16 Burst results for "Sabin Vaccine Institute"

"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

Making Sense with Sam Harris

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

"In a market. That can't effectively incentivize it. You know we have antibiotics. That are losing their power over really every bug that concerns us and we're meandering toward a time that will be indistinguishable from the nineteen twenties and thirties. When we simply didn't have the drugs that could solve our most basic Infectious disease problems and the reason is there's not enough money in it you know. You take a new antibiotic cost a billion dollars to produce and you take it once for ten days in your life and then that's it that is if you're unlucky you know most people don't have to take them any specific new antibiotic ever rent and yet if you need it. This is the one drug. That's going to save your life you know. It's so it's we have to. This is the role of government or major philanthropy about some level. We just have to say the whether it makes any market sense in any rational time horizon for a business person. We have to spend money on these things. Yeah we've basically stood by as multiple antibiotic companies have gone out of business in the us and it just allowed this market failure to propagate to the point that you know who's even developing new antibiotics. I can only think of a couple of companies that even that business anymore and we're not really talking we're talking more about viruses than than bacteria the but that is an equally glaring issue and something that you know. One estimate that i saw you know superbugs could could easily be killing millions of people per year within ten years. Yes so what are the prospects of developing vaccines for whole classes of viruses. A universal flu vaccine universal corona virus. Vaccine what have you uncovered on this front. Well this actually ties to what you're just saying about market failures because it seems talking to some pretty informed people in this in this domain that a universal flu vaccine effort would probably have very good chances of succeeding at least fifty percent which is shot worth taking and the budget that i was quoted. Was you know. Probably in the range of two hundred million dollars over ten years with kind of an extreme like. Why don't we just for safety. Go up an order of magnitude budget of two billion dollars over ten years and you look at those numbers and you. You remember that. The flu is causing the us alone. Three hundred sixty one billion dollars a year in lost productivity in medical spending and you it's just flabbergasting and i couldn't believe my ears when the budget was quoted to me and it couldn't have come from a more informed person Who is harvey feinberg. He's the former president of the national academy of medicine and the former dean of the harvard school of public health and and more to the point. He's done a lot of work studying the potential for universal flu vaccine including at the sabin vaccine institute and so this is just another stunning market. Failure i mean if you can spend stick the worst case scenario two billion dollars over ten years for the chance of saving three hundred and sixty one billion dollars a year..

two hundred million dollars two billion dollars ten days harvey feinberg one drug sabin vaccine institute ten years millions of people billion dollars harvard once national academy of medicine Three hundred sixty one billio three hundred and sixty one bi One estimate over ten years least fifty percent nineteen twenties virus thirties
"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on Rusted Culture Podcast

Rusted Culture Podcast

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on Rusted Culture Podcast

"There's an article out here that the world's worst cova crisis is unfolding in brazil in this is coming to us from bloomberg march fifth. So it's a recent article that says world's worst cova crisis is unfolding in brazil where no fix seems to work and essentially here folks what they're according to this article and oakwood at what they're living through now is much worse than what they had before this according to two niece garrett in infectious disease expert vice president of the sabin vaccine institute in washington. I see a huge storm. Forming in brazil is what she's saying and it goes on to say this it says in the first two months of twenty twenty one and they're talking about these three cities that are just outside of sao paulo down here. I'm not gonna try to win. Enunciate with those cities are but there's three cities right right there on the map. Just outside brazil sao paulo brazil in it says in the first two months of two thousand twenty one more people have died of the virus in the city. Then all of twenty twenty most cova test coming back not only positive but positive for the highly contagious brazil. Variant that emerged in the amazonian city of manus the strain which preliminary studies suggest is at least twice as transmissible showed up in more than eighty percent of the samples collected at a clinic in the city from mid january to mid february. So i mean these variants are serious. Business anomaly that when you look at it. They're saying here in this article. The patients once elderly are now in their twenties and thirties and arriving even sicker then previously. I mean it's It's insane and you know folks. So yeah we had a good. We had a good payroll report. Nonfarm payroll report right Three hundred seventy nine thousand jobs gained in february. But are you willing to gamble everything on that and not only that but you still got crisis going on here with coburn. We're not through the woods yet. Eighty five percent of us haven't had our shots consider all these things and the other thing to consider here. Folks is this and i. I haven't heard phrase this way but take a look at this retail sales chart from the bureau of labor in statistics. Us government so. This chart is showing us. That retail sales are clipping higher at a very strong rate. That's great in the reason. Why is things like unemployment compensation. Yes things like unemployment compensation or giving people money to spend and they're actually spending it in its stimulating the economy. You can't discount the fact that not only. Are you helping millions of americans at need help with unemployment compensation but you're also stimulating the economy and as we know this economy sixty nine percent of it is consumer driven sixty nine percent of it unlike the tax cuts that they passed for the rich back in two thousand seventeen folks. None of that trickle down in had this kind of effect on retail sales did it. But the other compensation is having that kind of an effect. The stimulus checks are having that kind of an effect on the us economy. So yes you're helping. Millions of americans at the same time you are stimulating the economy. And since when is that a bad thing until next time folks. Thanks for tuning..

sao paulo brazil two thousand february twenties sixty nine percent washington march fifth Eighty five percent mid february mid january millions Three hundred seventy nine tho three cities Millions sabin vaccine institute first two months more than eighty percent two thousand seventeen folks amazonian
J&J COVID-19 vaccine could get FDA approval within days

Up First

03:45 min | 1 year ago

J&J COVID-19 vaccine could get FDA approval within days

"The fda is getting ready to authorize a third covid vaccine emergency use in this country. This one this vaccine is from pharmaceutical giant. Johnson and johnson. And if it's authorized it would join vaccines from pfizer and madera in the us vaccination campaign. But here's the thing those other. Vaccines require two doses. This vaccine from johnson and johnson needs only one single dose to be effective. Npr science correspondent. Joe palca is here to tell us how effective good morning joe morning. well one dose. that's exciting. How good is this new vaccine. Oh it's good. It was sixty six percent effect of overall in preventing moderate to severe disease and eighty five percent protective against more severe diseases. Now for people with good memories. They'll say wait. A minute i heard that madonna and pfizer wasn't that closer to ninety five percent effective and the answer is yes they were higher but those vaccines were tested before. Some of the new variants began circulating and prevent any five percent of severe critical. Disease is really good since the goal of the vaccines is to keep people out of the hospital and keep them from dying and the other thing about this vaccine is mentioned in the intro is that it's one dose which makes the logistics of getting it to people a lot easier to remember to come back so public. Health officials are looking forward to being able to distribute the j. vaccine. This is how anthony fauci chief medical adviser to the president. Put it on. Nbc's today show to have them come in and be in the mix with the other. Two is is nothing but good news. Nothing but good news. Foul cheat now. The process usually is before a vaccine gets authorized in advisory board has to approve it right. Well yes well. Though he has to is probably an exaggeration. It doesn't absolutely has to. The fda can approve things on its own lookout but like the other two vaccines. The the fda wanted to be extremely transparent. There were some questions about whether they were rushing the vaccine to the market before they knew it was safe and they want to assure the public that this was being looked at carefully so that committee has been around for a while. it's known in the trade as burg. Pack the vaccines and related biological products. Advisory committee i love that name ver- pack made of scientists and doctors with a variety of specialization relating vaccines before the meeting. Fda provides the committee with its analysis and they also make that analysis of the public So i asked. Bruce gallon president of global immunization at sabin vaccine institute. What he made of the analysis of the johnson and johnson vaccine. I didn't see anything in it. That i would think is going to be a show stopper for packed. Wanna recommend that. Fda act on so gallon is predicting the ver- pack will give the vaccine a thumbs up. How many doses. Johnson and johnson have ready to ship out. Well not as many as people had hoped a year ago when started trying to make these vaccines they all said. All we're gonna do this at risk manufacturing which means we're going to start making vaccine before they even knew it was going to be authorized even if it worked. And then they'd throw away if it didn't work and the government gave the money to do this but even with that company's still don't have the kind of inventory. The country needs in the case of johnson. Johnson they have about four million doses ready to go out the door and expect to have twenty million by the end of march and one hundred million by the end of june and remember. This is a one dose vaccine so one hundred million doses is one hundred million people vaccinated which is very big. Deal leslie and briefly. What is the timeline here. When the fda issued the emergency use authorization it could be any minute. I mean they knew it right after the meeting. They could do it tomorrow. That could do it in a few days. It'll be soon. I think if the committee gives a thumbs

Johnson Joe Palca FDA Pfizer Madera Anthony Fauci NPR Bruce Gallon Madonna Sabin Vaccine Institute JOE NBC Advisory Committee United States
"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Dialogue 79. The first Ark Station in L. A. The second in the nation. We started the dialogue and now more than ever, the dialogue continues here, ABC, Los Angeles County and Klos HD to Los Angeles. Great K ABC News at noon I'm sharing reared in Los Angeles and San Diego schools will shut down classrooms for the fall semester. But the Orange County Board of Education has voted to reopen all school campuses without making people social distance or wear masks. Last night, the board said, social distancing is not necessary, and students and teachers wearing masks is not only tough to enforce, but quote. May even be harmful. They're also not recommending classroom sizes be cut down, but are suggesting temperature checks. The decision was met with protests outside the education office in Costa Mesa, Orange County's 28 individual school district. Still get to make the final call and how they'll reopen campuses. If they do it all. Phil Human K. ABC. New Doctors are warning not to rush to a vaccine during a virtual health hearing, Dr Bruce Gellin warned. There can be no shortcuts when it comes to developing a safe and effective Corona virus. Vaccine. Gellin runs a Sabin Vaccine Institute in Washington, D. C. A national coaching organization says it prolonged shutdown is likely to result in catastrophic consequences for both youth sports and the kids who play them. The positive coaching alliance has one in four programs will not survive the shutdowns and when what's left to return coaches. They're going to need more training to handle the issues kids will likely have and display on the field and the courts. Youth sports teach kids So many things from work ethic to physical health and commitment to sportsmanship, Learning howto win and lose graciously important life lessons. They're not getting right now checking the markets. Currently, the Dow is up for 21 dynastic up 36..

Dr Bruce Gellin Los Angeles Los Angeles County Orange County Board of Educati Sabin Vaccine Institute ABC News Phil Human K. ABC ABC Ark Station Orange County Costa Mesa individual school district Washington San Diego
"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:46 min | 2 years ago

"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is corona virus a weekly report from NPR news I'm Lucas Cannavaro the United States has more confirmed coronavirus cases than any other country in the world and more confirmed deaths from covert nineteen but some states are already talking about re opening their economies we'll take a closer look at that story later on this hour and we'll talk about the federal government's response to this crisis first the latest in science and testing these we openings come despite there still being a great deal of concern over the testing shortage in the United States and there's another problem some new faster test may not be as reliable as hoped here's morning edition host Noel king speaking with NPR's Bob Stein tell me about this new fast testing when what's going on it's called the habit ID now cast and it's gotten a lot of attention because it's so fast it can tell someone if they're negative or positive in less than fifteen minutes you know like the quick flu or strep test resurfacing clinics and doctors offices you know president trump has bragged about this a lot and if the White House briefings and lots of people have been talking about how the attic ID now test could help life get back to normal okay but there is a problem with that what's the problem well you know it appears this test can miss more infected people than other tests Dr Gary pro cop is a top medical testing expert at the Cleveland Clinic he shared with NPR the results of what could be the biggest study so far to take a look at this he tested two hundred and thirty nine specimens with the ID now test and four other commonly used tests here's what he found the advertised in our five test comparison produce the most false negatives out of all the tasks he says back tests detected only eighty five point two percent of the positive specimens so that means if you had a hundred patients that were positive fifteen percent of those patients would be falsely called negative they be told of their negative for code when they're really positive well so fifteen percent of people could be walking around thinking that they are in the clear when in fact they're sick they're positive yes yeah that's what he's saying and you know the concern as they could spread it to other people now this test isn't the most common test out there today but fifty thousand are being produced each day and that's increasing fast so for one thing Procope says that these false negatives they could really dangerous for deciding whether it's safe for example you know can have patients come to hospitals maybe for like elective surgeries proconsuls his hospital stop using the test that way instead they're going with the three other tests that hit the mark between ninety six and a hundred percent of the time so what's happening with this test now is it being used for other things yeah you know it's being used to test doctors and nurses you know regular people who are worried they make me sick family members of sick people and this talk about using it to help decide all sorts of things like you know who safe to go back to work or get on a plane here Kerry program again from the Cleveland Clinic it is a risk that if you tell somebody they're negative and are truly positive that they will relax social distancing not wear a face mask at Sakura and could transmit the disease so that's the truth well let me ask you about abit the company that makes the test what are they saying about this you don't have it says the test is very reliable and any problems are not being caused by the test itself it could be how it's being used to that specimens are being diluted instead of going directly into the app and machines like they're supposed to but pro cop says the company needs to prove that now you know it's important note that all tests can produce false negatives any of the samples and collected the right way or at the right time just because someone tests negative one day they may get infected the next day and the habit I teach now quick test can be very useful especially when it's really important get results really fast and most of the time it is right but croak program says it's important to know that even when someone gets a negative test they may still be infected you know they can't get lulled into a false sense of security they can't let their guard down that was Noel king speaking with NPR's rob Stein so when will echo the nineteen vaccine be ready well some faxing developers are already doing testing with humans but it's probably going to be many months still experts say we need to plan now for the day a vaccine is available here's no working again she asked NPR's Joe Palca what sort of planning needs to happen well there's a lot to consider maybe we can start with manufacturing okay so let's say a vaccine sales through testing great okay we need a billion doses of it well you can't wait till the end of the testing and say all we are not what you thought of that they're thinking about it now the interesting thing is they are building capacity but companies now and people who are investing in them now our candidate may never make it so we're building this capacity and it may never be used so it's kind of an interesting conundrum yeah it really is it once we have a vaccine what will early distribution look like who gets it well I talk with the Bruce callin about that he's the head of global immunization at the Sabin vaccine institute when vaccines first available the supplies we limited the demand will be a lot more and then how do you manage that going used to be in government he says when there was a threat of a major flu pandemic they discussed how to prioritize who goes first clearly among the top where healthcare workers and people who provide community services the things that keeps society going there's the security sector whether that's international security or other military and then there's people who are part of society's critical infrastructure and as we've been learning they may not be the people who necessarily spring to mind as critical but I'm talking about people like grocery store employees and delivery truck drivers and people whose stock shelves and then you've got to think about in health terms so do you give it to people who are most vulnerable to give it to the elderly they're they're just on a whole raft of interesting issues that have to be grappled with okay so let's say we get to a day where we've got the vaccine we've gotten to the point where we can mass produce it and then it has to get to people all across the world how is that going to work yeah well you can imagine it's it's a low just tackle challenging of a enormous dimensions but it's also a financial challenge I mean this is not going to come for free and the question is okay so developed countries like the United States maybe we can spend billions of dollars but what about low resource countries well we have to figure that out and you know part of it is equity and doing the right thing and part of it is just enlightened self interest because this virus doesn't know anything about global borders and when air travel opens back up again all right you can bring a virus from anywhere in the world anywhere else in the world pretty quick and so it's important to take this as a global problem so experts are talking to you about this they're talking to each other about this are these kinds of discussions happening with governments with our government well absolutely absolutely there are NGOs are involved the international financial organizations of all governments are involved we just had a monkey wrench thrown into the works here a bit it's a little hard to say what the impact will be but a federal scientist named Richard bright who is focused on vaccine development says he was removed from his post at a key post in the vaccine development and he said in a statement that his lawyer has specifically cited pushed back he was pushing back against unproven potential treatments that president trump had repeatedly advocated for during White House briefings now you would think that in a global pandemic situation the World Health Organization might be the coordinating agency for taking care of this but this administration has shown the disdain our lack of faith in WHL that was morning edition host Noel king speaking with NPR science correspondent Joe Palca from the beginning of the pandemic scientists worldwide agree that the corona virus occurred naturally that it made its way from animals to humans like sars and murders which are also caused by coronavirus is but the trump administration has been raising the possibility that a lab accident in China could be behind the start of covert nineteen All Things Considered host Elsa Chang asked NPR's Geoff Brumfiel to explain this idea that all of this started in some lab how did that even gain traction in the first place well I mean there is what I call circumstantial evidence there's a famous lab in Wuhan that studies corona viruses from bats in bands are likely to be the source of this virus the US state department apparently raised some concern about that lab a few years ago and intelligence agencies are looking into it but here's the thing nobody at least publicly seems to have looked closely at how this work is actually done so myself and my colleague Emily kwong had been interviewing as many scientists as we can find who do this for a living and it's looking like this theory is kind of on thin ice really why is that what makes a lab accident a really unlikely very okay so the first thing to know is that there are a lot of corona viruses in bats maybe many thousands researchers think most of them don't make people sick but nevertheless scientists are very careful when they go to collect samples I spoke to John on the set UC Davis professor who leads a global project on emerging diseases and here's how she described it we wear a boot Steinbeck and ninety five masks I protection covered hands so they're all suited and booted and they swap these bats and then they immediately plunge those samples into liquid nitrogen freezing the virus so out in the field they're being super careful okay thirteen super careful out in the field but then when they go back to the lab are they still being super careful yeah they are that's a short back in the lab they actually work with a dead virus they actually inactivate the virus the killing and just study it's genetic code and even then they do that under bio containment hood wearing masks and gloves they do keep a tiny live sample but that's kept on ice it's almost never taken out of the fridge and when it is a lot of times they can't even get the virus they're looking for to grow so it doesn't work okay so I get how an accident sounds super unlikely but do we even know if the lagging behind followed these protocols that you're describing right now actually we do until all this went down that lab was working really closely with US researchers we know this is how they work now of course this doesn't completely prove there was an accident but when you put it all together the scientists I spoke to say think of it this way you've got a car wreck fifty feet from a telephone pole the fender is wrapped around the pole in your investigating whether the car was struck by lightning okay so what is the telephone pole in this scenario so that's all the other people who interact with pets I spoke to Peter gastric president of the eco health alliance a group that focuses on this kind of work and he says his team have been in caves when like a tour comes through we might do that with a hazmat suits on insurance will be filing past initials into the show which is quite bizarre and ironic thank such as tourists locals do it to a province of China there was a small survey that found nearly three percent the population at corona virus.

Lucas Cannavaro United States NPR
"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:46 min | 2 years ago

"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is corona virus a weekly report from NPR news I'm Lucasian of RO the United States has more confirmed coronavirus cases than any other country in the world and more confirmed deaths from covert nineteen but some states are already talking about re opening their economies we'll take a closer look at that story later on this hour and we'll talk about the federal government's response to this crisis first the latest in science and testing these we openings come despite there still being a great deal of concern over the testing shortage in the United States and there's another problem some new faster test may not be as reliable as hoped he was morning edition host Noel king speaking with NPR's rob Stein tell me about this new fast testing when what's going on it's called the abit ID now cast and it's gotten a lot of attention because it's so fast it can tell someone if they're negative or positive in less than fifteen minutes you know like the quick flu or strep test resurfacing in clinics and doctors offices you know president trump has bragged about this a lot and if the White House briefings and lots of people have been talking about how the abit ID now test could help life get back to normal okay but there is a problem with that what's the problem well you know it appears this test can miss more infected people than other tests Dr Gary pro cop is a cop medical testing expert at the Cleveland Clinic he shared with NPR the results of what could be the biggest study so far to take a look at this he tested two hundred and thirty nine specimens with the ID now test and four other commonly used tests here's what he found the advertised in our five test comparison produce the most false negatives out of all the tasks he says back tests detected only eighty five point two percent of the positive specimens so that means if you had a hundred patients that were positive fifteen percent of those patients would be falsely called negative they be told of their negative for code when they're really positive well so fifteen percent of people could be walking around thinking that they are in the clear when in fact they're sick they're positive yes yeah that's what he's saying and you know the concern as they could spread it to other people now this test isn't the most common tests out there today but fifty thousand are being produced each day and that's increasing fast so for one thing Procope says that these false negatives they could really dangerous for deciding whether it's safe for example you know to have patients come to hospitals maybe for like elective surgeries proconsuls his hospital stop using the test that way instead they're going with the three other tests that hit the mark between ninety six and a hundred percent of the time so what's happening with this test now is it being used for other things yeah you know it's being used to test doctors and nurses you know regular people who are worried they make me sick family members of sick people and there's talk about using it to help decide all sorts of things like you know who safe to go back to work or get on a plane here Kerry program again from the Cleveland Clinic it is a risk that if you tell somebody they're negative and are truly positive that they will relax social distancing not wear a facemask excel draw and could transmit the disease so that's the truth well let me ask you about abit the company that makes the test what are they saying about this you don't have it says the test is very reliable and any problems are not being caused by the test itself it could be how it's being used to that specimens are being diluted instead of going directly into the app and machines like they're supposed to but pro cop says the company needs to prove that now you know it's important that all tests can produce false negatives do you know if the samples and collected the right way or at the right time and just because someone tests negative one day they may get infected the next day and the habit I teach now quick test can be very useful especially when it's really important get results really fast and most of the time it is right but croak program says it's important to know that even when someone gets a negative test they may still be infected you know they can't get lulled into a false sense of security they can't let their guard down that was Noel king speaking with NPR's rob Stein so when will a covert nineteen vaccine be ready well some vaccine developers are already doing testing with humans but it's probably going to be many months still experts say we need to plan now for the day a vaccine is available here's no working again she asked NPR's Joe Palca what sort of planning needs to happen well there's a lot to consider maybe we can start with manufacturing okay so let's say a vaccine sales through testing great okay we need a billion doses of it well you can't wait till the end of the testing and say all we are not what you thought of that they're thinking about it now and the interesting thing is they are building capacity but companies now and people who are investing in them now our candidate may never make it so we're building this capacity and it may never be yours so it's kind of an interesting conundrum yeah it really is it once we have a vaccine what will early distribution look like who gets it well I talk with a bruise callin about that he's the head of global immunization at the Sabin vaccine institute when vaccines first available the supplies we limited the demand will be a lot more and then how do you manage that going used to be in government he says when there was a threat of a major flu pandemic they discussed how to prioritize who goes first clearly among the top where healthcare workers and people who provide community services the things that keeps society going there's the security sector whether that's international security or other military and then there's people who are part of society's critical infrastructure and as we've been learning they may not be the people who necessarily spring to mind as critical but I'm talking about people like grocery store employees and delivery truck drivers and people whose stock shelves and then you've got to think about in health terms so do you give it to people who are most vulnerable to give it to the elderly they're they're just such a whole raft of interesting issues that have to be grappled with okay so let's say we get to a day where we've got the vaccine we've gotten to the point where we can mass produce it and then it has to get to people all across the world how is that going to work yeah well you can imagine it's it's a low just tackle challenges of a enormous dimensions but it's also a financial challenge I mean this is not going to come for free and the question is okay so developed countries like the United States maybe we can spend billions of dollars but what about low resource countries well we have to figure that out and you know part of it is equity and doing the right thing and part of it is just in light and self interest because this virus doesn't know anything about global borders and when air travel opens back up again all right you can bring a virus from anywhere in the world anywhere else in the world pretty quick and so it's important to take this as a global problem say experts are talking to you about this they're talking to each other about this are these kinds of discussions happening with governments with our governor mint well absolutely absolutely there are NGOs are involved the international financial organizations of all governments are involved we just had a monkey wrench thrown into the works here a bit it's a little hard to say what the impact will be but a federal scientist named Richard bright who is focused on vaccine development says he was removed from his post I am a key post in the vaccine development and he said in a statement that his lawyer has specifically cited push back he was pushing back against unproven potential treatments that president trump had repeatedly advocated for during White House briefings now you would think that in a global pandemic situation the World Health Organization might be the coordinating agency for taking care of this but this administration has shown the disdain our lack of faith in WHL that was morning edition host Noel king speaking with NPR science correspondent Joe Palca from the beginning of the pandemic scientists worldwide agrees that the coronavirus occurred naturally that it made its way from animals to humans like sars and murders which are also caused by coronavirus is but the trump administration has been raising the possibility that a lab accident in China could be behind the start of covert nineteen All Things Considered host Elsa Chang asked NPR's Geoff Brumfiel to explain this idea that all of this started in some lab how did that even gain traction in the first place well I mean there is what I call circumstantial evidence there's a famous lab in Wuhan that studies corona viruses from bats in bands are likely to be the source of this virus the US state department apparently raised some concern about that we have a few years ago and intelligence agencies are looking into it but here's the thing nobody at least publicly seems to have looked closely at how this work is actually done so myself and my colleague Emily kwong had been interviewing as many scientists as we can find who do this for a living and it's looking like this theory is kind of on thin ice really why is that what makes a lab accident a really unlikely very okay so the first thing to know is that there are a lot of corona viruses in bats maybe many thousands researchers think most of them don't make people sick but nevertheless scientists are very careful when they go to collect samples I spoke to John on the set UC Davis professor who leads a global project on emerging diseases and here's how she described it we wear boots Steinbeck and ninety five masks I protection covered hands so they're all suited and booted and they swap these bats and then they immediately plunge those samples into liquid nitrogen freezing the virus so out in the field they're being super careful okay they're being super careful out in the field but then when they go back to the lab are they still being super careful yeah they are that's a short back in the lab they actually work with a dead virus they actually inactivate the virus the killing and just study it's genetic code and even then they do that under bio containment hood wearing masks and gloves they do keep a tiny live sample but that's kept on ice it's almost never taken out of the fridge and when it is a lot of times they can't even get the virus they're looking for to grow so it doesn't work okay so I get how an accident sounds super unlikely but do we even know if the lagging behind followed these protocols that you're describing right now actually we do until all this went down that lab was working really closely with US researchers we know this is how they work now of course this doesn't completely prove there was an accident but when you put it all together the scientists I spoke to say think of it this way you've got a car wreck fifty feet from a telephone pole the fender is wrapped around the pole in your investigating whether the car was struck by lightning okay so what is the telephone pole in this scenario so that's all the other people who interact with pets I spoke to Peter dash check president of the eco health alliance a group that focuses on this kind of work and he says his team have been in caves when like a tour comes through we might do that with a hazmat suits on insurance will be filing pass in the shelves and to show which is quite bizarre and ironic it's not just tourists locals do it to a province of China there was a small survey that found nearly three percent the population had corona virus.

United States NPR
"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"News I'm David Greene and I'm no well king good morning when will a covert nineteen vaccine be ready some vaccine developers are already testing on humans but it's probably going to be many months still experts say we need to plan now for the day of vaccine is available NPR science correspondent Joe Palca has been talking to them Hey Joe Hey no well still experts say we need to plan now what sort of planning needs to be happening right now well there's a lot to consider maybe we can start with manufacturing okay so let's say a vaccine sales through testing great okay we need a billion doses of it well you can't wait till the end of the testing and say oh yeah now what you thought of that they're thinking about it now the interesting thing is they are building capacity but companies now and people who are investing in them now Hey we may never days our candidate may never make it so we're building this capacity and it may never be years so it's kind of an interesting conundrum yeah it really is it once we have a vaccine what will early distribution look like who gets it well I talk with the Bruce count about that he's the head of global immunization at the Sabin vaccine institute when vaccines first available supplies we limited the demand will be a lot more and then how do you manage that going used to be in government he says when there was a threat of a major flu pandemic they discussed how to prioritize who goes first clearly among the top where healthcare workers and people who provide community services the things that keeps society going there's the security sector whether that's international security or other military and then there's people who are part of society's critical infrastructure and as we've been learning they may not be the people who necessarily spring to mind as critical but I'm talking about people like grocery store employees and delivery truck drivers and people whose stock shelves and then you've got to think about in health terms so do you give it to people who are most vulnerable to give it to the elderly they're they're just not a whole raft of interesting issues that have to be grappled with okay so let's say we get to a day where we've got the vaccine we've gotten to the point where we can mass produce it and then it has to get to people all across the world how is that going to work yeah well you can imagine it's it's a low just tackle challenges of a enormous dimensions but it's also a financial challenge I mean this is not going to come for free and the question is okay so developed countries like the United States maybe we can spend billions of dollars but what about low resource countries well we have to figure that out and you know part of it is equity and doing the right thing and part of it is just enlightened self interest because this virus doesn't know anything about global borders and when air travel opens back up again all right you can bring a virus from anywhere in the world anywhere else in the world pretty quick and so it's important to take this as a global problem say experts are talking to you about this they're talking to each other about this are these kinds of discussions happening with governments with our governor mint well absolutely absolutely there are NGOs are involved the international financial organizations of all governments are involved we just had a monkey wrench thrown into the works here a bit it's a little hard to say what the impact will be but a federal scientist named Richard bright who is focused on vaccine development says he was removed from his post and a key post in the vaccine development and he said in a statement that his lawyer has specifically cited pushed back he was pushing back against unproven potential treatments that president trump had repeatedly advocated for during White House briefings now you would think that in a global pandemic situation the World Health Organization might be the coordinating agency for taking care of this but this administration has shown at this stage in our lack of faith in WHL a lot of hurdles in here still talk of thanks to you're welcome the US China relationship has become a central issue in the presidential election year and president trump likes to suggest the former vice president Joe Biden is too close to Chinese leaders but the Biden campaign says the president hasn't helped China accountable for the corona virus pandemic here's and here's also my father when the president is criticized for how he has handled the corona virus outbreak hello often point a finger at China there's nobody ever been tougher on China than me in fact the president says he got elected in twenty sixteen but because of his tough talk on China specifically trade in twenty twenty he's accusing his democratic opponent Joe Biden as being weak on China but the fight over who's tough on China is no longer just about long standing trade concerns it's also about this pandemic that originated in China here's a recent ad from America first a super pacs supporting president trump the China travel ban Jennifer we were forty years Joe Biden has been wrong the ad ends.

David Greene
"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

11:38 min | 2 years ago

"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on KCRW

"Enter a name please see our why news headlines are coming up next at seven o'clock good morning scientists and health officials are racing to create a vaccine for covert nineteen which probably won't have one for months and once we do who gets it first and who makes that decision it's morning edition from NPR news the White House and the Biden campaign each accuse the other of being too close to China I'm David Greene and I'm no well king if the pandemic forced you to cancel your travel plans will your airline give you a refund more men appear to be dying from covert nineteen than women a researcher explains why that might be happening Vermont says it'll start opening back up carefully and health workers who don't have protective masks give snorkels I tried it's Thursday April twenty third the actor Dev Patel is thirty today in the news is next live from NPR news I'm korva Coleman stocks opened modestly higher this morning despite a fresh wave of unemployment claims and beer Scott Horsley reports the Dow Jones industrials rose more than one hundred points in the opening minutes of trading the labor department says another four point four million Americans filed claims for unemployment last week as the coronavirus lockdown continued that's down from the previous week though still extremely high by historical standards over the last five weeks more than twenty six million people filed jobless claims that's about one out of every six people who had jobs in February investors were unfazed by the news which was in line with forecasts stock indexes rose in early trading a handful of states have begun the process of relaxing stay at home orders issued in response to the pandemic other states however are proceeding more cautiously it's got worse the NPR news Washington congressional Democrats are postponing a vote that would let lawmakers vote by proxy during the pandemic and peers winter Johnston has more house speaker Nancy Pelosi had drafted a proposal that would permit lawmakers to cast their votes by proxy allowing them to function from home while the crisis plays out but house Republicans argue the rule change would undercut legislative tradition now pelo see says instead she's forming a bipartisan committee to review options for re opening the chamber during the pandemic members of the house are expected to return to Washington on Thursday to approve the next round of corona virus relief funding NPR's Windsor Johnston that funding is worth nearly half a trillion dollars it's intended to replenish a program that aids small businesses and will offer some relief to hospitals as well for many states lack of wide scale testing for the corona virus remains a key obstacle for re opening their economies as NPR's Eric Westervelt reports California has pledged to expand testing especially in low income and minority communities Dr mark galli California's health and Human Services Terry said Wednesday California will soon open eighty six new testing sites in what he called testing desert's to serve people who've been disproportionately affected by the corona virus those are brown and black communities those are lower income communities where people are still going to essential work to ensure that they are knowledgeable of their status with covered nineteen and that they can continue to do their job and protect their family California has a goal of testing twenty five thousand residents a day by month's end and up to eighty thousand a day in coming months right now the nation's most populous state is testing just sixteen thousand people a day Eric Westervelt NPR news San Francisco suspected tornadoes have crashed through the Midwest and south yesterday and today killing at least six people the deaths range from Oklahoma to Louisiana on Wall Street the Dow Jones industrials are up one hundred eighteen points or about half of a percent you're listening to NPR news from the David Barnett foundation news from here at KCRW I'm Terry Glaser LA mayor Eric Garcetti says corona virus tests will be available for all essential workers in the area starting today health care professionals grocery store workers first responders and critical government personnel can get a test even if you don't have symptoms the region is expected to have its first heat wave over the weekend with temperatures in some spots heading into the nineties both the mayor and LA police chief Michael Moore are warning people to stay away from parks and beaches to slow the spread of covert nineteen Garcetti says the city will open cooling centers if needed several nearby counties have allowed some public spaces to remain open said he says he respects that some communities are different by an outbreak that happens in a neighboring county will affect us it'll come here Garcetti says the protest open up businesses don't factor into his decisions and that he's relying on science and the guidance of county health officials the only city council is moving ahead with a plan to protect rental units in the city covered by rent stabilization from rent increases for a full year initially some members of the council wanted to extend a rent freeze to all residential units in the city but the legality of that came into question the ordinance the council seeking would prevent rent hikes on units built in nineteen seventy eight or earlier LA tenants are currently protected from no fault evictions until the end of the health emergency once the crisis eases residential renters will have a year to pay back rent that may have been missed as a result of the pandemic the city attorney's office has a month to draft the ordinance preventing rent increases on certain older units it would then go back to the council for a vote the California department of public health is quietly released guidelines to answer the troubling ethical question of who lives and who dies if California experiences a new surge in the corona virus outbreak case you're Debbie cerise council has the details on how hospitals could address that medical dilemma officials say the California's limited hospitalization compared to other states is a good sign that the plan will never be implemented but some counties have experienced a second wave of infections which means the state could be vulnerable if social distancing restrictions are eased prematurely the guidelines advise hospitals to develop a team to make determinations on who receives care if necessary younger people and workers who are quote vital to the acute care response will receive care before others workers will be given priority if there's a tie between patients who can't be treated hospitals could eventually also turned to a random lottery system of ties persist California officials have sought an additional fifty thousand beds and ten thousand ventilators in anticipation of a peak of infections next month for KCRW I'm cerise castle and if you look at the waters off of Long Beach you might think there was some kind of ship graveyard floating near the coast with corona virus driving the demand for oil to record lows a fleet of tankers is Idoling in California waters with nowhere to go storage facilities are nearly full refineries both here and in northern California stop processing crude oil estate home orders put a lid on the demand for gasoline the only times reports more than twenty million barrels worth of oil is parked in tankers along the west coast support for NPR comes from the corporation for public broadcasting and the estate of Joan Kroc whose request serves as an enduring investment in the future of public radio it's seven of seven this is morning edition from NPR news I'm David Greene and I'm no well king good morning when will a covert nineteen vaccine be ready some vaccine developers are already testing on humans but it's probably going to be many months still experts say we need to plan now for the day of vaccine is available NPR science correspondent Joe Palca has been talking to them Hey Joe Hey Noel still experts say we need to plan now what sort of planning needs to be happening right now well there's a lot to consider maybe we can start with manufacturing okay so let's say a vaccine sales through testing great okay we need a billion doses of it well you can't wait till the end of the testing and say oh yeah now what you thought of that they're thinking about it now and the interesting thing is that we are building capacity but companies now and people who are investing in them now Hey we may never days our candidate may never make it so we're building this capacity and it may never be used so it's kind of an interesting conundrum yeah it really is it once we have a vaccine what will early distribution look like who gets it well I talk with the Bruce callin about that he's the head of global immunization at the Sabin vaccine institute when vaccines first available the supplies we limited the demand will be a lot more and then how do you manage that going used to be in government he says when there was a threat of a major flu pandemic they discussed how to prioritize who goes first clearly among the top where healthcare workers and people who provide community services the things that keeps society going there's the security sector whether that's international security or other military and then there's people who are part of society's critical infrastructure and as we've been learning they may not be the people who necessarily spring to mind as critical but I'm talking about people like grocery store employees and delivery truck drivers and people whose stock shelves and then you've got to think about in health terms so do you give it to people who are most vulnerable to give it to the elderly they're they're just not a whole raft of interesting issues that have to be grappled with okay so let's say we get to a day where we've got the vaccine we've gotten to the point where we can mass produce it and then it has to get to people all across the world how is that going to work yeah well you can imagine it's it's a low just tackle challenging of a enormous dimensions but it's also a financial challenge I mean this is not going to come for free and the question is okay so developed countries like the United States maybe we can spend billions of dollars but what about low resource countries well we have to figure that out and you know part of it is equity and doing the right thing and part of it is just then lighten self interest because this virus doesn't know anything about global borders and when air travel opens back up again all right you can bring a virus from anywhere in the world anywhere else in the world pretty quick and so it's important to take this as a global problem say experts are talking to you about this they're talking to each other about this are these kinds of discussions happening with governments with our governor mint well absolutely absolutely there are NGOs are involved the international financial organizations of all governments are involved we just had a monkey wrench thrown into the works here a bit it's a little hard to say what the impact will be but a federal scientist named Richard bright who is focused on vaccine development says he was removed from his post a key post in the vaccine development and he said in a statement that his lawyer has specifically cited push back he was pushing back against unproven potential treatments that president trump had repeatedly advocated for during White House briefings now you would think that in a global pandemic situation the World Health Organization might be the coordinating agency for taking care of this but this administration has shown the disdain our lack of faith in WHL a lot of hurdles and Pierce Joe Palca thanks to you're welcome the US China relationship has become a.

White House NPR
"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Org health care workers fighting Coburg nineteen are still facing shortages of personal protective equipment but some are worried about the risks of speaking out this led in some instances to removal of chefs they've had conversations with their administration that have not led to the changes they wanted to see I'm Lizzie o'leary and that's next time on the take away weekday afternoons at three on ninety three point nine FM this is morning edition from NPR news I'm David Greene and I'm no well king good morning when will a covert nineteen vaccine be ready some vaccine developers are already testing on humans but it's probably going to be many months still experts say we need to plan now for the day of vaccine is available and here science correspondent Joe Palca has been talking to them Hey Joe Hey no well still experts say we need to plan now what sort of planning needs to be happening right now well there's a lot to consider maybe we can start with manufacturing okay so let's say a vaccine sales through testing great okay we need a billion doses of it well you can't wait till the end of the testing and say oh yeah now with the thought of that they're thinking about it now the interesting thing is that we are building capacity but companies now and people who are investing in them now Hey we may never these are candidate may never make it so we're building this capacity and it may never be used so it's kind of an interesting conundrum yeah it really is it once we have a vaccine what will early distribution look like who gets it well I talk with a bruise callin about that he's the head of global immunization at the Sabin vaccine institute when vaccines first available the supplies we limited the demand will be a lot more and then how do you manage that going used to be in government he says when there was a threat of a major flu pandemic they discussed how to prioritize who goes first clearly among the top where healthcare workers and people who provide community services the things that keeps society going there's the security sector whether that's international security or the military and then there's people who are part of society's critical infrastructure and as we've been learning they may not be the people who necessarily spring to mind as critical but I'm talking about people like grocery store employees and delivery truck drivers and people whose stock shelves and then you've got to think about in health terms so you give it to people who are most vulnerable to give it to the elderly they're they're just such a whole raft of interesting issues that have to be grappled with okay so let's say we get to a day where we've got the vaccine we've gotten to the point where we can mass produce it and then it has to get to people all across the world how is that going to work yeah well you can imagine it's it's a low just tackle challenging of an enormous dimensions but it's also a financial challenge I mean this is not going to come for free and the question is okay so developed countries like the United States maybe we can spend billions of dollars but what about low resource countries well we have to figure that out and you know part of it is equity and doing the right thing and part of it is just enlightened self interest because this virus doesn't know anything about global borders and when air travel opens back up again all right you can bring a virus from anywhere in the world anywhere else in the world pretty quick and so it's important to take this as a global problem say experts are talking to you about this they're talking to each other about this are these kinds of discussions happening with governments with our governor mint well absolutely absolutely there are NGOs are involved the international financial organizations of all governments are involved we just had a monkey wrench thrown into the works here a bit it's a little hard to say what the impact will be but a federal scientist named Richard Bryan who is focused on vaccine development says he was removed from his post a key post in the vaccine development and he said in a statement that his lawyer has specifically cited push back he was pushing back against unproven potential treatments that president trump had repeatedly advocated for during White House briefings now you would think that in a global pandemic situation the World Health Organization might be the coordinating agency for taking care of this but this administration has shown disdain our lack of faith in WHL a lot of hurdles and P. are still packing thanks to you're welcome the US China relationship has become a central issue in the presidential election year and president trump likes to suggest the former vice president Joe Biden is too close to Chinese leaders but the Biden campaign says the president hasn't helped China accountable for the corona virus pandemic here's NPR's us my father when the president is criticized for how he has handled the corona virus outbreak hello often point a finger at China there's nobody ever been tougher on China than me in fact the president says he got elected in twenty sixteen but because of his tough talk on China specifically trait in twenty twenty he's accusing his democratic opponent Joe Biden as being weak on China but the fight over who's tough on China is no longer just about long standing trade concerns it's also about this pandemic that originated in China here's a recent ad from America first a super pacs supporting president trump but the.

"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on KCRW

"Road a compound semi taking up the right lane it's five oh seven this is morning edition from NPR news I'm David Greene and I'm no well king good morning when will a covert nineteen vaccine be ready some vaccine developers are already testing on humans but it's probably going to be many months still experts say we need to plan now for the day of vaccine is available and here science correspondent Joe Palca has been talking to them Hey Joe Hey Noel still experts say we need to plan now what sort of planning needs to be happening right now well there's a lot to consider maybe we can start with manufacturing okay so let's say a vaccine sales through testing great okay we need a billion doses of it well you can't wait till the end of the testing and say oh yeah now what you thought of that they're thinking about it now the interesting thing is they are building capacity but companies now and people who are investing in them now Hey we may never days our candidate may never make it so we're building this capacity and it may never be used so it's kind of an interesting conundrum yeah it really is it once we have a vaccine what will early distribution look like who gets it well I talk with a bruise callin about that he's the head of global immunization at the Sabin vaccine institute when vaccines first available the supplies we limited the demand will be a lot more and then how do you manage that going used to be in government he says when there was a threat of a major flu pandemic they discussed how to prioritize who goes first clearly among the top where healthcare workers and people who provide community services the things that keeps society going there's the security sector whether that's international security or other military and then there's people who are part of society's critical infrastructure and as we've been learning they may not be the people who necessarily spring to mind as critical but I'm talking about people like grocery store employees and delivery truck drivers and people whose stock shelves and then you've got to think about in health terms so you give it to people who are most vulnerable to give it to the elderly they're they're just such a whole raft of interesting issues that have to be grappled with okay so let's say we get to a day where we've got the vaccine we've gotten to the point where we can mass produce it and then it has to get to people all across the world how is that going to work yeah well you can imagine it's it's a low just tackle challenging up of a enormous dimensions but it's also a financial challenge I mean this is not going to come for free and the question is okay so developed countries like the United States maybe we can spend billions of dollars but what about low resource countries well we have to figure that out and you know part of it is equity and doing the right thing and part of it is just enlightened self interest because this virus doesn't know anything about global borders and when air travel opens back up again all right you can bring a virus from anywhere in the world anywhere else in the world pretty quick and so it's important to take this as a global problem the experts are talking to you about this they're talking to each other about this are these kinds of discussions happening with governments with our government well absolutely absolutely there are NGOs are involved the international financial organizations of all governments are involved we just had a monkey wrench thrown into the works here a bit it's a little hard to say what the impact will be but a federal scientist named Richard bright who is focused on vaccine development says he was removed from his post a key post in the vaccine development and he said in a statement that his lawyer has specifically cited push back he was pushing back against unproven potential treatments that president trump had repeatedly advocated for during White House briefings now you would think that in a global pandemic situation the World Health Organization might be the coordinating agency for taking care of this but this administration has shown disdain our lack of faith in WHL a lot of hurdles and Pierce Joe Palca thanks to you're welcome the US China relationship has become a central issue in the presidential election year and president trump likes to suggest the former vice president Joe Biden is too close to Chinese leaders but the Biden campaign says the president hasn't helped China accountable for the corona virus pandemic here's NPR's us my college when the president is criticized for how he has handled the corona virus outbreak hello often point a finger at China there's nobody ever been tougher on China than me in fact the president says he got elected in twenty sixteen but because of his tough talk on China specifically trade in twenty twenty he's accusing his democratic opponent Joe Biden as being weak on China but the fight over who's tough on China is no longer just about long standing trade concerns it's also about this pandemic that originated in China here's a recent ad from America first a super pacs supporting president trump do the.

David Greene NPR
"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:45 min | 2 years ago

"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"More men appear to be dying from Hove in nineteen than women a researcher explains why that might be happening Vermont says it'll start opening back up carefully and health workers who don't have protective masks give snorkel so try it's Thursday April twenty third the actor Dev Patel is thirty today in the news is next live from NPR news I'm korva Coleman the house will vote today on a nearly half a trillion dollar measure to add more money to a new small business lending program aimed at keeping businesses afloat during the pandemic the legislation also includes more money for hospitals and B. R. Susan Davis has more the plan includes three hundred and ten billion for the small business lending program but there are already concerns it will run out of money again fast the first influx of three hundred and fifty billion for this new program ran out in just two weeks lawmakers are already talking about the next piece of legislation that will be necessary to prop up the U. S. economy party leaders and the White House are publicly discussing another round of direct payments to Americans extending unemployment benefits providing aid to states and local governments a new infrastructure spending once this legislation is approved by Congress today Washington will have spent more than two point seven trillion dollars in less than two months to combat the coronavirus and provide economic relief Susan Davis NPR news Washington the top official in charge of the federal agency that develops vaccines says he was forced out of his job by the trump administration Dr Rick bright says he was removed because he pushed back against the use of an anti malarial drugs to treat covert nineteen that was touted by president trump and peers Brian Naylor has more right was director of the biomedical advanced research and development authority in a statement he says he was involuntarily transferred from that post to a lower level job at the national institutes of health he says he had insisted that the government invest the billions of dollars allocated by Congress to address the corona virus pandemic into safe and scientifically vetted solutions and not in drugs and other technologies that lacks scientific merit that's an apparent reference to anti malarial drugs that trump has said should be used to treat covert nineteen right says he's speaking out because in his words to combat this deadly virus science not politics or cronyism has to lead the way Brian Naylor NPR news suspected tornadoes have killed at least six people across the south from Oklahoma to Mississippi from Houston public media Davis land reports on damage in Texas the tornado flattened homes and brought down power lines search and rescue teams in Polk County Texas were digging through the rubble overnight in the small town of on Alaska at least three people were killed between twenty and thirty injured according to Polk County officials thousands were left without power emergency officials initially told people to shelter at a nearby high school then the school lost power and people had to move to a gem in the next town over Polk County has issued a disaster declaration and Texas governor Greg Abbott has deployed state resources to the area Davis land reporting this is NPR the labor department will release its report on weekly jobless claims this hour in the past several weeks more than twenty two million people have filed unemployment claims as the pandemic ramps up Harvard says it will not seek nor will it accept millions of dollars it wasn't mine to receive as part of a corona virus relief package from member station WGBH Kerr carapace of reports the decision comes after a very public spat with president trump Hubbard was slated to receive nearly nine million dollars from the fourteen billion dollar pool designated for colleges in the cares act that president trump signed last month on Tuesday trump aronie Asli said Harvard should return stimulus money intended for small businesses harbored bristled at the claim that it took or even applied for coronavirus stimulus money meant for small businesses now Harvard says it's decided not to accept any of the funds for colleges instead it will encourage the U. S. education department to reallocate the money to Massachusetts institutions that are struggling to serve their communities Stanford and Princeton have also said they won't take any federal relief money for NPR news I'm Kerr characters that in Boston officials with the royal Canadian Mounted Police say they believe a gunman acted alone in the deaths of twenty two people last weekend in Nova Scotia the mass shooting was the deadliest in modern Canadian history officials want to know if the gunman had help in obtaining a fake police uniform and a fake police vehicle I'm korva Coleman NPR news support for NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include the corporation for public broadcasting and the estate of Joan Kroc whose request serves as an enduring investment in the future of public radio and the John D. and Catherine T. macarthur foundation at mac founder dot org this is morning edition from NPR news I'm David Greene and I'm no well king good morning when will a covert nineteen vaccine be ready some vaccine developers are already testing on humans but it's probably going to be many months still experts say we need to plan now for the day of vaccine is available and here science correspondent Joe Palca has been talking to them Hey Joe Hey Noel still experts say we need to plan now what sort of planning needs to be happening right now well there's a lot to consider maybe we can start with manufacturing okay so let's say a vaccine sales through testing great okay we need a billion doses of it well you can't wait till the end of the testing and say all we are not what you thought of that they're thinking about it now the interesting thing is they are building capacity but companies now and people who are investing in them now Hey we may never days our candidate may never make it so we're building this capacity and it may never be used so it's kind of an interesting conundrum yeah it really is it once we have a vaccine what will early distribution look like who gets it well I talk with our Bruce callin about that he's the head of global immunization at the Sabin vaccine institute when vaccines first available the supplies we limited the demand will be a lot more and then how do you manage that going used to be in government he says when there was a threat of a major flu pandemic they discussed how to prioritize who goes first clearly among the top where healthcare workers and people who provide community services the things that keeps society going there's the security sector whether that's your national security or the military and then there's people who are part of society's critical infrastructure and as we've been learning they may not be the people who necessarily spring to mind as critical but I'm talking about people like grocery store employees and delivery truck drivers and people whose stock shelves and then you've got to think about in health terms so do you give it to people who are most vulnerable to give it to the elderly they're they're just not a whole raft of interesting issues that have to be grappled with okay so let's say we get to a day where we've got the vaccine we've gotten to the point where we can mass produce it and then it has to get to people all across the world how is that going to work yeah well you can imagine it's it's a low just tackle challenges of a enormous dimensions but it's also a financial challenge I mean this is not going to come for free and the question is okay so developed countries like the United States maybe we can spend billions of dollars but what about low resource countries well we have to figure that out and you know part of it is equity and doing the right thing and part of it is just enlightened self interest because this virus doesn't know anything about global borders and when air travel opens back up again all right you can bring a virus from anywhere in the world anywhere else in the world pretty quick and so it's important to take this as a global problem experts are talking to you about this they're talking to each other about this are these kinds of discussions happening with governments with our government well absolutely absolutely there are NGOs are involved the international financial organizations of all governments are involved we just had a monkey wrench thrown into the works here a bit it's a little hard to say what the impact will be but a federal scientist named Richard bright who is focused on vaccine development says he was removed from his post I am a key post in the vaccine development and he said in a statement that his lawyer has specifically cited pushed back he was pushing back against unproven potential treatments that president trump had repeatedly advocated for during White House briefings now you would think that in a global pandemic situation the World Health Organization might be the coordinating agency for taking care of this but this administration has shown at this stage in our lack of faith in WHL a lot of hurdles and P. are still talking thanks to you're welcome the US China relationship has become a central issue in the presidential election year and president trump likes to suggest the former vice president Joe Biden is too close to Chinese leaders but the Biden campaign says the president hasn't helped China accountable for the corona virus pandemic here's NPR's us my college when the president is criticized for how he has handled the corona virus outbreak hello often point a finger at China there's nobody ever been tougher on China than me in fact the president says he got elected in twenty sixteen but because of his tough talk on China specifically trait in twenty twenty he's accusing his democratic opponent Joe Biden as being weak on China but the fight over who's tough on China is no longer just about long standing trade concerns it's also about this pandemic that originated in China here's a recent ad from America first as super pacs supporting president trump do the.

Hove researcher Vermont
"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To be in the conjoined after discovering in the film straight all of that follows a young woman becomes caught practicing room while working at the motel housekeeper three host of PBS art assignment here's ideas a prompt for craft projects and take your calls I'm not doing all of this on the this is morning edition from NPR news I'm David Greene and I'm no well king good morning when will a covert nineteen vaccine be ready some vaccine developers are already testing on humans but it's probably going to be many months still experts say we need to plan now for the day of vaccine is available NPR science correspondent Joe Palca has been talking to them Hey Joe Hey no well still experts say we need to plan now what sort of planning needs to be happening right now well there's a lot to consider maybe we can start with manufacturing okay so let's say a vaccine sales through testing great okay we need a billion doses of it well you can't wait till the end of the testing and say all you know not what you thought of that they're thinking about it now the interesting thing is they are building capacity but companies now and people who are investing in them now Hey we may never these are candidate may never make it so we're building this capacity and it may never be used so it's kind of an interesting conundrum yeah it really is it once we have a vaccine what will early distribution look like who gets it well I talk with the Bruce callin about that he's the head of global immunization at the Sabin vaccine institute when vaccines first available the supplies we limited the demand will be a lot more and then how do you manage that Callon used to be in government he says when there was a threat of a major flu pandemic they discussed how to prioritize who goes first clearly among the top where healthcare workers and people who provide community services the things that keeps society going there's the security sector whether that's international security or other military and then there's people who are part of society's critical infrastructure and as we've been learning they may not be the people who necessarily spring to mind as critical but I'm talking about people like grocery store employees and delivery truck drivers and people whose stock shelves and then you've got to think about in health terms so do you give it to people who are most vulnerable to give it to the elderly they're they're just not a whole raft of interesting issues that have to be grappled with okay so let's say we get to a day where we've got the vaccine we've gotten to the point where we can mass produce it and then it has to get to people all across the world how is that going to work yeah well you can imagine it's it's a low just tackle challenges of a enormous but for dimensions but it's also a financial challenge I mean this is not going to come for free and the question is okay so developed countries like the United States maybe we can spend billions of dollars but what about low resource countries well we have to figure that out and you know part of it is equity and doing the right thing and part of it is just enlightened self interest because this virus doesn't know anything about global borders and when air travel opens back up again all right you can bring a virus from anywhere in the world anywhere else in the world pretty quick and so it's important to take this as a global problem say experts are talking to you about this they're talking to each other about this are these kinds of discussions happening with governments with our government well absolutely absolutely there are NGOs are involved the international financial organizations of all governments are involved we just had a monkey wrench thrown into the works here a bit it's a little hard to say what the impact will be but a federal scientist named Richard bright who is focused on vaccine development says he was removed from his post at a key post in the vaccine development and he said in a statement that his lawyer has specifically cited pushed back he was pushing back against unproven potential treatments that president trump had repeatedly advocated for during White House briefings now you would think that in a global pandemic situation the World Health Organization might be the coordinating agency for taking care of this but this administration has shown disdain our lack of faith in WHL a lot of hurdles in here still talk thanks to I'm the US China relationship has become a central issue in the presidential election year and president trump likes to suggest the former vice president Joe Biden is too close to Chinese leaders but the Biden campaign says the president hasn't helped China accountable for the corona virus pandemic here's and here's us my college when the president is criticized for how he has handled the corona virus outbreak hello often point a finger at China there's nobody ever been tougher on China than me in fact the president says he got elected in twenty sixteen and because of his tough talk on China specifically trait in twenty twenty he's accusing his democratic opponent Joe Biden as being weak on China but the fight over who's tough on China is no longer just about long standing trade concerns it's also about this pandemic that originated in China here's a recent ad from America first a super pacs supporting president trump the.

"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:39 min | 2 years ago

"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on KCRW

"Workers face covered nineteen every day we spoke with the UCLA nurse about a month ago and she had this morning everybody gets to get one it's just like a grocery stores all going to start paying time finding things on the shelves are empty right we have nothing to the hospital for there's only so much real estate did her fears come true I Madeline Brandon update from the front lines today at noon on press play on KCRW one woman only unto the point the corona virus pandemic is changing the way we live in reality we're probably doing things here three years has of what we might if it's on the other one a set includes online shopping but is it always ethical on are to the point podcast time Israel seven this is morning edition from NPR news I'm David Greene and I'm no well king good morning when will a covert nineteen vaccine be ready some vaccine developers are already testing on humans but it's probably going to be many months still experts say we need to plan now for the day of vaccine is available NPR science correspondent Joe Palca has been talking to them Hey Joe Hey no well still experts say we need to plan now what sort of planning needs to be happening right now well there's a lot to consider maybe we can start with manufacturing okay so let's say a vaccine sales through testing great okay we need a billion doses of it well you can't wait till the end of the testing and say oh yeah now what you thought of that they're thinking about it now the interesting thing is they are building capacity but companies now and people who are investing in them now Hey we may never days our candidate may never make it so we're building this capacity and it may never be used so it's kind of an interesting conundrum yeah it really is it once we have a vaccine what will early distribution look like who gets it well I talk with a bruise callin about that he's the head of global immunization at the Sabin vaccine institute when vaccines first available the supplies we limited the demand will be a lot more and then how do you manage that cal and used to be in government he says when there was a threat of a major flu pandemic they discussed how to prioritize who goes first clearly among the top where healthcare workers and people who provide community services the things that keeps society going there's the security sector whether that's international security or other military and then there's people who are part of society's critical infrastructure and as we've been learning they may not be the people who necessarily spring to mind as critical but I'm talking about people like grocery store employees and delivery truck drivers and people whose stock shelves and then you've got to think about in health terms so do you give it to people who are most vulnerable to give it to the elderly they're they're just not a whole raft of interesting issues that have to be grappled with okay so let's say we get to a day where we've got the vaccine we've gotten to the point where we can mass produce it and then it has to get to people all across the world how is that going to work yeah well you can imagine it's it's a low just tackle challenging of a enormous but dimensions but it's also a financial challenge I mean this is not going to come for free and the question is okay so developed countries like the United States maybe we can spend billions of dollars but what about low resource countries well we have to figure that out and you know part of it is equity and doing the right thing and part of it is just then lighten self interest because this virus doesn't know anything about global borders and when air travel opens back up again all right you can bring a virus from anywhere in the world anywhere else in the world pretty quick and so it's important to take this as a global problem say experts are talking to you about this they're talking to each other about this are these kinds of discussions happening with governments with our government well absolutely absolutely there are NGOs are involved the international financial organizations of all governments are involved we just had a monkey wrench thrown into the works here a bit it's a little hard to say what the impact will be but a federal scientist named Richard bright who is focused on vaccine development says he was removed from his post a key post in the vaccine development and he said in a statement that his lawyer has specifically cited push back he was pushing back against unproven potential treatments that president trump had repeatedly advocated for during White House briefings now you would think that in a global pandemic situation the World Health Organization might be the coordinating agency for taking care of this but this administration has shown disdain our lack of faith in WHL a lot of hurdles and Pierce Joe Palca thanks to I'm the US China relationship has become a central issue in the presidential election year and president trump likes to suggest the former vice president Joe Biden is too close to Chinese leaders but the Biden campaign says the president hasn't helped China accountable for the corona virus pandemic here's NPR's us my college when the president is criticized for how he has handled the corona virus outbreak hello often point a finger at China there's nobody ever been tougher on China than me in fact the president says he got elected in twenty sixteen but because of his tough talk on China specifically trade in twenty twenty he's accusing his democratic opponent Joe Biden as being weak on China but the fight over who's tough on China is no longer just about long standing trade concerns it's also about this pandemic that originated in China here's a recent ad from America first a super pacs supporting president trump do.

UCLA
"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Stories you need to know about that's next time on the California report this is morning edition from NPR news I'm David Greene and I'm no well king good morning when will a covert nineteen vaccine be ready some vaccine developers are already testing on humans but it's probably going to be many months still experts say we need to plan now for the day of vaccine is available and here science correspondent Joe Palca has been talking to them Hey Joe Hey no well still experts say we need to plan now what sort of planning needs to be happening right now well there's a lot to consider maybe we can start with manufacturing okay so let's say a vaccine sales through testing great okay we need a billion doses of it well you can't wait till the end of the testing and say oh yeah I know what you thought of that they're thinking about it now the interesting thing is they are building capacity but companies know and people who are investing in them now Hey we may never days our candidate may never make it so we're building this capacity and it may never be used so it's kind of an interesting conundrum yeah it really is it once we have a vaccine what will early distribution look like who gets it well I talk with a bruise callin about that he's the head of global immunization at the Sabin vaccine institute when vaccines first available the supplies we limited the demand will be a lot more and then how do you manage that Karen Hughes to be in government he says when there was a threat of a major flu pandemic they discussed how to prioritize who goes first clearly among the top where healthcare workers and people who provide community services the things that keeps society going there's the security sector whether that's international security or other military and then there's people who are part of society's critical infrastructure and as we've been learning they may not be the people who necessarily spring to mind as critical but I'm talking about people like grocery store employees and delivery truck drivers and people whose stock shelves and then you've got to think about in health terms so you give it to people who are most vulnerable to give it to the elderly they're they're just not a whole raft of interesting issues that have to be grappled with okay so let's say we get to a day where we've got the vaccine we've gotten to the point where we can mass produce it and then it has to get to people all across the world how is that going to work yeah well you can imagine it's it's a low just tackle challenges of a enormous put front dimensions but it's also a financial challenge I mean this is not going to come for free and the question is okay so developed countries like the United States maybe we can spend billions of dollars but what about low resource countries well we have to figure that out and you know part of it is equity and doing the right thing and part of it is just enlightened self interest because this virus doesn't know anything about global borders and when air travel opens back up again all right you can bring a virus from anywhere in the world anywhere else in the world pretty quick and so it's important to take this as a global problem so experts are talking to you about this they're talking to each other about this are these kinds of discussions happening with governments with our government well absolutely absolutely there are NGOs are involved the international financial organizations of all governments are involved we just had a monkey wrench thrown into the works here a bit it's a little hard to say what the impact will be but a federal scientist named Richard bright who is focused on vaccine development says he was removed from his post as a key post in the vaccine development and he said in a statement that his lawyer has specifically cited pushed back he was pushing back against unproven potential treatments that president trump had repeatedly advocated for during White House briefings now you would think that in a global pandemic situation the World Health Organization might be the coordinating agency for taking care of this but this administration has shown at this stage in our lack of faith in WHL a lot of hurdles and P. are still talking thanks to I'm the US China relationship has become a central issue in the presidential election year and president trump likes to suggest the former vice president Joe Biden is too close to Chinese leaders but the Biden campaign says the president hasn't helped China accountable for the corona virus pandemic here's NPR's us my college when the president is criticized for how he has handled the corona virus outbreak hello often point a finger at China there's nobody ever been tougher on China than me in fact the president says he got elected in twenty sixteen but because of his tough talk on China specifically trait in twenty twenty he's accusing his democratic opponent Joe Biden as being weak on China but the fight over who's tough on China is no longer just about long standing trade concerns it's also about this pandemic that originated in China here's a recent ad from America first a super pacs supporting president trump do.

David Greene California NPR
"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"sabin vaccine institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Right a big question here when will a vaccine to be ready scientists around the world are working as quickly as they can yeah and some vaccine developers are already testing on humans but even if these initial tests go smoothly we probably won't have a vaccine for widespread distribution for many months still experts are saying that it is important to start planning right now for the day when a vaccine does become available because not everyone is gonna have access to it right away NPR science correspondent Joe Palca has been covering this Joe let's jump right in vaccine developers are getting ready for the day we have a vaccine what are they getting ready for exactly well they're gonna have to think about how you gonna make it I mean let's say a vaccine sales to the testing okay great we've got a but but certainly we need a billion doses where you can't just press a button overnight you have to start the building manufacturing capacity now and the interesting thing is that companies are doing that but some of them know that the vaccine that they're going to be making will never make it to market but they're still going to build these facilities so you have to build capacity and take risks and then we do have a vaccine is it as easy as just given it to everyone yeah it's not obviously I talked to Bruce gallon about that he's head of global immunization at the Sabin vaccine institute and he says that when the vaccine is first available supplies will be limited but demand obviously will be high so how do you manage that well gallon used to work in government and said that when there was the threat of a major flu pandemic they discussed how to prioritize who goes first clearly among the top where healthcare workers and people who provide community services the things that keeps society going there's the security sector whether that's international security or other military and then there's the people who are part of society's critical infrastructure and as we're learning they may not be people who necessarily spring to mind is critical I mean I'm talking about grocery store employees delivery truck drivers stock shelves so then when you think about in health terms you have to think about who is most vulnerable to infection maybe the elderly should get the vaccine first or maybe it's something to decide on who's the sickest so there's a lot of questions to answer including how you pay for this right because it sounds like it's going to be expensive well obviously yes it's going to be very expensive I mean billions and billions and and that may not be the it's such a huge problem for developed countries but what about low resource countries I mean there are questions of equity there are questions of self interest too I mean the virus doesn't know anything about borders and once global travel starts again people can go anywhere in a matter of hours so you could possibly have it re introduced into this country so there's going to have to be discussions about how how you do it how it's paid for who's going to pay for it and how to make sure that everybody in the world gets a chance to get it get their hands on it and receive it.

Fighting Coronavirus with Dr Bruce Gellin

Inside Jaws

04:23 min | 2 years ago

Fighting Coronavirus with Dr Bruce Gellin

"Bruce Gallon welcome to fight in corona virus from American innovations. Sivas great to be with you. Thanks thank you. You're you're our inaugural guest here and we couldn't have a better. I won So many questions to ask you but I thought we'd just start with a question that everybody is asking everyone which is like how are you doing right? I mean I'm right now. I'm in a closet in my apartment in Brooklyn not for corn reasons. Just 'cause the acoustics are better than here but where are you and what is your day to day life like right now so thanks so. I'm at my home in Washington. Dc and a lot of us. We do a lot of work at home but also going to have to do some other things. I think that probably spring cleaning will never be the same because these endless listed chores seem to be multiple. Glad you're getting something productive. That's that's great. I want to turn to vaccines. You're at the Sabin Vaccine Institute. What is the state of play? Do you think now. In terms of Cova Nineteen vaccine development. This is a very important question is top of mind and there are a number of approaches being taken a you know. That's that's encouraging that the state of technology is such that if people think they have an idea on approach that they could take. Let's go for it and so there are twenty five or thirty or more ideas. What are called candidate vaccines that are at least being considered some have already started? Clinical trials others are still working away into the system. They may be ideas that people haven't thought of before but I think that's where in past investments in science and biotechnology plus ingenuity at a time of crisis. Like this brings out all kinds of ideas. So I'm encouraged by that as a general principle but at the same time. It's important that these vaccines are evaluated. So that they actually should. They be used perform as expected to to provide the immune response that we think will protect people and are safe enough to give to millions and millions if not billions of people around the world. What the breakthroughs that we need to actually radically accelerate this process. Like is there some scenario in ten years or twenty years where we're able to almost simultaneously develop a vaccine? Is there like a machine learning element to this kind of simulation element to it? Where you could actually simulate a clinical trial with enough computing power or something? I mean it. The ideal scenario would be an emerging viruses shows up and you know ten days later were producing a vaccine in in bulk. Is that ever going to be a possibility? You know. I don't want to never and I getting to that. It's GonNa take some time. I think the first part of that is is to make sure that we have as clear understanding of the human immune system in the human immune response to these to these pathogens as possible because while we can design vaccines that we think are the right thing. It's up to the immune system to actually do the right thing to create immune response. That'd be protective on the vaccine side. We need to have as many different approaches. What are referred to platform technologies ways to make vaccines? People are very familiar with influenza. Vaccines that for a long time until very recently were made only eggs and insert as it were quite well. We we knew how to make it. We knew how they performed. We knew that they create an immunity. We knew they were safe. But we needed to have different systems to create that and the idea of different platform technologies. Because not all vaccines can be developed in these same platforms. Corona viruses aren't gonNA work in an egg system for example and developing as many of these different platforms as possible is GonNa be cake. That's beginning to happen now. I was saying somewhere the other day. The idea of beginning the ramp up to mass production while the clinical trials are happening. So yes you may potentially waste some mass production cycles on a vaccine. That doesn't end up performing as well as we'd hoped but when you do have the one that does perform you're ready to go. You don't have the kind of ramp time. Is that a potential scenario. I think you're exactly right and while there is that a clearly the risk of building something. That isn't the right fit Given what's at stake I think that taking you the technologies that seem most promising and beginning to look hard at what the existing global manufacturing capacity is and when it needs to be and to start to fill those gaps. Is really important

Sabin Vaccine Institute Bruce Gallon Brooklyn DC Washington