18 Burst results for "Saas Business"

"saas business" Discussed on The Tropical MBA Podcast

The Tropical MBA Podcast

02:48 min | 6 months ago

"saas business" Discussed on The Tropical MBA Podcast

"In in a failed. <Speech_Male> Because, <Speech_Male> we weren't talking to our customers <Speech_Male> enough. <Speech_Male> If, you're letting <Speech_Male> the market, drive your product <Speech_Male> development <Speech_Male> I. Think you're GonNa give place <Speech_Male> and I think that's <Speech_Male> what Simon saying. If you <Speech_Male> let your developers drive <Speech_Male> the product, <Speech_Male> you might not end <Speech_Male> up with anybody seeing <Speech_Male> it because nobody's <Speech_Male> talking about <Silence> because nobody needs it. <Speech_Male> You're building the <Speech_Male> the beautiful contraption <Speech_Male> that nobody <Speech_Male> wants. Yeah <Speech_Male> and the interesting <Speech_Male> thing though is like <Speech_Male> when you say <Speech_Male> you know listening to the market <Speech_Male> or whatever. <Speech_Male> Don't actually <Speech_Male> mean listening <Speech_Male> to the market <Speech_Male> no I mean <Speech_Male> talking to the market <Speech_Male> and then asking <Speech_Male> them for money. <Speech_Male> That's the talk. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> If you build <Speech_Male> something beautiful <Speech_Male> and you put people in it <Speech_Male> and you say, do you think this is <Speech_Male> beautiful a lot of times <Silence> I'll just say yeah. <Speech_Male> It doesn't <Speech_Male> mean they're going to buy <Speech_Male> it right? It <Speech_Male> doesn't mean they're gonNA use <Speech_Male> it efficiently. It doesn't <Speech_Male> mean it's GonNa make them money <Silence> or they're going to stick with <Speech_Male> it. and. <Speech_Male> So that is <Speech_Male> the key to me that <Speech_Male> I think marketers can <Speech_Male> bring to the table in terms <Speech_Male> of product development <Speech_Male> that sense <Speech_Male> of like what <Speech_Male> people are actually <Speech_Male> doing out <Speech_Male> there in the marketplace <Speech_Male> and how <Speech_Male> the product can sort <Speech_Male> of plug itself <Speech_Male> into that exist <Silence> in behavior. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Well, we just had <Speech_Male> a conversation before we <Silence> flipped on these microphones. <Speech_Male> We've <Speech_Male> kind of identified these <Speech_Male> three subsets of <Silence> customers. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> again, we're like very early <Speech_Male> days. So we're starting <Speech_Male> to China figure out like <Speech_Male> WHO's going to pay US money <Speech_Male> and who's going to be the best customer <Speech_Male> and you <Silence> know what's going to win <Speech_Male> but you know <Speech_Male> the conversation that we had <Speech_Male> okay. We've got these three <Speech_Male> subsets of customers <Speech_Male> like let's put together everything <Speech_Male> that we're doing for <Speech_Male> these people right now <Speech_Male> a lot of them were <Speech_Male> doing it for free and figure <Silence> out if we can charge them free <Speech_Male> of it. <Speech_Male> And then actually got <Silence> charge for it. <Speech_Male> I'm <Speech_Male> starting to believe that <Silence> the earlier <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> can get product <Speech_Male> in front of people, <Speech_Male> and this is probably <Speech_Male> obvious. But the earlier <Speech_Male> you can get product in front <Speech_Male> of people I don't care if the churn <Speech_Male> is seventy, <Speech_Male> five percent <Speech_Male> at least <Speech_Male> you know that they turned <Speech_Male> seventy five percent <Speech_Male> and they're willing to pay <Speech_Male> initially nineteen <Speech_Male> dollars <Speech_Male> because if you <Speech_Male> don't run the experiment, <Speech_Male> you will just <Speech_Male> forever build your <Speech_Male> dream product and I, think <Speech_Male> that's what <Speech_Male> Simon is <Speech_Male> rallying against <Speech_Male> is getting in a situation <Speech_Male> where he's just building <Speech_Male> his dream product and <Speech_Male> has zero market <Speech_Male> intelligence. <Speech_Male> One hundred percent. <Speech_Male> So that's the kind of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> market talking <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> we <Speech_Male> are talking about, and <Speech_Male> hopefully we'll have more to talk <Speech_Male> about with your <Speech_Male> in the coming weeks <Speech_Male> as we continue to <Speech_Male> run experiments <Silence> just for some brief context. <Speech_Male> Simon's <Speech_Male> been working <Speech_Male> with us <Speech_Male> on dynamite jobs <Speech_Male> since early <Speech_Male> in the summer <Speech_Male> and were <Speech_Male> on phone all week <Speech_Male> long. So as a as <Speech_Male> sort of the back <Speech_Male> story <Silence> to what's going on here, <Speech_Male> you know <Speech_Male> Simon's in the day-to-day <Speech_Male> trenches with <Speech_Male> us on DJ <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> pretty exciting. <Speech_Male> That's it for this <Speech_Male> week. Ian, will be back <Speech_Male> next Thursday <Speech_Male> morning I was always and <Speech_Male> a big shout <Speech_Male> out to our sponsor <Speech_Male> smash <Speech_Male> digital <Silence> for checking out the show. Of course, <Speech_Male> there <Speech_Male> are Goto <Speech_Male> Seo <Speech_Male> experts you <Speech_Male> can check them out at Smash <Speech_Male> Digital Dot <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Com <Speech_Music_Male>

Simon product development US Ian China
"saas business" Discussed on The Tropical MBA Podcast

The Tropical MBA Podcast

04:46 min | 6 months ago

"saas business" Discussed on The Tropical MBA Podcast

"It's kind of complicated because you know a lot of Times Hotel Company is a separate entity even separate competent than the hotel. Let US A. That sometimes as to integrate with the hotel, but sometimes doesn't. So it was we saw some opportunities there. And we built a piece of software that we thought was solving a problem for them. I think you know this could be a whole show Dan but basically. A lot of what we're trying to do there was like reengineering problems that didn't need to be solved basically. So that was one mistake in the reason we're making that mistake as we weren't working closely enough with our customers to understand exactly what their needs were. And I think we might be falling a little bit of that right now. But part of what we're building right now is actually new. I, think some of its novel and some of it's risky and I. Think you have to take those types of risk? I? Mean I think you could just go knock off another software product and do everything the exact same. But sometimes if you have insight and I think at the time when we're doing valley up, we didn't really have insight. We're just building what we thought we wanted to happen. You can fail, and so you know this go round Dan I don't know. I feel like we have a little bit more insight because we have been working with these people for. On these specific set of problems for a couple years now whereas in the valley industry were not doing that. It is interesting though to look back and say you know it didn't work out last time. Hopefully, things are different this time and I do think that we are. A lot more engaged in our market, and also we are dog fooding in our market in a way that we weren't in the Valais market where me and you weren't about ready to go get some account set some Sheraton's and Parks Lambeau. So that was not in our future, but very much we would be users and customers and hopefully profitable customers of the software aiming to build right now. So I do think that that's different. We have this sort of innate sense of how we would make money off of it. Yeah. There's a lot of things are different. Honestly I mean just look at the partner dynamics from two thousand fourteen there are very different to. Really I was the one that was driving the product, our other partner in that..

Dan Times Hotel Company partner Valais
"saas business" Discussed on The Tropical MBA Podcast

The Tropical MBA Podcast

04:21 min | 6 months ago

"saas business" Discussed on The Tropical MBA Podcast

"Trying to get complex things done without real software, we're trying to piece together a bunch of.

"saas business" Discussed on The Tropical MBA Podcast

The Tropical MBA Podcast

02:41 min | 6 months ago

"saas business" Discussed on The Tropical MBA Podcast

"It's an unfolding that exists for hundreds of entrepreneurs that listen to the show not just. Me and you these are how careers progress in part of the reason I wanted to underline it you know, for example. Last summer I don't know whether it was like in the DC or what's APP where you knew that Mian were in Barcelona you drop by. And I remember that meeting because we had an office. Adam and the yeah. I think that's the more citizens doctor you last summer in Brazil and I think it was around the time of your you a launching damn ideals and you're looking about like. How would it look like if that would be a big platform and stuff like that? You didn't even talk about job much at the time. Yeah I. Enjoyed that I think. I probably never built a business that would not be. Mostly useful for the DC S. ended up in a circle. You know even the pitches heavily use in the community. Going player and even frame as well and I think that's GonNa like. Bunting long enough. You feel like well, I'm on building businesses that makes sense for these people because they're my friends. That's why even spraying the so nicely, youth and adopted in my circle. He was actually build it other members of damage. Done it also like. Mentors. It's interesting like. Jason Calix recently described on his podcasts where it was an evolve Ravi cons, but rather he was speaking about how important? It is that in San Francisco, everybody's like around each other and they basically are become the early adopters for each other's ideas and projects, and I see a lot of the same sort of thing happening inside the d. c. you just a different culture and a different style of business. Yeah. Don't think we need could be like physically reach other like having the forum and having the same. Culture of the Community GonNA bring us together wherever we are. And these things like leads to interesting relations and you gonNa have to both online. Use of venue actually beat finding person that's where like something really valuable happens you know like somebody not just some idea of business knicks year you know it actually happens. But that moment than you actually met always GonNa like feel the know friendship a button issue. Yup. I don't remember the exact moment but I do remember. We're always chatting on the phone and and in DC and stuff over the years and in person and then. There was a moment like during early Cova where he and I were like really banging our head against like a bunch of bubblegum duct tape. Spreadsheets, you know how people do we're just.

Jason Calix Mian Barcelona Cova Brazil San Francisco Adam
"saas business" Discussed on The Tropical MBA Podcast

The Tropical MBA Podcast

04:00 min | 6 months ago

"saas business" Discussed on The Tropical MBA Podcast

"Digital with eight three, zero, one SEO project, which wasn't a great fit for them. So they referred me to someone who could help and I know that's why we use them. Somebody listens to this pod. Services over its smash digital dot com realities they really know what they're talking about. They've got skin in the game. They use the exact same methods for their clients that they do to their own portfolio of profitable businesses. That's right there practitioners. It's really empowering to deal with experts who are just straight up and honest about what they can and can't do for your rankings and your SEO in general rather than being walked through some cheesy sales process by SEO services built for people who really don't understand the power of SEO or how applies specifically to their business. If have smashed digital in your businesses back pocket or just learn more about what they do check out over at Smash Digital Dot Com. We appreciate the team at smash for sponsoring the show. How and when did you decide to pull the plug on that second startup? Basically about the same with the same for the first one like. Money runs out, you know of invade didn't have enough money in company areas will. I give it my best. You know I can't do it the longer than this because I was losing money. And looking back I mean other things you might have thought about doing differently in retrospect. I don't know. It's always a risk. You know basically I'm. Like startups and startup are. Like a crazy gamble. You know you invest your time and usually like. A year or two at least see any result. It's like a sport that probably like highly addictive some I heard being the founder is even more riskier than be. Actor in Hollywood, which is already super heart. So I guess like feeling that I've made one sexist or Eddie like these pages. Feel, I can do it again. But after I should realize I can never really fail if I don't lose money if only invest my dying because I can work as a developer and get I felt. So. I felt like it's Kinda interesting game I can just keep trying this. Over and over as long as you know I have energy. And after two years of like well, this is the point that I have to move on. It wasn't so easy. I, didn't want do I still I could stay in not getting partnered to around but that's not what happened. Do you really think it was a marketing problem at.

Eddie Hollywood founder developer
"saas business" Discussed on The Tropical MBA Podcast

The Tropical MBA Podcast

01:50 min | 6 months ago

"saas business" Discussed on The Tropical MBA Podcast

"Now you're talking about a business that has since you've sort of shut the doors on it more or less. I mean. If you're processing seven million dollars, worth of tickets, why is there a problem turning it into a business? It sounds much better than actually you know few would. Charge just like one percent. It's still must. Great you know. To make. Actually, a monthly income. So, first of all, we had this kind of daring approach did not charge ticket fees are not charged percentages of those tickets and you thank you get out. Of that by just monthly fees. That it was something. Other people discourage us from doing and maybe it helps it selling on platforms like up sumo but. Actually. Get the monthly revenue in for the first time that you would need but you've for founders order expenses. Federal. Challenging situation. Suddenly the whole marketing. Hype. This is Kinda like falling to pieces and we didn't know how to structure it so. It was used a lot by then Taylor and he himself you know both making probably one or two million of those seven in his company. You end up having the same is GonNa play know now I had founders but because he left the marketing co founder and he couldn't get the new one in time to help the thing, we are still struggling to figure out the marketing for the bathroom. mean it does seem a little bit like history repeated itself with these last two startups. That's true. Yeah and I honestly it wasn't really excited about that. I thought I'M GONNA fix that by buttoning of it somebody who has some experience but Ended up in the same situation. Give.

Taylor co founder
"saas business" Discussed on The Tropical MBA Podcast

The Tropical MBA Podcast

04:42 min | 6 months ago

"saas business" Discussed on The Tropical MBA Podcast

"Tell me about the genesis of your next project then. Well I didn't want to make the same mistake. So after Commerce player I decided to partner up with so my friends and. kind of tried to mitigate the risk of. Not Having to wear well promoted. Was the woman's I look around and You know by closest friends most of them are actually dmed circle to see if one of the monster particularly me because I enjoy being single founder realized I'm much much better at being co founder if it stronger and skills team. So one of my friends should actually couple of friends at ideas about what to do next. So that was very positive. My next project after. That was got even frame. You probably know even the bright that's like a ticket ration-. Could the booking. Service. So I decided to build a platform for selling tickets online mostly because my good friend from brockton tales running even for Google, he's organizing learn three hundred even around the world. Every year probably less static assist virus innovating. But at the time it was intense and he had rebecca need for ticketing suffer for this company for the partnered up and decided to build something for everybody. and. What happened Well at the beginning. Actually got more than what I hoped for. Instead of just two of co-founders you're immediately for the guys, Dean and James. And we were building this new. Ambitious goals to. Compete with all the platforms were very soon found out that they actually so many ticketing tools around we didn't have such urgent idea and B basically start building the ticketing part for based on what dense needs to time and his company, and after we did that he's offering other people as though. And what were those needs that made you guys think that? There was room for another ticketing platform because yeah, there are a lot out there. Well mostly because the number one you know. Getting even I still had some features and and things that are not perfect and people struggle with that especially with organizers like like then Taylor. So we felt confident that we can. Get you a bit there features improved on that and build new ones..

founder partner co founder brockton Google rebecca Taylor Dean
"saas business" Discussed on The Tropical MBA Podcast

The Tropical MBA Podcast

04:54 min | 6 months ago

"saas business" Discussed on The Tropical MBA Podcast

"Also. On top of just being technic Guy I decided to do marketing support. And Video production, and all the other things that ever no not doing before, and I was not an expert and. It was Kinda crazy, right I was doing like you and a half. I eventually, I didn't threaten to huge success even though it's still around people are still using today. Can you explain what it does briefly? Simon. If marketing video rapper. So you take youtube video, you added the comment player and I'll give you. Like, official coat again, put your website and it's like a new video player very can add some marketing even so the video. What ended up happening with the company. Eventually I don't my friends took over. Why wouldn't you just keep running at what happened there? Just. Lifting while from my savings and I made some sexist it's coming for me. It's a money but with not enough to support me, you know month to month. Can you say what it got to? Its stated on something like thousand dollars he was never really like I had big success on more than I made. I think the whole campaign made hundred thousand does revenue. So that was how I get most of the money for you know, keep it running for a year but eventually I get really overwhelmed by all the. Marketing and then video production everything that I didn't even have time to development. So. If A. Tough time in terms of actually being productive all different fronts and eighty allies like what my other funders, doing these pages and all the stuff that I had no idea how to do and I get right you know all the myself. I was just like probably overly optimistic I just didn't think it's GonNa be that hard. What was it fundamentally that the APP sumo customers saw the software that your day to day customers may be didn't. I think. I. would be like bad or anything I just felt explaining its normal users up someone could. Kinda. Sheet. Myself with the bigger brand and get more trust. I wasn't as good as. New customers that I would be able to play myself y you know and how can use that. That's My co-founder from what he did just Like the commission you know you can get so much people to use the product you know and team where I was just a developer. Thank to sell that I didn't really like fast enough all the marketing instant I would need to sell. That's up there. You know you kinda built this baby and you had some success with it and it wouldn't.

youtube Simon co-founder official developer
"saas business" Discussed on Entrepreneur Stories for Inspiration: Millionaire Interviews

Entrepreneur Stories for Inspiration: Millionaire Interviews

01:41 min | 10 months ago

"saas business" Discussed on Entrepreneur Stories for Inspiration: Millionaire Interviews

"They need it. Hi My. Name's Diana Goodwin and I'm thirty six I'm the founder and CEO of market box. The market box team is based in Toronto Canada. Market box is a business to business. Sas Platform that software as a service platform our software is meant to help. Service businesses manage logistics and sales of selling services, so were best suited for businesses that are either service, marketplace, or have a business that has service providers have to travel to different locations to serve their customers whether they have to travel to poems or two businesses the reason that we started. The software is because my first company, which is called Mobile, which I- bootstrapped for over eight years. We had to build a software internally to manage all of the traveling swim instructors who would go into clients home and Condo polls to teach private swimming lessons because there was no software that existed for us to manage all of these swim instructors, and also the sales piece of things so eventually other businesses started to approach off mobile for our software, and then turned it into the current market box platform so that we could help other. Other businesses that have service providers who are not tech savvy they can use our platform instead to manage all of the logistics and sales. It is extremely painful to have to build your own software. It can take tens of thousands of dollars, hundreds of thousands.

"saas business" Discussed on Entrepreneur Stories for Inspiration: Millionaire Interviews

Entrepreneur Stories for Inspiration: Millionaire Interviews

05:31 min | 11 months ago

"saas business" Discussed on Entrepreneur Stories for Inspiration: Millionaire Interviews

"For people to buy asked because they know it's. It's a great business was pretty amazing. It sounds like we're kind of just living off what you made all those profits from the Google ad words and affiliate marketing over the last ten years. Would you say over ten years? Yeah, I lived on profits for ten years exactly and I did invest the money. I made a lot of mistakes there. As well I made a few positive things spot in general. I was really bad when it came to investing money. I read everything to do. Do with Warren Buffett so I thought I wanted to be this kind of Warren Buffet, type, Guy and really smart and careful and really effective and make forty percent a year, etc, what I actually did was I wasn't careful. Little I was like really careless with my business. Potter's like people stole money from me. A wasn't looking at the profit and loss statement at all, like I was just very leaving very carefree I wasn't the most important mistake that I made was investing i. I didn't diversify enough like the really basic stuff that they teach you about. If you're an investment advisor, diversify be safe. You know Warren Buffet talks about never lose your money. So I wasn't focused on that I wasn't careful. I was basically careless. I did make some really good decisions like in two thousand and eight in the housing crisis I thought what's the best thing because I had money from the Internet at a few million dollars? So what's the best thing I can best in? In and I decided the investing was real estate in the US actually was right at the very good decision like the way that I did it wasn't that great. 'cause I went to, I felt while I don't live in the US have to get business PA, so winning tried to find like Business Baez thought will diversify the respond having four or five business partners eventually now all of them fallen away so I now have only one donahue who is a good business. To be honest, what I should have done is not have business spotted. It'll just because I'm not in the US doesn't mean that icon invest in e convinced in simple real estate. Right something like what I should have done is just had simple houses that are failing. You have minimum problems in good areas, and I would have done really well, and it's very easy to do and you can. I got upon to help me. Find those give them a finders fee, but by going fifty fifty on a losing a lot of my profit, losing a lot of the upside, and even in the case where I've got a really great pasta and. And that I still have this really great pond, and we've done extremely well with a Florida real estate dot hasn't gone as well as could've because the fact that I'm giving away fifty cents, so he's done amazingly well. He's done lot of the properties of grown up ten times of the lost ten years, so they've done extremely well, but even despite that probably would have been just as well awful better off by doing it myself by the way I mean. Usually, it's like if you bring all the equity in the guys finding the deals and taking care of it with the management, and everything is usually. You're ninety percent owner still any. Ten percent. Yeah, although I did different types of deals so I did it where you get where I get a six percent preferred return rigor I'd started off as a ten percent photon, and then also he's putting in ten ten thirty nine percent of the equity, so it wasn't so bad, I certainly learned a lot..

Warren Buffett donahue US Google Potter advisor Baez Florida
"saas business" Discussed on Entrepreneur Stories for Inspiration: Millionaire Interviews

Entrepreneur Stories for Inspiration: Millionaire Interviews

03:33 min | 11 months ago

"saas business" Discussed on Entrepreneur Stories for Inspiration: Millionaire Interviews

"This was only short term opportunity. A lot of people were doing that at that time is two thousand and six I. Remember I, got one check from Google and not just new to the Philippines so I was living with my parents, said they received the check in Australia was like eight hundred eighty thousand dollars a like open this. They overdo like Oh. There's a check for eight hundred and eighty thousand dollars like they had no idea what's going on released. It wasn't like a porn website or something, but my parents is seeing this check from Google for eight hundred thousand. It's like what is going on here. Yeah, that was crazy. Yeah, that's what I was gonNA distinguish and make sure I heard that. Right where you said you were paying four thousand and you're making over a hundred thousand full hundred thousand yet yet. Oh. You're paid four hundred thousand. Okay, that's all I'll say like four thousand, eight, hundred thousand. Okay, so it's fill four hundred thousand, basically net profit. Yes, wow, so what your parents say. That's pretty amazing. I guess they went to concern because it was from Google and the new. That was an entrepreneur, and they knew that I was doing stuff, but we didn't mention that before that that. That I actually trained as a medical doctor. Right so I actually started yeah, well the one second. Why don't we go ahead and go back to that? Because I think now we've got an idea of okay. Your team was doing beforehand and why you made the software so yeah, why don't we really back to actually go into college and then what you ended up doing from there? Yeah well, we'll starting from the beginning. Even in high school started doing some kinds of businesses some coaching, etc. I didn't really know what a wanted to do decided to do. Medicine because got the marks and I thought it was like a really interesting career, and just on the cutting edge, which it is, so I did that and I completed. It even took a year also. Also because I was so entrepreneurial I wanted to be successful as an ultra listen to Jay, Abraham A. If you heard of few Music Marketing Guru about these unique marketing strategies, so listen to him and read all this stuff about marketing I thought I'll now I'm going to be mocking sold, and so I took a year of medicine to be a marketing consultant which was. was probably my, I, e Good Ventura in terms of business, trying to start a business from scratch, doing nothing, and found that it was quite actually left my sales. Skills were terrible. A wasn't comfortable, talking to people in person and trying to sell something to them directly, so I kind of failed about ambition, and took the rough to get a couple of clients but it. It didn't really go anywhere. And I went back to medicine completed my medical degree and started working for a couple years. As I'm going to cut in from time to time because you're going to go really really quick sounds like so, what year did you graduate? And how old were you when you Kim a medical doctor? Acreage raided around two thousand I think it was. Time would have been twenty..

Google Philippines Jay Australia Abraham A. Marketing Guru Kim consultant
"saas business" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

Inside Intercom Podcast

10:44 min | 1 year ago

"saas business" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

"That you need more attention right now and flag would counter risk of churn or which accounts have opportunities as to help grow with Google and ultimately good for us but it's also a much better customer experience so if from customer side you're going to have a contact contact with someone who is understand what's happening in your space is contacting you at a relevant time on a relevant topic based on something you've been interacting acting with somewhere else at Google. We use a lot of that. Ai Technologies to optimize time. But even inside call centers sweating. A lot of this is really useful as well Such a high volume high transaction level space. You got so much more data to help you predict chat bots can be actually a great way to to help L. A.. Typical inside sales have have a much more interesting conversations. During the day those chat bots can help you screen ally upfront. That used to have a human being. We have to get through as many contacts as possible before you could have an interesting conversation. I was not a very fulfilling way to spend your day. But if you've got these chat bots now can a help screen all that stuff out for you. That time it gets to a person. You're having a really productive. Conversation may has a better experience for customer. And it's a way better experience variance just as a sales rep definitely and you spoke a little bit and saves as well about marketing disruptive technology so of C- that's something as we at entercom moved more into the chopper an AI world. We face that challenge as a company that aims to make Internet business personal you have to remain nine neutral in that space of being personal but also providing the assistance of things like bots. So what are the Communists that you think. Companies in that space are making in terms of marketing. I see it but also confessed to having made myself that I get excited about this technology technology and I and I see a lot of our customers that we work with. Go through the same thing that I particularly. If you're in something that's very transformative or disruptive you just get excited what about the tech and you want to go in and talk to customers at attack and they you expect to. They're gonNA be just as excited about it as you are. And they're usually not and we all know that but we do it over and over and it's it's a very hard habit to break and I think one of the most important lessons I've had to learn the hard way I watch. Some of my friends in this space going through the same challenge is going in and talking about the impact make the end impact the end the value. That you're gonNA drive back for the customer. The technology is really not as important as that. End Outcome that you're enabling you know what does success look like for them. And how are you going to help them get to it. And it's we all know that but it is very difficult to do that because we get excited about the products that we're working on the other You know if your product truly is transformative and disruptive something people haven't seen before or is going to have a longer adoption cycle you get so much pressure pressure from investors and stakeholders to go big right up front and go for the biggest enterprise players you can get as fast as you can because they do tend to be able to make bigger purchases is with you but they are the slowest to adopt that technology and so it feels slower starting downmarket and convincing some of those early adopters to gain your product. But that's the way to do it. It's the only way you're going to be able to build enough of a user base up front to have stories to have learnings because those big enterprises are not gonna go first every now and then you're gonna find someone who enjoys being disruptive and exciting person inside the enterprise. Those oser unusual to find so I wouldn't I pushing back on the pressure. You're going to get from investors and stakeholders to start up market. I is important and you'll actually be able to move faster in the end when you build a smaller customer base of front of smaller customers and then build bigger customers on top of them and can you think of any companies off the top of your ahead. You don't have to say intercom better doing this. Type of marketing of disruptive Technologies Rice or just even making enough noise that they're noticeable. Yeah I mean I see it a lot and you guys have been good example of just the growth that you guys have seen. One of the companies who enjoy working with a lot is a company called lyrics back out out of the US and they have marketing automation technology that reads all kinds of different data sources inside these marketing groups. They have so many disconnected data sources mrs but it brings all of that together and helps marketers make better recommendations on you know who they should target and why and they did. They started with a smaller customer base. They were fine to the product. They got a lot of things wrong up front just like we all do really open about telling that story and what they've learned from it but once they hit that sweet spot of knowing. This is what we're really great at and could play that over and over again. They established credibility and today. They're working with some of the biggest brands in the world. We love having them as a partner partner. We saw with them in a lot of our very large enterprise accounts but it would have been hard to get better. I like the they had to start building that business at the beginning and then build toward those big enterprise accounts when we think away I it is really easy to assume that all of this innovation is happening in Silicon Valley but there are people like yourself or even Geoffrey Hinton who leads the brain Google who aren't permanently based in the valley. So can you talk a little bit of bad any. I work that you know that's going on outside of Silicon Saudi. Oh I think most of the interesting work is. I'm a bit biased. On this point because I live in Seattle and so and I think everyone else should do. It's a great city but from my friends who live in California. I I have no idea why they do that. It's one of the world's most expensive places you can live. But they do tend to think that all all the interesting innovations happening there and now I've spent the last ten years in Seattle watching all of these incredible startups in that space as well as friends working at Microsoft and Amazon. Zayn doing incredible work but I visited thirty countries in the last ten years meeting with enterprises and software companies building incredible products and in a lot of cases platforms like us. It's the people who build on top of it that are truly driving all of the nation in the space. So we're giving people tools tools that you can build great products with and I've seen that and every country I've visited in cities all over the world fantastic and then just to start wrapping things up so a machine learning have very odyssey developed really really quickly in the Clare Combined with hardware development. What other advancements do you think are really going to move the needle in the next two to three years? I am particularly excited about the AI. Space Right now I just you know having watched you know what we started rated with cloud twelve years ago when I started getting into this space we spent an enormous focus on platform as a service and infrastructure as a service and that did did enable alive. And if you you look at that as a business today and the hundreds of billions of dollars collectively and growth still impressive. But what I'm seeing in with a I has much bigger. Opportunity for impact like McKinsey is estimating this at nine point five trillion dollars across the world wide range of industries and the use cases are are everywhere like those initial days of cloud. You're really focused on people who had servers. And how do you migrate servers but an AI is going to be used by consumers. And the way you're using tools and products at home you're going to use is it and your doctor's office it's going to be used in manufacturing plants going to be used by governments. The impact is incredible. And I think we're just getting started started when you see some of these use cases today. It's just incredible. What people of Bill with it and the technologies relatively early so that concept has been been around for a very long time? But you know what's happened in the hardware space to truly enable that calculations at scale and what's happened with the innovation around on the neural network capabilities to do all the stuff much much faster and efficiently. That's all relatively recent and the things that are being built on top of that today. Hey I can just incredible early. So who knows what that's going to look like siding you mentioned. Ai Touches consumers so just one final question. And if you're GONNA work that way obviously guiding principles are really really important and Google has published. Its own principles in terms of how to work with Ai. But do you think that's something something that legislators need to do for their various jurisdictions or something that companies should be left to do themselves undefined. Their own principles. Well I do think there's responsible will regulation. That will come in this space. But I think it's more important that companies are doing that themselves and thinking through. How are we inside our organization? Shen GonNA use this data and how are we going to use it responsibly. And particularly if your product touches consumers in any way you have to go through that that process ask you mentioned we published a set of ai principles for Google that guide the way we use products. And how we think of Technology Inc and what we build old and ensuring that we're building things for good and not for things that will cause harm very broad statements that every company that builds in the space needs to know that and again back. If you're in the regulated industry you you really need to be able to know that yourself and to build articulate back to customers of how you're GonNa make decisions of what you're going to do just as importantly what you're not gonNA do. And why and what safeguards you're going to put in place for that I think that's part of what will help overcome. Some of the fear people have of this space is partly just understanding what the technology is not but also all of us as communities unity and as a society agreeing on what we're GONNA do responsibly. And just as important what we're not GONNA do in this space that's great. Thanks so much for joining us today and just for our listeners as where can they keep up with you. I'm you mostly. You should follow Google clouds that look at that space but you can follow me on twitter. Mat Rogers Great. Thanks so much Matt. Thanks for listening to the inside. ENTERCOM PODCAST for more interviews go to intercom dot com slash blog or. Subscribe to our podcast on Itunes spotify soundcloud or set jerk this inside intercom.

Google AI Ai Technologies Seattle US California entercom McKinsey Silicon Valley twitter Geoffrey Hinton Silicon Saudi Matt Technology Inc Bill Shen Microsoft
"saas business" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

Inside Intercom Podcast

11:58 min | 1 year ago

"saas business" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

"Thanks thanks for joining us today. You're fresh off the stage where you were chatting about trends which we will get you in a minute but first of all. I think it'd be really nice. Nice to Kinda give everyone a sense of your job accuracy. So you head up the gas initiative program which means you work with Saas companies. All over the world implement into into their products. But tell us how you came about focusing your career in Saas. Yeah I came. Originally into cloud out of the hardware business owes working at Dell L. and then moved into cloud because you could just see how fast the innovation was coming in that space and how transformative is going to be across the whole industry and so helps start one of the first cloud platforms and got to be part of the team that built that from zero to billions of dollars and then about a year ago. DISC- got really excited about the opportunity across a I and my favorite customers have always been SAS companies and so I joined Google. My focus is exclusively on SAS companies. And how do we help them get started google cloud and run programs for technical on boarding as well as CO marketing and Co selling that we do SAS partners all over the world and you mentioned some of your previous roles there so interestingly you've worked in both sales and marketing as well at Microsoft and obviously Google But how has that experience shapes the way you advise the Saas companies. You work with a well. It's been a great experience running both kind of teams just personally WHO's a little bit operations background? A lot of marketing background. A lot of sales background. So I've seen SAS and I've watched cloud from all of those different angles and it's fun because you come from the marketing view of having a much more strategic view of what's happening across the market. And how do you message your product and message did your offering and make it relevant for people and then sales of how do you actually make that real and start demonstrating and showing value for customers. Also got to help build and one of the first customer success teams. That was a huge learning experience again. Had to do it all the hard way. There wasn't a lot of established practices at the time. But but it's that background is really helpful. They get to work with the SAS companies. Having seen a lot of that for many years now getting to watch what they're building and how fast it's all changing changing emerging Incredibly exciting I can imagine and you mentioned they're doing things the hard way. So Obviously Your Saas Initiative program is very like can accelerator so you guys help SAS companies build and market their products and sell them. But what do you think are the top challenges that face those ask companies today. Well just beyond the really hard part watching. How do you have a great product? It's going to be relevant for customers that they're gonNA WANNA buy and how you get into market May. That's obviously where you're going to spend the vast majority of your time but a- empathy for how these companies are just trying to keep up and this this rapidly evolving market. Is I look at it. Just from the cloud technology standpoint of how fast the underlying technology is changing. You know how fast coober netease came about and how transformative that was of how people built apps and now particularly what's happening in AI and how fast that is evolving and just keeping up with the pace of that change is really hard similarly particularly bearing a little bit by industry. You're in but the regulatory environment is changing in constantly and as you're trying to grow from a focus in one country to multiple countries and sometimes even different regions within countries keeping up with that rapidly changing aging environments incredibly hard so for all the right focus added build a great product teddy to market that. Just the challenge is keeping up in this environment with all those other external factors. That's quite a challenge for companies. And they're obviously a lot of startups here. Today it's stock. So Oh you guys offer market development funds as part of this initiative so beyond their use of Google. Clair's Harry choosing what companies that you support. Yeah we lose a lot of things we look for in that space. The first anyone can build on Google cloud so we welcome. Obviously we have a lot of programs programs and technology available to help people get on board as fast as possible no matter what space durant or what product. They're building there are. There is a partner program that again. There's a pretty wide open. Space of anyone can come join that once your partner than we do. Try to be very proactive about communicating roadmap updates in training different programs to help those companies build. Something great with Google Cloud. How do we make it as easy as possible? But within that ecosystem there is a set of partners that we do invest more heavily and like you mentioned the MDF programs and we look for companies that are aligned with the conversations. We're having primarily with our commercial and government accounts announcer just short language. Enterprise accounts so we focused heavily on retail financial services manufacturing public sector. A couple of other verticals that we have believe that differentiated story and and as we go into these companies. What we're increasingly finding is the only way we're able to bring complete clete solutions to them that solve their problems involve some other partner product on top of us So this fastest. Ai Adoption is coming in the enterprise brize. Most enterprises don't have giant data science teams that are building a lot of that. Ai Technology themselves. They want to use someone else's software that that can bring that innovation into their enterprise. So we look for companies like that that are aligned with the same enterprise focus. We have same workload focus. We have but make it better and can you give us an example of any of those companies today. Yeah one of the companies. We've really enjoyed working with the lie in the last year based here in Europe as company. Thank you bet at a London. Very focused in the retail space. And they have some incredible personalization software being to get the number wrong love. Those guys is and forgive me for this but it's something like billions of recommendations every day through some of the largest retailers in the world and some of the best known consumer brands. But they've taken taken all of this incredible innovation around Ai and make that possible for those retailers again never going to build out giant data science teams inside a retail company but Cuba can come in and take all of this amazing data. They've got around prior purchase history and what people are doing on their website and help them build better recommendations nations for people to buy Bronx and four companies like that who already have a stellar product. What are the common mistakes you see them Eh? Making in terms of achieving even greater growth. You always see a few and again. This is just my opinion working across us. Lots of these companies now for a long time when I get nervous for them Is when after a couple of minutes. I can't understand what they're building across we had and it's working that message down something. Very succinct. Very clear is hard good work. It's actually much easier to use a lot of words to explain what you're trying to build but the clear you can make the better and I think most companies can benefit benefit from having someone who's not in their space hearing that story with fresh years and giving feedback of whether or not they can understand that another challenge we we see is a particularly in earlier stages not being specific enough about where they're gonNA focus target and we as some of the first advice they give to a lot of companies is pick one vertical and then pick one workload within that vertical and be an expert at that degraded that prove. Your use cases proved who's the value that you can generate be able to put an economic case to get some great customer stories in case studies and you'll get much more traction that way in when you go into into a customer and you understand the business that they're in and the challenges they have you can communicate the value of your product to them in that language that's way more powerful powerful and what I see is sometimes a fear to do that of it feels limiting if you pick that one workload that one space effectively actively means you are not working those other spaces at least for a time but you can always grow into those other space so it doesn't mean you have to pick that one right now and never go work into another vertical. The having those first case studies in this first stories is so important. And the only way you're going to do that is really focusing. Can you think of any companies right. Now that you think have don't oh not very well or are in the process of doing very well well Interest is impacted. My friends at Cubanacan. I really respect with these guys have built and and it's a recommendation engine that theoretically could be used across all kinds of things and so they came in and they've really focused on retails. We talked about a moment ago ago. But they're now expanding into other categories as well so they're also working with travel companies now so started in retail now starting to expand in this other space and I think that's a really great way to start building a business to deepen one and then go and move on to next once you've gotta proven base and you've probably already covered this but just in case aces anymore. What would your advice be companies? That already have an established market that are trying to move more upmarket or even head towards enterprise get I get those first wins is the hardest and I think in some cases the allure of the big enterprise I I can be distracting in some ways. There's nothing wrong with having a company that's focused entirely on mid market companies. You know frankly there. They tend to be a lot more profitable customers across the board for all of us. Big Enterprises are super demanding. They're gonNA squeeze the deal art as they can. They have a lot of power in those relationships tips and so everyone looks toward them. But it's the last place you WANNA START A. You're going to get way more. Traction faster starting lower in the market and then building up a to it. But the key thing you're gonNA need is proven use cases improving values like even in those enterprises. They'll pay attention to a story that's come from a midmarket account that you've been able to prove economic value. You've created for that customer. One of the easy ways you can do. It is start tracking your buyers and where they go a to those mid marketeer companies or prime hunting grounds for next enterprise buyers. And so you start to see one of your buyers move into one of these these bigger enterprise accounts you've been trying to get into. That's a prime way to open a door inside those accounts and obviously if you start selling to smaller companies with vision of moving okay. You're at some point. You're going to overcome that challenge and not caught. Those people will shift your focus. Maybe seventy thirty eight hundred twenty towards those larger companies so you mentioned there. Things like customer stories or customer evidence. Do you think that they are the real golden ticket in making that shift improving improving yourself. Because you don't want those enterprise view you as someone selling to smaller companies. No one wants to go first so particularly in the enterprise price space. It's high risk for them. And so the more proven you are the better the more stories you can point to and use cases the better and you know a a lot of very well known brands or actually pretty small companies and so if you can secure some of those really well known brands even if they're not a big company that can still have have a lot of influence with enterprise buyers but but back to one point you said like even as you start getting into enterprise. I don't think the walk away from those earlier customer..

Google Dell L. Europe Microsoft Big Enterprises durant Cuba London Clair Cubanacan Harry
"saas business" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

Inside Intercom Podcast

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"saas business" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

"Hello there on D. Randy welcome to inside Intercom today. We're continuing with our second season of scale. It's our series dedicated to the particular strategies and frameworks dried business growth. Once again we've lined up a slate of brilliant leaders and thinkers from the likes of paddle yelp spread social people who've all successfully proposed their company to a new stage age of growth despite the arms as we know there isn't a magic formula to scale but over the next few weeks you'll hear them share the growth levers. They found on the advice that they have for others looking to expand their business in the same way. We're harking back stock again this week. With a fantastic interview we recorded on the PODCAST. Scott Stage this time inside. Intercom editor. Amanda Connolly jets with Google's head of south initiative not Rogers as you can imagine mass had some brilliant insights to share their conversation touches on a variety of topics including the challenges faced by SAS companies scaling in a rapidly evolving. They were even just keeping pace is the challenge in itself and they also cover. Ai Trends in south discussing. WHO's doing it rice and what advancements we can look forward to in that space over the coming years so without further delay? Let's hear what mass undermanned had to say Matt. Thanks thanks for joining us today. You're fresh off the stage where you were chatting about trends which we will get you in a minute but first of all. I think it'd be really.

Scott Stage Amanda Connolly Randy Google Matt Rogers
"saas business" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"saas business" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"The next couple of weeks and next week on sales pipeline radio we have Joe Hyland. He's the CMO of on twenty four. We're going to talk talk about secrets of CMO's secret successes behinds mobis revenue leaders joey started a podcast called confessions of CMO. We talked a little about that and the week after our first episode in March. I'm super excited. We have Jill Conrad. She is one of my favorite people in the B. Two B. Sales world. She's written a number of books including snap selling and just huge hugely hugely influential to me into others in B. Two B. Sales so excited to have her join. The program is well today. We still have a little more time with Jocelyn Brown. She's the VP of customer MMA success at Ala Katya Jocelyn from your journey from eloquent Oracle to where you are today having that sort of culture and focus on customer success is great but I think continuing to provide fight ideas and insights to your customers oftentimes and I think we've seen this data from Gartner and CB in others. It's not just providing phone number to call. It's not adding more features. It's really helping helping your customers become smarter giving them new ideas and insights that is a huge competitive differentiator so the content or seeing online and then what you're providing to customers is a huge part of your job as well absolutely and I think to bring it to sort of brass tacks as much as we talked about a lot of softer stuff in the culture of Alachua that really drove such an amazing community for us. I mean that resulted in in real impact in real results and not came with investment doesn't happen by accident and and there is a real outcome to that so customer success should not be mistaken for dialing for smiles. It's absolutely not that when you understand stand a customer's business with when you have a great relationship and great empathy for what they're trying to accomplish and you're really trying to help them solve that problem. You will make that company company successful and they will grow by more and you will make that individual successful and they will remember that and they will take you everywhere they go and not amplifying effect of advocacy advocacy comes from the real work of listening understanding and providing solutions for your customers that includes clued your software but also in advice gyns in connections in helping them talk to peers that are struggling with the same things I would want anybody to mistake customer success just for service or something saw it has a true and very real business benefit absolutely a lot of people listening. Probably you're in that that can't we talked about the beginning ending of the of the episode around just not really having people not having resources and so if I'm if I'm a VP mark listening saying yeah this makes sense. We need to be doing this but I don't have Jocelyn on my team yet I don't have you know we have this in my budget. What are some things people can do to build the foundation for a more impactful customer success effort effort yeah absolutely the the good news is it's probably an extension of some of the stuff you already do that? Idea of journey mapping notes talked about a lot in the the marketing. It's extending that all the way through the customer life cycle and understanding the touch points the contents the tools the other other types of things the triggers all the way through that they're going to help the customer better going to provide opportunity for your company and sort of seeing where your gaps are and where you might be able to get the biggest bang for your buck in terms of closing that gap understanding the journey that your customer is going through and using your tool is just as important as understanding the journey Ernie that they go through in researching understanding and making a buying decision but a lot of the same tools apply a lot of the same theory applies a lot of the same work can be done for me. It's always going to involve a team. I think that in certainly be nothing really can replace that relationship and that empathy and somebody really feeling like you care what happens to them in the context of how you're working with them. I had the version of a customer who I've realized I worked with for eleven years. Come visit us in our headquarters and just before she got up to tell her story she returned to me and said having a company really care about you. Matters maters a lot and she's a buyer. She's the person making that decision and not matters to her so I think sometimes people forget the human equation that there's real you work in building relationships and those relationships carry an inherent value for the customer and for the company. That's sort of working now. There's no doubt about that. There aren't enough people that I think prioritize that I think too often we look at the spreadsheet and we managed through you know the numbers we wanna hit we look at customers is buildings but buildings don't actually sign checks the people inside the buildings do and there's something about having a good relationship with someone in showing and proving that you care that not only generates loyalty but gives gives you a little bit of the benefit of the doubt you know you've got you know things are going to break you know things are going to not work the way they want. You want them to so you know I think in the right environment you know in in in in most environments comments you get pro customers that are angry and yell and scream and get upset in an environment where you actually make this part of the culture where you make you make a care they call and wonder what they can do to help you there rooting for you who took to do it well before we have to wrap up here in a couple of minutes. You've been doing this for a while. I think there's a lot of people that I know that you've worked with that. We've talked about in the past that you've learned from who for people people that want to learn more about how to do this right who are some of the people that have been influential for you people in terms of Customer Care Customer Advocacy that you'd recommend people go and read I take just an incredible amount of learning from my days at Alachua and I continue to work with those people and talk to them. So you mentioned Politici- Ema he certainly were right on customer success in the power relationships. Heather Fe is WHO's at look book is probably one of the most talented advocacy leaders that I've really ever met. I'm against that customer so I spent a lot of time reading their content and have had a chance to meet Alison pickens. I think she writes some really great stuff. It's really practical stuff. Maybe about the operational organizational things that maybe people are kind of craving. You've got you've actually got a plethora of people talking about it ran right now what I would suggest is fine the meet up in your local city and go and talk to a bunch of people it's really in that networking effect in not community that I get at my best ideas and I get my greatest value because as we are kind of building on this kind of a profession you don't know who's GonNa have your next best idea and and I think people are bringing experience from lots of other functions that is just accelerating the growth of customer success just making us better so find your friends. I love to hear hear from people. I'm very happy to talk to them. So you can find me on Lincoln my twitter handle is Josh Brown. JC Brown. I'm happy to interact on on this stuff because that's what's fun for me appreciate you doing that and I think you know your coach. Share in your answers reinforce everything I know about you just being a very genuine very customer centric person very very open to sharing ideas is and and your experience with other appreciate that very much I would echo the fine friends meet friends stay connected with friends that also have similar roles not necessarily in your industry not necessarily what your same the type of customer I think sometimes if you get into other industries other customer situations you might discover something that you hadn't thought about in your four walls that someone else is doing because of what feels natural them that might be truly innovative new in your industry that gives you another edge so definitely important to continue to be lifetime lifelong learners. We'll speak in Paula lifelong learners. We're going to have to wrap things up here. You're on another episode of Sales Piper. If you like what you hear today and if you want to share this episode with other people on your team you can do a number of different ways you.

Customer Care Customer Advocac Katya Jocelyn VP Alachua Josh Brown Jocelyn Brown Joe Hyland Jill Conrad joey Paula Oracle Ernie Politici- Ema Gartner Alison pickens Heather Fe Lincoln CB eleven years
"saas business" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"saas business" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Two B. Sales the marketing today is no different. We have Jocelyn Brown. She is the VP of Customer Success Al Acadia. She is from Canadia really really excited to have her join us today. talk a lot more about customer success in Customer Advocacy Jocelyn. Thanks again for joining US my pleasure man. If you listen to the show in the past you know that we are is guilty not as a lot of marketers and that we spend the majority of our time talking about acquisition we tend the majority of our time talking about getting customers on board and when you look at the budgets and the resources a lot of beating me marketing marketing groups I think that's reflected there as well. You've got all these people and budgets and marketing technology do acquisition and then when it comes to sort of keeping customers oftentimes it's it's a toll free number an and occasional newsletter and I don't know if you saw just this morning a friend of both of ours politics Shema who's the CEO of nudge. You put something up on Lincoln talking about customer success than in now that previously obviously it might have been more reactive. It was more important service now. It's really a a revenue driver for the business to drive advocacy basset of the brand expansion so maybe used to be kind of a maybe after thought. Maybe something that was thought of as more reactive administrative and tactical is now very much a strategic part of the business so would love to have you kind of talk about your perspective there and then what you guys are doing a without allocating as well yeah. Absolutely I think probably the advent of subscription economy really of SAS is what has is put just such a spotlight on retention on investment in your customers and stop business model really has given a seat at the table to those folks that actually work with the customers Dan Day out because we sort of have to earn their business every day. Either barrier to leave is very low and we need to make sure that they are are constantly feeling like they're getting value in feeling valued in that sort of business relationship. I've been doing it for ten. Plus years probably early longer than that if I were to really admit it and really for me being with the customers where it's at it is really the center of the company from results from revenue from mm-hmm from sort of anything I actually work with customers Po sale but I also owned a fairly large number in that I am responsible for all the renewal revenue and also so oliver expansion revenue which accounts for a very significant part of our growth so to say it's just kind of an afterthought or a piece is a gross misunderstanding of the economics of Saas Business so certainly allocated the the customer is the center really bevery thing and you know we built our product for that we organize denies our journey for that. Our customers really lead our marketing they are best kind of voice in the market. peer to peer references are kind of valuable due to our prospects so putting the time and effort and attention into our customers to make sure that they are receiving value means that they're going to talk about it. They're gonNA explain it in the market. They're going to continue to work with US and advocate for our business so I think those that haven't figured that out yet are behind. I wholeheartedly agree and let's let's talk about how that relates to what we talk a lot about here even on the acquisition side which is the buying journey and I think oftentimes we think of the buying journey too often his ending when someone one buys like that may be the middle may be the end of the sales process but it's really the middle of what I'd call the Revenue Bowtie you know the you may have gotten someone to buy but that's when things really begin as someone who's spent quite a bit of time and I want to get back and talk about the Likud as well. How do you as a customer success professional think about the buying journey? It's way beyond the on the deal right. Absolutely I think also just in the nature of how people by now because it's a lot easier to try things because it's a lot easier you're to sort of start small and grow from there you also are seeing that people are really trying and then expanding so that land and expand strategy that we were successful with that Alachua and is a very big piece of our strategy at allocated is let's get people in in experiencing our product experiencing our team solving their problem. Maybe the smaller scale and then help them kind of map out how to get got to a fully executed strategy fully executed and that there's there's really no downside to US bringing in customer at a sort of smaller scale L. because we know first of all that our technology is going to help them. We know that our team understand what's going on has done it many many times before and is going to provide provide them the right kind of guidance and we know we let them kind of set the terms of how they grow that it's going to be the right solution and the right fit. We're not going to kind of have to back back into it based on a sale cycle that maybe not everybody knew enough to run really well so for us. There's no fear of people coming in and sort of trying. Take a bit first because history tells us that a great place for us to start and grow and we've had great success there and then it makes the whole process a loophole less the friction in the process for the customer and a lot easier. They don't have to fix everything all at once. We don't have to do a big bang. Release can really kind of move them along and that's a little change in the buying in process. That's a little change in technology. Were Immigrations and things like that are easier but that's also just our philosophy. We want you to get a feel for technology to feel some relief of us being able to help solve that problem and then experience our team because our team really is so invested in making sure that you are successful that you're going to partner with us..

VP of Customer Success Al Acad US Customer Advocacy Jocelyn Brown Saas Business Canadia Likud Shema Lincoln CEO partner Alachua
"saas business" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

18:48 min | 2 years ago

"saas business" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

"Go where many men of explode a never returned data. Let's face it. We are surrounded by data. For example. My average day is quite door. I a laptop a record podcast a Royal echoes update. Social media make a few telephone calls. Take my dog for a walk go for a run and listen to a few podcasts or even watch better net. Flicks. Nothing exciting about that. At all book. You could look at it. Another way my watch checks by heart rate counts. My steps spa. If I last FM Mon is what songs alike will recommend visit or the playlist Toomey in the sideways, Amazon, and Netflix does a similar service, and every podcast article or social media posts has a wealth of metrics, including engagement levels that could essentially determined any future success, even the mundane is surround. By data. Not let's take that into the world of business and using data to truly understand your customers and prospects as co founder and CEO of profit, well, which was formerly price intelligently. Patrick Campbell is using proprietary industry. Data on over eight thousand businesses to help some of the world's best companies such as zyppah and we steer for example. And they helped them to identify the best pricing and growth opportunities that are actually working today. So can we make data Sam sexy? I don't know if I'm gonna give it a try book elope and hold on tight. So I can be meal is all the way to the US. So we can speak with Patrick Campbell front profit. Well, a learned more about how easy encouraging businesses to work hard on using day to understand the profile and psyche of their customers buy building quantified buyer personas. Messy full welcome to the show. Patrie? Can you tell the listeners Labatt who you are? And what you do. Yeah. Great question. So I'm Patrick Campbell Maceo founder of a company called profit well used to be called price intelligently. And we do we basically help subscription businesses with a couple of things we give free subscription financial metrics away that allow people to basically see their monthly recurring revenue in their analytics. And then we make money by selling products to help them with their cancellations as well as with their pricing in a couple of other things. And so yeah, long story short. That's that's kind of the professional side and the personal side there's not much except for the professional side. So for better or worse there. But the I'm I'm from Wisconsin. Which is in the middle of the US, I studied econometrics and math in in college. And then kind of worked in tech Lamai ho career in a couple of different. Capacity's, six so pumped research, and you guys I quickly learned that profit. While is the first business intelligence platform to actually bring together all of the businesses reoccurring revenue, which is businesses financial usage and attribution. I'm bringing all into one place. That's inside lated absolutely accurate on one hundred percent free. Now that it got me thinking of it. So we'll get we'll delve into that a little bit later, but keep just tell me a little bit more about how you do. This maybe provide a few use cases just to enable listeners to visualize. Exactly what it is that you do. Yeah. Totally. So it's basically the the long story short is when you think about a business, and it doesn't matter exactly what your business is. But for us we target subscription businesses. Right. And that's SAS software as a service subscription boxes, subscription media, all types of different types of subscriptions, and the beauty of kind of the subscription model is that you know, it bakes the relationship directly into how you make money. So that particular user they buy that subscription. And if. They basically, you know, no longer see the value or you screw up or something like that. Then they're going to end that relationship canceling that that subscription, and so with that kind of preface what's fascinating in the subscription world, and in the business world in general is that it used to be there wasn't as much competition. There wasn't as much kind of problems. You know in terms of building a business. It was still hard. It was hard to build the thing or to build the the products marketing and sales it was easier because there just wasn't as much noise out there again, it was still hard. But it wasn't wasn't as hard as it is today. And so because of how hard it is getting in because of this new model, it's really really important to understand who these customers are how your businesses functioning where there are holes in your business where there are problems in kind of all of the above in terms of in terms of those kinds of concepts. And so what we do really. US Specifically is our free product we plug into your billing system. So it could be. You know stripe. Zora braintree. Whatever you're using to actually build these subscription come companies and customers and what we ended up doing is. We basically give you insight into. Here's how much monthly recurring revenue have here. How many cancellations are happening? Here's how many people are buying more. Here's how many people are buying less and just a whole suite of of different analytics that done point to. Hey, here's a problem. Hey, you have too many people cancelling that look like this. Or here's something. That's great. You have you have a ton of people doing this activity, which is awesome. In that allows a business understand what works, and what doesn't ultimately helps them kind of focus on the right things because it's getting harder and harder to to grow that

US UK Europe Twitter profes Alaska CEO Patrick writer Graham Bank London Neil c Hughes Patrick c Campbell ten million dollar one hundred fifty million doll two hundred three hundred year One hundred percent one hundred dollars
How More than 25% of all SaaS Businesses are Growing

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

05:33 min | 2 years ago

How More than 25% of all SaaS Businesses are Growing

"Go where many men of explode a never returned data. Let's face it. We are surrounded by data. For example. My average day is quite door. I a laptop a record podcast a Royal echoes update. Social media make a few telephone calls. Take my dog for a walk go for a run and listen to a few podcasts or even watch better net. Flicks. Nothing exciting about that. At all book. You could look at it. Another way my watch checks by heart rate counts. My steps spa. If I last FM Mon is what songs alike will recommend visit or the playlist Toomey in the sideways, Amazon, and Netflix does a similar service, and every podcast article or social media posts has a wealth of metrics, including engagement levels that could essentially determined any future success, even the mundane is surround. By data. Not let's take that into the world of business and using data to truly understand your customers and prospects as co founder and CEO of profit, well, which was formerly price intelligently. Patrick Campbell is using proprietary industry. Data on over eight thousand businesses to help some of the world's best companies such as zyppah and we steer for example. And they helped them to identify the best pricing and growth opportunities that are actually working today. So can we make data Sam sexy? I don't know if I'm gonna give it a try book elope and hold on tight. So I can be meal is all the way to the US. So we can speak with Patrick Campbell front profit. Well, a learned more about how easy encouraging businesses to work hard on using day to understand the profile and psyche of their customers buy building quantified buyer personas. Messy full welcome to the show. Patrie? Can you tell the listeners Labatt who you are? And what you do. Yeah. Great question. So I'm Patrick Campbell Maceo founder of a company called profit well used to be called price intelligently. And we do we basically help subscription businesses with a couple of things we give free subscription financial metrics away that allow people to basically see their monthly recurring revenue in their analytics. And then we make money by selling products to help them with their cancellations as well as with their pricing in a couple of other things. And so yeah, long story short. That's that's kind of the professional side and the personal side there's not much except for the professional side. So for better or worse there. But the I'm I'm from Wisconsin. Which is in the middle of the US, I studied econometrics and math in in college. And then kind of worked in tech Lamai ho career in a couple of different. Capacity's, six so pumped research, and you guys I quickly learned that profit. While is the first business intelligence platform to actually bring together all of the businesses reoccurring revenue, which is businesses financial usage and attribution. I'm bringing all into one place. That's inside lated absolutely accurate on one hundred percent free. Now that it got me thinking of it. So we'll get we'll delve into that a little bit later, but keep just tell me a little bit more about how you do. This maybe provide a few use cases just to enable listeners to visualize. Exactly what it is that you do. Yeah. Totally. So it's basically the the long story short is when you think about a business, and it doesn't matter exactly what your business is. But for us we target subscription businesses. Right. And that's SAS software as a service subscription boxes, subscription media, all types of different types of subscriptions, and the beauty of kind of the subscription model is that you know, it bakes the relationship directly into how you make money. So that particular user they buy that subscription. And if. They basically, you know, no longer see the value or you screw up or something like that. Then they're going to end that relationship canceling that that subscription, and so with that kind of preface what's fascinating in the subscription world, and in the business world in general is that it used to be there wasn't as much competition. There wasn't as much kind of problems. You know in terms of building a business. It was still hard. It was hard to build the thing or to build the the products marketing and sales it was easier because there just wasn't as much noise out there again, it was still hard. But it wasn't wasn't as hard as it is today. And so because of how hard it is getting in because of this new model, it's really really important to understand who these customers are how your businesses functioning where there are holes in your business where there are problems in kind of all of the above in terms of in terms of those kinds of concepts. And so what we do really. US Specifically is our free product we plug into your billing system. So it could be. You know stripe. Zora braintree. Whatever you're using to actually build these subscription come companies and customers and what we ended up doing is. We basically give you insight into. Here's how much monthly recurring revenue have here. How many cancellations are happening? Here's how many people are buying more. Here's how many people are buying less and just a whole suite of of different analytics that done point to. Hey, here's a problem. Hey, you have too many people cancelling that look like this. Or here's something. That's great. You have you have a ton of people doing this activity, which is awesome. In that allows a business understand what works, and what doesn't ultimately helps them kind of focus on the right things because it's getting harder and harder to to grow that

United States Patrick Campbell Marketing And Sales Patrick Campbell Maceo Labatt Wisconsin Toomey SAM Co Founder Amazon Zora Braintree Founder Netflix CEO One Hundred Percent