't get treated really well unless we're a giant Joe Rogan gets treated really well. Small podcasters, we just produce content and a lot of us don't get the monetization, everybody thinks they're making all this money. And with bad apple, which I think is so great and that's why it's a thrill for me to introduce podcasters to it is that it's a way for them to generate revenue. With the algorithm, it actually increases their listenership so they can make more revenue. So it's the rise of tides so all the ships rise as opposed to my ships can arise yours is not effect. I think I called my podcast wings of inspired business because it was really around this whole idea. We all do better when we fly together, right? So lift as we climb. And I think that sensibility and forms everything at pedophilia as well is when we're really in it together and we're really helping each other. I mean, all the data bears out that when podcasters are cross promoting one another, both podcasters do better. And so, and that's where our data comes in and really understanding those overlap audiences, where is that effort going to be most effective? And I think your point too about people really wanting to dive deeper like they hear one snippet on your podcast and say 30 minutes, 40 minutes or whatever. And that one snippet or clip on panopoulos allows them if they're interested and they listen to that clip and they want to know more about that. The recommendation engine is going to make it effortless for them to find all the other things. That are to do that as well. And that's only going to get more and more sophisticated. I mean, the more people using it, the more sophisticated it gets. And we've been talking about a lot about data. I just want to make sure that people understand too that on pedophilia, we've managed to do that in such a way that absolutely sacrosanct protects people's privacy. We do not sell data. We don't harvest data. We don't share it with anybody, everything's anonymized, and we really focus on protecting it. To the point where if you have a podcast on a social app that you want to listen to, you can even listen incognito. And it won't show up to your friends that you're listening to something like we have things like that in the app, a lot of really sophisticated features. And so when we're looking at the data from an advertiser perspective or to help podcasters really understand who their audiences are, it's all grouped into personas and avatars and composites. So that everybody's data is 100% protected. And moreover, unlike Facebook, we don't have to follow everybody all across the Internet to be able to do this. We really have elevated this in a way of how can we be social, how can we be personalized while still protecting people's privacy? Yeah, I love that. And I think that there's a consciousness behind the that when people interact with binoculars, they will feel it because there is it's a scrappy bunch we are scrappy. Yeah, we're scrappy. But I think there's a consciousness of really that parabola is a lot bigger than all of us. And then it really is going to transform and disrupt the industry of how people listen to podcasts and how they interact. One of the cool things is you have the ability. And you can do this. You can send messages to me on the bad app. You can send messages to Melinda, and you can say you're like the episode. I can also have the ability to do a live chat at different times. It's a lot of interactivity. And that's one of the things I love about Apple, and then in podcasting, there's not a lot of two way communication. There's just one way. And I love, I will say that people are very persistent, and they will find a way to contact me, which I think is really fun. But with bonobo, it makes it really, really easy. And it creates communities around topics. And it's funny because there are topics of podcasts that I've discovered in pedophilic. They're not even know there was a podcast about. And I think that's fascinating because there's so much content out there and there's so many people working so hard and giving their heart and their soul and just everything they have to create this content for you and you'll be able to find it and put up. And I think that's a beautiful thing because speaking of ayahuasca, if you're hearing about ayahuasca right now, it's interesting because that may trigger something in you because things come across your path at the right time. And it's just a beautiful thing I've discovered some really incredible messages. One is I'm trying to think of, oh man, sacajawea. So there's a podcast. It's an audio drama on sacagawea, and it's fascinating. And I learned so much. The Indian Sega Julia, imagine dying. If I died today, I don't think in 250 years you'd be talking about me. I just don't. I mean, I try to make an impact. You're making an impact, but are people going to be talking about us in 250 years? They talk about her still. And it's fascinating. So that was discovered on Pablo. So that's one of the cool things I love about it and that you discover information that you didn't know that you didn't know and I just kind of say, well, the universe thought it was time for me to learn about this stuff. Yeah, a 100%. We're always about making that easy. And of course we want people's feedback. I mean, so we really want to create. And I think we have a really safe container for people to be able to say, hey, look, I really think you should do this differently or have you thought about this feature or any of those things because we really believe in co creating with our customers and really creating safe space because that's really the root of community is being able to a genuine one. Is being able to have that trusted connection. Not just banal connection, but really trusted connection. And that's really what we're about. And where we're going, increasingly with everybody in this really big tent. But Ron, it's such a delight to work with you. It's amazing. I've known you for a while. And to have you come on board on the company and be our podcast evangelist is amazing. Because you know, just in your heart exactly what it takes for podcasters to succeed. And having your insights and the insights of all the podcasters feed through to our engineering team and our product team and as we grow out other parts of the business is just invaluable. And did I mention those hiring? There you go. We need a lot of people, you know? So stay in touch with us. Keep checking our website. We got a whole marketing team and sales team and more engineers to hire and all kinds of things. So I really looking for people who want to really who love this journey. I mean, yeah, it's a journey of innovation, but also a lot of fun and creativity and inspiration. And really cool people. I will have to say really cool people. You know, the one question I want to ask you, and I like to ask this is, it's 2022.

Joe Rogan sacajawea apple Melinda Facebook Apple Pablo Ron
"sacagawea" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"sacagawea" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Governing cancer member Giannis stone has told Bloomberg that the new tool to keep debt market turmoil at bay may not need to be used if markets believe in its power. Here's what he told us. I believe that there is a lot of truth in the idea that if we convince markets that this is going to be a strong tool, we might not need it at the end of the day. Have it on the shelf. I hope that will surprise markets only on the positive side. That's European Central Bank, governing council member Yanis strona speaking exclusively to Bloomberg there, the ECB has accelerated work on its so called anti fragmentation tool after a jump and Italian government yields in June. President Joe Biden says his administration is still discussing possible action on U.S. tariffs on Chinese imports. The comments come after U.S. secretary Gina romando told NBC's meet the press, she expects a decision shortly. The president is being thoughtful about this, unlike president Trump, those tariffs that he opposed made no sense. And so we are briefing him and I expect to make a decision shortly. And if he decides to lift certain tariffs, it will be because he knows he has to think about doing everything he possibly can to provide any relief to consumers. But he's going to do it in a thoughtful way that is strategic and also most important, most important to him and to all of us is without hurting American workers. That was U.S. commerce secretary Gina raimondo speaking, American labor unions and some top official support keeping the tariffs, but others such as US Treasury secretary Janet Yellen have argued for reducing the levees on Chinese goods to help curb the fastest pace of inflation in 40 years. Shanghai has reported its first case of the highly infectious BA 5 armor current sub variant of COVID. The financial hub will step up testing measures with residents in at least 9 districts being required to be screened twice this week. Officials are warning of very high risks as the growing outbreak in the city raises fears of a return to lockdown. The city reported 69 new coronavirus infections for Sunday, one of them outside of quarantine. Okay, those are our top stories. Now I mentioned we'd get more on the gas story in Europe, and it's been a worry for weeks, of course. Germany and its allies are bracing for Russian president Vladimir Putin to use the opportunity of maintenance on the Nord stream pipeline to cut off gas flows for good that maintenance starts today, takes about ten days so the question is whether the flow is turned off, turned on again at the end of that maintenance period, let's cross now to Berlin and join Bloomberg's burger yen and who has details for a so good morning burger. Moscow denies it is using gas as a weapon. Does anyone know what Russia will do here then, post the maintenance period? That is exactly the problem nobody really knows. The government is bracing for everything. They're bracing for the worst cuts in our that it might be cut off altogether 100%, but also it could be just a sort of 50%, 20%. It can also go back in full speed afterwards. So really, what has to be done at this present moment is that the government is setting up contingency plans. The plans for C for example that companies cut back their energy consumption and some kind of system operationing will be introduced and also that prices will be passed on to the consumer, but obviously the balance has to be striked because in the end all of these measures will have an immediate impact on the economy so there is massive fear of a deeper recession and how these packages are going to be designed will largely depend how big the impact is for the economy. The European Union energy minister is going to be meeting to discuss contingency plans for winter later this month. What could emerge in terms of plans at a European level? At the European level, I think they are discussing means of on the one hand, also appealing to the consumers to reduce consumption, and also to create a kind of new system of delivery of energy to Europe. Also, they are looking at in ways of how to get new resources, keeping up coal plants, which Germany is already doing, maybe also in other countries, or opening up LNG terminals. So they are looking at various means of on the one hand increasing energy and on the other hand, reducing the consumption. Burger, thanks very much. Yenin, let's get to the stocks we're watching this morning, Bloomberg sagarika, Jason garney joins us with the details. Sacagawea let me start with the banking sector and some news out of dance care that certainly weighing on their share price this morning. That's right. Good morning, Anna. Don't, which is, of course, Denmark's biggest bank cut is 2022 profit outlook after its trading operation and insurance unit will basically slammed by the surge in interest rates. The cut is another blow to the shareholders as just months earlier, the bank had said it wouldn't pay out further 2021 dividends as it ended talks with U.S. and Danish authorities to end its money laundering case. This, of course, goes back to 2018 since and the bank has actually been shoring up capital in expectation of what it has called material signs after its revealed in 2018 that it Estonian units had been used for years to learn the money from former Soviet states, including Russia. Okay, so that's the latest on Dan skirt. Airbus next. Seeing passenger growth slowing into the 2040s. That's right. So more bad news for the airline sector, essentially. So rising energy costs as we all know, could flow passenger demand in the coming years Airbus said in its latest market forecast. Overall, it still expects sales of new jets to climb as the pandemic effect

Bloomberg Giannis stone European Central Bank, governi Yanis strona Italian government President Joe Biden Gina romando president Trump Gina raimondo American labor unions US Treasury Janet Yellen U.S. ECB NBC Vladimir Putin cancer
"sacagawea" Discussed on Out of Bounds Podcast

Out of Bounds Podcast

07:52 min | 2 years ago

"sacagawea" Discussed on Out of Bounds Podcast

"She goes to the hill, nobody looks twice at her when my dad goes to the hill who's an Arab guy with a big with a big beard, he gets a hundred looks and a hundred comments every single day. So what is that like for you? What do you think about this whole situation? Because I think you're right. We're finally getting a chance to talk about this kind of thing. Yeah, I mean, I think like the spectrum of people's understanding of native folks and then native folks understanding of where we belong in a balance to that is so wide. Like I've had the experience at my own home of people just completely with the mindset that native people don't really exist anymore. I remember the first time I explained to someone what natives outdoors was on the lift. And then I was a native skier. He and I couldn't tell if it was like totally on of ignorance or if it was trying to be disrespectful or what it was, but he literally asked me if I was related to sacagawea. And I was like, one. You didn't even pronounce that right? Like this and that and like, it's just so complicated. But then I also think about growing up where I grew up here in Colorado on the front range stolen Cheyenne rapahoe Lakota land. We're not really talked about. And when you learn about natives in school, when I learned about them, they taught you about the ancestral puebloans that they call the anasazi out on the west slope and blah blah blah and they made us seem like ancient people that don't exist anymore. So there's one side of it that's like, yeah, we have to show people that native folks are still around and we do even ski. And then the other flip side of it is like, we have to show native folks that get like we can be in this place. And this is something we can do and typically for native folks like I think the sports that we're shown in the most are like running in basketball and because of that, those are huge in our cultures. Nowadays, you know, there's a lot of pow wows that have three on three basketball tournament. And there's all sorts of times that they'll be a cause in native youth will run hundreds of miles for a cause and like, that's something we're used to seeing. And we're not used to seeing a skier as an activist as a native person. And so that representation side of it is huge. And to me, representation within the sport is one of the biggest things that I try to just fight for and make really known and really plain because there aren't other native folks who ski, but almost every time I bring up that conversation with them, their experience is so similar to mine where they just felt isolated and that their experience as a native person skiing was something they were all alone in or just their family or however it might be. And so yeah, there's a lot of work that needs to be done there. And it kind of comes from two different sides. But I think the singular solution of that is just having the outdoor industry and ski media on our side to be like, yeah, we're here. We are actually here in our experience as different, but our experience is the same in a lot of ways. And we, you know, we have something to contribute to this space because we've always been here. We are in these mountains before they were ski resorts or anything like that. But yeah, the representation thing for me is huge. You know, it's like, there were no black folks in any sport before Jackie Robinson. And now could we imagine professional sports as we know them the NDA the NFL MLB any of those sports without that. And so it took just like that first kind of seed of being like, oh no, this is a space where these people belong for the people themselves to know they belong there, and for the fans to embrace that. Yeah. And I think one of the things that I end up fighting all the time, one of the battles, I guess I start fighting online all the time is like people are like, why even mention it? Why do you even need to talk about it? And this is why you need to talk about it so that other people listening like you like myself, like whatever you're from, if you feel like there's not people like you out there, it's important to know that there are. I think that's why it's important to talk about for one. And two, it's like, why would I shut up about it? You know, like, why do I need to be like, why do I need to be quiet? Why do you need to be quiet? It's like we should be proud of where we come from, just like everybody else. It's like, I'm just as proud of the American side as I am the Arab side. But the American side is like a given. I am proud and I have to be proud almost, you know? The other side is like, I should just hide that and that's how I felt growing up was like you sweep it under the rug. You don't talk about it as much because you're afraid of how people are going to look at you one way or the other. Oh, totally. That's definitely how I feel and felt growing up. And I think it's definitely there's a way that it's amplified for those of us who are mixed race in that way. Because there's a part of you that's like, well, should I could cut my hair a little different and I could save it. Totally. I could dress a little different. And I could sink into that comfortability and privilege that's there . And then there's another side of you that's also why should I have to sacrifice that because you're uncomfortable. And I think that's really the thing about it is usually that anybody that's telling you to be quiet about it, it's not about you. It's about them. And what they're uncomfortable hearing. And for native folks in particular, I feel like where the part of the past of this continent that people and the land. Yeah, well, that's the thing. People don't want to don't want to talk about the fact that we wouldn't be having all these forest fires if native folks were still managing the forest to move game around and set small fires in order to get certain plant species to grow in a more prolific way. And all those things like that very concept of wilderness and how we see the land in this country is like based around removing native people first and then imagining it as empty. And I think that it feels especially magnified when you're in a ski resort and people get a lookout over this expanse of untouched lands and think it's all been perfect and that's the way it should be. And it's like, dude, this is our home. So how do you manage that then as a skier, like you're looking at this land and everybody's using this land and like at one point you feel a connection to the land as your own and like, but on the other hand, you're looking at it, like, I want to go skiing. I want to go out there and I want to I want everybody to use this land for what it's for, I guess. So there's got to be a balance point, and I'm, I don't know, I'm sure you've thought about this. What do you think about? How do you balance that as a as a native person? And as a person wants to go skiing. For me, I think like, I see it so much like, especially now I saw it differently, maybe, you know, 5 years ago when I had only been skiing for a couple of seasons. There was a part of me that was more resentful then. Didn't understand how the outdoor industry works and things like that. And now I see it as like, okay, this is an opportunity for justice and equity. Where it's like, we have nearly $1 trillion industry when it comes to outdoor recreation. That happens exclusively on stolen land. Yeah. And it's growing. It's growing every year. Yeah. And so it's like, okay, for me, the way I think about it is if we need better access if we need to take care of these lands better and if we need more places this can be more places to hike more places to all those things,.

sacagawea basketball skiing Jackie Robinson Colorado NDA NFL
"sacagawea" Discussed on Out of Bounds Podcast

Out of Bounds Podcast

07:20 min | 2 years ago

"sacagawea" Discussed on Out of Bounds Podcast

"In a balance to that is so wide. Like I've had the experience at my own home of people just completely with the mindset that native people don't really exist anymore. I remember the first time I explained to someone what natives outdoors was on the lift. And then I was a native skier. He and I couldn't tell if it was like totally on of ignorance or if it was trying to be disrespectful or what it was, but he literally asked me if I was related to sacagawea. And I was like, one. You didn't even pronounce that right? Like this and that and like, it's just so complicated. But then I also think about growing up where I grew up here in Colorado on the front range stolen Cheyenne rapahoe Lakota land. We're not really talked about. And when you learn about natives in school, when I learned about them, they taught you about the ancestral puebloans that they call the anasazi out on the west slope and blah blah blah and they made us seem like ancient people that don't exist anymore. So there's one side of it that's like, yeah, we have to show people that native folks are still around and we do even ski. And then the other flip side of it is like, we have to show native folks that get like we can be in this place. And this is something we can do and typically for native folks like I think the sports that we're shown in the most are like running in basketball and because of that, those are huge in our cultures. Nowadays, you know, there's a lot of pow wows that have three on three basketball tournament. And there's all sorts of times that they'll be a cause in native youth will run hundreds of miles for a cause and like, that's something we're used to seeing. And we're not used to seeing a skier as an activist as a native person. And so that representation side of it is huge. And to me, representation within the sport is one of the biggest things that I try to just fight for and make really known and really plain because there aren't other native folks who ski, but almost every time I bring up that conversation with them, their experience is so similar to mine where they just felt isolated and that their experience as a native person skiing was something they were all alone in or just their family or however it might be. And so yeah, there's a lot of work that needs to be done there. And it kind of comes from two different sides. But I think the singular solution of that is just having the outdoor industry and ski media on our side to be like, yeah, we're here. We are actually here in our experience as different, but our experience is the same in a lot of ways. And we, you know, we have something to contribute to this space because we've always been here. We are in these mountains before they were ski resorts or anything like that. But yeah, the representation thing for me is huge. You know, it's like, there were no black folks in any sport before Jackie Robinson. And now could we imagine professional sports as we know them the NDA the NFL MLB any of those sports without that. And so it took just like that first kind of seed of being like, oh no, this is a space where these people belong for the people themselves to know they belong there, and for the fans to embrace that. Yeah. And I think one of the things that I end up fighting all the time, one of the battles, I guess I start fighting online all the time is like people are like, why even mention it? Why do you even need to talk about it? And this is why you need to talk about it so that other people listening like you like myself, like whatever you're from, if you feel like there's not people like you out there, it's important to know that there are. I think that's why it's important to talk about for one. And two, it's like, why would I shut up about it? You know, like, why do I need to be like, why do I need to be quiet? Why do you need to be quiet? It's like we should be proud of where we come from, just like everybody else. It's like, I'm just as proud of the American side as I am the Arab side. But the American side is like a given. I am proud and I have to be proud almost, you know? The other side is like, I should just hide that and that's how I felt growing up was like you sweep it under the rug. You don't talk about it as much because you're afraid of how people are going to look at you one way or the other. Oh, totally. That's definitely how I feel and felt growing up. And I think it's definitely there's a way that it's amplified for those of us who are mixed race in that way. Because there's a part of you that's like, well, should I could cut my hair a little different and I could save it. Totally. I could dress a little different. And I could sink into that comfortability and privilege that's there . And then there's another side of you that's also why should I have to sacrifice that because you're uncomfortable. And I think that's really the thing about it is usually that anybody that's telling you to be quiet about it, it's not about you. It's about them. And what they're uncomfortable hearing. And for native folks in particular, I feel like where the part of the past of this continent that people and the land. Yeah, well, that's the thing. People don't want to don't want to talk about the fact that we wouldn't be having all these forest fires if native folks were still managing the forest to move game around and set small fires in order to get certain plant species to grow in a more prolific way. And all those things like that very concept of wilderness and how we see the land in this country is like based around removing native people first and then imagining it as empty. And I think that it feels especially magnified when you're in a ski resort and people get a lookout over this expanse of untouched lands and think it's all been perfect and that's the way it should be. And it's like, dude, this is our home. So how do you manage that then as a skier, like you're looking at this land and everybody's using this land and like at one point you feel a connection to the land as your own and like, but on the other hand, you're looking at it, like, I want to go skiing. I want to go out there and I want to I want everybody to use this land for what it's for, I guess. So there's got to be a balance point, and I'm, I don't know, I'm sure you've thought about this. What do you think about? How do you balance that as a as a native person? And as a person wants to go skiing. For me, I think like, I see it so much like, especially now I saw it differently, maybe, you know, 5 years ago when I had only been skiing for a couple of seasons. There was a part of me that was more resentful then. Didn't understand how the outdoor industry works and things like that. And now I see it as like, okay, this is an opportunity for justice and equity. Where it's like, we have nearly $1 trillion industry when it comes to outdoor recreation. That happens exclusively on stolen land. Yeah. And it's growing. It's growing every year. Yeah. And so it's like, okay, for me, the way I think about it is if we need better access if we need to take care of these lands better and if we need more places this can be more places to hike more places to all those things,.

sacagawea basketball skiing Jackie Robinson Colorado NDA NFL
"sacagawea" Discussed on Out of Bounds Podcast

Out of Bounds Podcast

08:19 min | 2 years ago

"sacagawea" Discussed on Out of Bounds Podcast

"Got some guy messaging me or emailed me yesterday about something I posted and he's like, doesn't just need to be cheaper. Why are we assuming everybody is like broke that doesn't go skiing? Just because of the color of their skin or where they come from. It's not necessarily assumption of them being broke. I mean, whether they are they aren't, it's just like, why would you spend that money on a thing you don't know how to do and don't necessarily feel welcome, right? And that's always the thing. So what do you think about that? How can we get more people involved in the sport that maybe don't look like the typical white guy that normally is. And again, I always kind of feel like I have to preface this a little bit because obviously people are sensitive and I don't want to be attacking anybody because, like I said, my mom's a white lady from west Springfield, like people know this, and I love her more than anybody on the planet has nothing to do with her being white. But when she goes to the hill, nobody looks twice at her when my dad goes to the hill who's an Arab guy with a big with a big beard, he gets a hundred looks and a hundred comments every single day. So what is that like for you? What do you think about this whole situation? Because I think you're right. We're finally getting a chance to talk about this kind of thing. Yeah, I mean, I think like the spectrum of people's understanding of native folks and then native folks understanding of where we belong in a balance to that is so wide. Like I've had the experience at my own home of people just completely with the mindset that native people don't really exist anymore. I remember the first time I explained to someone what natives outdoors was on the lift. And then I was a native skier. He and I couldn't tell if it was like totally on of ignorance or if it was trying to be disrespectful or what it was, but he literally asked me if I was related to sacagawea. And I was like, one. You didn't even pronounce that right? Like this and that and like, it's just so complicated. But then I also think about growing up where I grew up here in Colorado on the front range stolen Cheyenne rapahoe Lakota land. We're not really talked about. And when you learn about natives in school, when I learned about them, they taught you about the ancestral puebloans that they call the anasazi out on the west slope and blah blah blah and they made us seem like ancient people that don't exist anymore. So there's one side of it that's like, yeah, we have to show people that native folks are still around and we do even ski. And then the other flip side of it is like, we have to show native folks that get like we can be in this place. And this is something we can do and typically for native folks like I think the sports that we're shown in the most are like running in basketball and because of that, those are huge in our cultures. Nowadays, you know, there's a lot of pow wows that have three on three basketball tournament. And there's all sorts of times that they'll be a cause in native youth will run hundreds of miles for a cause and like, that's something we're used to seeing. And we're not used to seeing a skier as an activist as a native person. And so that representation side of it is huge. And to me, representation within the sport is one of the biggest things that I try to just fight for and make really known and really plain because there aren't other native folks who ski, but almost every time I bring up that conversation with them, their experience is so similar to mine where they just felt isolated and that their experience as a native person skiing was something they were all alone in or just their family or however it might be. And so yeah, there's a lot of work that needs to be done there. And it kind of comes from two different sides. But I think the singular solution of that is just having the outdoor industry and ski media on our side to be like, yeah, we're here. We are actually here in our experience as different, but our experience is the same in a lot of ways. And we, you know, we have something to contribute to this space because we've always been here. We are in these mountains before they were ski resorts or anything like that. But yeah, the representation thing for me is huge. You know, it's like, there were no black folks in any sport before Jackie Robinson. And now could we imagine professional sports as we know them the NDA the NFL MLB any of those sports without that. And so it took just like that first kind of seed of being like, oh no, this is a space where these people belong for the people themselves to know they belong there, and for the fans to embrace that. Yeah. And I think one of the things that I end up fighting all the time, one of the battles, I guess I start fighting online all the time is like people are like, why even mention it? Why do you even need to talk about it? And this is why you need to talk about it so that other people listening like you like myself, like whatever you're from, if you feel like there's not people like you out there, it's important to know that there are. I think that's why it's important to talk about for one. And two, it's like, why would I shut up about it? You know, like, why do I need to be like, why do I need to be quiet? Why do you need to be quiet? It's like we should be proud of where we come from, just like everybody else. It's like, I'm just as proud of the American side as I am the Arab side. But the American side is like a given. I am proud and I have to be proud almost, you know? The other side is like, I should just hide that and that's how I felt growing up was like you sweep it under the rug. You don't talk about it as much because you're afraid of how people are going to look at you one way or the other. Oh, totally. That's definitely how I feel and felt growing up. And I think it's definitely there's a way that it's amplified for those of us who are mixed race in that way. Because there's a part of you that's like, well, should I could cut my hair a little different and I could save it. Totally. I could dress a little different. And I could sink into that comfortability and privilege that's there . And then there's another side of you that's also why should I have to sacrifice that because you're uncomfortable. And I think that's really the thing about it is usually that anybody that's telling you to be quiet about it, it's not about you. It's about them. And what they're uncomfortable hearing. And for native folks in particular, I feel like where the part of the past of this continent that people and the land. Yeah, well, that's the thing. People don't want to don't want to talk about the fact that we wouldn't be having all these forest fires if native folks were still managing the forest to move game around and set small fires in order to get certain plant species to grow in a more prolific way. And all those things like that very concept of wilderness and how we see the land in this country is like based around removing native people first and then imagining it as empty. And I think that it feels especially magnified when you're in a ski resort and people get a lookout over this expanse of untouched lands and think it's all been perfect and that's the way it should be. And it's like, dude, this is our home. So how do you manage that then as a skier, like you're looking at this land and everybody's using this land and like at one point you feel a connection to the land as your own and like, but on the other hand, you're looking at it, like, I want to go skiing. I want to go out there and I want to I want everybody to use this land for what it's for, I guess. So there's got to be a balance point, and I'm, I don't know, I'm sure you've thought about this. What do you think about? How do you balance that as a as a native person? And as a person wants to go skiing. For me, I think like, I see it so much like, especially now I saw it differently, maybe, you know, 5 years ago when I had only been skiing for a couple of seasons. There was a part of me that was more resentful then. Didn't understand how the outdoor industry works and things like that. And now I see it as like, okay, this is an opportunity for justice and equity..

skiing west Springfield sacagawea basketball Jackie Robinson Colorado NDA NFL
"sacagawea" Discussed on Out of Bounds Podcast

Out of Bounds Podcast

07:49 min | 2 years ago

"sacagawea" Discussed on Out of Bounds Podcast

"What do you think about that? How can we get more people involved in the sport that maybe don't look like the typical white guy that normally is. And again, I always kind of feel like I have to preface this a little bit because obviously people are sensitive and I don't want to be attacking anybody because, like I said, my mom's a white lady from west Springfield, like people know this, and I love her more than anybody on the planet has nothing to do with her being white. But when she goes to the hill, nobody looks twice at her when my dad goes to the hill who's an Arab guy with a big with a big beard, he gets a hundred looks and a hundred comments every single day. So what is that like for you? What do you think about this whole situation? Because I think you're right. We're finally getting a chance to talk about this kind of thing. Yeah, I mean, I think like the spectrum of people's understanding of native folks and then native folks understanding of where we belong in a balance to that is so wide. Like I've had the experience at my own home of people just completely with the mindset that native people don't really exist anymore. I remember the first time I explained to someone what natives outdoors was on the lift. And then I was a native skier. He and I couldn't tell if it was like totally on of ignorance or if it was trying to be disrespectful or what it was, but he literally asked me if I was related to sacagawea. And I was like, one. You didn't even pronounce that right? Like this and that and like, it's just so complicated. But then I also think about growing up where I grew up here in Colorado on the front range stolen Cheyenne rapahoe Lakota land. We're not really talked about. And when you learn about natives in school, when I learned about them, they taught you about the ancestral puebloans that they call the anasazi out on the west slope and blah blah blah and they made us seem like ancient people that don't exist anymore. So there's one side of it that's like, yeah, we have to show people that native folks are still around and we do even ski. And then the other flip side of it is like, we have to show native folks that get like we can be in this place. And this is something we can do and typically for native folks like I think the sports that we're shown in the most are like running in basketball and because of that, those are huge in our cultures. Nowadays, you know, there's a lot of pow wows that have three on three basketball tournament. And there's all sorts of times that they'll be a cause in native youth will run hundreds of miles for a cause and like, that's something we're used to seeing. And we're not used to seeing a skier as an activist as a native person. And so that representation side of it is huge. And to me, representation within the sport is one of the biggest things that I try to just fight for and make really known and really plain because there aren't other native folks who ski, but almost every time I bring up that conversation with them, their experience is so similar to mine where they just felt isolated and that their experience as a native person skiing was something they were all alone in or just their family or however it might be. And so yeah, there's a lot of work that needs to be done there. And it kind of comes from two different sides. But I think the singular solution of that is just having the outdoor industry and ski media on our side to be like, yeah, we're here. We are actually here in our experience as different, but our experience is the same in a lot of ways. And we, you know, we have something to contribute to this space because we've always been here. We are in these mountains before they were ski resorts or anything like that. But yeah, the representation thing for me is huge. You know, it's like, there were no black folks in any sport before Jackie Robinson. And now could we imagine professional sports as we know them the NDA the NFL MLB any of those sports without that. And so it took just like that first kind of seed of being like, oh no, this is a space where these people belong for the people themselves to know they belong there, and for the fans to embrace that. Yeah. And I think one of the things that I end up fighting all the time, one of the battles, I guess I start fighting online all the time is like people are like, why even mention it? Why do you even need to talk about it? And this is why you need to talk about it so that other people listening like you like myself, like whatever you're from, if you feel like there's not people like you out there, it's important to know that there are. I think that's why it's important to talk about for one. And two, it's like, why would I shut up about it? You know, like, why do I need to be like, why do I need to be quiet? Why do you need to be quiet? It's like we should be proud of where we come from, just like everybody else. It's like, I'm just as proud of the American side as I am the Arab side. But the American side is like a given. I am proud and I have to be proud almost, you know? The other side is like, I should just hide that and that's how I felt growing up was like you sweep it under the rug. You don't talk about it as much because you're afraid of how people are going to look at you one way or the other. Oh, totally. That's definitely how I feel and felt growing up. And I think it's definitely there's a way that it's amplified for those of us who are mixed race in that way. Because there's a part of you that's like, well, should I could cut my hair a little different and I could save it. Totally. I could dress a little different. And I could sink into that comfortability and privilege that's there . And then there's another side of you that's also why should I have to sacrifice that because you're uncomfortable. And I think that's really the thing about it is usually that anybody that's telling you to be quiet about it, it's not about you. It's about them. And what they're uncomfortable hearing. And for native folks in particular, I feel like where the part of the past of this continent that people and the land. Yeah, well, that's the thing. People don't want to don't want to talk about the fact that we wouldn't be having all these forest fires if native folks were still managing the forest to move game around and set small fires in order to get certain plant species to grow in a more prolific way. And all those things like that very concept of wilderness and how we see the land in this country is like based around removing native people first and then imagining it as empty. And I think that it feels especially magnified when you're in a ski resort and people get a lookout over this expanse of untouched lands and think it's all been perfect and that's the way it should be. And it's like, dude, this is our home. So how do you manage that then as a skier, like you're looking at this land and everybody's using this land and like at one point you feel a connection to the land as your own and like, but on the other hand, you're looking at it, like, I want to go skiing. I want to go out there and I want to I want everybody to use this land for what it's for, I guess. So there's got to be a balance point, and I'm, I don't know, I'm sure you've thought about this. What do you think about? How do you balance that as a as a native person? And as a person wants to go skiing. For me, I think like, I see it so much like, especially now I saw it differently, maybe, you know, 5 years ago when I had only been skiing for a couple of seasons. There was a part of me that was more resentful then. Didn't understand how the outdoor industry works and things like that. And now I see it as like, okay, this is an opportunity for justice and.

west Springfield sacagawea basketball skiing Jackie Robinson Colorado NDA NFL
"sacagawea" Discussed on Out of Bounds Podcast

Out of Bounds Podcast

06:37 min | 2 years ago

"sacagawea" Discussed on Out of Bounds Podcast

"Because it took a lot for me to afford and fight to have the opportunity to even be on the mountain and so I really identified with it after having to earn it in with what so there's a few things I want to touch on. One of the things and it's a thing I've been kind of harping on a lot lately is the expense and making it more accessible for people to go skiing, right? And it's like, you hear all spectrums of opinion from I don't know, I got some guy messaging me or emailed me yesterday about something I posted and he's like, doesn't just need to be cheaper. Why are we assuming everybody is like broke that doesn't go skiing? Just because of the color of their skin or where they come from. It's not necessarily assumption of them being broke. I mean, whether they are they aren't, it's just like, why would you spend that money on a thing you don't know how to do and don't necessarily feel welcome, right? And that's always the thing. So what do you think about that? How can we get more people involved in the sport that maybe don't look like the typical white guy that normally is. And again, I always kind of feel like I have to preface this a little bit because obviously people are sensitive and I don't want to be attacking anybody because, like I said, my mom's a white lady from west Springfield, like people know this, and I love her more than anybody on the planet has nothing to do with her being white. But when she goes to the hill, nobody looks twice at her when my dad goes to the hill who's an Arab guy with a big with a big beard, he gets a hundred looks and a hundred comments every single day. So what is that like for you? What do you think about this whole situation? Because I think you're right. We're finally getting a chance to talk about this kind of thing. Yeah, I mean, I think like the spectrum of people's understanding of native folks and then native folks understanding of where we belong in a balance to that is so wide. Like I've had the experience at my own home of people just completely with the mindset that native people don't really exist anymore. I remember the first time I explained to someone what natives outdoors was on the lift. And then I was a native skier. He and I couldn't tell if it was like totally on of ignorance or if it was trying to be disrespectful or what it was, but he literally asked me if I was related to sacagawea. And I was like, one. You didn't even pronounce that right? Like this and that and like, it's just so complicated. But then I also think about growing up where I grew up here in Colorado on the front range stolen Cheyenne rapahoe Lakota land. We're not really talked about. And when you learn about natives in school, when I learned about them, they taught you about the ancestral puebloans that they call the anasazi out on the west slope and blah blah blah and they made us seem like ancient people that don't exist anymore. So there's one side of it that's like, yeah, we have to show people that native folks are still around and we do even ski. And then the other flip side of it is like, we have to show native folks that get like we can be in this place. And this is something we can do and typically for native folks like I think the sports that we're shown in the most are like running in basketball and because of that, those are huge in our cultures. Nowadays, you know, there's a lot of pow wows that have three on three basketball tournament. And there's all sorts of times that they'll be a cause in native youth will run hundreds of miles for a cause and like, that's something we're used to seeing. And we're not used to seeing a skier as an activist as a native person. And so that representation side of it is huge. And to me, representation within the sport is one of the biggest things that I try to just fight for and make really known and really plain because there aren't other native folks who ski, but almost every time I bring up that conversation with them, their experience is so similar to mine where they just felt isolated and that their experience as a native person skiing was something they were all alone in or just their family or however it might be. And so yeah, there's a lot of work that needs to be done there. And it kind of comes from two different sides. But I think the singular solution of that is just having the outdoor industry and ski media on our side to be like, yeah, we're here. We are actually here in our experience as different, but our experience is the same in a lot of ways. And we, you know, we have something to contribute to this space because we've always been here. We are in these mountains before they were ski resorts or anything like that. But yeah, the representation thing for me is huge. You know, it's like, there were no black folks in any sport before Jackie Robinson. And now could we imagine professional sports as we know them the NDA the NFL MLB any of those sports without that. And so it took just like that first kind of seed of being like, oh no, this is a space where these people belong for the people themselves to know they belong there, and for the fans to embrace that. Yeah. And I think one of the things that I end up fighting all the time, one of the battles, I guess I start fighting online all the time is like people are like, why even mention it? Why do you even need to talk about it? And this is why you need to talk about it so that other people listening like you like myself, like whatever you're from, if you feel like there's not people like you out there, it's important to know that there are. I think that's why it's important to talk about for one. And two, it's like, why would I shut up about it? You know, like, why do I need to be like, why do I need to be quiet? Why do you need to be quiet? It's like we should be proud of where we come from, just like everybody else. It's like, I'm just as proud of the American side as I am the Arab side. But the American side is like a given. I am proud and I have to be proud almost, you know? The other side is like, I should just hide that and that's how I felt growing up was like you sweep it under the rug. You don't talk about it as much because you're afraid of how people are going to look at you one way or the other. Oh, totally. That's definitely how I feel and felt growing up. And I think it's definitely there's a way that it's amplified for those of us who are mixed race in that way. Because there's a part of you that's like, well, should I could cut my hair a little different and I could save it. Totally. I could dress a little different. And I could sink into that comfortability and privilege that's there . And then there's another side of you that's also why.

skiing west Springfield sacagawea basketball Colorado Jackie Robinson NDA NFL
"sacagawea" Discussed on Out of Bounds Podcast

Out of Bounds Podcast

07:05 min | 2 years ago

"sacagawea" Discussed on Out of Bounds Podcast

"Was 21. And yeah, and so that was when I really started to identify as a skier, was that first season. Back in the day, they used to have the Rocky Mountains super pass in my first my first year with the super pass was when I was like, okay, I skied probably a good 40 days and I felt like an actual skier for the first time in my life and it kind of took over from the feeling that I had to find a way to stick with because it took a lot for me to afford and fight to have the opportunity to even be on the mountain and so I really identified with it after having to earn it in with what so there's a few things I want to touch on. One of the things and it's a thing I've been kind of harping on a lot lately is the expense and making it more accessible for people to go skiing, right? And it's like, you hear all spectrums of opinion from I don't know, I got some guy messaging me or emailed me yesterday about something I posted and he's like, doesn't just need to be cheaper. Why are we assuming everybody is like broke that doesn't go skiing? Just because of the color of their skin or where they come from. It's not necessarily assumption of them being broke. I mean, whether they are they aren't, it's just like, why would you spend that money on a thing you don't know how to do and don't necessarily feel welcome, right? And that's always the thing. So what do you think about that? How can we get more people involved in the sport that maybe don't look like the typical white guy that normally is. And again, I always kind of feel like I have to preface this a little bit because obviously people are sensitive and I don't want to be attacking anybody because, like I said, my mom's a white lady from west Springfield, like people know this, and I love her more than anybody on the planet has nothing to do with her being white. But when she goes to the hill, nobody looks twice at her when my dad goes to the hill who's an Arab guy with a big with a big beard, he gets a hundred looks and a hundred comments every single day. So what is that like for you? What do you think about this whole situation? Because I think you're right. We're finally getting a chance to talk about this kind of thing. Yeah, I mean, I think like the spectrum of people's understanding of native folks and then native folks understanding of where we belong in a balance to that is so wide. Like I've had the experience at my own home of people just completely with the mindset that native people don't really exist anymore. I remember the first time I explained to someone what natives outdoors was on the lift. And then I was a native skier. He and I couldn't tell if it was like totally on of ignorance or if it was trying to be disrespectful or what it was, but he literally asked me if I was related to sacagawea. And I was like, one. You didn't even pronounce that right? Like this and that and like, it's just so complicated. But then I also think about growing up where I grew up here in Colorado on the front range stolen Cheyenne rapahoe Lakota land. We're not really talked about. And when you learn about natives in school, when I learned about them, they taught you about the ancestral puebloans that they call the anasazi out on the west slope and blah blah blah and they made us seem like ancient people that don't exist anymore. So there's one side of it that's like, yeah, we have to show people that native folks are still around and we do even ski. And then the other flip side of it is like, we have to show native folks that get like we can be in this place. And this is something we can do and typically for native folks like I think the sports that we're shown in the most are like running in basketball and because of that, those are huge in our cultures. Nowadays, you know, there's a lot of pow wows that have three on three basketball tournament. And there's all sorts of times that they'll be a cause in native youth will run hundreds of miles for a cause and like, that's something we're used to seeing. And we're not used to seeing a skier as an activist as a native person. And so that representation side of it is huge. And to me, representation within the sport is one of the biggest things that I try to just fight for and make really known and really plain because there aren't other native folks who ski, but almost every time I bring up that conversation with them, their experience is so similar to mine where they just felt isolated and that their experience as a native person skiing was something they were all alone in or just their family or however it might be. And so yeah, there's a lot of work that needs to be done there. And it kind of comes from two different sides. But I think the singular solution of that is just having the outdoor industry and ski media on our side to be like, yeah, we're here. We are actually here in our experience as different, but our experience is the same in a lot of ways. And we, you know, we have something to contribute to this space because we've always been here. We are in these mountains before they were ski resorts or anything like that. But yeah, the representation thing for me is huge. You know, it's like, there were no black folks in any sport before Jackie Robinson. And now could we imagine professional sports as we know them the NDA the NFL MLB any of those sports without that. And so it took just like that first kind of seed of being like, oh no, this is a space where these people belong for the people themselves to know they belong there, and for the fans to embrace that. Yeah. And I think one of the things that I end up fighting all the time, one of the battles, I guess I start fighting online all the time is like people are like, why even mention it? Why do you even need to talk about it? And this is why you need to talk about it so that other people listening like you like myself, like whatever you're from, if you feel like there's not people like you out there, it's important to know that there are. I think that's why it's important to talk about for one. And two, it's like, why would I shut up about it? You know, like, why do I need to be like, why do I need to be quiet? Why do you need to be quiet? It's like we should be proud of where we come from, just like everybody else. It's like, I'm just as proud of the American side as I am the Arab side. But the American side is like a given. I am proud and I have to be proud almost, you know? The other side is like, I should just hide that and that's how I felt growing up was like you sweep it under the rug. You don't talk about it as much because you're afraid of how people are going to look at you one way or the other. Oh, totally. That's definitely how I feel and felt growing up. And I think it's definitely there's a way that it's amplified for those of us who are mixed race in that way. Because there's a part of you that's like, well, should I could cut my hair a little different and I could save it. Totally. I could dress a little different. And I could sink into that comfortability and privilege that's there . And then there's another side of you that's also why.

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"sacagawea" Discussed on Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

08:08 min | 2 years ago

"sacagawea" Discussed on Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

"And you saying that, those are like the blue magoo. If that's legit, that's one of my favorites, and then you said the wonder. Was working with, but it was one of those main, you know, it was one of the main, I think it was European firms that, through the late 90s, early 2000s pumped out all the heat. Who else was with them? I forget his name, the jinx proof was with them. I think sub cool was with them. I don't remember the name of the company. I am out of that loop. It was a DNA or something, I don't know. But so yeah, they had the California too. I mean, so they had the plug on a lot of those really killer cuts. Williams wonder and shit. You have to pardon me too. I'm getting a little sniffly because I have had this cold for a week, man. It's ridiculous. Yeah, I hope it's not COVID. I really do. I have not been out. It's been my thing. The congestion. Yeah. But I don't know why it was going on with my button. So I gave up and quit everything. Yeah, it's me too. And I'm an old dude, right? I just turned 46 about, I don't know, four or 5 days ago. I don't happy birthday. You're not that old. Man. Oh yeah, well, you've done a lot more than me. I've only smoked all the weed you've made all the weed. All right. So now I know this. I know this answer, I think, but one of the questions here was, do you smoke more flour or concentrate? I'm gonna probably say flour for you, you don't really smoke any. I don't smell concentrate because the concentrate that I like are really hard to produce and they cost a decent chunk of money. So I won't smoke chemical concentrates. I just, it's never pickled my fancy. It did for a brief period of time when I was, you know, into consuming large amounts, and I didn't have to pay for it, but that didn't last very long. And the reason didn't last very long for me is a fucking shift too harsh, man. I don't like coffee like that. So this is within a couple of months of experimenting with the concentrates where I said this product isn't for me, but I've never lost the case for the fresh frozen bubble hash or the ice wax. I mean, that shit's right at my alley. It's just, it's expensive and it's hard to make. Do you ever have anybody make your personally, you got a personal connect or something that you can. So I think it's dragon lab is all he goes by on Instagram. I think that there was another part to that. Double check on Instagram here. Give a shout out to yeah, it's just drag map. It's underscored dragon lab. He's what I consider my hash guru. He makes fresh frozen and he processes it himself, and then he squeezes it into ros and everything. I'll make all the other concentrates, but I just ask him to just stop right there at the bubble and give me that and he doesn't do it last year where I kicked him of some plants for to work with and then he kicked me back the hash. And I worked that great. Yeah, and you know it's amazing because when you can get cooperation like that because that's a lot of work, man. It's a lot of work. Yeah, you know, again in a shout out to him for putting in the elbow grease. I like to say and I love to say this right now is that the secret to making good hash is elbow grease and it's the reason that most people can't figure it out everyone wants to think there's a secret ingredient or people are doing the secret process. It's fucking elbow grease. You break your back making this shit, but you can tell in the finished product and this dragon label he's got his passion worked out there. It's so true, man. It's just you can't cut corners. You just can't cut corner. It's like making a good or bad. It's like making a good wine or a good liqueur or a good cure on a cannabis. You got to do it right. And it takes time and effort. Let me ask you this. What strain do you prefer in concentrate form that you grow? Another good question. I haven't had a chance to concentrate those strain yet, but I know that this is the one that I want. I tried to get the dragon lab to work with this one last year and he said, oh, you know, maybe next year is that what you wanted to do though at four blueberries this year. But so it's a sack of candy. And that's the candy land cross with sacagawea. That will make some concentrate that plant hasn't been released yet. It's one or two people got it, and they didn't run with it. I don't know what happened, but so nobody's really had a chance to try this yet, but I already know that the concentrate that come off of that plant will win cups across the country across the parking globe. Yes, yes. Is it going to happen? I'm not sure. I don't know. I have to eat stock of it. I had somebody approach me recently asking for something along those lines and I got sick, but I just, we had a thing lined up to meet up and it just didn't work out. I am leery to let that plant go without the confidence of knowing that I'm going to at least get back and return what I want for it. Which at a bare minimum is 20 grams of concentrate a year for the next 5 years. I just haven't really met that person yet where I'm like, look, I know this is a special plant. And so I put some work into not only making it, but keeping the mother alive. And so in order to pass it off to you, I need something in return. And we always get to that point, and then I tell them what I want to return and it's kind of falls apart from there, so it's like, okay, keep it myself, I guess. I guess I just got to do it myself. Maybe, maybe, but you know, it's one of those things that there's so many things that I've seen over time that no one believed in it, and then the person that did just went crazy with it. So true. You just got to find the right person with the right faith. But it's worth it. I would not ever settle for less. That's for sure. Do you know a love light air water rocks? No, not off the top of my head. The someone who follows you, love light air water rocks. What is the difference? Or is there any difference in D-Day shorts, blueberry, and Dutch passions, blueberry? All right, so I got a little bit, you know, it was a mouthful there. So you asked if I know a person named love. Yes. Light. And then that person asked the question, is what's the difference between Dutch basin and GJ blueberry? Yes, sir. Okay, so the difference between Dutch passions blueberry and DJ's blueberry is just the selected mothers. Both of the mothers came from the exact same branch of DJ's back stock. I don't know the reference, but in our work, when my work and my closet is just referred to as the F four blueberry boy and F four blueberry mother. If I'm not mistaken, Dutch passions, blueberry mothers came from the exact same seeds that the plants that I have come from, they were just they had different characteristic traits and the different characteristic traits my impression is that the Dutch passion. I'm not sure I think that's passions might have used more than one male. I'm not certain, but my understanding is that the Dutch passion selections leaned more towards the sulfur kush, Williams wonder pre 98 terpenes, DJ selections made more towards the blueberry sweet cart candy floral selection. Okay. Okay. And that is two different

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"sacagawea" Discussed on Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

07:58 min | 2 years ago

"sacagawea" Discussed on Oregon Rooted: The Dirt Show

"Don't think it was a seat. I think it was a mother. I got a thyroid diesel plant from somebody else. Super excited about and I was shocked at the progeny. The mother was okay. I wasn't expecting what I got out of the progeny. And I was just, I was shocked and dumbfounded and heartbroken that the progeny with hemp, and it is well put out a bunch of, I mean, it was a pretty hermaphroditic. Or something. What do you think the THC was about 13? Maybe lower than that. I didn't smoke it, man. Like I said, I was testing out the prodigy. I got to like 5 or 6 weeks, and I was like, oh, fuck you, get the fuck out of my room. I don't even want to smoke you. Evicted. Evicted. Of all things, too. Well, to be honest, out of all the plants I've ever tried, sour D has been the worst failure of my time too. I failed hard on sourdough and I don't know if I just got the wrong cut. Talk to the wrong people, grew at the wrong way. I don't know, but damn. Okay, so moving on again, mister call me the wizard. Most surprising result of a cross. Most surprising that the Oregon cutthroat stands out for sure. I think it was frosty, man. It was frosty. I think that was the straw on the camel's back for me that was just like holy shit. And I was expecting the red. I think what was surprising of that was I wasn't expecting it, you know, the reaction that I had to watching that develop, how much fun that plant was to grow. It's gorgeous. And then, and then at the finish with all the residents and some of the terpenes too are just off the chart. So I think I would pick the Oregon cutthroat. And you had mentioned to me you're like, you know, I expected people to use that as a breeding stock. I think you said that. And yeah, they have. They have been. Well, that's the thing, dude. I used it along with the two I selected was a plumber kush, and then which I did most everything with. And then I did a few selections with the organ cutthroat. And let me tell you, man, every every cross I did, which was like three or four crosses of that organ cutthroat, then the next generation just came out frost. Frosty and so now it's just like I gotta just pick out the other traits I want, but that OCT really brought the snowman. I want to say, I don't want to say the wrong person, but I won't say who I thought it was. But there was somebody online who found one of those residents males from that stock. It was like the mail, the F 13 mail that I found, but it was an Oregon cutthroat one. I'm thinking was fucking red. This person started a seed company with it. You know, and they're selling seeds and shit. I know that there's absolutely fire in that progeny to be worked with. I put a disclaimer in those packs too for anybody who's interested. The big part of the reason why I charge a little bit more for those I have a disclaimer in those packs that allows people to use it for whatever they want. If you're looking for red weed, covered in resin and grab a pack of pork and cutthroat your three to use them for whatever you want. And see, that's the thing that happened with me with Oregon cutthroat. I have this big problem where I enjoy, I really enjoy the beauty of cannabis. And so when I grew that organ cutthroat, like it was like my prize rose in the garden. You know what I mean? Like it was that one rose that just was just perfect. It was just fucking red and beautiful and different and frosty and just it smelled good and it grew healthy and it was just, it was amazing and it's just like it didn't want to kill it. I didn't want to take it down. It was horrible, you know? But I did. And even then, here's just so just so everybody knows what that organ cutthroat. As is, as it self, the bag appeal, even outdoor, grown, the bag appeal is amazing. Just yeah, that's one thing about that organ cutthroat is you can grow it outdoors. You know, throw it in the 100° sun in southern Oregon and at the end of the year, you're still going to have some amazing bag appeal. I see a lot of those purples out there, but they're just lacking that resin. It is. No, and the Oregon cutthroat looks like those really light green ones sometimes. It just looked like they had been coated in some sugar, some powdered sugar. You're like, how can that not be strong? I don't know. Anyway, and then can you shout out three different nutrient companies that you could support that people could check into? We do have a lot of people like to use nudes, man. What do you prefer? Are you top dressed, organics? Are you liquids or what do you do? Sure. Oh, I too come to mind. I'm Leary on this subject because I know. Endorsements, but so I do use the nectar for the gods and that product for me is super convenient. And I also, I feel like it's a quality that it matches what I'm looking for. I also feel like I don't know if this is true or not, but I feel like the company is semi sustainable in the sense that they're not doing the horrible things to the environment. Another product brand that I really enjoy using is down to earth. I use their co organic mix. And then of course you know, I'm still using SLF. I still use the SLS 100. There's three right there. Yeah, absolutely. Yeah, and I'm good with that, man. And he just said, if possible anyway. But yeah, nectar is really good. It's easy. And the SLF is that's a given. You know how many times that thing has saved me? SLF. I have a tendency to get things a little hot. And SLF has saved me a few times, but. And then down to earth, dude, that's a given. That's my amendments. Yeah. Yeah, so I think in most people would probably agree with all that. And then the last one here is, here's a good one. What strain of all the strains you work with, what strain do you consume or would you consume the most? I get asked this question a lot. It's super interesting. I guess it's helping me realize that people, you know, obviously respect my opinion to them. People care, man. I told you this. So I really like the velvet rope and the velvet ropes had the two sibling cross to which were Motown lockdown and strawberry reset. Both of those were similar. The motto on that lockdown was definitely more fuel and gas, the strawberry recess was more berry, but the velvet ropes I really liked. It just had this all around consistently rounded effect. And in terps on it are just second to none. As far as I'm concerned, there's your pre 98 right there. And I'm not familiar with the bubble that some people are, but as far as I don't need to go back any further than the ropes. Let me say it that way. And can you remind us what the cross is of the velvet, you said? It ropes with sacagawea number 6 and the F four blueberry boy. Okay, okay. Look at your weird Julia. I mean, you did a lot with that, didn't you? Yeah, yeah. I used the mail from that in several different females. I really like that line. Again, that came from sunny chiba, and that's the Williams wonder blue magoo. I classify it more as the exodus cheese. I think it's the closest that I've come to the cheese and seed form.

Oregon Leary berry sacagawea Julia Williams