35 Burst results for "STU"

Visa’s Planned Purchase of Plaid Faces Antitrust Scrutiny at the Justice Department

WSJ Tech News Briefing

00:49 sec | Last month

Visa’s Planned Purchase of Plaid Faces Antitrust Scrutiny at the Justice Department

"We report exclusively that the Justice Department has antitrust concerns about visas more than five billion dollar deal to buy the FINTECH company plaid according to people familiar with the matter the DOJ is expected to decide soon whether it'll sue to block visas purchase plaid make software that allows banks and Fintech Stu plug into consumers various financial accounts it partners with then mo the stock trading APP Robin Hood and the Mortgage Software Startup Blend Labs Vindicate Companies and Merchants He plant as a way for consumers to make purchases without having to. Rely on debit and credit cards, and as a way for merchants to avoid the swipe fees set by those cards networks visa, the largest card network in the US handled two point, two trillion dollars of credit debit and prepaid card transactions in the first half of twenty twenty.

Fintech Justice Department Robin Hood United States
Forget Barrel-Aged Whiskey: This Company Whips Up Instant Aged Spirits in the Lab

Business Wars Daily

04:12 min | Last month

Forget Barrel-Aged Whiskey: This Company Whips Up Instant Aged Spirits in the Lab

"This is a little test. If you're a fan of craft of things that require years of patients to pay off, say a Christmas tree farm, a newly designed luxury car or an eighty year. Old Scotch time is a worthwhile investment to you on the other hand. If speed matters more to you than craft, you may see years invested in, say those Christmas trees as so much wasted time. It's much faster to make an artificial tree after all and you can still hang lights on them but what if you could have convenience and craft at the same time? Seems impossible doesn't well, not anymore at least for one particular beverage, scientific innovation has come to whiskey. There's nothing about whisky that's new. The date of its invention is a little fuzzy but historians say may have existed as long ago as fourteen hundred ad or maybe even further back than that today, the longer it ages the more expensive it is and two connoisseurs typically the better it tastes but not to the founders of silicon. Valley's bespoke in spirits, Stu Aaron, and Martin. JANACEK say they've come up with a laboratory process for making whisky and only a few days if they took my made quiz being the second group, they call the years it takes to age say mark antiquated and wasteful. bespoke spirits doesn't call itself a distillery. Rather the company is Spirits Tech Company intended to help other distillers, grocery chains and celebrities create custom spirits that can move like lightning from lab to store shelves. The name speaks to its intent bespoke means custom-made. The startup uses the lab to bring the barrel to the spirits rather than the other way around in other words, it's using material science massive amounts of data analysis to. Create spirits according to Forbes rather than putting spirits into oak barrels. The company places selected tiny pieces of wood in precise combinations in a kettle with spirits in char- heat and churn or apply again with scientific precision to mimic the aging process much much faster. The company claims they can create seventeen thousand different flavor combinations in three to five days. Most whisky is aged in barrels for about five years according to CNN. So far spoken has made whisky Tequila Rum and brandy mostly for other companies but they also do sell spirits to consumer specifically a line of different whiskies from classic Bourbons to one made with Ron Whiskey of course, the biggest obstacle, any food or drink made in a lab faces scepticism about and quality when it comes to that question bespoke in his taken home about two dozen awards from spirits tasting events since they launched early this year, that's the social proof. They think they need to grow the rest of the business, not just custom blending new products behind the scenes, but also helping distilleries rescue batches of expired beer or spirits from distributors that aren't quite right which seems. To be a good foundation for a promising business, still it's hard to grow a whole new category of anything without enough money. Early, this month, the small business one, two point six, million dollars in seed funding from hall of fame, Baseball Star Derek jeter, and Silicon Valley scientists TJ Rodgers purists may turn up their noses at spoken in America. Popular rival maker's mark is not only one of the oldest whiskey brands. Its history is at selling point founder bill. Samuel senior bought a distillery in Loretto Kentucky in nineteen, fifty three but that distillery began making whisky as far back as the early eighteen hundreds. Maker's marks message today is still it's one bottle at a time every time. And an oppression bit of copy anticipating the changes coming to the Industry today they also say it's been a widely held belief around here that character isn't made by machine. Ouch. Regardless of an expected war between purists and innovators, the time may turn out to be just right for bespoke in the pandemic is spiking demand for spirits but trade wars are making them more expensive to import according to CNN. And when you can't import easily making new spirits here, bottles that can get to the shelf in the blink of an eye could fill a growing demand. and to that investors like, Derek. JETER may well say, cheers.

Spirits Tech Company Derek Jeter CNN Ron Whiskey Stu Aaron Tj Rodgers Forbes Samuel Founder Loretto Kentucky America Martin
11 Trivia Questions on The Human Body

Trivia With Budds

04:44 min | Last month

11 Trivia Questions on The Human Body

"All right guys we are diving into some human body related trivia questions. Let's see if you know all these answers number one approximately how many bones does the average adult have question number one approximately how many bones does the average adult have number one? Question number two, five, human senses are sight hearing taste touch, and what five human senses are sight hearing taste touch and what what's missing their number two. And number three. What is the most common human blood type? What is the most common human blood type number three Number four what is the colored portion of the human I called? What is the colored portion of the human I called number. Four. Question number five approximately how many pints of blood doesn't average adult body contain approximately how many pints of blood doesn't average adult body contained. And number six human sex determination occurs at six to seven weeks in Jeff. Station prior to this, all fetuses are essentially what? Number seven. What part of the human blood carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body part of human blood carries oxygen from the lungs the rest of the body. And eight what is the largest solid organ and the average adult human? What is the largest solid organ the average adult human? Question Nine, what nine hundred, sixty, six, sci fi film involved injecting a miniaturized crew into a human body what nineteen sixty six film was that An number nine number ten, what spiral shaped ear bone is mainly responsible for hearing what spiral shaped ear bone is mainly responsible for hearing. Andy Bonus question to close out this episode humans are the only animals with which of these body parts. Is it a belly button fingernail knuckle or Chin Chin Belly Button fingernail or Chin or sorry or knuckle knuckle cinelli button fingernails. Those are your choices humans, the only animals with which of those body parts. All right. Those are your questions for the human body will be right back in just a second to see how you did. We are back with the answers to human body Trivia here comes question number one and the answer approximately how many bones does the average adult have we are looking for around two hundred for this one kind of just general answer there I think. The actual answer is like two. Oh, six to five. But if you put somewhere around two hundred, that's the approximate answer we were looking for number two the five human senses are sight hearing taste touch. And smell when you smell stuff like a Yankee candle, maybe burning some kind of autumn sent around your house right now in time for Halloween number three, what is the most common human blood type O positive I think that's what I am but I have no idea. My wife asked me the other day she goes what's your blood type I said I don't think anyone's ever asked me before they're thirty four years of life I have no idea. Number four what is the colored portion of the human I call? That's the Iris also a Goo Goo dolls song number five approximately. How many pints of blood doesn't average adult body contained? That's eight pints of blood eight number six human sex determination occurs at sixty seven weeks in station prior to all fetuses are essentially female female. Number seven what part of the human blood carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body that the red blood cells, red blood cells, number eight. What is the largest solid organ in the average adult human? That's the liver liver alone STU. And number nine, what nine, hundred, sixty, six, sci fi film involved injecting a miniaturized crew into human body. That is fantastic voyage. Also the plot of most of the magic school bus episodes I remember as a kid number ten, what spiral shaped your bone is mainly responsible for hearing. You're using it right now to listen to this episode and that's the coke. La. Cochlea. And number eleven. Humans are the only animals with which of these body parts we had Chen belly button fingernails and knuckles. The answer was Chin Chin. So they have it

Chin Chin Chin Andy Bonus Jeff Chen
Marianna Leivaditaki's Chestnut Onion Stew Recipe

Monocle 24: The Menu

05:20 min | 2 months ago

Marianna Leivaditaki's Chestnut Onion Stew Recipe

"Hello My name is Marina Boulevard key and I am from Crete half creighton and half Scottish Ashley I am a chef and I work here in London. And have been doing. So for many years, I was the head chef Mario and currently the head chef at Maurito at Hackney road. The race appeared like to share with you today is a chestnut and onion stew with the option of adding Pumpkin to it. So dishes really simple. A slow cooked stews. So you just need to create a really small base and sweet base using finely chopped carrots and celery and garlic and kind of cutting them really small and putting them in a pan with a little bit of olive oil and making sure they're nice and sweet. So cooking them for about fifteen to twenty minutes and then adding lots and lots of baby onions. So I like to use the Bora tiny. Tyler onions because they're small the really sweet and they're quite mild. So depending on how many people I want to do this do for I locate about five to seven baby onions, per-portion sa- loads, and loads, and this will make you really really beautiful. So after your base is nice and sweet, you just add the onions and then you add your cooked chestnuts. So of course, you can use chestnuts that you cook and you. Peel, but that will take a very long time. So I like to use good quality vacuum packed chestnuts. So I would say you kind of us about one hundred, one, hundred, twenty grams of chestnuts per portion just to be really nice and generous, and this is kind of what this is about using chestnuts instead of meat. So it's adding this kind of really really nice richness to this to that meat word if you using. That so you get everything in the port you add some really good quality chopped tomatoes a nice amount of red wine you season with salt and pepper, and a little bit of Orange Peel, a cinnamon stick, and you just make sure your port is nice and liquidity and there's enough liquid to kind of let this to cook gently few think the reason you can always add some wine or you can just add some water. Place a lead and just let it simmer for half an hour forty minutes just until it start smelling beautifully, you will be able to smell the orange and the cinnamon. When you take the laid off, you will see actually this source has really thickened and this Jew is just absolutely delicious. I wouldn't say it needs more than forty five minutes send. Another amazing ingredient to add that is very seasonal at the moment is. The pumpkin or the butternut squash or any funny squash that you might come across. You can just peel it Q-bert and added in this do at the same time with your base, your salary and your carrot, your onions. So I think here in London I don't often see chestnuts Jews and it's a true. That's very traditional in Greece in the winter months and it's absolutely amazing like if you go up the mountains, you know you. Might Walk into Taverna. The is run by an old granny and before you even kind of you just open the door and you're like, okay, she's Cook Chestnuts Stu. You know. So it's something that you find, but it's something that is also special. So it's not everywhere. It's not in every TAVERNA eater you go two sets a win today sheets really warming at celebrating chestnut, which you know are just absolutely amazing and I love them. And, it's a dish that I recently I collaborated with this amazing new project called wild radish, and this is my dish for Christmas together with lots of other things. So it's a little bit more elaborate, but the main stew is this chestnut and nonunion stew and it's been fantastic collaborating with world radish because it's just an amazing new project asking US sheriffs and other really really lovely beautiful capable sheriff's. To think of dishes they love Cook them, create them, write them down, and then they make them really easy for everyone to do. So you receive this amazing box with

London Peel Bora Tiny Mario Nonunion Tyler United States Greece
Los Angeles - Weather Helps Firefighters Gain More Ground In California

KFBK Garden Show

01:27 min | 2 months ago

Los Angeles - Weather Helps Firefighters Gain More Ground In California

"Right now. Cal Fire reporting that a fire. Another fire started this morning called the glass fire in Napa County. It's already at 800 acres. But the milder weather has allowed firefighters to make progress on a number of fires. You realize since the beginning of the year, there have been 8100 wildfires that have burned well over 3.7 million acres here in California that's larger than the state of Connecticut. There have been 26 fatalities and over 7000 structures destroyed that they have made good progress on controlling the Ln you lightning complex fire. In Napa Lake Cinema, Collusive Solano and YOLO counties. The EU Lightning complex fire. All of these started in August 2 and that Stu Fire in Contra Costa, Alameda, San Joaquin Stanislaw counties. And the beauty Hema glen fire. All of those three fires are about 96 97% contained contain doesn't mean they're out and with heavier winds expected they could Flare up again. And then, of course, there's the the big fire. The August complex fire, which has burned over 873,000 acres of that it's only 43% contained. All right. We'll keep you advised of all that, and we'll talk gardening.

Hema Glen Fire Stu Fire Napa County Napa Lake Cinema San Joaquin Stanislaw Collusive Solano EU Contra Costa Yolo Connecticut California Alameda
Congressional Inquiry Faults Boeing And FAA Failures For Deadly 737 Max Plane Crashes

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:57 min | 2 months ago

Congressional Inquiry Faults Boeing And FAA Failures For Deadly 737 Max Plane Crashes

"A sweeping congressional inquiry has found damning evidence of failures at both Boeing and at the Federal Aviation. Administration in the development and certification of the seven thirty seven Max, the report says these failures contributed to to Max plane crashes killing three hundred and forty six people. Here's NPR's David Schaper. The House Transportation Committee investigation finds that there was no singular technical flaw pilot failure that led to the deadly 737 Max plane crashes. In Indonesia, in October of two, thousand, eighteen Ethiopia, the following March instead it describes the circumstances that led up to them almost like. A perfect storm calling it the horrific culmination of a series of faulty technical assumptions by Boeing's engineers lack of transparency in the part of Boeing's management and grossly insufficient oversight by the FAA. The report details Boeing's flawed design of a new automated flight control system on the plane and mistakes and using outdated and faulty assumptions of pilot response, as well as a culture of concealment keeping information from the F., a. its customers, and the pilots would fly the plane. There's something big came out of this. That's just is mind Boggling House Transportation Committee Chairman Peter Fazil Inquiry and says, what's mind boggling is at both Boeing and the FAA contend they followed proper procedures at vowed the seven thirty seven Max to be compliant that the bureaucratic were it was compliant but the problem is it was compliant and not say and people died the report also details how Boeing employees were under enormous pressure to keep costs down in the plane on. Schedule Aviation Subcommittee chairman. Rick. Larsen says misguided priorities of senior management drove. A number of troubling decisions in one case, senior management when as far as installing countdown clocks in conference rooms making clear to Max employees meeting production timelines rather than safety was a top priority. The congressional investigation is one of many into what caused the lion air and Ethiopian Airlines. Seven thirty-seven Max Plane Crashes Christine Negroni is an aviation journalist and author of the book, The crash detectives and she says, while much of this information isn't new. Poll, what is to me astonishing about the report is the depth, the thickness and the jury of both FAA and bowling knowing that there were problems with the redesign of this airliner and the oblivious -ness of both parties in recognizing that this was a problem that needed to be addressed and thing to grow any fines. Remarkable is that a number of people did raise. Safety concerns about the seven, thirty, seven Max. But those were either inadequately addressed or just dismissed by Boeing many of them never seeing the light of day at the FAA and that's an especially painful realization for the families of those who died in the Max crashes. It angers us to see how how much. Boeing did to cover this up and how much FAA is done. To help them cover it up Michael Stu Mos daughter twenty, four year old Samya arose to mow was on the plane that crash last year Ethiopia, he believes evidence in this report now shows that the first plane crash in Indonesia was preventable within covering up to keep the Max in the air after the lion aircrash so that it crashed again in Ethiopia and killed my daughter. was unforgivable in a statement a Boeing spokesman says, the company has learned many hard lessons from the plane crashes and its mistakes and has made fundamental changes to the company's safety culture and protocols. As a result. The House Transportation Committee is now drafting legislation to improve at a oversight and certifying planes. A Senate committee is expected to take its own at a reform bill later today. David. SCHAPER NPR news.

Boeing FAA House Transportation Committee David Schaper MAX Ethiopia Indonesia Federal Aviation NPR Chairman Ethiopian Airlines Schedule Aviation Subcommittee Bowling Larsen Senate Christine Negroni Rick Peter Fazil Michael Stu Mos
[AI Futures] Steps Towards International AI Governance - with Futurist David Wood

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

07:30 min | 3 months ago

[AI Futures] Steps Towards International AI Governance - with Futurist David Wood

"So David where I thought we'd start off here is around this broad topic of the governance of artificial intelligence I. think that there's concerns about the near-term around security privacy. There's longer term concerns about becoming more powerful people are thinking about should there be just regional surveys of governing technologies or or is it prudent to really think about global governance GM stance or way that you like to frame that problem? I'm all in favor of some local experimentation I. Think it's appropriate to have some things out to not obvious in advance that we can. Off. The Bat first time get a complete system of regulation. Correct. So I'm in favor of different parts of the globe whether it's the EU whether it's America whether it's China experimenting with a view to. Seeing which rules make more sense which rules viable. However, it has to be a stepping stone to watson envisioned global agreement because people will not surely be loath to commit themselves to that restrictions nationally locally if they perceive thought competition is going to be able to walk without these restrictions and get potential advantage. So we have to move into coast to international agreements to. Many people people are. Fearful of the any prospect of global government they feel that it's going to be d'italia -tarian or inch to wants the. Taliban. But what I will say is that we already have examples of global governance of various things. We have a sports organizations which managed to reach agreement on how the soccer football. World Cup is played. The Olympics Organization makes lots of agreements even though the constituent. Nations have lots of different political viewpoints and lots of different makeup. So there are examples of how useful agreements can be reached even between the ideological opponents. That's what we have to build on. I. Like the idea of local experimentation. It does indeed feel very hard to take a directly to the top okay world. Here's the page we're going to be on in terms of how data's treated or what is allowed to do or not allowed to do that Cetera. How do you see that playing out in terms of? Relative, near-term thinking about obviously the EU is they have their GDP are rules that are coming out. You see new sort of waves of these rules emerging in different countries than some observation by the global community as to how are they shaking out their implications for private sector innovation whether implications for human rights where implications elsewhere and then being able to use those as the experiments to build something more global. Exactly, right and the GDP aw in the EU is very important case point most people of mixed views about the actual implementation we often think, wow, this is clunky. This is A. This is poorly done on the the hind. We have sympathy towards what the rules are trying to do, and we say, yes, it is appropriate. Thought is the right to have an explanation. It's appropriate for people to understand how the data's being used and so on. So we can see that the intent is Goud. If maybe not. One hundred percent in agreement, but it's a starting point, but it is not something that's done once and then finished on the contrary. It's part of what should be an ongoing sequence my lendings in the Business World I spent twenty five years in the mobile technology and smartphones industry that was an industry in which there was a great deal of rapid change, their surprises of a new entrance of disappointments of things going wrong and. Then things going overwhelmingly right. My key lesson from all of that is the importance of agility the flexibility. Of course, you can set the overall long term direction, but you must stay get to that overall target in stages interim as moll steps, a new must be ready to your plan based on what you have lent in what new things become clear that were less clear L. ear on that face so we will get their stage-by-stage. I think politics the world of politics often seems almost like a domain were that innovation where in the private sector let's say is rampant stood to be the only game town isn't the only real game in town in politics to some degree because experimenting with fifty counties in Wisconsin, about how we're going to manage healthcare bills is really hard to do and seems somewhat viable as opposed to. Some big change for the whole state of the whole country and it just Kinda. Gets rolled out. Is there a way to sort foster a greater degree of this experimentation because it feels like at least historically, there have been limits to seeing politics as part of this iteration learning it's more of just clunking inevitability. It's not seen as maybe the global community is not look to aggregate policy as a way for us all to learn for us all to move forward. So ready to encourage that mindset in that learning like you saw in the private sector. One problem with politics is people really like to admit that they will wrong stu really like to have something a defied with them as being a failure whereas in business more people are willing to shrug and say, yes, dot to didn't walk as I expected and you know what analogy I'm wiser. And Business we talk about failing smart failing fast and feeling forward and it sounds like buzzwords. But all three of these things means something particular failing forward in particular means that you don't try and move on quickly and did deny the you ever were associated with such an experiment you say, well, here's what you've learned from it and you use that as a starting point for the next round of experiments but they politicians like to present themselves and we often as voters like to see all politicians is A. Superhuman Infallible Vegas and we need to have a much more human understanding of how politics works. So that's one thing that will help. A second thing that will help is more of a coalition that mentality rather than two different groups WanNa. The right and the other the laughed the Republicans at the Democrats or whatever politics is in my view much healthier when there are multiple different parties involved and where it's quite easy for people to move from one party to another as their owner. Viewpoint changes evolves over the time. So sadly, when two different blocks very adversarial. Limits the ability to have more meaningful and useful discussion. It pushes into their role in mental state as well. It puts into this tribal frame in which we often don't want to say something we think is true because it might be embarrassing for offsides. So instead, we latch onto something that makes the other side look stupid even though we may not fully believe it. So it's a very bad way of having a proper. Discussion. So sometimes I talk about we need more than just democracy. We need a super democracy. We need to learn how to have these discussions in a way that We're happy to admit that we've been wrong with hoppy to admit we've changed our mind after all to court the Economist John Maynard Keynes though he may not actually have said this when the exchange I changed my mind, the

EU GM Taliban John Maynard Keynes David Wisconsin Watson Goud Soccer Olympics Organization China America Wanna Football
The Strange Myth About Oxygen And The Yin-Yang Gases With AJ

My Seven Chakras

04:37 min | 4 months ago

The Strange Myth About Oxygen And The Yin-Yang Gases With AJ

"Ever since which urine witold that we need a lot of oxygen to survive were to breathe in deeply so that we can get enough oxygen oxygen has been touted as life giving gas that US earthlings can art survive without but is this entirely true or is there more than meets the eye on today's episode we're going to explore this very interesting and profound dodig, and by the end of this episode, you will actually understand in a very simple and easy manner how you're breathing translates to more energy deeper relaxation. Oh mind and better hilt. But before I, continue our request you to please hit the subscribe button on your phone especially if you're on an iphone. Something to the podcast algorithm that ensures that people who wouldn't normally see this episode Ashley come across. So please hit the subscribe button right now. All right. So before we dive deeper I, think we need to take a few steps back and understand how energy is produced in the body from a scientific perspective and this is really interesting when you breeden. You're taking oxygen which goes down your throat into your lungs and into your bloodstream. The oxygen then binds to the him global in your blood cells. Now, the oxygen is then transmitted into the mitral. Contra. And if you remember lessons from school, you'll remember that it is the powerhouse of your cell and through a chemical reaction the Oxygen Burns with the glucose in the cell to form Energy Carbon Dioxide and water vapor, and then when you breathe out. You exist the governor dockside along with the water whip. The energy is then transmitted to wherever it is needed in your body. Isn't that amazing? All of this happens between your in him. An exile. Now oxygen can be likened to fuel that Burns to release energy too little fuel and you really can't start a fire and what happens when they're stu much fuel. Well, there could be a fire or literally an explosion. So what do you think happens when for some reason, you inhale too much of oxygen. You can't be good for you. Right. It turns out that it actually isn't just like when you expose I n to air for long periods of time, the oxygen in the atmosphere reacts for the through a process that is called oxidation to cause rust in the same way when you breathing too much oxygen or a period of time that can lead to oxidative damage in your body. In your disuse in your muscles in the form of inflammation and cell damage. Now, this can be tricky. Because on one side, I'm saying that we need oxygen to produce energy but we're also saying that or exposure to oxygen can lead to inflammation and cellular damage and the key to understanding this lies in a process guard bores effect. Be. Or are bores effect when you breathe in Oxygen Surf. The oxygen binds with your haemoglobin in your blood and a member the oxygen needs to get released from your hemoglobin and has to reach your mic Andrea, which is a powerhouse of yourself for the energy to be produced. So if there's a high level of oxygen. Did remain bound to your hemoglobin and over a period of time this can cause tissue damage and what happens is the free radicals actually start attacking your own system. This can lead to depression Lou Energy Fatigue and immune disorders does this sound familiar the solution to the challenge lies and somehow decreasing the level of oxygen which leads to the hemoglobin releasing or ejecting the oxygen, which can then go to the Powerhouse, off your cell the Mitochondria for energy production. And the UNSUNG hero over here is Garvin Dioxide in other words for cellular hilt optimum energy. You don't just need oxygen, but you also need carbon dioxide for your body to be able to produce energy

Oxygen Surf Garvin Dioxide United States Andrea Ashley Breeden
Forests Getting Younger and Shorter

60-Second Science

02:07 min | 5 months ago

Forests Getting Younger and Shorter

"They give us paper and fuel as well as vital ecological services like cleaning the air, storing carbon and providing habitat. We're talking about trees, of course, but changes in the environment largely caused by humans appear to be causing profound transformations in trees around the world in a new study scientists reviewed global research on trends, Intrigue Birth, growth and death. They combine those data with an analysis of deforestation, and they found that worldwide older trees are dying at higher rates than in the past due to factors like rising era, temperature, wildfires, drought, and pathogens, most of the drivers of that decrease of large trees are increasing themselves such as temperatures, going up droughts or more severe wildfires, windstorms and deforestation are all although variable across the globe. They're. Increasing in so both the loss has already occurred, but we expect more continued loss of big old trees. Nate McDowell an earth scientists at the civic. Northwest National Lab. Who is one of the study's authors? So if we have an increasing rate of death, particularly, the larger older trees. What's left are the younger trees, so that's why, on average through the loss of bigger older trees are forests are becoming inherently younger and shorter. This is a problem because old trees are vitally important for sure. The increase in death does limit the carbon storage of ecosystem and can forces system to become a carbon source to the atmosphere. Second reason we cares from biodiversity perspective. Will grow trees tend to house a higher biodiversity than young four STU. And the third reason is aesthetic as as a society. We care about these trees. We have national parks named after big trees. So there's a there's a personal reason for people to care about this as well.

Nate Mcdowell Northwest National Lab
Best Meditation Practices

Blue Lotus Buddhist Temple Podcast

06:18 min | 5 months ago

Best Meditation Practices

"Good Morning. It's Tuesday morning June twenty third. And, I'm be Coney Huila from Blue Lotus in crystal lake. Well. I live in crystal, Lake Illinois, and the temple is in Woodstock Illinois. Out Today is Beautiful Day here. It's been a little stormy. How is how is your place? How are you this morning? How's your mind? Getting enough movement. Enough exercise. I don't think I am I have to work on that harder. Too much sitting at the computer. So today. I wanted to start with a question someone had sent. Asking if which is best one thirty minutes sitting day for your meditation practice. Or doing six. Five minute short meditations during the day. And that's a that's A. It's a good question. It's interesting. I think for some people. When they begin, the five minutes might be all. They feel they they can handle. All, they feel they can sit still for. They may not see. They may not be really committed to. The practice and just trying it out so if that's the case. I'd say try the five minutes as often as you can during the day and see how you feel. But. In terms of The real benefits of meditation I think working towards that thirty minute. Time every day is better for us because we are really then able to begin developing the stillness. The saw Mata the the tranquility our bodies. And the slowing down. And allowing us to then access. The the deeper benefits of meditation. And in the long run that's what will be. That's what will be. really wanting more and more of. But I don't think the five minutes if you can scatter those through your day. And give them a good five minutes. I think that's necessarily bad for everyone I I think. There are a lot of people who might start that way. and. If you're doing that, would wholeheartedly, you'll find pretty soon that you want to sit longer than five minutes because you might just be relaxing. And Ready to sit. When the five minutes is up. But if you've if you've committed your schedule to only having five minutes then. Your body's going to be ready to get up even if you're kind of longing to stay. So if you can only do five minutes do that and do as the. Person asking the question mentioned Stu. It may be six times a day. You can do that at work if you took a five minute break every couple of hours and you were able to sit somewhere. But really make your goal to be the thirty minutes because I think that's where the real benefits from our practice will show up in our lives, and the practice practice for herself of moving beyond just the. Surface, but really down into see. What's going on with us in accessing? Accessing deeper. Deeper parts of us. Okay. But that's a great question. What are we doing in the world? He stays at so up in the air. Right into. There's so many questions. I have a an upcoming retreat I'm really feeling. I have really mixed messages about that and. Having have to make a decision today doing it or not, and this one I'm one of the leaders for so it makes a big. It's a big. It's a big decision. And I, know individuals make their own decision about going, but I realized that this is what we're being faced with more and more as things open up. But not very well being opened up. We're in stage four now in the in this part of Illinois. So. We're we have more access to places that were still being. Really encouraged where mask into social distance and we, we see the statistics at all over the world. The numbers are rising again. And we have to make lots of decisions and. Hopefully make the right decision, so that may be a more conservative decision than we'd like to make sometimes. we may not be. There may not be a heavy weight of the majority behind us, but remember we have to. Follow the path. That were laying out for ourselves. We have to be true to what we. Honestly, see going on in the world. And evaluating that. And once in a while. Someone will remind me that you know I'm in that. I'm thinking about other people and then someone. Usually. My daughter will remind me that I'm in I'm old I'm in the high risk area. I'm one of the. Just because of my age. And then they're probably some you know. Some other things that are combined with the age, but just my age puts me into that category of I need to be really

STU Lake Illinois Crystal Lake Coney Huila Woodstock Illinois Blue Lotus Illinois Mata
A Tennis Star Catches COVID-19

No Challenges Remaining

05:27 min | 5 months ago

A Tennis Star Catches COVID-19

"Welcome the no challenges remaining. It is Sunday. June twenty first twenty, twenty I am Ben Rothenberg I was working on posting are editing an episode that I recorded a couple days ago with buddies and frequent guests, this show remobilize into all and Louisa Thomas also this episode for the beginning of it. round table talking about the open their plans etcetera etcetera. Then a couple less than an hour ago, there was a posted popped up. I think I dream and remained Toumani. Join me again hello. Hello. Irene was the first one is. If I saw a post, this poster came up on your instagram feed, and can you describe what you saw instagram? Basically posted a photo of himself with a mask, announcing that he is back in Monaco and tested positive for covid nineteen an he apologized for possibly endangering others so yeah, it was him basically disclosing that he has positive, and as we know agree, gorgeous got back from Croatia where he was playing in the Adria tour and a couple of days before that he was playing in Belgrade as well, so he's playing Novak store, and yeah, and we mentioned that obviously on the podcast we recorded two days ago. I it it should be noted that we've seen many patriots of Griego over the past couple of weeks. But that's the first pitcher. We've seen what I'm wearing a mosque. Stu Point to money no I think. Yeah, so this is sort of tenses. Thing hopefully it get to a Rudy Gobert moment in tennis where Gregoire realized I have nothing fallen close attention, paying close attention to the Adria tour, but grew on court yesterday a Saturday in Croatia playing a match inside our Croatia as part of this Adria series traveling around the Balkans he was in. Serbia and we talked about this. A bunch on the show and I think I will probably still. Post the show recorded before, but I feel like this will change the tenor of its I want to post these. Get this one up I throw show that we are connected to reality more than maybe the other episode from two days ago because I think as Louisa, early people say on the show like. In these times a lock change short period of time, this is obviously a big moment for tennis. One that I think it's fair to say that we all feared was very possible with looking at Adria series, which is exhibition event sort of started by Novak Djokovic determined director. Quote Unquote was Georgia Djokovic of ex brother. It was being held in Belgrade and a few other planned stops around the Balkans They just actually after the news of Dmitrov positive test. They just can't sold the final match of today's session in. Montenegro which was supposed to host next weekend had already said thanks, but no thanks to Adria tour canceled their leg of the event. We sort of imagined Asia tour, which was an event. Whichever one you twenty? How about you described? He described what what we saw because he posted a bunch of photos. From recent days what Adrian Tour Bend like the got people concerned something this. Business was sending. The optics are not good. Let's put it charitably that way. Yes essentially what we've seen is What is a very regular event in very abnormal times you know? Whether it's you look on twitter on on streams on on Youtube big crowds in the stadium at Novak's Club scene players. And hands and invading each other's personal space and Interacting with fans you've seen videos of. Them are on the out in a club stripping together. and. Will these images that would be normal in normal times, but these aren't normal times, and it makes you cringe a bit. And so there there there's been tons of criticism and. Of course. Rich kind of. Received a lot of criticism for an we actually spoke. To US ball. And he said kind of that. He's aware of the criticism from the West. But you know what while things may be bad in the UK or the, us, it's not. It's not the same in Serbia. And, yeah, and for that reason you know people have been kind of reacting to that and reacting badly, and that's kind of where we. Can I add? They also had a kids day. That had a lot of kids. We've seen the photo of that as well and they've had a football match, and they've had a basketball match in Croatia. They went to a concert with Donovan John August the new version others the other day, and the thing is you have players who came from countries. Who aren't Serbia and Croatia in that? You have you have players someone like Gregoire? Who flew from the states, then winces Bulgaria, possibly also to Monaco. You also have such as Vera. Vera who's traveling from different places Sasha's also saddlebrook for quite a big portion of the quarantine time you have people traveling from different places, and they got off the plane, and you see the video of them getting off the plane and immediately hugging Novak, and immediately being welcomed people into walking around the no masks I don't understand how you can get a flight and already know that that person that person didn't have time to get tested, so that already was

Croatia Novak Serbia Gregoire Louisa Thomas Belgrade Georgia Djokovic Tennis Monaco Adria Montenegro Ben Rothenberg Vera Adrian Tour Bend Toumani Donovan John August Rudy Gobert Stu Point Irene United States
Symptoms of Coronavirus: Early Signs, Serious Symptoms

Science Magazine Podcast

12:43 min | 8 months ago

Symptoms of Coronavirus: Early Signs, Serious Symptoms

"What does it mean to be sick with current Oh virus we typically think I probably of shortness of breath symptom that will determine whether you should go to the doctor. You have a fever could lose your sense of smell. Maybe some stomach problems. Who What does this virus actually? Due to the body Meredith Wiedeman team of reporters from science looked at what we know of its effect system by system. It's not a complete picture yet but researchers are starting to pull it together. Okay Meredith how are you? I'm fine how are you Sarah? I'm good. This is a very comprehensive story from nose to Toews. I think they saw in one description of the work. Yes and so what happens? When a person comes in contact with the novel coronavirus. He essentially they inhale it and respiratory droplets. They might also pick it up on fingers that they then placed to their face from an inanimate surface the virus finds a welcoming home in the upper respiratory tract. A back of the throat the nose. Because there there are cells that are rich in what are known as ace two receptors and these are receptors that live on the surface of some cells and that the virus needs in order to get into those cells. We don't know the numbers but some people are just gonNA clear the infection and move on with their lives. Right they are. They're going to either be a symptomatic not even being aware they are infected and they can be very infectious in this stage or they might feel crummy they might have Malays. They might have aches fever. That really within a week or so start to recover ordered. They might go into a more serious phase of the disease. This is when the virus makes its way into the lower respiratory tract. That's right if your immune system can't beat back the virus while except in your nose and throat then the risk goes up of marching down your windpipe and into what we call the respiratory tree. The whole system of Airways that leads to the far reaches of the lung. And that's where the virus again finds a welcoming home because the tiny air sacs called Alveoli where oxygen exchange occurs with the blood also adds an abundance of these ace to receptors on their cell surfaces. And this is a problem because if the immune system goes on the attack these tiny spaces in the lungs you can get really serious problems. Sure it becomes what we know as pneumonia and ammonia simply as lung inflammation. This particular virus can cause a really rip roaring lung inflammation but these patients may have in quotes. Mild the MONJA. Although I don't think anyone has described how they feel as mildly affected or they may turn a severe sharp corner where they begin a rapid downhill. Slide into what we know is acute respiratory distress syndrome where. There's just a raging pneumonia and on their chest xrays or C. T. Scans you're GonNa see white where you should have seen black. Lack representing air in an white. Is this whole inflammatory? Response trying to beat back the virus but doing damage itself. Alveoli walls breakdown either can be clots in the little tiny blood vessels that supply the OBVIO- light nurse. Just a real STU real mess and when people deteriorate very seriously enough deny one thing that researchers are trying to understand is how serious is this immune response and would intervening at that point. Be Helpful for patients. If you have just a regular immune response and you start giving immune suppressing drugs your disarming your your Mahameed in a minority of gravely. Ill patients the immune system goes into this really damaging hyper immune state. Call that a cytokine storm when levels of certain chemical signals and the blood. Go absolutely off the charts and in the end what happens is the immune cells of the body began attacking healthy tissues and you can get widespread kwoh-ting you get the blood. Vessels leaking blood pressure plummeting. It's a catastrophe for the whole body. So in efforts to combat that out of Control Immune response they are deploying drugs that go after specific ones of these chemical signaling molecules known as cytokines and just to be clear here. Most of what we're going to be talking about is for severely affected patients people who are in the ICU people who are coming into the ER. So let's turn to the heart and blood vessels meredith. This is something surprisingly being seen in maybe twenty percent of patients. Yes it's clear that the heart and blood vessels are a target for Kovic and just how unwise still being sorted out. Let one paper in. Jama cardiology found heart damage in nearly twenty percent of more than four hundred patients who were hospitalized for the disease in. Wuhan another found forty four percent of patients in an ICU. There had abnormal heart rhythms. And then there's also an increased tendency to blood clotting that in a Dutch. Icu nearly forty percent of patients had blood. That was clotting abnormally. These are extremely problematic issues and people. That are already very sick from pneumonia. What has been seen happening to people's hearts there seems to be heart inflammation and it's possible because the heart lining and the blood vessel lining just like the cells in the lungs and the nose is rich in these ace two receptors again. They're the viruses port of entry into into cells. So the cells could be. It's possible that they're being in the heart. And the vessels directly inflamed. It's possible there at the lack of oxygen. Getting through because of the problems in the lung is doing additional damage to her vessels could be that a societal kind storm releasing all these inflammatory molecules again and sells remember they attack normal healthy tissue and that can include the linings of blood vessels so there are these multiplex of potential causes that may indeed vary between patients as to what's causing let. But it's clear that there's cardiac and vessel damage in a significant number of severely. Ill patients let's take a turn now to the brain. This is something that we've seen some scary reports on actually of inflammation in the brain and we've also seen law sense of smell in corona virus. Patients is that something that's related to the brain it might be that's not been established but there is a direct connection from so-called olfactory neurons. The ones that light you smell running from the nose up to. It's called the olfactory bulb which connects to the brain as one of our sources. Put It as a nice sounding feary who I have to go and prove that it actually extends to the brain but there are more general brain effects. That don't trace back to loss of sense of smell for one thing. The bloods increased tendency to clot can put patients at risk of having strokes. There's also a problem in that. A lot of these folks developed kidney failure that in itself can cause delirium and problems for the brain in addition there can also be a quote unquote sympathetic storm. It's sort of an overreaction of the nervous system that somewhat analogous to the site of kinds storm and that's common after traumatic brain injury some people with Cova nineteen can lose consciousness. So there's just a whole panoply of potential brain symptoms another symptom that I'd heard of before reading this story and I haven't heard most of this. Was that people can have symptoms in their gut. They can have diarrhea. They can have upset stomach. Does this mean that you know the virus pieces of the virus are surviving digestion? Yes apparently it does. And one of the suggestions is that patients are swallowing their own respiratory secretions and that the virus is carried live and somehow survives the acid environment in the stomach to land in the small intestine which is again replete. With these ace two receptors. An so virus can establish. Wow a robust infection. There that's it's thought what's leading to diarrhea nausea and other problems in perhaps on average about twenty percent of patients across studies. I WANNA take a step back here and just talk about how all these different systems being affected kind of expand the pool of people who have pre existing conditions that would make corona virus infection. Really dangerous for them. Can you talk a little bit about that? Sure so since we were just talking about kidney disease in the kidneys. That's one of the organ systems. Where if you have a pre existing kidney disease that gives you basically a handicap when you start this race with this new virus than we think of something like diabetes harms the kidneys. So if you start with a lower baseline of kidney function these chronic kidney patients with pre existing kidney disease are at seriously greater risk of developing acute kidney injury during the infection in the same way diseases that affect the blood vessels will also put patients at higher risk. High blood pressure diabetes again congestive heart failure all these kinds of pre-existing disease just make patients that much more vulnerable. Should they become infected? So how is research like this? It's so preliminary. Were really just beginning to understand the progression of this infection. How will this help with interventions or treatments? I think it will certainly offer clues and sign posts. There will be new discoveries that hopefully will lead to highly effective drugs but we have already a good deal of information that points the way to either existing drugs or targets for drugs now being developed knowing for instance the outline of a site a kind storm which is something that can be triggered by other viral infections or bacterial infections. We have a starting place with that. We have these drugs already being deployed and other inflammatory states like rheumatoid arthritis that you can then say well. If they're beating back a certain site assign one of these out of Control Chemical Messengers in arthritis may be they will also be back some piece of the cytokine storm. That's going on in these severely ill patients and so you have such drugs being deployed in clinical trials. What we know about the ace two receptor and it's detailed protein. Structure has been defined by a couple of new important papers hopefully will give us new unique targets to actually prevent binding there. Which would be terrific. Yeah so what? Was it like trying to report on this? Big Mix of peer reviewed preprinted small clinical studies firsthand reports. Those kinds of things was very challenging. Every scientist and physician we interviewed really added the caveat. This is science on the fly. Our knowledge today may be completely eclipsed a month from now or what we're thinking about how this diseases is acting may be proven wrong within three weeks. This is obviously an ongoing endeavor to understand how the disease progresses what conditions set you up for getting extra sick and then you know the mechanisms that are happening at the cellular level. Where is the best information going to come from? Do you think. Is this something where people need to set up. These robust studies that you described. Are they doing that now? Yes in fact. They are doing it but hampered by the fact that they're trying to at the same time in many cases take care of desperately ill. Patients cleverly does the analogy goes trying to build the plane. While you're flying at this information is going to be constrained or imperfect because of the situation. It doesn't mean it's not going to be important.

Bloods Pneumonia Meredith Wiedeman Respiratory Distress Upper Respiratory Tract Respiratory Tract Fever Toews Sarah Lung Inflammation Respiratory Tree Obvio ICU Scientist
2 Unusual Hacks to Convert Your Inbound Traffic

Marketing School

02:01 min | 8 months ago

2 Unusual Hacks to Convert Your Inbound Traffic

"When we think about inbound traffic obviously that's people coming to you and in the context of I'm talking about right now. I'm going to talk about inbound traffic coming to my blog so this is like Seo content marketing basically organic search coming out. And so one thing that you can do when you think about converting people coming to your site is you can use survey funnels. And this is a tactic that was or strategy popularized by Ryan Leveque from the ask method. He has a book called. Ask method. That's a S K not the method of so he also has a tour that you can use to so the tool what it does. It's called bucket dot. Io and basically you're able to survey people coming to your site thing like. Hey maybe if I land on the single rainn website. Are you looking to start your own business? Are you looking for marking services? What are you looking for? A second? Funnel does people into very specific campaigns and a bucket that makes it very easy to do. There's a lot of different tools to use. But that's he's the guy that kind of popularized doing survey on also. I'll give him credit bucket that I owe one strategy that I use is mrs number to create some sort of free neom experienced. This could be on your website. This can anywhere so for example one thing. I'm implementing right. Now is the ability to pay for live chat with SEO expert so imagine a Intercom Style. Chat Bot about something that's man by human but instead of just having the Intercom Chat bought my team. Is We already designed something? That looks just like it. So when you click new conversation it'll say. Hey this feature is blocked. Only available to premium members click here to upgrade and then once they upgrade then they'll be able to see a real chat where they can chat but the point. I'm trying to make is including features and elements within your design and site and start blocking Ones you can use these tactics like Web APPs Stu but you can do it for any general site and generate more sales that way versus just driving people to sales paid all the time and selling them make him take action and charged for that action.

Ryan Leveque Intercom Style Rainn
Making Do

Your Brain on Facts

09:36 min | 8 months ago

Making Do

"Dissolve one packet of Lemon Jello in one can or one cubes worth of Beef Bouillon. Add lemon juice and allowed to cool. Add three hard boiled eggs diced. One Cup diced celery. Half an onion grated one cup miracle whip and one can of corn beef chopped chill until set slice and serve congratulations. You've just made corned beef luncheon salad. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. Use It up where it out make it do were do without my grandmother would say. I thought that was clever saying from her side of the family but it was actually a slogan from World War Two encouraging the public to use fewer resources so more could be diverted to the war effort. We're all getting a taste of that as we're hunker down unable to shop at the spur of the moment and much more limited in our choices when we do thankfully we do have precedent to fall back on after all people are still alive today it through the Great Depression children. The roaring twenties came to an abrupt stop with the Stock Market Crash of Nineteen Twenty nine which saw billions of dollars evaporated into thin air. The crash wasn't the sole cause of the Great Depression. There were things like the dust bowl wherein incorrect farming methods turned the fertile American planes into a desert but the crash did act to accelerate the global economic collapse by nineteen thirty three. Nearly half of America's banks failed and thirty percent of the workforce was unemployed. You had to make the most of what you had and you had to get good at that fast to women. Help struggling homemakers to be able to feed their families. Eleanor Roosevelt an aunt. Sammy beginning in nineteen twenty. Six and Sammy had a popular weekday. Radio show called housekeepers chat about cooking and other domestic concerns as well as chitchatting about whatever else was going on at the time and Sammy was very popular especially in rural areas. Thousands of people wrote into her for recipes by nineteen thirty to one hundred and ninety four stations broadcast aunt. Sammy show and she published aunt. Sammy's radio recipes. Parenthetically the Great Depression Cookbook. It would be the first cookbook published in Braille. Interestingly enough though I struggle to think of how difficult it would be to cook on wood or old timey gas stove without good eyesight on Sammy's recipes. Were meant to be simple healthy and easy to cook. She's even credited with helping Broccoli. Find widespread acceptance prior to which it was only found in insular Italian neighborhoods and Sammie helped many wives and mothers through the Great Depression but once that was over then country was back on its feet. People lost interest. The show was cancelled sometime in the nineteen forties. Though sources don't agree when exactly. There's one other fact about aunt Sammy. That's worth mentioning. She didn't exist in the latter half of the twentieth. The Department of Agriculture Bureau of Home Economics created a wife for uncle. Sam The on creatively named Aunt Sammy. The character was voiced by different women at each individual radio station that way the listener would hear an accent similar to their own and feel more connected to aunt Sammy. Three women worked behind the scenes at the USDA to prepare the script each week that all the regional aunt. Sammy's would use fanny Walker. Contested Recipes Josephine. Harmful wrote the chatty portions of the show and Ruth Fan demine coordinated all of the Menus and recipes. The other woman who guided homemakers through was the very real first lady. Eleanor Roosevelt. When Franklin Roosevelt entered the White House in Nineteen thirty three? A record number of people were hungry but being president is not without its perks and the first family eight well even extravagantly while people stood inbred lines. Eleanor Roosevelt. Who didn't know how to cook realized that the way she and the president ate in the White House had the potential to influence and even help the nation through the depression. She hired an acquaintance. Henrietta Nesbitt whose husband was out of work to be the new White House housekeeper housekeeper at that time more like how we use the term homemaker today and not as we use a euphemism for cleaning lady. Nesbitt and Roosevelt retooled the entire kitchen installing modern appliances and coaxing the skeptical White House staff to use them. This was the first kitchen in America and it wasn't even sanitary recalled. Nesbitt in her memoir. Meanwhile Eleanor turn to home economists for menus that would balance nutrition and economy the healthiest recipes in the world wouldn't help people if they couldn't afford the ingredients what's more she resolved to serve these humble dishes in the White House. Her efforts were covered by national newspapers and followed closely by housewives. There was a catch. These nutritious economic meals were awful. The first kitchen was turning out some of the most unpalatable meals in modern memory. The president himself was usually the test subject for these new dishes and he obligingly choked them down. Things like deviled eggs with tomato sauce and prune pudding in place of lavish dishes. The White House table was the stage for things like Spaghetti with boiled carrots. Cold jellied billion and bread and butter sandwiches served so much mutton that being grown sheep which is cheaper than lamb. Because it's much tougher that it became a joke throughout Washington. The first lady experimented with foods like milk corno a mix of dried milk powder and cornmeal developed by Cornell University milk. Porno could be eaten as a gruel like dish or worked into recipes. I was not brave enough to research. What those recipes might be. The bland meals became so notorious that visitors to the White House would eat before they went nutrition. Not Taste was paramount in the time of soup. Kitchens and bread lines and eleanor. Roosevelt was trying to use her table as a way of encouraging and inspiring other Americans to get through this uniquely challenging historical moment. It was just as well they got used to eating a limited range of food because FDR's presidency also included World War Two and the Roosevelt's eight rationed food just like everyone else Roosevelt's White House eight modestly in an act of culinary solidarity with the people who were suffering. Jane's Eagle men. The CO author of a square meal told The New York Times. Here's a sampling of menu items. The first family and the public general might have enjoyed in massive bunny ears spaghetti with carrots and white sauce. The sauce was basically just milk. Meatless loaf made with peace oatmeal peanuts. Rice and or cottage cheese. Whatever you could get your hands on Mulligan's stew any animal. You could kill or find dead with whatever veggies you could manage or anything. That would keep hungry. They for a few hours without killing you like sawdust. It was reportedly created by the massive homeless population during the depression. Where people in homeless or migrant worker camps would pool their resources so that everyone could eat none of my sources mentioned where the name Mulligan might have come from. We do know the name origin of another STU. Hoover Stu Herbert Hoover had been elected just in time for the crash. But Unlike the Roosevelt's he continued to live the good life in the White House. Shantytowns BECAME HOOVER. Villes and the soup from soup. Kitchens became hoover stu the weirdest one of all and this report is opinion was peanut butter in baked. Onions was a whole onion hollowed out stuffed with peanut butter and baked. Just because we have two things on hand doesn't mean we should eat them at the same time as Eagle men succinctly put it. Peanut butter has nothing to say to a baked onion. Some recipes sound like they shouldn't work but surprisingly do like mock Apple Pie. Apples weren't readily available. But Americans weren't willing to give up their conic Apple Pie. The apples in mock apple pie were actually Ritz crackers and it worked. If you're not already familiar with Youtuber Emmy made in Japan. I'll link her hard time series in the show notes and on the website. She all kinds of dishes from times of deprivation including hot water pie grapefruit. Peel steak toast soup. And even the Haitian dirt cookies which you can hear more about in episode number ninety four. My name is mud while we can be grateful that recipes like ketchup soup and peanut butter and mayonnaise. Sandwiches are behind us. Some food created during the depression is still with us. Meatloaf is a comfort food classic and shaping food into loaves go to during the Great Depression. The same goes for casseroles which were a good way to use up odds and ends or to mask less palatable ingredients the depression also gave us the mother of all comfort. Food Kraft Macaroni and cheese or kraft dinner for my friends up. North in Nineteen thirty seven craft heard about a salesman from the tender Roni. Macaroni Company of Saint Louis. A Scottish emigrant aimed grant Leslie going rogue and selling his noodles with packets of greeted kraft cheese attached. They hired him to promote the concept and started selling it for nineteen cents for four servings.

Eleanor Roosevelt Aunt Sammy White House Depression Franklin Roosevelt President Trump Great Depression Cookbook America Stu Herbert Hoover Henrietta Nesbitt Sammie Hoover Washington Cornell University Mulligan Department Of Agriculture Bure
Parents Who Lead | Stewart Friedman

The LEADx Show

09:23 min | 9 months ago

Parents Who Lead | Stewart Friedman

"Our guest is of course Dr Stewart Friedman. Stu Let me officially welcome you on leadership show in and again so we're here to talk about parents who lead the leadership approach you need to parent with purpose fuel your career and create a richer life. And I've you've been teasing about this book coming out for a while now and I've been excited because like you. I mean part of my message to the world is leadership isn't just something you do at works. Not a work thing. If leadership is influence were leading all of the time whether we want to or not were influencing people right are leading in our families in our places of worship at work of course and I've often thought about so. I've got three kids to Earn College. One's in high school and I often think about the parallels compare and contrast leading at work leading at home. And so I've just been so excited for this book and let's let me start with. You is about a third of the way through and I thought is called parents who lead or couples who lead because actually the front part is really about the importance of partnership with your significant other spouse etc. Let's start there. Tell me more about that. We'll reimagined the total leadership program which I've Been Teaching Award for last twenty years after creating this model for leadership growth when I was head of Leadership Development at Ford Motor Company. Twenty years ago based on research done the decade plus prior to that on how you grow as a leader and how you integrate the different parts of your life in ways at work for all of them. We created this model. There I came back to work began teaching. It here. Wrote a book about it Brian. It's a companies around the world. But my my students my clients in my total leadership courses in programs very often with say you know I'm doing this said of exercises and we're doing pure coaching. We're looking at identify. Your core values your leadership vision writing that out sharing getting feedback identifying the key people in your life what they expect of you what you expect them actually talking to those people in developing your skill and being able to hear the stuff you don't want to hear from people who matter most to you and seeing the reality of what people actually need from you. Now what you think they need from you and then experimenting with new ways of getting things done that are good for them and for you. I've been doing this and my partner or my my friends. They see me doing this. And They WanNa do it to and especially with respect to how we're dealing with our kids together. I said well you know just finding a copy of the book and you'll do it in parallel but you know eventually they You know there was a drumbeat of like write something for us that we can do together so that was one big push another was when I turn sixty five a few years ago. My kids who are in their late twenties early thirties. I asked them for my sixty fifth birthday this. What do you want your birthday data? Centre? Here's what I would like. Take some time and right to me to be long page whatever. What would you like me to be doing with the remainder of my productive life? Wow what an exercise. Well that's beginning and how by my doing whatever it is that you'd like me to do. Would I be benefiting you alive and third piece be willing to talk to me for an hour about what you were? So that was given that my family gave me a my three kids at my incredible wife and and that those those were some profound conversations. I shouldn't have waited till I was sixty five to do that. Exercise Yes. The professor gave his children and assignment. But it's it's I. I can't recommend it enough. It was just so wonderful to do this. And one of the things that came out of it was Issue US what you know to focus on what you can do to be helping the next generation of people which is the initial motivation for my getting into this whole field to begin with so so those are some of the reasons why a book about parents who lead and let me just say one other thing about it but respect to your question is not just couples. The primary emphasis is on people who are raising children together. We call them parenting partnerships. Because we very consciously wanted to avoid you know the exclusion of the many many many varieties of parenting partnerships that exist some of them are in traditional heterosexual couples but You know some involve single parents who are raising children with other people who may not be their spouses extended family friends et Cetera et CETERA. So we we emphasize this notion of parenting partnerships partners in parenting to be as inclusive as we can although much of the material from our research lab was generated by people who are married who are raising their children together that makes sense and so in the parenting partnerships. I mean one of the first things you say is And again I'm coming at it. I thought this was going to be You know being sort of funny here like you delegate at work here's how you delegate to your children or something and it doesn't start like does start with with the kids it's talking about in a parenting partnership explore each other's values do you. Are you aware of each other's values explorer? Why you want to be parents won't tell me more about. That's the right place that we need to start. I'm so glad you're asking him. Because People WanNa rush right to the hacks right. Yep How do I reduce stress and make my kids smarter more effective less risk in oral? But you know what we know from the Science of leadership which we tried to harness here my Luther Elissa westering and I to bring to the art of parenting. There's a lot we know that is relevant. And one of the things that we know with confidence is that effective leadership starts with your values and your vision. You you have to have a clear idea to be able to articulate to some degree what you care about most your purposes and we are headed white and so that's where we begin on. What are your? What are your values? We help people identify what their eyes are here. Here's a whole bunch of value statements. Choose the four or five that are most representative of what's most important to you. Draw on Your Life. History to identify the critical episodes. That help you to understand what it is that you must care about and write a short one pager on your vision meaning specifically imagine. It's fifteen days from now fifteen years from now. Rather what are you doing on that day in the morning and the afternoon in the evening? With whom and why. What's the impact that you're having a legacy you're creating and we ask people to do these activities on their own? I starts with you. And then we ask their partner in parenting to do the same to do this together and we. We provide a lot of coaching tips. Throughout and in the appendix had to work together and how to work with other people other parents which is important part of what we are proposing. You're in helping people to do is a lot smarter and more effective to grow as of heater as apparent when you're working with peers who are struggling wrestling with trying to grow in the in their own path but it begins with. What do you care about? What's your vision of the future? You're trying to create and then show that with your partner and see where those compatibility see where this conflict. Yeah because there's going to be both probably that's right. We'll usually it and talk it over with compassion with curiosity with commitment to shared future. Although in some instances they're pretty rare people realize. Oh this is the future. You're hoping for in your life. This is a few drum hoping for in my life Wait a minute so you know there can be some some uncomfortable conversations there but for the most part and I've now been talking to people who are in our research lab who've been practicing this for a while and I asked him so what's what's the big takeaway with with still resonates a shared vision. The collective vision that was a that set us on a new path of greater clarity of what we care about. It helps us make decisions not just in the long term but in the day to day. Why are we doing what we're doing today this month? This season so leaders effective leaders. They know what they care about. And they're able to articulate that in a way that is end relates to other people in ways that they feel is a is meaningful. And so that's where we begin the work of learning to be a parent who rates

Partner Dr Stewart Friedman Ford Motor Company Wrestling Brian Elissa Westering Professor Representative
At-Home Cooking in the Time of Social Distancing With Adam Rapoport | House of Carbs

House of Carbs

08:37 min | 9 months ago

At-Home Cooking in the Time of Social Distancing With Adam Rapoport | House of Carbs

"Oh you and I were exchanging notes last week about you know doing a pod. We wanted to provide a kind of public service out. There tall are taste. Buds all are hungry. Homeys at our at home doing the appropriate thing. Under the guidelines provided by our local and state and federal government in terms of social distancing and a whole bunch of us are now all of a sudden home cooks on a much more frequent basis with more time than we previously expected or anticipated And so I reached out and you were. You said Yeah I have some thoughts and You know even since the original exchanging of notes last week You and the good folks at bone apetite have been coming up with all kinds of rich concepts and ideas and guidelines and you know sensitive direction. I want to start with your newsletter post. That went up arrived in my email last night. Which you know has the tagline. Cook the food that makes you feel good because that to me really is a helpful vital kind of reminder about you know the place that we're in the physical space that we're in and and you know the challenge that we're all sort of confronted by And you mentioned in the newsletter. How you know you yourself in terms of with your own family had been cooking some some things you know about the right away. You're cooking food that I would sort of put in in a category that that I characterize as indulgent but but now you know we're we have to cook in ways that make us feel sustained But also you know able to to perform in the new world that we're living in So wh what are you looking at in terms of cooking the food that makes you feel good? Yeah I you know week one as I guess you call it when we all sort of realized. We're GONNA sort of lockdown ourselves for quite awhile. Perhaps last week was interesting that I think a lot of us kind of adrenaline is like all right. Let's let's be positive about this. Let's lean into it. It's almost like when there's a blizzard coming and you start cooking a lot of food and I got double batching Ball Nasariyah recipes My wife's making chocolate chip cookies with our son by the end of the day. You're like man. I need a cocktail and by the end of the week as like Mad. I cannot I gotta like dial it down a little bit because it was like big dinners every night. Having drinks it was all about home cooking three meals a day and at some point I realized okay. Like let's keep cooking but let's at least be a bit more sensible about what working? Then we have a columnist Cristina Che. She started this Hashtag gentle foods. I was like what? What is the foods be that was like I like the sound of it? I don't quite know what it means. What I'm intrigued and today was saying like food. That's like a blanket. It just makes you feel good. I guess you could. Kinda describe it as healthy comfort food if that makes sense and chase someone. Who's a you know? She's an avid eater. But just making things like yesterday for lunch I made a lentil salad lentils or the easiest thing in the world to make your phone unsalted water through in some chopped up Celery some carrots and I assembled in the water with them some herbs and I had to like a nine minute hard boiled eggs a little more than a a a Romney but not at Chalky Yolk will vinaigrette analysts very satisfying. But it's not like knock you on your ass cooking. That's exactly why thought this was the right way to kind of frame this conversation you and I are going to have is because the impulse that you described at the outset of like okay. This is a food challenge. That's in front of us and we have you know. Now this opportunity time-wise where you you don't feel like you have to rush. And so the inclination is to be a bit more indulgent Just in terms of you know heavier kinds of meals you can take the time to let things braise and Stu and you know this sort of day and age of social media everything. I don't WanNa say it was showing off but there was a certain camaraderie among everyone that everyone wanted to share what they were making and talk about it and you wanted to sort of put your best foot forward cooking wise at every dinner you made had to be some sort of statement that we're all sharing together. Let's let's make this as delicious in Poudel as possible this whole ordeal. We're in right now Exit it was fun I just I just don't think it's sustainable so again. Like right now being a little bit more sensitive balanced and we'll get there and and that doesn't mean I'm not gonNA enjoy cocktail at the end of the day today but I'm just sort of being a little bit more sensible and yeah whether it's making a batch of beans and you can make beans without the Hawk. You can do things that are satisfying without being punishing in that sort of rich bistro. You know bottle of red wine. Stay Crete SORTA WAY and two everybody's credit The sense of community that emerged as everybody in in that sort of you know food vertical which is all of us but really people you know folks that that liked to traffic in sharing pictures sharing recipes and having ongoing social media conversations about Cooking rightfully. You know jumped in with Gusto. I mean you you mentioned After you put up the the BOLOGNESI recipe your boy Dave. Grohl giving you a seventeen step by step string of texts with pictures and information about all everything that he had going. You know his version of the ball Enezi. But that's not sustainable. That's not every day. That's not how we're going to be able to feed ourselves and feed our families daily So there needs to be some kind of balance and we're this is exactly what you would expect in week. Two right. It's it is. It is a balanced kind of I outstare coming back Earth. A little bit and you know and we posted a ton of service conduct the way I look at it on a petite right now are sort of mission is twofold one on one hand. We need to provide the service and the recipes. That home cooks need. And Right. Now we are all home talks So that's a lot of the slide. Shows like you know. I my table when we did. Last week was eighty-nine recipes with five ingredients. Fewer Dash seriously I love. I'm a simple cook at heart when I'm at home and these these kind of the recipes I love best. We provide a lot of cooking advice. many other slides shows and then the other side of that is not only do people need cooking inspiration advice but we all need company right now. We all need companionship. And if you follow bond petite on Youtube and you see all our test. Kitchen Editors Andy in Bali and Sola and Chris Carlin everybody And these people feel like friends to you five and a half million youtube subscribers and Claire and Brad and everything. It's important that those guys are so popping up on your youtube feed in our epide- instrument feed and right what we're going to start doing. Started this week which will show up. End of this week is all the test. Kitchen editors now have iphone. Eleven's with professional grade microphones and tripods. And they're going to be recording all of their own. What were test kitchen videos now at home in their own apartments and I think that's GonNa be really interesting as you'll still see those same familiar faces but now you're going to be their pets you. Maybe you'll meet up fiance or a husband or a way to get roommates in his whole sort of universe of ancillary characters. Sort of populating the body cinematic

Youtube Cristina Che Chalky Yolk Romney Grohl Poudel STU Dave Bali Chris Carlin Sola Claire Brad
Flight Lines: The Heroic Story of Two Migratory Shorebirds

Published...Or Not

07:43 min | 9 months ago

Flight Lines: The Heroic Story of Two Migratory Shorebirds

"Have someone sitting opposite me just twitching to tell his story. The book is flat. Lines and the author is Andrew Dobson Andrew. Welcome to three C- I thank you. David I'm curious about the would twitching. I haven't really made a close study of twitching despite writing. This book. Twitching is a word that is used by dedicated. Some say obsessive Burgers and sometimes they detractors to Indicate their preoccupation with finding the next bird. An observing bird minded research. Because it's not actually mentioned in the book the twitching behavior of Howard Medhurst who was one of the leading birdwatchers in the nineteen fifties and sixties. But this book in other words is about birds or in particular one species of birds the grey plover a daoist wallflower of the shorter dance. It spreads thinly around the world's margins and is often overlooked. What's the fascination with the Gripe Lot? Well let's start by working our way towards the bird from what we are. Probably the closest bird that we know to this is the masked left wing. It's often colder plaza. But it's sexually left wing but that's what we know as a plot now go through that gate and think about the kinds of things that the left wing does transfer them to the tidal flats of the world the far-flung tidal flats of the world. And there's this small bird not much begun a blackbird gray when it's out of the breeding grounds highly colored up when it gets to the breeding grounds and it is commonly found with others in the group of Long Distance Flying Margaret lowrie shore. Birds the ultramarathons birds. Now when you say ultra-marathon sort of distance are we talking so the two birds that I particularly follow which were satellite tag in South Australia and flew north on the first flight. Each of them flew over the entirety of Australia of Indonesia the Philippines to land one of them in Taiwan and the other in southern China so each of them took a nonstop flight of more than seven thousand kilometers. Just to give us a sort of indication in layman's terms. When you're holding this bird. How much are you holding? Well you're holding about a cup of sugar not a big white. You're holding something that really can be quite placid in the hand. Despite its wildness. And you're holding. I guess the promise of many generations of optic life birdlife and they transcend boundaries in many ways in the journey. We've got apple tree boundaries as people on borders and they bicycling cross all of those hemispheres international borders and such like. It's it's quite a phenomenal feet. If you want to get carried beyond the trivialities of human life like borders then migratory long distance migratory birds are a really good way to start because there will pass through the margins of many countries but is not off one eye and they have total disregard for human borders. Now one of the things that the book sort of touches on as you look this journey other various forms of tagging that have occurred or the ability to follow from banding to rocket nets and now two satellites. The satellites would give you an inordinate amount of opportunity to try and be particular about what you say quite revelatory. They are Give you almost near real time information. About where on the planet this bird is and what it's doing even because if you have a lucrative say on a breeding ground you'll see it move from point to point to point as it fades and then goes back to the central point which is the nest So yes it can be unrivaled information and It really is hugely illuminating. As opposed to the banding which was more happenstance abandoning as the book suggests started in the lighting hundreds. But that would rely on. Someone actually catching the Buddha game. We'll exactly Either catching the again or killing it or finding a dead. The doyen of Australian Migratory Schubert's studies like Clive Minton when he lived in England. Has I band on? A migratory shortbread was on a lovely good coach spotted. Red Shank and he was really pleased to have it in hand really priest to put the band on it and some weeks later he got the band back because it had been shot by the mayor of putting your in France who returned the band with the address on to Clive. Now a couple of things fascinated me about. The birds are reading this book. I'm the song lines. There's a connection here with an indigenous song. Lawn is moving up. Moving from group to group and changing as guides and there's an equivocal mention of what the birds was well yes we'll I'm careful to not impose my description on indigenous cultures. But I hope that I have drawn out of the records of indigenous couches The great variety of names. This bird has as it travels not just from Australia. But through China up to Siberia and across to North America where? It's pretty circum Paula. It has a series of lovely nines. And the they are run there are really illuminating series. Too you know they describe often. I described the bird by its phonetic. Call sometimes they describe it by its coloring in Alaska where I went It was cold emphatic. And that means the scorched bird. But so there's a similarity through the sort of landscape in many ways. Yes depending on which part of the world now for such a fragile creature. They are quite a number of threats in this day and age the threats for the gripe the mind well. We've got a bird here. That has persisted down through evolutionary generations for about one hundred and thirty million years so it's not easily removed from the face of the earth. But while it's doing well other others. In the group of long distance migratory shore birds are not doing so well And as a whole the contracting in numbers. I'm this four that have been listed on Australia's critically endangered list in recent years. Because of the problems they face pardon the analogy but the canary in the coalmine. Well certainly you know I think migratory shore birds. We Stu people generally in Australia particularly and when we look at the coasts we should think about the health of Alco spy. The prison or absence of birds like

Australia Andrew Dobson China Long Distance Clive Minton South Australia David Margaret Lowrie Howard Medhurst Alco Burgers Alaska Paula Taiwan North America Red Shank France Philippines England
The Walmart Haul Episode

Hungry Girl: Chew The Right Thing!

07:37 min | 9 months ago

The Walmart Haul Episode

"All right. We're GONNA jump right in. It's a Walmart Hall. Which means we have lots of products that are ready to be chewed and sipped and swallowed starting with the above all of the above. Not necessarily in that order. But first we have tiller and hatch pressure cooker meals chicken Tortilla Stu so basically these are frozen bags of food items that you throw a pressure cooker or these days. We know it as an instant pot and so it's already made so he just throw the what the contents of the bag into the pressure cooker and IT COOKS UP PRETTY QUICKLY. So this one says only gives you stove top directions to which is nice. I had this. Oh you add water to the pressure cooker. Then you add the sauce than the rest five minutes and then when the timer goes off wheat four minutes. This is basically a nine minute meal. But then but you do have to heat up. Depressurize your pressure cooker. So I wonder if it's really quicker than using stove-top but well I don't know but I'm interested to try it because one cup has one hundred ninety calories four grams of fat and four smartphones points. I know you've got that fast because I'm starving fun and have lunch. Mike is not eat lunch. He's about to chew on Jamie's hand but now we're going to try this. It looks very soupy but this is a chicken stew that was made in a pressure cooker. Or in a I'd like you pass Utensil. Thank you so much wonder. What the origins of the word like Stu like as far as you know what you're doing that's STU maybe names to studio originally it make sense doing it Well it's really good. All right that chicken. This tastes like homemade. Mom's chicken suit and there's corn in it. It's very mild but it's flavorful. This is really great. Comfort food totaling. I love that it's not too salty. Yeah what's sodium? Like on six sixty for a cup so it's not low but let's put that over cauliflower. Rice I love. It was like chicken tortilla soup but with corn beans. Yeah so it's really delicious. It's unexpectedly tasty. We're off to a good start. Okay next up. The product is called mighty spark all natural premium cuts of chicken PROSCIUTTO WITH TOMATO. Basil and garlic seasoned ground chicken so this is basically whereas the packaging of that. Is it a It looks like you buy it in. Like the butcher section where you would buy like genealogy so it's ground chicken smells so good smell it. That's already been flavored. We just throw it in my rankin. Who's probably with like Marinara sauce or something? Who took a big hunk of that? Yeah probably but it already has like what's in it seasoned Rochetta Wise. It's tomato Basil Garlic That's really I love that you don't like about it. It's a little different like sometimes we do the shortcut thing where we Italian seasoning. This doesn't hit you over the head in the same way. Like you really taste the basil or things. He's so good you're probably instead of making ground meat out of it you can do like a meatball or something or Turkey ball. Yeah yeah or like a really fun Burger. I love that. Like sometimes they'll name it something like Bouchette and then you taste it. And you're like they should've just called it tomato garlic. I like that really delivers on the shuttle flavor. Absolutely it does and four ounces. One hundred sixty calories eight grams of fat for smart points to for to that is excellent. All right next up. We have hunts chilly kit. Just add meat. Ready in twenty minutes. So it's brought to you by. Hunts the people make ketchup? You know the people who make the the other ketchup. And it's a chilly kit. So this is a little bit. It's a smart thing you it's ready in twenty minutes you everything you need. Except for the ground meat of choice we decided to make it with extra lean ground beef and as it is without the beef or any of the meat. Three quarters of a cup is one hundred calories no fat and three smart points as package so it has like the little tomato the sauce and the beans. So we're GONNA try it already semi seasoning. I think That everything I've rhythm Kinda tastes like catcher. I was GONNA say days like they're less good ketchup. I kind of was I. Wish hines me this. What did hunt do before they did? They just automatically become tiniest competition or they have something else besides the ketchup tomato people. Yeah think they do a lot of tomato? This is not an this is not the. It's good but it's not great. It's a little like sour acidic facing. I think it might be good for kids for effort forever not forever viral with that. Yeah I don't know anyway. Let's move on next one. I'm kind of excited about because I saw this as I went up to the kitchen. And the back. They were prepping. It see cuisine smart indulgences Tortilla crusted. Wild Alaska pollock. I would say Alaskan but it's called the Alaska pollock. I guess and the thing is I think seek was in listened to us or took our idea and ran with it but basically we have made a Tortilla in crusted chicken. This is a Tortilla incrusted. Pollock which I didn't realize anyone ever called anything pollick. I thought pollock was just like fake crab the other white meat even the other whitefish before you tasted the story with C. Cuisine. They're the ones that made the salmon that we didn't like didn't they? Make one thing we liked and one thing we know I think this is like their redemption. I love it. You know what I like about it. It's like soap crispy and crunchy so it's Each belay has two hundred and forty calories. Six grams of fat seven smartphones. That's really tasty. That's like the best fish on the planet it is. It does taste like a fish. Stick to air. Fox did we airfreight or BEGA. How do we do it? I bet we have tortilla crested wild Alaska Pollack with smart ingredients. Oh Yeah do you see all the different things that goes on the cross. Yeah we named him so they are Yellow Corn Black Bean Jalapeno Chili tomato lime cumin Cilantro. Paprika they did not dial it in. I want more of that. It's Great Roy. Wheels aren't turning when the cameras. There are no cameras but when when the audio wasn't rolling I'll be eating more about if we had cameras rolling. Do you think we would do our little dance. In the beginning of the episode with the Music Lisa kind of has like a like a ninety s like Humpty Hump kind of thing. I don't have it. I don't know what you're no. No you did this did that. Jamie Jamie Shuffle. Bought my head your head. Okay all right. We should have cameras rolling. Okay moving on. This is an exciting product for a knife. I WANNA cut these. This is fun because I grew up as a white castle fan. I'm a New Yorker. My Dad and I like if we were sometimes alone on father's Day I don't know why we would be but a couple of years I remember. We went to white castle father's day when was like seven. I don't know where my mom and my siblings were. But we were there now. They're making Vegan White Castle. Black beans sliders stats are incredible but little little side. Note here about me. Because I'm from the West Coast. I've never been to white castle. The only white castle I know of is the frozen white castle.

White Castle Jamie Jamie Shuffle Vegan White Castle Alaska STU Walmart Hall Pollock Turkey Basil Alaska Pollack Rochetta Wise Mike Bega West Coast Bouchette Hines C. Cuisine
"stu" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

05:17 min | 10 months ago

"stu" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Game brought to you by marathon no matter where are your travels take you. MARATHA can improve your engine performance with quality top tier gasoline marathon. Fueling the American spirit yesterday yesterday on the show the mighty stu gods said and he wanted to plant his flag in a place where no one is planting their flag. Which is I'm not sure? Sure About Zion. I don't like that. He's a little thick not with to seize. I don't like that he's Pudgy Scott said I'm not sure about him. He's got a white thing on his leg. The criticism was really flimsy. But STU gods wanted to stake out the position of. I'm the first one here to question. All all things I on. Even though he didn't have a lot of factual backing behind anything that he was saying no said he was sloppy. I rarely do And today that that was yesterday today is today today would like to announce that Zion is going to be the greatest basketball player. We've ever seen I mean. Did you see that guy last night. Incredible the the. Pelicans were Dan. They were down to the blazers. Zion brings back tennis seventeen. Thirty one points rebounds five is says and then he's the first player Eggert NBA history first rookie. Since nineteen seventy six. Seventy seven season two point and there was there was there a nineteen it was it felt like not. And then you were tasers yet sutton happened there. Listen I have across gear on. I'm trying to do the best I can hear. Have these very you know. Restrictive gloves on trying. Find the bounce from page the page but last night Zion became the first rookie. Seventy six seventy seven to have a thirty point five rebounds five Mrs Game In thirty minutes. Oh Man. Was I wrong yesterday but today I am right. Zyban is going to be special one of the great this stat original Blair so this stat from Andrew Lopez. Zion had more points than minutes for for the second time last night and this from Elias Sports. Since the shot clock era began in one thousand nine hundred fifty four or Stu gods likes to say now fifty four fifty five and only other player to do that twice within his first ten. NBA Games among guys to play fifteen plus US minutes in both games Michael Jordan. I'm Jay so that is the Stugatz That you guys know and love right there. Whatever I said yesterday? It's the Bob Arum line. Yesterday I was lying today. I'm telling the truth. Yeah I mean listen that's how sports fans role You know we're not held to any sort of accountability. I think you're pretty extreme. And your Sibley like not just a sports fan like extensively you're supposed to have slightly more responsibility than the average sports fan when talking in a microphone for three hours a day. I call him as I see him Dan and yesterday. That's what I saw and today this is what what I'm seeing. Okay I just that that's how I roll. I call him as a Siham and that was yesterday. Today's Today today. He's the greatest player ever tomorrow. He might be going back. You know. Go back to being a bus but for today today only I think probably be better than his heirless that well I mean it's is useless. I can't do anything we can't do much. I just and you hit it with a how about that at the end is if you were saying something okay. So you've covered the spectrum down at him and instead he's going to be the best player ever. I don't have anywhere conversationally where I can go with that other than to just get annoyed with the fact that you keep repeating the same thing for four four minute we've established. There's nothing that you said matters. Okay good I disagree. I feel like God is giving you plenty of talking points because today you can dispute whether or not. He's going to be the greatest one ever now. That's that's always his case that you're going to run out of energy doing that after like two or three days but if tomorrow he's the worst ever again that's a whole nother conversation everyday's a new conversation and Dan everyday daily show every day. That's not really how it works. Though in terms of anything in the way of consistency about that warming bring goods say all the time. This is the first time. Someone's hearing this every day. Fifteen minutes. We're doing fifteen minute bits. That doesn't matter consistency. Who remembers new listener every fifteen minutes right? Well that's the way you climb to the top billy. That's the way you do it. I I think you should follow through. God's his pants see where it leads. It led me to a to a very big house. I I think other people should follow that path and see how see how it works out for that at the worldwide leader and beyond. I think more people should do it. So Stu gods has some competition as is the National Court Jester. I think where are the it's it's PF T- commentator right Where where are the competitors? I for stugotz is thrown. It's ripe for the taking. He's in rerun of A. PF T smart layered cigarettes is genuinely and imbecile. Thank you there's crispy and then there's crispy try our new and improved Tyson crispy chicken strips crispy just got crispy crispy Donlevatar. Some people.

Zion Dan Stu gods Scott NBA Jay Bob Arum Elias Sports Zyban blazers US sutton Michael Jordan Tyson National Court Jester Sibley Andrew Lopez Blair
"stu" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:17 min | 11 months ago

"stu" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"All right so the last thing you said Stu was he doesn't care and you're exactly right he doesn't care he doesn't care about the system this is his last go okay the guys you know he's almost eighty yeah I don't think he's we had better be running it you know eighty two or eighty four this is this is probably his last go he spent his whole life trying to get socialism accepted in America he is this close and that's the message that he's now bringing to all of his supporters we've never been this close last time the DNC screwed him last time we know they did everything they can to stop him certainly that's how he believes that's what he and his supporters believe okay do you think when he is pulling like he's pulling right now and if he comes in and he wore it wins the first two of the the really the first three out of four that's going to energize them these people already say everything is a conspiracy everything is dirty everything is corrupt they're partly right and they don't care about the system they want to burn the Democratic Party to the ground they're going to go into my walkie and he is not going to give up in Milwaukee he's just not going to do it is nothing to lose he has nothing to lose and everything to gain and his supporters I'm telling you Milwaukee should be on high alert when that thing is going on Milwaukee better be prepared because you have people that are coming that are anarchists that are communists that they don't care some people just like to watch the world burn I'm not sure that all these people want the world to burn but they want this system to burn down and I don't think he's going to give up Milwaukee's gonna be an interesting thing to watch especially if you don't have a winner going in I mean he did this to Hillary Clinton last time and I know like his take is you know he was screwed and there's definitely some evidence of and an obvious point that they wanted Clinton to went right I may not see a socialist as possible to actually win the election there's a million reasons why Democrats wanted Hillary not to mention just her connections in the establishment and all of that a lot of it we learned in those hacked emails bottom line if you are still one by four million votes sure the election wasn't all that close and despite the hats Bernie Sanders kept going and going and going because he had been a lot of money and he had a incredible amount of sort of grassroots activists level support those people who feel like they were screwed last time feel like it was ripped out from under him when you know the evidence I don't think it's really there for that but beyond that yeah I think I think they they definitely favor Clinton but yeah I don't think he was winning anyway I mean he he wasn't he lost all it was not as I get older every lever they could do to make sure I imagined it to happen they wanted it to happen but it happened anyway yes you know like it's like it's like Nixon breaking into Watergate the guy was going to win forty eight states.

Stu
"stu" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"stu" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"So stugatz is rarely actually sorry. He apologized a lot but none of us think he's ever sincere with his apologies. But he legitimately got fans of this this. Show mad at him on Saturday because we throw these parties for Miami and gratitude and they've been great fun and each of them has gotten to bigger and better and STU gods People think it's a bit with Stu Gotz about not going to show and he felt bad about not showing up and sort the throwing it in the faces of everybody that he hadn't shown up and so I heard him talking about this during the break and he wanted to publicly apologize in a way that he doesn't do very frequently. Is that the general gist of what's going to happen here. Now Yeah it's been weighing on me and I do. I feel really really bad. I don't apologize often but this time I feel like there is a need to apologize it away. That is genuine and sincere and not defensive. So who is this directed toward. This is is directed toward just people who were there that night or just fans of the show fans of the show. I want to thank everyone for being here today on such short notice very difficult day enough that I did not realize this that my actions would cause such great harm. Who So many people? The fallout was more than I ever could have anticipated. And for that I am truly sorry to the people who criticize me for not attending an event that day themselves did not attend. The STUGATZ is strong strong. I apologize listeners of the show for risking the career I had going at the.

Stu Gotz STUGATZ Miami
"stu" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

06:49 min | 1 year ago

"stu" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"All right so we have a scheduling shift here on television And that Feels a bit insulting. We'll get to that in just a second and I am warding off. I am a Kong on the top of a the building. Warding off all the people from on high telling me how. There's no way that Lebron James is underpaid. We will get to that in a second. But Stu gods throughout throughout the break spent the entire break wearing me out with Wyatt is and how it is. The Larry Bird would never be caught dead anywhere around load men. It doesn't even know what it meade's same with that entire team billion we're looking at Robert Parish. The chief. There was a seven day period in which he played eight games a out of control. He has like ten day stretches where he has eight games here and you know what the cheapest thing after that. What happened to the other two games? That's what he's saying. Load Management Management. I mean no part of this. I mean seven to sitting in coach city the city. The Guy Probably worked two or three jobs at the time. Also grocer manners. There's not going to say. Hey what's going on like load management. I work five days week. It's not GonNa Happen to work at the grocery store doesn't work in the NBA. Bill Bradley. I mean you can put them down. Basically every year for eighty two games per season he worked at listen. It worked just fine for bill had a hall of fame career. I think he became a senator. He's doing just fine I he is. Of course you have Honda. John Havlicek eighty to every single year. Never complained doesn't WanNa know what load management is doesn't care what load management is. I am telling you if Honda Hondas with us. If we add on the show recent law he is rolling over in his grave with Kawhi Leonard. Wait a minute some of one of US might be subject to a fifty dollar fine because I believe I just killed him. He's dead so okay. Okay God's fifty dollar fine then for wondering if he was dead no because these debt that was asking you a question and now I've confirmed the is rolling over in his great and you're probably thinking hey if you would've taken some days off maybe who are to live longer. No it bill character. That's why he lives so long because he played everyday. And don't let these numbers trick you Dan Le Retard when he goes Lebron played eighty two games they play like every seven days. Now Okay and this ten game span that the Paris the chief played ten games. They would've played maybe one or two. NBA Finals Game. It's ridiculous the schedule. Now I play eighty gains overspent at eight months like eight games a month. It's a privilege to play basketball. So let me get to this scheduling change for a second because as as you guys talk about how much time there are between games we are headed over to ESPN U. at eleven o'clock Eastern. We are doing so for an hour our to make room for the Garrett Cole Press Conference and the reason I bring this up beyond it being insulting to us that we're Disappearing for an hour to another network because because Garrett Cole is speaking Coltrane I find myself in a place laughing during this very discussion that we're having having about let's look for a second when you think that. Lebron James is an underpaid at what Garrett Cole was just guaranteed not every fifth day four missing four days of work we gotta show up but he could be hung over. He doesn't have to do anything other than bullpen session. So He's what did you guess Lebron's being paid for the next four years as Garrett Cole signs for a guaranteed three hundred twenty wanting four million dollars because that number is a buck fifty three but they both play thirty two games a year. So what's The difference Garrett Cole Oh has far less of an impact on what it is that he's doing but a far better union than the one the NBA has to be worth three hundred and twenty four million dollars hours and get he was to the New York Yankees. Now I ask you again. What the Hell do you think Lebron would fetch in an open market with no salary? Cap With the Steve Bombers and James Dolan's of the world throwing money at him I can't even imagine what it would be would be a lot. There was an eleven day a stretch back in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine in which Honda had games on November seventh November eighth November Eleventh November Twelfth November fourteenth November Fifteenth Eighteenth Nineteenth and twenty first played. It all played thirty six minutes a game. STU gods continues to thunderhead undeterred. Even though I believe I witnessed something during the break that has never before been witnessed in the history of this show show which is still. God's was making a argument that you will hear from Sita Shining. See about how Larry Bird didn't need no damn load owed management as opposed. Today's lazy players. And then right. After that at the microphones went off and sort of a vision. Came to STU STU gods it was a bit of a moment of clarity although he completely ignored it and then continued down his merry way of ripping the athlete of today but it came to him like a vision and Roy. You're old enough to remember this. But I don't think Chris and Billy are Larry. Bird is the only player in the history of the sport to spend his last five seasons is on his stomach on the court I think is gonNA use them eligible employees those dams. They must've spent like the lasting image. That you have of the end of Larry Bird's career legion is what they were using on his back. It just wheeling back out there and I'm sure he was looking at Paul Pierce in that wheelchair and being really. Do you remember what I did. I laid on the court on my stomach stomach and they just put ice packs on. I've done you look at his stats guys. You will see that. He spent his last two years in the NBA laying on his stomach on the parquet floor. It was amazing. He would only only come out like it wasn't even a training room. You wouldn't go back to the locker room. He just lay on the side of the court and then they sort of prod him with a Taser or something and get him to play twenty twenty four minutes. Yeah but if you ask him he wouldn't have done it any other way. Oh you didn't know you're better goal. Somebody they write about the Minnesota and there he still has last season average twenty per game as toys. He had an obligation to the kid to take the ice off his back. I WANNA WANNA know how many seasons he spent doing that because Roy. You're old enough to remember Larry Bird at.

Larry Bird Lebron James NBA Garrett Cole Honda Garrett Cole Press Conference Roy STU gods Wyatt US Bill Bradley Kawhi Leonard meade John Havlicek basketball senator Robert Parish ESPN Sita Shining Hondas
"stu" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

12:27 min | 1 year ago

"stu" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"We alluded to this a little bit before or is taking advantage of what's available to us today with digital marketing and social media One thing that I see some people are starting waiting to do but not as much as I thought there would be. is the aspect of video and utilizing video to reach those individuals. So you know what are some of the suggestions you have for people to Against stand out in and get in front of that person and get that meeting you want. I mean video. Video is video really interesting tool. Isn't it There's there's one one company in particular that I'm I'm really impressed with vineyard. Although I know there are others coming up vidartes allows you to record video right on the spot and embedded in your at well. I should put air quotes around in bed. But it in it you embedded into into the email that you're sending so I think that's actually pretty nice if you're going to thank someone or if you're going to say hey actually. Hey on a check in. We haven't spoken in a while. That was probably not the best message to put up. I've got value for women smoking while and you know I wanted to let you know about these things that have come up or or I was at. I don't know I was was I was attending a seminar that that I know you weren't because I was there and there's some really interesting things I wanNA share with you about that I there you end up you end up humanizing yourself now. We're talking right now. And I have a have a green screen background on where we're talking on zoom and so and that sort of formalizes everything but But you can with some of these. I think actually the most valuable things you can put into video are your your humanity and your authenticity intensity. So it doesn't have to really be a fancy not studio in the background and fancy light and so forth. It's just you being human and showing your face and you know I mean it always makes so much the difference when when I found anyway when you when you meet people face to face I whenever beat them you might be talking on the phone doing business. You could be doing it for years but if you meet in person it just has a big impact it back then and I think that's also kind of impact that That video can have as well yet found. Handed it to be helpful in in connecting with people Even conferences for example. I've gone to more than my fair share of those in the last two years but I find the conferences that went really well and I had a great time at and learned a lot and she was able to share a lot where those that. I had connect act with individuals before the conference and even a good colleague of mine I'm based out of Toronto Collier. My we've known each other for almost three years now and we've never met yet. We keep missing each other at conferences. But we've actually talked on the phone and I've been on on my podcasts. I'm going on hers tomorrow. And there's an event coming up next month's in Toronto and I know we're both going to be there so basically I'm gonNA say. Meet me by a Room B twelve and it just in hopefully make it happen because we've tried to meet up and it's so funny where someone that's around the corner from me. We've never met but I meet people that are in San Diego or London or Australia all the stuff I run into them three or four times a year and like what is but but in can I again those people when they get a personalized message. and they see the the visual of things. It's GonNa get their attention. They're going to pause for a moment and you're going to have more of their attention. Then if they're listening to of recorded voice mail or reading an email email or a letter because they might be vacuous something else. If they're actually watching a video and high Stewart's Michael here just wanted to say hello and thank you again for doing what you did and I love that you know cartoon the sat me. It's IT'S NOT GONNA put my office but it's in my living room now. Well that yeah. That's that's showing you. Hopefully he or she spouses okay with being in the living depending on what you drew but at the end of the day. It's all those things things were again. It's well as personalized things that in this day of access to everything and we can pretty much order anything we what in the world but if you get something that is unique and one of a kind type of thing. Those tend to stand out a little bit if it's personalized gift. That is truly personal. People remember that and they'll chair. Yeah yeah they do they do And God there's so many really interesting ways to give gifts I actually did. You know I'm talking about my my books but I talked to a lot a lot of authors actually for for my research for this forget the meeting and how to get a meeting with anyone one of one of my favorite sources as John Ruslan and John wrote the Book Gift Allah Jay and he's a master at giving gifts and and he showed me some of the ways that he uses knifes. Pardon me knife sets for example. Must my voice here prefer second A knife set so it he he has these beautiful set. A beautiful set of cut co knives. They're really nice nice and he'll send it to someone with with the knife block. I don't know what that's called butcherblock. I'm not sure what it is but But the block that contains the nights. Now you only get they get the the block and they get the first knife so they can put it in the kitchen and put the knife in and and then every week a new knife in the set arrives and the knives are engraved and they're they're wrapped really beautifully and before too long the spouse or the partner of the person that John's trying to reach starts asking when you going to do business with this person because it's such a unappreciated item. In the home. What's really interesting is? He's not just it's not just influencing the target of his campaign but he's influencing someone who has a great influence her the spouse or partner. That's a big deal that makes a. That's that is a great impact on decisions about things. Like why are you gonNa meet this person. You're GONNA DO Business. I love the way this person thinks. That's pretty cool. You do need to find that you you really need to think about influencing the people around influencing the influencers I should. I should say but the people around the person that you're trying to reach so you mentioned assistance a moment ago. You know I'm GonNa Bring it back to the cartoons for a moment when we send one one of those One of the big cartoon prints there it starts with a with a contact with the with the executive assistant and it's It's let's say say either rap or if I'm using it use it myself so if I'm using alcohol the the assistant I and say hi. My name is STU hynick. I wanted the Wall Street. Journal cartoonists honest and unsettling imprint of one of my cartoons in his spot. Your boss and by that time. There's usually saying really. Wow Okay so would you mind if I send. I Uni Mail with the details. Snow cautious by email address since they send the Nima with the details. And then if you wouldn't mind also get back to you with the Fedex tracking information. As soon as I have have a great. That sounds good. You send a car out. Maybe even even ahead of time to the assistant thanking generally her usually her for For their help so by by the time the big board has arrived it's actually touches and it's involved an influence here which is really really important to to the outcomes of these these campaigns. Yeah and that assistant immediately goes to the boss like you said like you know the spouse. It's the same thing it's like. I've been working with stew for well while he's a great great person. He's done a lot of great things so you need to talk with them and anybody. That has a good assistant. They're going to listen to that assistant. I know I know I did. Because while she scared me but and more ways than one but it was one of those things this where it was the point where delegation you know one of the things I talk about burnout and and things like that and I was horrible at delegation now the pendulum has swung long now. Anything lands on my desk ago. Who besides me can work on this but in that they accused me of that? Because it's true but anyway with with information that I receive I will hand it to the assistant and I'll say take a look at this. See if there's an Gotcha. See if there's anything that I should really really pay attention to. And she was awesome at that. We're still yeah. You might look at this section because she could see things that I wouldn't necessarily see just in the business of my day so the assistance and the spouses are crucial. So if you can influence them it's an it's almost like having the Golden Ticket Ear Inn Because unless it's just a complete mismatch what you're offering what they're there but if you're going to this effort to send all of all this information and try to reach this person you obviously have done your homework and you know this is somebody that I would like to work with. Because of whatever product or service that you have that would the beaten official to them or their organization absolutely It really makes so much difference you in in the actually in in my first book how to get a meeting with anyone. I devoted a chapter to assistance. Because I think they're absolutely. I know there are absolutely critical to the outcomes of these contact marketing campaigns. And just your success. You know if they're not on your side if they're on their bosses side but if they're not also on your side you're not gonna get anywhere. And so in in that one chapter I described them as as the VP of access or or or talent scouts. Either away. That's really how should they should be treated. You GotTa impress them before you ever get to the person you're trying to reach and and even even is your reaching out and connecting with the person you want to reach. What a great point Michael that you were? You're saying you would give the your assistant. These some of these pitches or materials and say take a look and see what the Gotcha if there are Gotcha. What's what's the gist of this? And something you know my priorities you know we're trying to do. Is this something we should be looking at inches. Also good as saying. Are you sure you want to put that in there That might come back to haunt you like okay. I won't poke the bear today. Let me do it tomorrow please. So I know in the book you wrap everything up with the perfect contact campaign now what I guess. What a high level suggestion where maybe let me your face it this way? What are some common mistake ceased? See People still make even after your first book that The probably prompted you to write the next book on this with some things that that you see. People Continue to to stumble on that really limits their impact as far as reaching those key people. They want to see reach well. I wouldn't say that wrote the the second book because people were making mistakes from the first People been doing amazing things and they did amazing things after the book and he took things that they took from the book and made them really really work well for them so there were great stories about how that how that came about and I would say actually the real motivation for the second second book was a lot a lot of a lot. More success stories were reporting in about using contact marketing. But I think you know one of one of those mistakes really leads me to a small part an element of the new contact marketing model which is using still using outreach methods but also adding digital persistence track to it so using remarketing ads throughout the process so before contact attack during contact and throughout the sales cycle maybe even throughout retention so just ongoing..

John Ruslan Toronto Michael STU hynick Australia Stewart San Diego Jay London
"stu" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"stu" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"They've won the rose bowl and they had the second most wins over top ten teams in college football football. That's because the other teams in that conference are overrated he. He said that not me. I knew laboratory was a moron and now i have just more approve. You confirmed it. This is the most idiotic take i've ever heard glad i've never heard of your show pathetic doc wolverine here and i've got to say this is the dumbest poll i've ever seen. You can understand michigan. They've been getting dragged. What a joke of a poll. All probably the second most decorated big ten program. He spells big ten the way that i can with capital even know i believe the most decorated what a one g progress that is probably the the one g program. I think your phone must have added state. That's actually funny m._s._u. Has literally won the conference three times. Since two thousand ten they also finished top six in the country three straight years <hes> top six random number a eh super weird and unnecessary shade. You were told to say this. I was actually bob. Eiger your coats top twenty program all time but carry on donlevatar wisconsin a- and always at number four wisconsin lives at number four in the a._p. Poll they will win absolutely nothing. Nothing nothing ever stugatz wisconsin will never ever ever ever win a national championship in football. This is live at our show. Oh with a stu gods on e._s._p._n. Radio i'm going to read a letter two of the audience here that was posted by and n._f._l. Player <hes> mike ryan is beside himself with delight that football returns tomorrow he has been ogling the flu the coach coach of the packers <hes> the way that the rest of us have been ogling the body issue and the eagles offensive lineman..

football wisconsin mike ryan packers michigan eagles one g
"stu" Discussed on Weekend Observations with Stu and Jr.

Weekend Observations with Stu and Jr.

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"stu" Discussed on Weekend Observations with Stu and Jr.

"Did stay did you just mash him up to God? I think we nailed it. We need more this hang on, George. Give me more of Stu God, I like more magenta. Magenta your name should be star. Calling me jinx, please. All right, George. Let's talk about magenta in what he was like as a boss, was he ever your boss. When did you go way back time for a brief amount of time? I wanna say. I mean it wasn't even a year before a bigger company ended up buying the radio station that Stu gods. Look, he deserves all the credit in the world because he put together something that I don't think anyone thought could ever have worked. Okay because plenty of people tried before him. So on the front end I want to actually give him credit. I'll out of this part of that's fine for real deserves because there were a lot of people that tried to create a basically the station, the station in Miami. That was like the equivalent to WFAN, for example is the original station was five sixty two QA, and there was a bunch of upstarts that tried, and never they fell by the wayside, or just didn't couldn't make it work financially or whatever. And stugatz as credit put together a dream team and he overpaid for it, and he bankrupted the poor guy station. But nonetheless, he made such a powerful station lineup. And, and just you know partnerships with the different teams that he created all that too. The point where a big radio company wanted to buy it, and they did and we survived because of it. So despite Stu gods being magenta the Lakers who backed into who may we'll probably back into Jimmy Butler, or eventually, Anthony Davis or someone like that Stu guts in, Stu gods in fashion backed into a big company buying the radio station as he was bankrupting, the guy who actually originated the radios, Dan. Now, Georgia's right like George is also a programmer. He was a program director for wwl yet. So he nine months for that. But I did put together a lineup. Well, hang on hang on. Speaking that lineup Georgia, I'm proud of you. You said to put together a dream lineup were you part of that lineup was you called yourself, part of the dream line, if you or your we had Sodano said Rosenberg boob Joe Rosamund Lebowitz, art? I mean, that's we had people who tell us, that's that's as good as any national lineup that's out there at the time and he's not lying. There were. People that said that. And then yeah. And then we you know as guys left, then we still had the core. You know that he like Joe rose, eventually left because he couldn't deal with stugatz. And the guy who he bankrupted. And then we, it ended up being the core of me. Again he left because the dolphins laughed and he wanted to fall in the dolphins. Is that right? But he also got any almost like literally almost punch out the guy you bankrupted. Yeah. Like fifty times over so the problem with the bankruptcy not to get defensive here because everything Georgia, saying Jackson, if you remember George, I told our owner to go out and get a house for Super Bowl week..

Stu gods program director Stu God Joe Rosamund Lebowitz Georgia Stu Lakers Miami Jimmy Butler WFAN wwl Anthony Davis programmer Jackson Dan Sodano Joe rose Rosenberg nine months
"stu" Discussed on Mile Hi Radio

Mile Hi Radio

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"stu" Discussed on Mile Hi Radio

"She walked up to me and asked me to. Seven. She. Stu you'll still.

Stu
"stu" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

09:19 min | 1 year ago

"stu" Discussed on 600 WREC

"You Stu? Hi. I'm fabulous. Are you? Yes. Yeah. I feel good today. Do I do a dangerous thing? Well, usually when you feel good I have to deal with PR nightmares. You say that when I feel really bad too. It's true. That's a good point. I wonder whether learning here. So here's the thing. Donald Trump today is the day that I love I love Donald Trump being the president is states because no one else would have the balls to do this. He came out and said, okay. So new own help us out of the border. You don't think it's a problem? But everybody else in America seems to think it's a problem. But you don't fact you got your sanctuary cities. So I tell you what we're gonna do. We got all these people that you just say release into America what we're going to do. Instead is we're going to transport them to your sanctuary city. And we'll just drop them off in your city. Good luck with that. Yeah. I'm interested in this. Because it's I heard it's a radical proposal this. He's out of control. You know, first they said, it was something that was floated and that was bad enough. But now the president's really really considering it. And I just want someone to ask what is the negative? Tell you explain to me what the negative is the only one I've heard is going to cost more which doesn't make any sense to me at all because they're sanctuary cities around every border in America. So you can just go to a close one. You don't have to go to San Francisco could be option. I hope it is an option. See that's the thing. It's like this is being treated as a troll right by the president United States. He's trolling them. And the trolling part as you pointed out the fact I'm gonna I'm gonna I'm going to up the ante. I don't think it's troll enough. But we'll get to that on this. Okay. Go ahead. I gotta say the trolling part of it is my least favourite part of this proposal. Listen to it for. Case. How is this bad for the city's sanctuary cities? Because I hear all these left-wing people coming out and saying, well, we can't bring all these people here were care for our share share. She's like I can't even care for our own here in California. You can't bring more people here. Argument. I. Understand how they're I don't understand how they actually get out and and tie their own shoes and make it in the world. Obviously have not thought these things that is your argument, you're on the wrong side. Exactly eight maybe it's so fundamental to their belief that the real reason we don't wanna legal immigrants here is because race we're racists. Like, maybe that's what they actually believe. I've always thought that was just a dumb political tactic. Maybe that's what they actually believe. Because if you think the only reason we want people here don't want people, here's because we don't like Mexicans. Well, then you're an idiot. We were happy to bring legal Mexican immigrants into this country. Happy to do it. The the question here is whether we can take care of people who are illegal. So if you are saying that it's bad. It's a punishment essentially for these cities to get these legal immigrants. You are admitting foundational part of our argument. And if it's not true. Well, then you're gonna be happy. It's not a punishment. So you're not worried on the city side. How about for the immigrants is it bad for the immigrants? Will you? Tell us all the time that the sanctuary cities are the only people treating them fairly you tell us that the cities that are sanctuary cities are welcoming with open arms. These people are treating them better than the other places. So shouldn't it be if we're going to be nice to illegal immigrants are people claim trying to claim asylum that we should bring them to the cities that you identify as the only places they could be treated fairly in the United States. Yes, he's in that good for immigrants. Yes. So now, he found it's good for cities. And it's good for the immigrants. What about the border towns themselves, the border towns that are not sanctuary cities? What about the cities that they're going to these illegal immigrants or asylum seekers are going to now that are not sanctuary cities? The people who do want to enforce our immigration laws and are instead forced to take thousands and thousands of illegal. Grits that they are welcoming to them. It's not fair to them. And it's not fair to the immigrants either the undocumented immigrants because these are dangerous cities for them because they're not welcome. Like, they are with open arms in places like San Francisco in Los Angeles, and New York, and and even Austin, Texas e-e-e-e-no your ear. You got open arms. You're saying come here. What is the point of of saying, you're a sanctuary city because you're saying open arms? Hey, this is the place if you're looking for sanctuary nobody ever, you know, as Burrell didn't run into the house of The Hunchback, you know, because she's like a want some soda. Does anybody have any soda in here? No, she cried sanctuary. You can't touch me. You can't take me out of here. You can't do anything. I'm safe here. That's why. Why you have a sanctuary city your safe there every place, it's not a sanctuary city. It's very unsafe. And as we've learned nobody wants to feel unsafe. That's us safe zone for you. So we don't wanna just let them come over to places that are not save exactly. The feelings are an important part of this. Yes. And again, like, I think this can come off as a troll. But in reality don't know, if it is like, these these cities are saying, we have the resources to deal with these people we had the we we have the open arms that we haven't tight people who will accept illegal. You guys don't we're better than you. We've decided to violate federal loan to signal. Our on this issue. We should reward that behavior. I agree with you one hundred ten percent. And the only thing in the article initially, and since the only thing they can come up those two one is it's going to cost more. We don't have. Hey, it's the right thing to do. That's not put a price on the right thing to do what you do have to put as I would argue in many other cases as what you that. Congress has the power of the person there has to be money associated with these types of things, you can't just create money. You can't just print money to do this. Right. So the government doesn't care that. I do there are so many to how dare you this. What will it cost us? Not see again, you're just trolling. The proposal. I say, let's take them up on their offer. Sure, I understand that. But like they're so I'm listening to the way. I don't want to just troll in a minute. I'm going to tell you how I want this actually executed. I don't wanna just troll. I seared. Sincerely, want this to happen. I with you. Really good. I know what this program, I believe if they say there's no money for buses. I believe this audience will raise the money to bust these people to sanctuary city. Thought like, okay. Well, they're on a bus. That'll be on the bus a little bit longer will be more associated cost. I guess but first of all they're close by keep talking about San Francisco that would take a long time. But Glenn, according to at least ABC news, they're not they're flying people to these cities. They're taking their in planes at seven thousand dollars an hour that they're flying people to the cities, and they're like, well, if they have to fly them a little bit longer. It will cost more flying them. How is that? Even. Like, they're going to Indiana. They can get on a greyhound bus and go to Indiana where they're supposed to be set. And that's my thing is that rate hound bus Icee. We just get some yellow school. Whatever point though, is that the the idea that we can't hold them in our facilities, which by the way, Republicans have asked for additional facility rejected by Democrats, very Morton. Remember, so have you you have to put them somewhere inside the United States. Why would you not give them to the people who say they want them? Exactly. Right. Good. Exactly. Right. And you can do it by the way their border towns. There are places all across the border that are sanctuary cities. You don't have to go to San Francisco tomorrow, Alaska. Bring them to the closest certainly money overflights with us free Chit now. May I tell you how I would like to see this unfold. I love to hear. I will do that in one minute..

San Francisco United States president America Donald Trump Indiana Stu California Alaska Morton ABC Congress Burrell Austin Texas Glenn Los Angeles New York one hundred ten percent
"stu" Discussed on Weekend Observations with Stu and Jr.

Weekend Observations with Stu and Jr.

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"stu" Discussed on Weekend Observations with Stu and Jr.

"Com. I wish I could leave this review anonymously. But people know, it's me, but I'll be honest, Stu was perfect. I don't have a single criticism for the guy. How could I dare to criticise a hot take master? Not only were his takes significantly hotter than anyone on the show. Including myself, but you also somehow found a way to go. I every time which having been on around the horn, dozens of times, I don't think has ever been accomplished. Typically, you go around the horn, and it rotates since the name it was really more like around the stugatz. Which would be a good show. I said at the end of the show I wanted to have him back. I wasn't joking. I meant it. He makes the show better. Just like he makes literally everything he does better. All right. Thank you. May know, I think reality nail that. Like, he nailed exactly what it is that it was going to say, by the way. Check out the meantime show, featuring her dog plenty it's a laboratory and friends a podcast network. You can subscribe rate and review. Please subscribe rate review because is the best. She's fantastic or football knowledge is as good as anyone networks authentic. You produced that podcast, right? I do. And who does she have on this week? She has Spencer hall of Eden SP SP nation. They focused a lot of their conversation on draft talk. And she says that drew lock this. Quarterback from Missouri has a fifteen percent chance of being a good quarterback in the NFL. And he's probably gonna go in the first round of fifteen percent chance fifteen. Yes. Fifteen percent percents. Okay. Do you? Listen to her podcast. Now, you are a mother, I let's go to Sarah Spain. What what it Sarah sarahspain have to say about my performance. This is going to be wordy. Right. We a lot of words you're gonna blast me Sarah, Spain sarahspain, what did she have to say about my performance on around the horn, Stu gods on around the horn, a dream realized a life spent in pursuit of a goal that finally came true. Of course, it was April Fools, and it meant absolutely nothing in the show was completely off the rails and Woody paid scored about as well as I would have in second grade with rudimentary understanding of numbers points, and how games work, but that being said, I think stugatz was a champion in all the ways that stugatz is interrupted people. He didn't realize when he was being muted and continued to talk and didn't know none of us could hear him. So that when he became unneeded in yelled out. I said that we all had to inform them the commercial breaks than we know couldn't hear it because he was muted in the end. He got destroyed by his good pal. Woody who he tried to pay off the commercial break via van mo- with the old okeydoke sending Meena to the FaceTime instead of him despite him feeling like he was cruising to victory. You can't win under I try, and I really think that Stu gods was made for the show assuming that he can get his fiery hot takes into more bite size pieces that he can follow directions. Do hard work and prep study the topics. Engage responsibly and respectably with the other who am I kidding all the things I've named art things. That's that's can't do know. This is this is not a good fit for him, a wild horse cannot be tamed and stugatz needs to live and run free at stupidity. And the Dan lebatardshow was stugatz with the occasional appearance in an ill fitting suit on highly questionable. But I love you, Stu, and if you ever asked me in person if I think you should do out around the horn again. No, I absolutely going to say to your face that that the answer is. Yes. And I miss you every day. Oh, this the gods are strong in that one Sarah. I love you too. Thank you for making me feel right at home, and I will be back and I am coming to that title. Okay. Check out her podcast. That's what she said would sarahspain amino Hassen is your guest this week? Please download review rate. Subscribe all that good stuff. Do it for Sarah support. Sarah support me in supporter dog guy. You shouldn't support his Frank. I saw what are the iceman episode? I would say stoop guts a couple of things number one..

Stu Dan lebatardshow Sarah Sarah sarahspain Sarah Spain Woody Spencer hall NFL football Missouri Frank Meena fifteen percent Fifteen percent
"stu" Discussed on Weekend Observations with Stu and Jr.

Weekend Observations with Stu and Jr.

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"stu" Discussed on Weekend Observations with Stu and Jr.

"No, I sold or any one of the panelists the way you the care that you expressed to retain, you know, it was like it was watching it was like watching Dan do HQ with his dad where he's just very patient, very respectful. And I I gotta tell you. I enjoyed them getting sappy here for a second. I told Dan it was so nice to see Tony kinda Connell. What he paid and help what he out in a tricky spot because I was saying I'd be intimidated by that entire studio and the buttons and all that stuff. And it was just nice to see Tony it, really. Well, thank you for this. This is why I'm here. I thought making TV thousand episodes ago, you know, years ago. I say to people, you know, and I'll say this to you as you appear more and more. I'm trying to make you forget you're on TV right, which may be tough because the camera loves you. And you love the Cameron. I'm not sure who loves each other more Stewart, but I'm gonna miss you. Guys. Forget you're on TV. I'm trying to get to a real moment. I'm trying to get through an authentic moment. This is how I've grown into a host. Maybe this is possibly because it's the only way I know how to live my life. You know? I mean, so I'm trying to make you forget your TV. I'm trying to go for relatable moments predictable moments. This is a little bit too much TV one to one maybe. But this is this is the secret sauce for me, you know, and and it's been thirty six hundred sixty episodes still I mean, that's an absurd number. How can a human continue to do that every single day? Well, here's how I do it. It's become it's become not my TV show. But it's become a pulse in my body. You know, it's part of who. I am. So I knew exactly what what he was going through. I knew how he wanted to play host fair day. But I knew. How frightening. It is to be host for day. Three cameras seven people in your ear. Now you've got to. Read seven tornado name, Stu gods on the show to try to take over the show. I mean, what are you? You know, we know what that is. And I knew I wanted him to to be proud of the work. He can do I wanted you wanted to be proud of the work you're gonna put out and this was a big opportunity for you. And and every time we go on it's a big opportunity for all of us. So it's being to TV show. And it's now, you know, I want to make a real moment for all of us. And how did I come to that part of it? Then actually, I know Dan in I different a lot of ways, and we're similar in a lot of ways he's trying to make the most awkward moment at all times radio television. Well, I'm trying to make the most real moment at all times and all television. And I think that's that's what maybe you got a glimpse of and you'll get more that you will. But I will tell you with all that said about us in our radio show, and Dan, and I'm happy to hear that you said, you got it from Dan because I tell people all the time, the end's, probably if not the kindest soul, I have ever met and probably the kinds of soul. I have in my entire life outside of. You know, my wife, and I'm only saying that because she's in the house. But he is he is just a kind soul. And so yes, we're always going for that. But Dan also knows he just knows me. So well, so we knows the topics and certain days where he has to just kinda not pushed so far. And and I think that's important. That's that's an important ingredient of making not just a radio show, but any show work. It's just knowing the cast around you, and knowing you know, if they're in a good mood bad mood. About TV. Let's join the squad lie. Join it for me. The most the word that comes back to and this is through having lived, you know, especially hard the last couple of years. We lost a son in delivery. We've had some challenges building the family that we've always dreamed of and I'm blissfully happy for. But.

Dan Stewart Tony kinda Connell Cameron Stu
"stu" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

11:32 min | 2 years ago

"stu" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Stu, how are you? Pretty well, Glenn. How are you? Good. I was I was thrilled to see how many people have been writing in and tweeting and Facebook posting how they are L there joining you know, it was Tyler Perry. Chris rock kid, a kid rock kid rock and me that went out, and we did our local WalMart and took care of all of the layaway, and it was such a cool thing. And I still challenge people in my position to go out and do something amazing because it's really. What's great is? It's not only good for you. But it's spreading I had so much mail yesterday from people who said I went into this with my family, and I just we only had fifty dollars or we had one hundred dollars or twenty five dollars. And it was so cool to do. So. Engage in that. Now, there's there's also a couple of things that I. I don't even know where to begin. We have thirteen percent of Americans will boycott Christmas spending thirteen percent still boycott Christmas spending yet they say that they do not want to be a part of this this whole commercialization. So they're not gonna spend any money for the holiday season. Thirteen percent. That's pretty high allow me to roll my eyes a little harder at that one. Because you know what? First of all, it's not going to be thirteen percent. Thirteen percent of people are not. That's not true. Secondly, we why do we vilify commercialism so much? What's? So what's so bad about it? What's so bad about having cool toys and fun parts at a can't be the whole holiday? And if it's the whole holiday, then you're right. You're doing it wrong. The great part of my childhood. I loved getting cool things for Christmas. My kids like doing it too. You know, there's nothing wrong with materialism. It's like it's like this weird like, and I know this isn't the way you're thinking about it. But I feel like a lot of conservatives have adopted. What is a sensually anti-capitalism liberal argument? Which is like, oh, well, we buying things makes nasty and dirty in your sullying. This this season by getting involved in commercialism commercialism is fine. There's nothing wrong with capitalism and can conservatism and commerce. They're all pretty darn great. And you know, the fact is if you let it become all about gifts gifts gifts gifts gifts gifts gifts. Yeah. You're you're doing it. That's not the whole thing. But it's still part of it. And that's okay. So I agree with you. I agree with you. I didn't think he would he because I don't it is not about the gifts. It's it's it's it's it's how you embrace that. It's. If you're making for instance, I have grown to really not like the month of December because it has become about I have to go do this. We have to go do that. We have to do this. We have to do this. Daddy, get the cards out. Everybody's expecting this. Did you get the presence for the people that you really don't even know and use and yes? View those out and don't forget all the part do this and the parties in all of this crap. That's not what this holiday is about. We've we've made this the most stressful month ever instead of just making this the coolest month ever, just go and just be with people and help people and and give people presents. There's nothing wrong with that. Right. And I think you're arguing against being over scheduled, which I am also then also just making it about stuff. Right. But like a card is not about stuff a car visiting knowledge meant to someone else. Hey, I'm thinking about you and this time of year. Right. But that is a task it winds up being tasked because you wanna make sure you get it to everybody. It doesn't feel like it's supposed to that's supposed to be a nice gesture. Right. That's not about like, oh, here's something. They're going to they're getting some cool commercial gift. Yes. You're buying the card, and you could theoretically make the card, but that's all about a message right to someone that you supposedly like, but how many times are you getting cards from people like, for instance. Yeah. I get a Christmas card last few years I've gotten a Christmas card from Vince Vaughn. Holiday thinking of me. I don't know how I got on his Christmas card list when I got into his Christmas card list that I get a Christmas card from him. First of all, it's pretty cool. No, it's cool. It is. It's like he's not thinking about me. He's like, you know, you know, pal. It's been another year. No that and that's what I mean, it becomes a task career. My my wife is a classic, but she loves Christmas. And she's a classic over scheduler. I would say like so she signs up for every Christmas tradition, and she signs up for every and the kids are in every little Christmas thing. And then every year we get here. And she's like next year. We're not doing x y and z because it's too much. And it's true. We run around like crazy though, I do love those things I do like going to those little traditional events. And I like, you know, a lot of it's just like going to see people and doing things that you wouldn't normally do the rest of the year. And you know, we have two little kids. So are in like nine thousand four hundred seventy five Christmas specials that we go to. And there's multiple showings of those who are about fifteen twenty thousand of those. But I mean again like you don't trade those things like you want to go do them. I. I'm kind of glad that Chien's not in ballet this year. I don't have to sit through the damn nutcracker twice. I think because it gets stressful because you're just adding it onto work and at times it feels like a job like I was on vacation last week. And I feel like I was running around more than any normal workweek, you're running around to events and picking kids up in your shuttling to the other thing. And then you gotta make sure you get there on time. Because if you're late, you know, the you'll miss it. And then you just feel like you're you've just adopted a new full-time job for the month. But that's not capitalists fault. That is not capitalism's fault. Commercialism is is a part of Christmas. And I don't I really don't think it's a bad part of Christmas. I think it's great. I I like going to I like going and doing the shopping and giving people gifts that they don't, you know, they got to come up with and pick out the especially with your kids like the stuff that you're able to get them. I mean. Yeah. No, you're right. You're only priority. I think is a better way of St. I tell the story told the story before so I apologize. But there was one year that we hit the first year that we really hit it. And I grew up in a family that I mean, I got one present one year. And you know, we we struggled as a family, and I always wanted to do Christmas for my kids beg. Yeah. Oh, yeah. And so I did we headed big one year. Remember this? I remember this year the the presence. I mean, I really honest to God I went out, and I bought everything I've ever wanted to get my kids and my wife for Christmas. I mean, everything the. The presence. The presents were like the tree base. So you couldn't see early couldn't see half of the tree. And and it was the most empty and hollow Christmas we've ever had. None of us recall. That is a good Christmas. And we got everything we wanted. Yeah. It's not about that. It's a priority setting issue. Right. I mean, you have to have the more important things or it's not doing it. Right. But the fact that you get the little it's like, you know, someone who is in shape might tell you, you know, eating nonstop ice cream buffets is not a proper diet shut up a little ice cream at the end of a meal can be can be great. Yeah. It's it's balancing everything. That's all. It is is just balance we swing from one side to the other. And we swing so far. It's the pendulum when it's in the middle is usually the right thing, you know, an all ice cream diet is not good ice cream occasionally. Is good. You know, let's just say lifestyle where you've never worked out a day in your life. In the end is not good. I'd this is a weird is still working on that convincing myself, and I can't really pull it off little heroin. Hey, but is your all the time? Shakes up your holiday season. Exactly. Right. So last night we finish the tree. You're listening yesterday. I was I was abandoned at the tree okay on Sunday. Because I was I was decorating the way my mother, you know, you kind of you are just who you grew up as and you don't really realize it and British it. I found myself as the only one decorating the tree. And I was like, hey, what happened while come? Is. It me and my wife from the kitchen said, Yep. If you and it was because I'm really OCD. I'm just so OCD on things and the tree. And so I was doing it like my mother used to which was you know. Okay, kids put the big things to block the hollow parts of the tree, and you know, blah, blah, blah, blah, planning process you signing, and it was not fun. And so last night we decorated the tree and I. I let it go. And it was it was it was it was fun. It was fun. It was I actually did enjoy it. It was very difficult once I sat down because I couldn't I couldn't I couldn't stop. And then I realized what I think it is. We have a fake tree. And fake trees. Because we we have when we got a we spent our Christmas up at the ranch in the mountains. We get a real tree in Texas. You don't wanna realtor? First of all you have to mortgage your house to get real tree. And and second of all it's like a Charlie Brown Christmas tree all the needles. Just fall off the mid the minute. The clock strikes twelve all the needles fall off his he's been dead for so long. Anyway. So we have a real tree when we celebrate Christmas up at the the ranch because we can just go out and cut one. I'm not like that at the ranch. I'm not like that at the ranch because the tree is imperfect. The tree is just like I said down on the couch. I looked at this damn train. I thought how did I ever like this tree? It's like a perfect cone. And I realized it was. Christmas tree is supposed to look like it is supposed to just be like, you know, the Handmaid's stuff and the stuff and it just kind of imperfect. I mean so much of it is tradition. Right. Did you grow up with all real trees? I didn't you had face. He had faked trees really fake tree. That's surprising coming from you. I know because I love the fake trees, man. There's so much easier. They.

Chris rock Facebook WalMart Tyler Perry Stu Glenn Vince Vaughn Texas Chien heroin Charlie Brown thirteen percent one year Thirteen percent one hundred dollars twenty five dollars fifty dollars
"stu" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"stu" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"This is your humble host stu taylor and again very the of an appreciative to have you on again today i i honestly never ever tried to take any of these wonderful opportunities i have every day for granted so now that i just need a box of kleenex and wipe the tears from my eyes but thou that i've cleared that up let's move into the into the show itself and i i want to only because it's my show hold on one second i wanna take an opportunity to say how personally happy i am with the pod i i could say a friend how do you define a friend somebody you sneak with every day somebody you've spoken with many times well i'll define it either way you want but i certainly have not met him personally but we become good friends filmmaker and author deneche their susa you know all those books on the hillary's america or how obama's america and how they destroyed this country i think those books very very very effective in determining some of the votes of the election now i'm gonna closet it as i season using all sports terminology appoint i know donald trump is limited in terms of things that takes these corrupt politicians to learn all these years i understand that sometimes i say what i raise my eyebrows trump was unfamiliar with the national susan and alan dershowitz informed me was and the national susan done more than here i mean i've ready i read his books they come out a reader from start to finish there's another one coming out i don't know the name of it and when ready to plop we'll have to national and again today trump really to know who the sousa was.

stu taylor hillary america obama donald trump alan dershowitz sousa susan one second
"stu" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

The Ziglar Show

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"stu" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

"So how do you instantly boost the value of your business and take it from getting paid wants to get paid over and over again you shift towards a recurring revenue model aka a membership site as the former co founder of the world's largest membership site platform our guests stu mclaren interacting with hints of thousands of memberships i notice he saw firsthand what works from building a thriving membership site and what doesn't to learn more reserve your spot by visiting zig show dot com slash tried it's going to be an incredible webinar in well worth your time capacities limited be sure to go to zip show dot com slash tribe to claim your spot okay folks here now mark tim and i bring you stu mclaren still we're gonna die in just honor to have you here again i've known so much about you from so many people for so long and i want to get into some of the business part but i want to know about your personal journey what inspired your true performance you've had such significant success in business world and now with your humanitarian fronts we wanna know how and why in literally i want to go back to your upbringing how did it influence your path towards success well for me i want i grew up in a very small town about an hour and a half south of toronto and when i say small town i mean it like i had corn on one side and cows on the other you know and so i grew up in this family where both my parents worked really really hard and i don't know if anybody listening can relate but both my parents had two full time jobs my dad he worked in a high school with kid.

co founder stu mclaren toronto mark tim
"stu" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"stu" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Stu guards those are both posts oh goes liber burns show we this two gone it's only is pm radio so speaking of race a clarification from earlier in the show we were talking simon been looking at the internet and i'm not going to i'm not going to look at the internet till mike tells me it's okay to come out the internet is cruel i think america's got uh uh the the most under reported addiction in the world not just america is our addiction to these devices run i'm telling you after yesterday i mean weighed on mike on this but after yesterday it may never be safe for you to go on the internet again all right so the internet is a bit of a poison well and you you keep hearing celebrities and other people saying that they've sort of kick the distractions out of their life and sort of reach day aid cleaner place of thinking because they're not being bombarded by stimuli all the time the need any time there's a moment to be alone with yourself your thoughts your feelings and serenity the instinct is to go to the phones and so i've just i've i'm getting out of it this week because i know what a poison the internet can be and i was vulnerable yes and i'm sure people are mocking it uh and so i don't know who's doing this though i don't know i'm just hearing from others so i'm not totally informed on what's happening and this and i'm not informed on any of the spits specifics of what's at with the exception of weei you knew that was happening whether you're higher did on i assumed i i know who the culprits are there will normally go after me if i'm vulnerable i know who those people are but i don't know what's presently happen even then he's only picking up fragments like he's assuming what eyes aim but he's not really hearing it um earlier you're talking about a barstool and i think there was some confusion there now while they were certainly celebrating the of the resignation of john skipper they came yesterday they weren't really rubbing it in your face even though they also employ michael rappaport who very publicly goes agile.

Stu america michael rappaport simon
"stu" Discussed on Weekend Observations with Stu and Jr.

Weekend Observations with Stu and Jr.

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"stu" Discussed on Weekend Observations with Stu and Jr.

"Auto go online to geico dot com or stop by the geico office nearest you three ways you could save you fifteen percent or more stu god's alabama is becoming annoy my colleague junior and senior inside a hotel room by myself last night covering the whole game he's he's weekend observations to win junior the podcast this is weekend observations on espn radio on espn app aaron gold amor ben artzi botkin for stu godsend goal junior this morning espn radio presented by progressive insurance guess son weekend observations appear via these xiao pennzoil performance line you can get in touch with us throw one eight hundred flowers twitter feed i'm hammer nation nineteen ban is at van underscore hard sock van good morning got a big college football weekend to talk about look at the nfl little world series got a lot going on this morning about yeah yeah i'm fresh bag of charged up just got back off of cruise this week i you know i love the crews dynamic of a cruz celebrity you go on a cruise and you have the bellyflopped competition and and i found myself you know i got on elevator and then i get off and i'm like i'm tell them my wife on like hey i just was in the elevator with the fourth place bellyflop competition guy you know it's like he was so down to earth you know the the concept of a cruise ship celebrity who was was pretty funny to me this past week now let me ask you this is a former nfl tight end throughout the course of your career former irish state buckeye in national champion do you get recognized on a cruise like our people taken self he's with you now.

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"stu" Discussed on Weekend Observations with Stu and Jr.

Weekend Observations with Stu and Jr.

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"stu" Discussed on Weekend Observations with Stu and Jr.

"Pennzoil synthetics with pure plus technology makes this deep time for performance winter is here but with coldstart protection an excellent performance an extreme temperatures pennzoil synthetics keeps your engine pairing so you'll know winter is here is an islamicist it sounds visit pennzoil dot com and make their suites today stu god's alabama it's becoming annoy mike only junior and ugly scene inside a hotel room by myself last night fallen governing the whole game these these weekend observations to win jr the podcast it is weekend observations ernie as being radio and the espn apps dig adds my goal junior with you every sunday seventy nine am eastern we are presented by progressive insurance august appear via the shell pennzoil performance lie you can tweet this show any time using the 1800flowerscom twitter feed ads do god's have an idea m goal a junior fifty seven bill gates you to join us it about about 12 minutes an pondered eight forty five from sunday nfl kowtow good morning michael junior good morning sue that's how we surviving the lacrosse world for you right now i know last weekend was the the start of falbo right last weekend was then had a have another tournament this week in mice with three games yesterday a batmitzvah west nights the show with you this morning and three more games i mean might be seconds i am dealt with the show i am added back up to to one like north palm beach like wellington for another three games set this up well i should say three games by assuming we're going to wear the jeb egyptair so if we do it's going to be another three games but it's elimination only now so moving forward it's winter go home.

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