40 Burst results for "STAN"

Fresh update on "stan" discussed on Mark Mason

Mark Mason

00:47 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "stan" discussed on Mark Mason

"Little bit of a downer. We also believe in property rights and this is a private hotel, and we believe in the rule of law. So we need to comply with the laws of this county that we're in. But a private hotel, just like your house gets to set its own rules. As Stan mentioned we are in a private facility on we do want to be respectful of the ordinances that they have as their private property. So please, please. She was kind like they're both. They don't want to say it could have been going on for a while. They don't want to say it, but she finally gets around us. Having everyone when you're in the ball room when you're seated. You should still be wearing a mask s so if everybody could go ahead, work on that. I know. I know it's it's not the most fun. You have.

Stan Both
Fresh update on "stan" discussed on Rick Hamada

Rick Hamada

00:56 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "stan" discussed on Rick Hamada

"Stan Bull in 2018, the Crown prince. The intelligence reports his viewed Kashiwagi as a threat to the kingdom and broadly supported using violent measures to silence him. The report could further complicate the U. S Saudi relationship this week. President Biden did speak with Saudi Arabia is King Solomon, Lisa. Thanks Jared and the Bite administration is just beginning to announce some actions in response to the report, including imposing visa restrictions on dozens of Saudi individuals, the Crown prince said in 2019. He took responsibility for the killing, but denied ordering it. Things heating up already in Florida, where the former president will speak on Sunday, Depending on who you ask, there could be a rift between establishment Republicans on the fired up conservatives here at CPAC this weekend would come inform Florida Congressman Matt Gates, a key trump ally in the U. S House, says the party's future is still trump and not the likes of Wyoming Congresswoman Liz Cheney. What does it tell you that if the number.

2018 2019 Stan Bull Jared Matt Gates Sunday Florida President Trump Liz Cheney Republicans Dozens King Solomon This Week Wyoming U. S House Donald Trump This Weekend Bite Cpac Saudi
Fresh update on "stan" discussed on Get Up!

Get Up!

01:25 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "stan" discussed on Get Up!

"Nine one twenty five as we talk it over with as promised our favorite member of the fab. Five the one and only jalen rose's here this morning a- i wanted to there's so many things and there's another finish i want to get to in a minute but i actually want to ask you about zion like last year. He wasn't playing and he was all anyone wanted to talk about this series. Averaging twenty six point game shooting sixty two percent from the floor he had thirty four last night. And i don't hear anybody talking about. What is i on right now. Stan van gundy has done a terrific job with getting zion on the move if you noticed in a couple of those highlights. Stephen adams is basically in the paint. Like an offense sublime it just clearance face you want to put shooting around zion and allow him to be your playmaker in theory. That's how you use him to stream if you notice it's not those awkward possessions where it's swing swing and also zion open for three. It's kim cutting him rolling him zipper down so he can go to his left hand. Is kim playing with pace. Is him playing with temple and finishing with force yet. Thirty points in the paint party points in the paint that's wilk chamberlain that's wilt chamberlain like yeah again. That's why he's shooting sixty two percent from the floor so he's having a terrific season but again their team that was a terrible final possession..

Stephen Adams Stan Van Gundy Sixty Two Percent Twenty Six Point Jalen Rose Thirty Points KIM Zion Nine Last Year Five Last Night Thirty Four Three Twenty This Morning Wilk Chamberlain ONE
Fresh "STAN" from Bob Sirott

Bob Sirott

00:56 sec | 9 hrs ago

Fresh "STAN" from Bob Sirott

"Two. Nothing win in Columbus. They now play the next five at home, so pretty good chance can will score his 400 on home ice. Would be the fourth player to score 400 goals as a Blackhawk, joining Bobby Hall, Stan Makita and Steve Larmer Hawks host Detroit tomorrow. Moneyline expect some heavy delays approaching route 60, just west of Diamond Lake Road due to railroad crossing malfunctioning signals also and rose. Our was still watching a crash in her at Irving Park in Ardmore in Itasca Prospect and Marino Court and then heavy delays on the A pound side of the D. N. Ryan Approaching 95th that's due to an accident. It's blocking the three left lanes. I'm Mikiko Cusiana, WGN. Traffic Central. Get all Your Chicago news from Steve for Trans. So Here's a question. If you could have coded 19 and not show any symptoms, does that mean you could have the regular flu or other viruses and also be asymptomatic will ask.

Stan Makita Bobby Hall Steve 400 Blackhawk Irving Park Mikiko Cusiana 400 Goals Ardmore Diamond Lake Road Tomorrow 95Th Detroit Marino Court Itasca Prospect Chicago Fourth Player Three Left Lanes TWO Trans
Fresh "STAN" from Bob Sirott

Bob Sirott

01:23 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh "STAN" from Bob Sirott

"Top six and six with Bob Suraj on WGN radio today, almost 6 14 and will chat with Lou Manfredini. Mr. Fix it lots of problems, especially snow related to talk to you about. If you've Got an issue 31 to 91 7200 will be the number to call through into 9817200 next with Mr Fix it. Let's get an update on traffic. First weather. Steve what's going on? We've got a couple of areas of fog this morning that might be impacting travel, especially if there's some freezing fog that is involved with that. Specifically on it. The DuPage Airport visibility down to about a half a mile Now some fog also in wheeling in down and Morris this morning Expect the high of 44 with sunshine Today. Chance of rain tonight alot of 34. Then some morning clubs tomorrow but sun in the afternoon behind your 45. Maybe 50 south of the city, and then Sunday a chance of rain but some dry hours who in sunshine and 45 for hi. It's 25 right now. In Chicago, Patrick Kane's 399th career goal snapped a scoreless time. The third period, the Blackhawks went on to a two. Nothing win in Columbus. They now play the next five at home, so pretty good chance can will score his 400 on home ice. Would be the fourth player to score 400 goals as a Blackhawk, joining Bobby Hall, Stan Makita and Steve Larmer Hawks host Detroit tomorrow. Moneyline expect some heavy.

Lou Manfredini Stan Makita Bob Suraj Bobby Hall Patrick Kane Steve Blackhawks Steve Larmer 400 Sunday 25 400 Goals Blackhawk Tomorrow 9817200 Today Chicago Tonight Detroit
Rights expert appeals to countries to return nationals from Syrias squalid camps

UN News

03:32 min | Last week

Rights expert appeals to countries to return nationals from Syrias squalid camps

"Of women and children who remain an arbitrary detention without end in camps in northeast syria must be helped homes the countries of origin atop independent ryan sex but has insisted an appeal to well over fifty countries. Whose nationals languishing. In the alcohol and roy centers because of their alleged links to isolate extremists. Special reputa- finola neo loin. Told you news's daniel. Johnson that many western european countries could do more to bring them home. So the scale of the challenge facing in syria is that we have over sixty four thousand people mostly women and children who are being held in camps in northeast syria in alcohol and regs camps primarily. It's been heartbreaking. Hasn't it listening to the grandmothers of those who are still detained in these camps. What are they telling you. So my mandate has had a lot of engagement with families including grandmothers grandmothers who are literally watching their grandchildren and their daughters starve on cell phones watching at sat with these grandmothers. And watch these images. And this is. It's it's profoundly heartbreaking because more than anything else they are completely powerless. Their governments are refusing to intervene and if those grandmothers were to send even packages of food or clothing or even any money to their daughters or their grandchildren to take them out of the extremity of the situation. They're in they would be prosecuted for assisting or giving material support to terrorism in multiple countries fifty seven unnamed countries. According to your last press release. Could you be a bit more specific about where these countries are always all regions of the world. It's across the globe. I mean we go from a to y afghanistan. Albania canada china denmark egypt poland portugal romania spain. Saudi arabia sudan to gca stan united kingdom of great britain and northern ireland. The united states and yemen. So these are countries that are spread across the globe but it is notable that. There's a really significant number of nationals from western states countries. Who have both the means and the capacity to bring their nationals home and are refusing to do so. Do you think there's an appetite to bring these people home. Though i think you have to create the conditions conducive to bring them home we the mandate i've been in countries where they have been brought home and the one thing i have seen is that governments are prepared to spend political capital to make the case for children and to accept their responsibilities to women and children and that requires an act of political will. It requires the language of compassion. It requires the language of comfort. It requires the language of calling children. And what's most challenging here. Is that a number of states. The states who called themselves human rights activists the states who say they have human rights foreign policies states who say that they are feminist in their foreign policies are not prepared to bring their women and children home. And so that's profoundly disappointing.

Syria Ryan Daniel Johnson Albania Romania Sudan Yemen Saudi Arabia Denmark Portugal Great Britain Northern Ireland Poland Afghanistan Egypt United Kingdom Spain China Canada
Stan Tatkin On Finding Love and Relieving Relationship Tension During Covid

Untangle

03:52 min | 2 weeks ago

Stan Tatkin On Finding Love and Relieving Relationship Tension During Covid

"Hello everyone arielle here. And my amazing yesterday as dr stan. Tekken so question for y'all you cooped up with someone and you might be feeling a little bit more anxious than usual and possibly their moments of the relationship. That are not going so smoothly. Do possibly wish you had more tools to help. Support yourself and your partner through this process whether that partner is your husband or wife or your child we'll dr atkins is on the forefront of couples research and therapy and he's the founder of packed the psycho biological approach to couples therapy. He'll share with us. How to observe and understand where partners are coming from and had regulate your and their behavior in some interesting ways. He also which i didn't realize before we started communicating with one. Another is amuse user. And he'll be employing news in some of his psycho biology research. And i have to say. I began to you some of the insights that he shared with me with my spouse and it has already helped so i'm very much looking forward to everybody. Hearing what stan has to share and to bit by bit improving the relationships inside of our very packed homes. Welcome stand high are how're you. I am wonderful and even more wonderful for hearing your voice alot. Thank you and i'm sorry. It had such a problem with my camera yard Should know that. I had technical problems with spilling t on my computer this morning. So that's why am cameras and working otherwise. I'd love to be able to see you so we're talking. That's okay they can hear your voice good. They can be guided by your deep tomba and deep insights wonderful system. And can you share. Just at the gecko one of the things that you've found very powerful in working with couples who are cooped up due to covid. It's interesting that we've kind of gone back to a time that we used to enjoy. Not that long ago. I might be older than some in your audience but before. There were so many distractions in so much information. Just bombarding us speed of information has increased so much just in our lifetimes that now were having to be with each other and there are good things about you sleep and some things that are very difficult and challenging as we kinda turn the clock back and find ourselves suspending more time interacting with each other and maybe for some people more time in reverie and meditating or noticing the small things not being so driven perhaps an even reaching out to people that we may have forgotten about and wondered how they're doing so yeah it is depending on your relationship and whether you have young children like you do when you have teenagers like other people do your courses going courses vary cut. This is a time. I think for people to do what should always be done and that is to think about what's really important and what we know is really important by studying people. On their deathbeds the thing that people lament the most or are happy about the most quality of their relationships and whether they're in good order and not now is a good time to make sure our relationships are in good order to do as best we can to focus on what's important and of course i'm relationships person.

Dr Stan Dr Atkins Arielle Stan
Strait sets: Djokovic dominates Chardy again

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 weeks ago

Strait sets: Djokovic dominates Chardy again

"Reigning US open champion Stan may also occur in Dominic team shook off a lengthy code quarantines to make solid start to their Australian Open campaigns both reaching the second round with straight set victories Serena Williams dispelled fears about an injured shoulder that was a fifty six minutes straight said stop conceding just two games on the way through that keeping alive who linked the quest for a record equalling twenty fourth major title the forty year old sister Venus also advanced as did men's number one that a calculation women's number two Simona Halep I'm grandma goes

Stan May Dominic Serena Williams United States Venus Simona Halep
Experience Traveling By Train

Travel with Rick Steves

04:39 min | 2 weeks ago

Experience Traveling By Train

"Start today's travel. With rick steves. With other. Eric wanner he recommends seeing the usa from a long distance train. Ride on amtrak. Our interview with eric was recorded just before the covid shutdowns kicked in when we travel. It's fun to see the world from a different perspective eric. Winer believes travel by train offers a rare combination of expansiveness and coziness. He spent a lot of time travelling by train while reading the work of great philosophers and for him. It goes together beautifully. He writes about that in his latest book. The socrates express eric. Thanks for joining us. Happy to be here so you actually took the train from washington dc to portland that sixty four hours. You could have flown in about five hours. There's just nothing rational about that. No it makes no sense. It makes no sense from a time point of view. Obviously it makes no sense from a financial point of view It really doesn't make sense from a mental health point of view. Either but i loved it. What can i say. I love every every minute of every hour of you know. It wasn't always. It's not the most glamorous way to travel but this just something to something awfully compelling about you made a very good case of that first of all you talked about the people you should the platform with. I mean okay. You're standing on the platform with surrounded by twenty or thirty people waiting to get onto that Train who are they okay. I'm going to do this quickly. Therefore determined therefore categories of long distance amtrak travelers. Okay number. One is retired people with lots of time on their hands. Number two is people who are afraid of flying. These are my compatriots to They take the train a number three or foam irs a fomer is a real enthusiasts. Who gets very excited about. Locomotives and other things like that means. They're so excited. They foam at the mouth. That's the idea okay You care to take a guess with the fourth category. As you'll never guess mennonites mennonites lots of minute nights a matter night. You mean like Lou dates are people that don't want modern. Well they apparently they They can fly but they can travel by train long distances. So these are the four categories and then there was me and i don't fit any of those categories. I was a category into myself for your kind of the opposite. Because you mentioned you have criminal phobia which is A fear of lack of time. And and you do just the opposite. It's that some kind of therapy. It was it was sort of this. What are you desensitize yourself to it. Well i always feel that your time is valuable. And i need to be making the best use of it and when you're on the train for some sixty plus hours you're just you're forced to slow down. I mean you're either go crazy or you slow down. Those two choices and i decided to slow down. The train is going to get the portland at its own pace. And there's nothing you can do about it. It will stop occasionally for an hour to for no apparent reason whatsoever and then start up again for no apparent reason and i would ask my fellow passengers if we stopped and they've just laugh at me like We got a new one. We gotta a rookie. Here in amtrak stan. You do not ask why. He thinks he's human. Beings are more important than freight right. We do we. We wait for free trains. Because amtrak does not own most of the tracks across the country the free traits everytime i go to portland derek from seattle and the train. I think i'm doing something nice for the environment. And so on. Or it's just kind of a cool thing to do and it's frustrating. Because i have chronic phobia also and i don't know beiber waiting here and somebody reminded me freight trains get priority over humans in the united states. That's not the case in europe but in the united states. That's the case but for those of us who like you and me have a fear of lack of time where where we schedule things. Its pedal to the metal. It's interesting how a long trip on a train you mentioned. It was like you hit a mother of time. Suddenly you had this big gift. That i guess you got more time just by slowing down right. And it's it's forced right because you can't go off and say we're going to go into into town and in fire up the laptop and get some work done. I mean you're on the train and you stay on the train and it's got through. I went through an interesting cycle. I i thought oh this is great. I've got this time. This is really good. I should do something. And then i just get antsy. And i started rearranging my little room at and moving things around and i started to go a little bonkers. I needed to do something. And eventually i came to acceptance that that he was gonna take a really long time to get to portland and i needed to just go with the flow and It took me a. I think somewhere around montana. I hit acceptance in there.

Eric Eric Wanner Rick Steves Portland Winer United States Washington Dc Phobia LOU Derek Seattle Europe Montana
Reddit: Wall Streets Achilles Heel? - burst 2

The 3-1 Collapse

00:34 sec | 3 weeks ago

Reddit: Wall Streets Achilles Heel? - burst 2

"If you think about the story of robinhood what he do. He stole from the rich and gave to the poor. In the sense of robinhood. The app did basically robinhood wasting stolen from a rich given to the poor then told the sheriff of nottingham that the poor stole from the rich in that exact is unacceptable literally robinhood. The is disgusting. Literally i'm pretty sure. I mean i don't know the legal implications of this ramification. Excuse me but this is. It's disgusting like i think it's illegal to. I'm not sure if you're allowed to block someone from investing in a specific share of stock or company but

Nottingham
How Lowriders Were A Protest Against White Supremacy

Past Gas

07:48 min | 3 weeks ago

How Lowriders Were A Protest Against White Supremacy

"The low rider movement was also political as a journalist of the nineteen seventies wrote quote. Low writing culture expresses the refusal of young chicano american to be anglicized. Never been a clear case of the automobile being used as an ethnic statement when mexican-americans drove low riders. They're both claiming their identity. And refusing to become invisible hassled by cops pigeonholed by the media and profiled by the general public. There is often a cost but the reward as it is so often in car culture was freedom. The history of low riding is as old as the history of los angeles car culture itself. If you've been to la or even if you haven't you're probably aware that it's a spread out city of wide boulevards and busy highways. You pretty much need a car to get around. And that's been the case for over a century of the city's history as early as the nineteen twenties. The city had an auto ownership rate of one car for every two point. Two five people compare that to the national average at the time which was one car for every seven people and it's because the tire companies paid to have the public transit yet. They show it in the documentary roger rabbit. It's very enticing to say that there is you know why conspiracy there probably was. There is definitely benefit for certain parties to shut it down but also people also liked having their own cars. So is a mix of things almost as soon as cars got into the hands of angelenos. Enterprising owners dissatisfied with stock sameness of cars like the ford model. A or the chrysler fifty eight quickly got into modifying them and stripping. Wait to create hot rods. Which back in the day were known as hop ups or cow jobs. I'm so glad that word has died out. What is a gal. I've idea let's bring that back. Yeah we got bring back. Dow job algi. That's so funny. My girlfriend said no more gal job. So i get the ones i have running cow job. My girlfriend says i gotta get a real job. Get rid of all my gal jobs. Cow jobs okay. So i found an an inch of blog post on jalopy journal dot com talking about the term gal job and just like hopped up or souped up right how that came from like racehorse giving racehorses like pills pills or drugs to improve their performance gal was also a nickname for like drugs as well So you're gone up your horse. The gow job got it and yeah while the initial focus was on speed some maters quickly became interested in how far they could push the envelope and other ways the great depression of the nineteen thirties was an added incentive for kearns iast to fix up and modify older cars rather than buying the latest and greatest the predominant car culture was creating hot rods. But there's a counterculture developing especially among the mexican american community that was a direct reaction to the dominant mostly white rod. Seen at first it wasn't known as low writing. It was just lowering your car. Also popular was chopping or lowering the roof of the car. Decorating vehicle's exterior with designs and replacing stock interior components with plush luxury substitutes. Still the term low rider hadn't yet been coined in the thirties. The clear predecessor of low rider history in the chicano community was a co style. A slang word that roughly translates to punk or troublemaker. But you goes were known for wearing zoot suits slipping their hair back and duck tales a distinctive pattern of slang and in association with swing in jazz. Music is so cool. I watched like archival footage of and they're just like i wish i could pull that style off. My grandpa had zoot suit back in the day. I wish that you are the same like personality. You had the same job hobbies but you just were every day. I'm like accidentally slamming the coattails of my zoot suit in my impreza. Guys look pretty cool. Still pacheco's weren't necessarily associated with a specific style of automobile wasn't until the fifties that mexican american culture started to really embrace the low rider aesthetic in the nineteen fifties. Many white hot-rodders chose to raise their car turning away from the sleek look that had been popular before the war in the words of chicano artists gabriel gibson. White drivers quote went into hot rods and fast cars. They would raise their cars. These big all motors these big trucks but the raza for the race says now i want to do the opposite on a nice and slow slow and low. The one thousand nine hundred fifty saw the true emergence of low rider culture especially in los angeles in the postwar period. Los angeles was a hub for american auto manufacturing. Second only to detroit with ford chrysler and general motors. All operating assembly plants in the area matching if that was still true. That'd be cool. Yeah bill alice. Ten cities ton is stan. Low rider culture. You have to understand. The history of los angeles and it's mexican population originally founded as a spanish mission to spread catholicism in the seventeen hundreds by the eighteen hundreds it had evolved into a forming and ranching up while the land owners were initially of spanish and mexican descent by the eighteen fifties white americans began to dominate. Los angeles is economy and governments prize surprise. Although mexican americans. And even chinese immigrants outnumbered white americans white angelenos still held most of the political power in the city while the white neighborhoods of los angeles boomed tocado in hispanic populations were increasingly regulated to urban ghettos or barrios especially in the east los angeles area away from the pacific ocean and the downtown core at first these neighborhoods were little more than shantytowns but after world war two the population of l. a. began to explode. The city had one of the largest populations of mexican people living anywhere in the world including mexico. Thousands of mexican americans who had served in the war returned or moved to los angeles and with the cash stipend provided by the gi bill. Many of these vets had the income to afford a car of course despite the improved economic times mexican american communities were still far from the luxury of beverly hills or the film set glamour of hollywood. I'd say hollywood is trying to say that convincingly knowing that hollywood is not very glamorous. Yeah i'm sure back in the day it was but the thing i find funny in interesting seeing like torres families like german tourists in like they're blonde hair and jean shorts like walking around hollywood so confused. Yeah well this is a this place full of like forty dollars suit stores and like weird pizza places. If you're coming to la don't go to hollywood. It's pretty bad. Plus all the studios are like in culver. All the studio sony's in color but most of them are in north hollywood. With their means of expression limited. Low riders became an important symbol of personal expression. Freedom and cultural independence

Jalopy Journal Los Angeles Roger Rabbit Chrysler Gabriel Gibson Ford Bill Alice LA Pacheco Depression Model Raza General Motors Hollywood Stan Detroit East Los Angeles Pacific Ocean Mexico
Reflections On Atlanta Braves Legend Henry "Hank" Aaron

The Lead

05:43 min | Last month

Reflections On Atlanta Braves Legend Henry "Hank" Aaron

"I could talk about the dignity in the class of hank. Aaron the man the you've been being for an hour easily but i'm a numbers guy and so let me tell you what i did. After hank aaron died i navigated over to his page on baseball reference. And i don't know. I just be held the majesty of this man's career and it literally gave me goosebumps. The more i looked the more. I realized he was beyond great. He was at some other level. He wound up with nearly thirty eight hundred hits. And that's a lot of freaking hits. It's a thousand more history chipper jones. It's two thousand more hits than mark. Maguire it's more hits than johnny bench and hank greenberg got combined and they're both in the hall of fame so i think about all those hints and i think about those seven hundred fifty five homeless because that's two hundred more homes than mickey mantle. Two hundred it's more homers than edgar martinez and duke snider hit combined. And they're both in the hall. But the more i dug i found other cool stuff to hank. Aaron had double digit home run seasons at age twenty and age. Forty here the only three players who did that. Willie mays ted williams hank aaron. That's a pretty good. Start on a mount rushmore. Would you say and all those home runs. He hit for all those years. This never struck out one hundred times. Then there's total basis crushes. Everyone who ever played in total bases six thousand eight hundred and fifty. Six total bases isn't just a record. It's seven hundred. Twenty two more than stan. Musial was the next closest player in history. If stan musial had hit another one hundred and eighty home runs. He still wouldn't catch i karen and total basis. That's a lot of total basis. That's incredible hitter hank. Aaron was for two decades. So is it possible to be one of the greatest players who ever lived and still the underrated. After looking over hank aaron's numbers. I think it is my name. Is david o'brien cover the braves for the athletic. And there's only two guys that i've ever felt this aura around them and that was mohammed ali and hank. Aaron and hank aaron. How's interviewed him. The first time at spring training. I remember approaching him and it was just You know i've done this for thirty years. And it was feeling. I've had unlike any other athlete that i've ever approached but then he immediately just he smiled and was so warm that that fear or intimidation just as melted away. And you could not believe that you were talking to this. Superstar is genuine icon living in atlanta for twenty years You can't overstate the importance of hank. Air to this city and this region the south. I grew up in the south and hank aaron being a black man being the greatest one of one of the two or three greatest players of all time and to do what he did in the south and then living in atlanta and seeing hank aaron you know mementos anchor and tributes and see his name on buildings and streets and that kind of thing. I would argue that. There is no athlete. That is more important to a city than hanker and wants to atlanta. He was such a huge part of how the culture of the south has changed. I mean this is a city where you feel fide of being so much black acceptance here. Thanks a huge huge part of that. He helped pave the way for all these other black athletes and entertainers wanna come here to be here. Brian jordan know it was an all star with atlanta. Bryant said that The reason that he chose atlanta was hank. Aaron and was a boy idle here. He said a black kid growing up playing baseball hank. Aaron was the guy but it was an opportunity for me to meet my hair. The hope the opportunity is given so many kids today. Amazing dominique wilkins. Said hank was a big reason. That he came here was one of the first people. It's probably one of the most instrumental guys into getting me here in atlanta. But one for god like hank. I wouldn't been here. Was hanker went to ted turner and said hey you need to get this kid by any means necessary. He said people should give the roses while they're alive and that he's glad to see him getting them now but he said hank should have been put on a pedestal decades ago and he was right What are the things that i remember him saying is that you gotta set example for people to come at you. And how do you do that. You do the right way you doing about being Have miltie you do it by just doing the right thing and the right thing a lot of times. It's hard and a lot of guys. Young guys don't know how to do the right thing. As far as how they present themselves to people and how they get back to people so to give back experts that i've learned over the years has become from erin trampling. We don't see that much of that anymore today. And he lived in the same house that he bought when he came here in. Nineteen sixty six from the

Hank Aaron Hank Aaron Atlanta Hank Greenberg Johnny Bench Chipper Jones Edgar Martinez Duke Snider Mickey Mantle Willie Mays Stan Musial Ted Williams Maguire Musial Baseball David O Mohammed Ali Brien Brian Jordan
Ball brothers Lonzo, LaMelo set to square off in NBA matchup

Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

03:48 min | Last month

Ball brothers Lonzo, LaMelo set to square off in NBA matchup

"We're talking about lonzo in the last segment. A little bit and brandon ingram coups mud cetera. But the whole point was that lamelo alonzo are playing. And you don't have a lot of brothers playing against each other. We know the wilkins brothers Played against each other. Obviously the soul brothers have played against each other so this is just another installation of that particular kind of cool fund rivalry that the nba tends to have but we you know we talked a lot about lonzo. What do you think of the mellows. Ceiling is wow. That's a great question Ever since i first saw him like what was it like three years ago now watching plane. Aau it was obvious he was really talented offensive player. So i would say. His silly is attached to his defense. Okay you know. The more he improved bronco on defense to hire his silly goes because even though i think he's a really talented offensive. Play at the reality is. There's not a whole lot of dudes who play his position in the back court. That can't get you them buckets. Right what else you got. And we're waiting to see him. Show us the other aspects of it tastes him from being a talented young player to someone who may be able to lead a team to a french tour championship. So at this point It's a wait and see i need to. I need to spend a liberal time playing ball getting better getting stronger. Before i can tell you where i think is ceiling is going to go because i need to see how strong and how defensive he's going to become yet. Defensively is a big problem. I think big problem right now but it's a big problem for young players especially rookies week or so. You know. it's time for all of them. So i'm not going to hold them to this. But after two seasons if dudes are still blown by him because he's too busy trying to leak out get buckets. Then we know what that is. Yeah look here's ofensive skill set. His passing is ridiculous. Like we already know that that very early on do you think. He has a higher ceiling than lonzo though no not inherently so right well of course. There's always a good defender. There's no question about really answer. Really good rebounder right. And he's equally as good as a passer. So you're asking yourself. We'll lonzo's offense developed faster than lamelo defense. Because that's gap right. There will lonzo's offense develop than I would say lonzo's offenses rounding to form much much better. These last eight months or whatever lamelo defense defense takes a while i feel like guy sometimes go years before they learn to play real. Good defense is that fair or it depends on the coach that should never have conversations with Jj radic over the years and bright before he was drafted. He and i were joking. I was like dude. I love you to be in phoenix. House wins nash. And amari and those guys were rolling. Sounds like do you just be straight buckets. Any overstaying strengthen gundy and you needed to lay defense to play. I needed to pay exactly to play defense for stand right and it was because of that. He's still in the league. I don't know if he was still being the league. If it wasn't for stan forced him to know how to play good defense and he did. He became a very capable defender Even though he's small right even though he you know he he's he's not he's strong for size but he's not like some overwhelming You know person when it comes to his strength but he's really smart. He plays the angles while he plays team defense. Because you're you're right. You're right

Lonzo Brandon Ingram Lamelo Alonzo Bronco NBA Jj Radic Amari Gundy Nash Phoenix Stan
Chicago Blackhawks captain Jonathan Toews out indefinitely with illness

John Williams

00:20 sec | 2 months ago

Chicago Blackhawks captain Jonathan Toews out indefinitely with illness

"For the Blackhawks, who will go to training camp next week without their captain Jonathan Tape, said in a statement. He's experienced symptoms that have left him drained and lethargic. He won't be in camp and won't join the team until he feels he can play well enough to help the Blackhawks president and GM Stan Bowman said. Caves, health is their top priority. The

Jonathan Tape Blackhawks Stan Bowman GM
Master P, Baron Davis In Talks To Acquire Reebok

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 2 months ago

Master P, Baron Davis In Talks To Acquire Reebok

"And a former NBA player or looking to fill some big shoes and take ownership of Reebok. Forbes reports Percy Master P. Miller and one time All Star Baron Davis are in negotiations to buy the sportswear company from Adidas, which picked it up in 2005 the asking price, Stan said about $2.4 billion, Miller says they'll focus on turning Reebok into a lifestyle brand rather than just a basketball brand, and their most important initiative will be to put money back into the community. That built the company. Davis says he thinks Reebok is being undervalued and he wants athletes, influencers designers and celebrities to sit at the table with him. Well, no

Percy Master P. Miller Reebok Baron Davis Forbes NBA Adidas Stan Miller Basketball Davis
Pelicans beat relocated Raptors 113-99; Van Gundy wins debut

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 2 months ago

Pelicans beat relocated Raptors 113-99; Van Gundy wins debut

"The pelicans rallied from an eleven point deficit and beat the relocated raptors won thirteen ninety nine in Toronto's first home game in Tampa Brandon Ingram led all scorers with twenty four points and J. J. Redick added twenty three including a four point play with just over a minute remaining Zion Williamson had a big second half for the pelicans and finished with fifteen points and ten rebounds helping Stan van Gundy get his first victory as New Orleans coach Toronto led by seven before being out scored thirty eight twenty two in the third quarter Pascal Siakam led the raptors with twenty two points I'm Dave Ferrie

Pelicans Brandon Ingram J. J. Redick Zion Williamson Raptors Toronto Tampa Stan Van Gundy New Orleans Pascal Siakam Dave Ferrie
Lily James and Sebastian Stan to play Pamela Anderson and Tommy Lee in Hulu series

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND

00:27 sec | 2 months ago

Lily James and Sebastian Stan to play Pamela Anderson and Tommy Lee in Hulu series

"Tommy liam pamela anderson. You remember that crazy relationship. Well we're getting at hulu series based on it. That was a long time. That was but the sex tape will even be involved in this whole hulu series. So you don't know about the tommy lee pamela anderson sex. Dave you might want to google. That is very interesting. And plays them Sebastian stan lily. James will be

Tommy Liam Pamela Anderson Hulu Tommy Lee Pamela Anderson Dave Sebastian Stan Lily Google James
Sebastian Stan to Play Mötley Crüe’s Tommy Lee in Hulu Series

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:38 sec | 2 months ago

Sebastian Stan to Play Mötley Crüe’s Tommy Lee in Hulu Series

"Been cast for the new Who Luke, Syria's based On Pamela Anderson and Tommy Lee. Oh, Lord have mercy That was a Dumpster fire. Well, the limited Syriza, Pam and Tommy will follow the scandalous relationship between the Motley Crue drummer than the Baywatch actress that dominated the tabloids in the nineties. Yes, it did. Reporting deadline, says Sebastian, Stan and Lily James will play Lee and Anderson. The Syrians will be produced by Seth Rogan and Evan Goldberg and directed by the guy who directed I Tanya Filming is set to begin this spring.

Syriza Tommy Lee Pamela Anderson Syria Luke Lily James PAM Tommy Evan Goldberg Sebastian Stan Seth Rogan Anderson LEE Tanya Filming
Facebook's Future with Mari Smith

Perpetual Traffic by DigitalMarketer

08:51 min | 2 months ago

Facebook's Future with Mari Smith

"We're gonna be talking a little bit about facebook's future in some of the things that she seen going on there's a lot happening privacy's sort of a big thing right now which will touch upon but lives video groups all kinds of stuff. What's the biggest thing that you see right now. That's really changing. Facebook that marketers need to know and then maybe we can get into some of the specifics of those things that they need to know. Murray absolutely well you just mentioned privacy and it was just double checking the day and it was march of two thousand nineteen zuckerberg mark zuckerberg kind of like almost like out of the blue is a little unanticipated. He pandas mega manifesto his privacy manifest doom. And everybody's talking about always. The pivot to privacy am own kind of interpretations of why this came about. You know what's the longer term. Play here that sucker. Berg is up to in it was in essence of there was an aspect of it was in response to the potential antitrust is also just getting pushed into like Know all the regulation components of i think eventually the whole social media landscape. We'll get regulated. That's inevitable just like radio television newspapers. It's inevitable so that's coming at some point and this is Kind of anticipating that in. What's fascinating to watch okay. What is the pivot privacy. Meanwhile they're doubling down on focusing on the three main messaging products that what's out being the biggest one. And then messenger which is really the number one messenger gap into the us. What's up number outside the us. And though they compete with apple i messages is pretty popular around the world and then the third one is instagram dragged in so zuckerberg in that manifesto use this word interoperability numerous times. We're just talking off lying there. Baking together familiar with that. If you're headed by the way my dad was a professional. Baker starlight bake cakes cupcakes stuff. So here's basically baking together. These three main messaging apps are products in essence. So they can kind of like not be in big more difficult so he can stand up there in goal no but no all of our users and our businesses our business. You know advertisers and customers. They have to be able to have these three products together and then but he's not saying out of course what they're seeing public facing which really we can all buy into. It's like hey yeah pun. Intended customer goes to instagram. He's looking year. She's looking at your shop owner. Gosh this item the go they buy it and then they're like but they tend to use what's out for two chatting or managing people and businesses. So they can their customer service. Follow up there asking questions. They can choose which inbox going to land in. What's up is direct or messenger. That's the aspect of interoperability. What's coming to is the ability to actually make those purchases inside any of those three inboxes in get the kind of the follow up. And then you've got that whole aspect of the chat baugh automation continues to be developed. So yes that would be. The main one is really. We were also talking about ecommerce. You know ralph. I know that area you focus on your agency and its ecommerce mobile commerce. you know. it's taken a leaf out of the. The books are the apps of asia's doing predominantly china. There's huge huge apps that entire operating systems inside of one one app. Don't see each being the biggest one of them but i think marketers today really looking towards developing their twenty twenty one plan. If you are in remotely in the world of e-commerce you have something to sell. But my point is there's a distinction here between physical products because that's almost always what facebook instagram ten to differentiate. They bring it all these features and it's shutting up shop earlier this year. The they just call it facebook shop. But it's now kind of streamline so if you have facebook shop it also is sitting right there on instagram and you can integrate with their partners right like shop of finding one of the main ones and so but were they've come right out and said is hey we recognize there are service based businesses and there are digital product based businesses and they're quote unquote working on solutions for all types of businesses. So i'm excited about that. Those those of us do digital product services. Yeah and you kinda started answering the question. That i had mario in terms of you know based on facebook trying to start baking all of these programs together. Have you seen that kind of come together with the programs that they've started in twenty twenty four businesses that are needing help during the pandemic and businesses. Maybe that are not so product centric and maybe more service centric like would have you seen happening with those kind of being a pulled together through the programs that they've started this year. We'll some of the real easy ones that they slipped in earlier in the year was like adding sticker onto instagram stories. Were you could users could recommend their favorite shops. Our local stores stick her in tag. The instagram account. That's made it made a difference to small business. I would hope so also like really trending hashtags hashtag support small business. They also june july of this year really emphasized. Hash is on facebook now. It's a whole other topic. I wrote a blog post about it. Hashtag of thing on facebook since two thousand thirteen so after seven years like okay. Now it'd be a good time to make them relevant on facebook. So i'm recommending to all my clients and students not in audience members is to go ahead and include hashtag support small business singular and plural on practically every post. You do so just adds a real easy simple one but about your question about the baking together. What happened just a couple of months ago. Is that the initial component of that interoperability. Kim with messenger integrate thing with instagram direct. To the point that they changed the dang logo now his do my head and because there's like every logo is all the same kind. I don't know what's happening anywhere. Google did the same thing right. Real visit dead called click up. It's like the same colors. And then i'm like a messenger instagram. Say all these seem like rainbow colors confused a lot of people and so now okay. Now we're not just doing that. light blue on messenger. Instagram and messenger so lots of changes all at once. It definitely does seem like the focus or the push for new products in the last three years on. Facebook has been more geared towards ecommerce dynamic product as and obviously facebook shop. And now you've got this interoperability with shop. It's really interesting. Because the digital the info people service people like. Well wait a second i mean. Obviously small business storefronts. That's always been sort of a mainstay stan. Or you're really involved with a lot of the small business. push that they did for marketing. But it's interesting to hear that digital like these other businesses which we all know and love. Obviously that's like that's how they make their living is going to be a more of a push in the coming years. Which is which is really good news. I think for a lotta listeners. Well it's true because you know we've all been selling online for you know a decade two decades and so wonderful able to have all of these users on their mobile devices and by the way of course. Instagram is one hundred percent mobile. they have the desktop version. But everybody's mobile and then facebook. It's roughly about eighty percent. Eighty five percent that predominantly access facebook on their mobile devices. So the easier. You can make it for the customer whether bbc to just tap tap. Tap bob okay. You know whether impulse purchases or really more thoughtful ones or just even getting into your funnel. Obviously those are. Those are really great in jackson. Re targeting you mention dynamic ads ralph and so you know i think you know some companies are just really good at sitting in your car like amazon. And they're like oh you might like these other twenty. Things would work exceedingly well. I mean it's one of the greatest tools especially for ecommerce

Facebook Instagram Mark Zuckerberg Berg Zuckerberg Murray United States Ralph Apple Asia Mario China KIM Google Bob Okay BBC Jackson
Will the Afghan Taliban commit to ending the country’s lengthy and bloody war?

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:01 min | 3 months ago

Will the Afghan Taliban commit to ending the country’s lengthy and bloody war?

"For the first time in nearly two decades of war a written agreement exists between the government of afghanistan and the taliban the question that now arises is the one concerning the value of the paper upon which it is written. The agreement follows some months of talks in doha. And at least in theory clears the way towards a ceasefire and some sort of roadmap leading to a lasting political settlement. It is not necessary to be outrageously skeptical however to wonder if the taliban amelie running out the clock in anticipation of the united states entirely losing interest joined with more on this by michael semple former deputy to the eu special representative for afghanistan and michael. Welcome back to the briefing the agreement in itself if we take it as face value. How big a deal is it. It's a small positive step. it allows us to move. It allows us to to move One one step forward a in these long negotiations. How certain can anyone be though that the taliban in particular negotiating or have been negotiating in good faith. Well i'd say that nobody should be certain about this. There are two diametrically opposed ways of looking at this and time will tell our one hour one view which is the ones. Some of the western diplomats are taking is that the taliban have realized that they can't actually win this war on that they would benefit from being part of some kind of a compromise settlement a which would allow c- a government jointly formed between the people who are currently in power in kabul on the taliban on would have international support So thoughts the idea that they're involved in difficult but good faith negotiations. They other view. Is that the taliban are using. These talks to provide political cover for their real game which is trying to win the war on the battlefield. Because of course you don't need a long memory or at least if you live in afghanistan. You don't require long memory to remember a time when the taliban were actually in charge of the country which they were for nearly a decade up until late two thousand and one is there any indication that the taliban thinking on governance has evolved at all since then or does afghanistan as it was in the ninety s. Still seemed to be very much what they would like afghanistan to be again well. This is the crux of the matter. Some of the taliban diplomats in cutter have put a lot of effort into persuading every body that they have matured that they wouldn't like to to force anything down. The throats of unwilling population are but if we wants to get an idea of what taliban governance looks like. We don't have to look back two decades in the past. We often look what is happening in areas. Which are controlled by the taliban today because they do hold sway in many parts of rural off. Stan i'm i would say that The taliban approach to governance in those areas is remarkably reminiscent of the way they run the country until two thousand and one. It's it is ruled by the barrel of a gun. Well one other thing which may or may not of course change. The dynamics of these negotiations is the imminent change of administration in the united states. Do we yet fully understand whether president joe biden will be as kane on president trump as president trump rather of ending the united states' involvement in afghanistan entirely. I think this is going to be one of the critical decisions that the administration will have to take in the early stages of despite trying to focus on other priorities But just the timetable dictates that in the though withdrawal process that the us has been involved in which is really for dramatically reduce the numbers of troops on the ground. The official position is that it's conditional upon they taliban sticking to the commitments which they gave to the us in their agreement signed on the twenty ninth of february now. Many of us believe that the taliban have not stuck to those commitments but of course their diplomats in in cutter asserts that they are doing so until now the trump administration has essentially turned a blind eye to for to taleban breaches of commitment and they the vitamin ministration. When it comes is going to have to look at look at the position on c- Do they continue turning the blind eye out or do they say the taliban the commitments and therefore does the. Us react to that down. The process of withdrawing troops

Taliban Afghanistan Michael Semple Doha United States Kabul EU Michael Stan Joe Biden Kane Trump Administration
The Day of the Lord is Near (Obadiah 1:15)

Pray the Word with David Platt

05:36 min | 3 months ago

The Day of the Lord is Near (Obadiah 1:15)

"Ovadai chapter one verse. Fifteen for the day of the lord is near upon all the nations. Just gonna stop there. The verse actually goes on. But i just want us to soak in what we just heard and pray. According to it for the day of the lord is near upon all the nations and the context here in ovid. Is this the shortest book. And the old testament just one chapter and it's addressing specifically got speaking through the prophet ovadai About the people of eithm the might who had helped capture fleeing israelites. And turn them over to the babylonians when they were being driven out from jerusalem and god makes clear in this chapter in this short bible. Bug that eat them. The nation the eat mites will be held accountable for what they have done and so we read this verse verse. Fifteen for the day of the lord is near upon all the nations and the verse goes on to say. As you've done it shall be done to you. Your deeds shall return on your own head in other words all people in all nations will one day give an account to god and in his holiness and his justice he will judge all the nations of the earth which means all people in all the nations of the world. Need the mercy of god. All people and all nations are senators. Who have rebelled against god and who deserve his just judgment yet. We know from new testament. God so loved the world all the peoples and all the nations of the world that he gave his one and only son that whoever believes in him will never perish but have everlasting life. The good news of the gospel. The great news of the bible is that salvation is available for all people in all nations that jesus revelation chapter five has died to purchase people for god from every nation tribe tongue language every nation every people group in the world. And that's what we need to think of when we hear nations for the day of the lord is near upon all the nations. Don't just think geopolitical entities countries like we think of two hundred or so united nations today think ethnic groups think people groups this is why we pray continually on this podcast for unreached people groups like today the karakolpak. People of us becca stan. Me tell you a little bit about the car. Call poc people so this people group is almost one hundred percent muslim. And i say almost because i we and our church family have been connected with believers among the karakolpak people who are meeting underground in secret who are gathering at great risk to worship god to study his word and to proclaim the gospel they are working to lead other karakolpak people to faith in jesus and we. We have stories of people being baptized. Among the caracol puck people so the gospel is going forward. The reality is though among the seven hundred and fifty thousand or so karakolpak. People and use becca stan. Most of them still have never even heard the good news. Of god's love in jesus and ovadai one fifteen makes clear that the day of the lord is near upon all the nations all the karakolpak people of us back. Stan will one. Day stand before. God as judge which means we give our lives praying and giving and going as god leads to people groups like the caracol people to make his mercy known among these people who've never even heard of love is not they've heard about jesus and rejected him. They've never even heard of the mercy of jesus. So i want to lead us to pray specifically for what god is doing among the caracol puck people for you and i right now in this podcast in the next two minutes to be involved with what god is doing and use becca stan and at the same time to step back and see the world through this lens when you look at world news among the nations and all kinds of different ways no every nation every tribe every people group in the world will one day stand before god as judged so as you look world news let it drive you to pray for the spread of the gospel and this nation among that people group in this language. Let's be world 'prayers. Let's pray with a world lens for the spread of god's mercy among all the nations knowing the day of the lord is near upon every single one of them so god we pray right now we intercede on behalf of the caracol but people and use becca stan.

Becca Stan Karakolpak Jerusalem Ovadai United Nations Stan
Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

Scientific Sense

44:57 min | 5 months ago

Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new Ideas Affect Society? And, help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense. Dot? Net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense dot com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen Dot Info. Mike yesterday's Dr Mark Hoffman, who is a research associate professor in the University of Minnesota Against City. He is also chief research inflammation officer in the children's Mussa hospital in Kansas City. Kiss research interests include health data delayed indication sharing initialisation Boca Mark. Thank you for inviting me. Absolutely. So I start with one of your papers Kato you need the use by our system implementation in defy date data resource from hundred known athlete off my seasons. So Michio inflicted. Data aggregated for marketable sources provide an important resource for my medical research including digital feel typing. On. Like. Todd beat to from a single organization. Guitar data introduces a number of analysis challengers. So. So you've worked with some augmentation log and in almost all cases be used. Data coming from that single macy's listen primary care behavioral. Or specialty hospitals and I always wondered you know wouldn't be nice. Get a data set. That sort of abrogates data from the radio on-ice. Asians but a lot of different challenges around that. So you wanted to talk a bit about that. I'd be happy to the resource that we've worked with. Is primarily a called health fax data resource. It's been in operation for almost twenty years. And the the the model is that organizations who are. Using these Turner Electronic. Health. Record. Enter into an agreement was turner they agreed to provide data rights to sern are. The identifies the date of affords aggregated into this resource. And certner provides data mapping, which is really critical to this type of work. It also the aggregate the data. And for the past probably six years. Then, they provide the full data set to especially academic contributors who want to do research with that resource. And I've been on both sides of that equation Lead that group during my career there, and then now I have the opportunity to really focus research on that type of data. So before we get into the details smog so e Itar Systems. So this is. Essentially patient records. So he gets dated like demographics out family history, surgical history hats, medications, lab solves it could have physician nodes no snow. So it's it's a combination of a variety of different types of data, right? A couple of things on the examples you gave it includes demographics. Discreet Laboratory results Medication orders. Many vitals so If access the blood pressure and pulse data. It does not include text notes because those can't be. Automatically identified consistently. So. We don't have access currently to TEX notes. Out of an abundance of caution. That his Hobby Stephen, physician writes something down they could use names they could use inflammation that could then point back to their. Patients Makita Perspective been the data's aggregated, the primary issue shoe that date has completely the identified, right? Correct. So. So yeah. So the data that we receive there's eighteen identifiers. Hip requires be removed from data. And those include obvious things like name address email addresses are another example One of the. Things. That is also part of the benefit of working with this particular resource. The. Dates of clinical service are not allowed to be provided under hip. White is done with this resource that allows us to still have a longitudinal view is. For any given patient in the data set the dates are shifted by A. Consistent. Pattern that for any given patient it can be. One two three four five weeks forward or one, two, three, four or five weeks backward. But that preserves things like day of the week effect. So for example, you see -nificant increase in emergency department encounters over weekends and you don't WanNa lose. Visibility to that. but it also allows us to receive. Very, granular early time stamped events in so. We can gain visibility into the time that a blood specimen was collected, and then the time that the result was reported back. And so we're able to do very detailed analyses with this type of resource. Right right and I don't know the audience our market is fragmented. Tau himself e Amorebieta providers out there. and so two issues. One is sort of. Standardization as to how these databases are designed and structured and others even that standardization that the actual collection of the data. In itself is not standardized played. So vk CAV vk potentially lot inability coming from different systems. Correct and that's part of what the paper that you mentioned Evaluates so. Often, night you out in the field in conferences you hear. Comparisons kind of lumping all organizations using one. Vendor lumping all using another together but as you get closer to it, you quickly learn that. It's not even clear. It's within those. Vendor markets. There's variation from organization to organization in how they use the e Hr and so. Because the identities of the. Contributing organizations are blinded to those of us who work with the data. We have to be creative about how we. Infer those implementation details, and so with this paper, we describe a couple of methods that We think move things forward towards that goal. Yes. So I'm not really familiar with that. So you mentioned a couple of things here. One is the the merge network. So this initiative including electric medical records and genomics network and pc off net the national patient, centered clinical research network support. Decentralized analyses that goes disparate systems by distributing standardized quotas to site. So this is a situation where you have multiple systems sort of. Communicating with each other and this net folks at allowing to sort of quickly them In some standardized fashion. So In this type of technology, there's janitorial core models. One is the. Federated or distributed model, the other is a centralized data aggregation. So there are examples including those that are mentioned in the paper where. Queries are pushed to the organization and. They need to do significant work upfront to ensure that there are standardizing their terminologies the same way. And once they do that upfront work than they're able to perform the types of queries that are distributed through those. Federated Networks. With. Okay. So that just one click on so that the police have standardized. So all on the at Josh site, then they have like some sort of a plan slater from from Stan Day squatty do all the data structure. And in many cases, they work through an intermediate technology. that would be. In general, consider it like a data warehouse. And so the queries are running against the production electric. Health record. That has all kinds of implications on patient care where you don't want to slow down performance. By using these intermediaries They can receive queries and then Follow that mapping has occurred. Than, they're able to to run those distributed queries. Okay. And the other model is You know. You say the g through the medical quality, improvement consortium and sooner to the health facts initiative. So this says in Sodas case, for example, in swags. This is essentially picking up data from the right deals, clients and Dan standardizing and centralizing data in a single database is that that is correct. One benefit of that model is that Organizations who for example, may not be academic and don't have the. Resources to do that data mapping themselves by handing out over that task over to the vendor you get a broader diversity of the types of organizations so you can have. A safety net hospitals you can have. Critical access rural hospitals, and other venues of care that are probably under represented in some of those. More academically driven models. And clearly the focus on healthcare about I would imagine applications in pharmaceutical out indeed to right I. Don't know if it s use and bad direction there has been some were performed with these data resources to. Characterize different aspects of medications, and so it does have utility in value. In a variety of. Analytical contexts. I was thinking about you know a lot of randomized clinical trials going on into Kuwait context and One of the issues of dispatch seem development toils that are going on that one could argue the population there are not really well to percents. it may be number by Auditees, men, people that deputy existing conditions. and. So he will serve at my come out of facedly trial. granted might work for the population. Tried it minority have sufficient? more largely. So I wanted this type of well I guess we don't really have an ID there right. So clearly, you don't know who these people are but they could be some clustering type analysis that might be interesting weight from It's very useful for Health Services Research and for outcomes research for you know what I characterize digital phenotype being. they can then guide. More, more formal research. you know you can use this type of resource to. Make sure. You're asking a useful question and make sure that there's likely to be. Enough patients who qualify for given study. Maybe you're working on a clinical trial in your casting your net to narrow you can. Determine that with this type of data resource. And is the eight tiff date who has access to it typically. So for this data resource on, it's through the vendor so. You need to have some level of footprint with them. which is the case with our organization. They're definitely a broadening their strategies. So they're. Gaining access into health systems that aren't exclusively using their electronic health records so. It's exciting to be a part of that that process. and to again work with them to. Analyze the data. I think. To the example you gave a formal randomized trials. In key part of what were growing our research to focus on is because this is real world data. You learn what's happening in practice whether or not it's well aligned with guidelines or formal protocols. And doing that there's many opportunities for near-term interventions that can improve health outcomes simply by. Identifying where providers may be deviating more from. Best Practices in than taking steps through training and education to kind of get them back towards those best practices. This data is a fresh on a daily basis. It's not. It's because it's so large and bulky? Typically we've received it on a quarterly basis in since it's retrospective analysis that's not been a major barrier. But. mechanistically, on onto soon aside is data getting sort of picked up from this system that it's harvested every day and then it's aggregated bundled and distributed on A. On a different timescale. Okay okay. So. From again, going to the, it's our system designed issue and implementation You say many HR systems comprised of more news at specific clinical processes or unit such as Pharmacy Laboratory or surgery talked about that. But then then people implement them this of fashion right they they implement modules by that can be a factor or sometimes they may want. One vendor for their primary electronic health record, but another vendor for their laboratory system. and so that's where you don't see a hundred percent usage of every module and every organization. And detailed number of different you know sort of noise creating issues in data one. This is icy speech over from ICT denied ten. and I don't know history of this but this was supposed to be speech with sometime in twenty fifteen. That's correct. So there is A. You know. There's a date in October of Twenty fifteen where most organizations were expected to have completed that transition. When I see with researchers who aren't as familiar with the you know the whole policy landscape around `electronic health records that? you can imagine researchers who assumed that all data before that date in October is is nine and all data after that date would be icy the ten. While we demonstrate in this paper, is that that transition was not Nearly, that clean and it was a much more, you know there are some organizations who just It the bullet and completed in twenty fourteen, and there are other organizations that were still lagging. In. Two Thousand Sixteen. Potentially because they weren't as exposed to those incentives in other things that you know stipulated the transition so. Part of why were demonstrating with that particular part of that work was that. you know these transitions aren't always abrupt. Yeah and and and so that is one issue and then you know a lot of consistency inconsistency issues fade. So we see that in in single systems and one of the items note here as you know if you think about the disposition code for death. you could have a right your race supercenter, right? It's a death expire expedite at home hospice, and so on. if this is a problem for a single system, but then many think about aggregating data from multiple sources this this problem sort of increased exponentially. Absolutely. So one of the challenges with documenting and and finding where you know if a patient has A deceased that. There's just multiple places to put that documentation in the clinical record. The Location in the record that. We have found to be the most consistent is what's called discharge disposition. By as we show in that analysis, that field is not always used document that and so if you're doing outcomes research and one of your key. Outcome metrics is death. And there are organizations that. Aren't documenting death in a place that successful. You should filter those out of your analysis before moving forward. And so part of what we wanted to promote is the realization that. That's the type of consideration that needs to be made The four. Publishing. Your data about an outcome metrics like death that. You're not. If you're never gonNA see that outcome it doesn't mean that people are. Dying in that particular facility, it just means it's not documented in the place that successful. Right. Yeah. So you know you on your expedience. Unique Position Mark because you you look at it from the from the vendor's perspective you're in an academic setting you're also in practice in a hospital. What's your sense of these things improving the on a track of getting getting this more standardize or it's camping in the other direction I think in general there is improvement I think The. Over the past eleven years through various federal mandates, including meaningful use and so forth. Those of all incentive organizations to utilize. Standard terminologies more consistently than was the case beforehand. I think there's still plenty of room for improvement and You know it's it's a journey, not a destination, but I think things have improved substantially. I was wondering there could be some applications of artificial intelligence here to In a clearly TATECO systems and you'd like the most them pity human resource intensive Yvonne to get it completely right. So one question would be you know, could be actually used a Dick needs to get it maybe ninety nine percent white. And that the human deal with exceptions I definitely think that that's an exciting direction that You want those a algorithms to be trained with good data, and that's a big part of what's motivated us to. Put this focus on data quality and Understanding these strange nuances that are underpinning that date has so that. As we move towards a in machine learning and so forth. We have a high level of confidence in the data that's training those algorithms. Right. Yeah. I think that a huge opportunity here because it's not quite as broad as NFL, not natural language processing it is somewhat constrained. that is a good part of it. The back part of it is that is highly technical. and so. you know some of the techniques you know you can have a fault tolerance in certain dimensions such as you know, misspellings lack of gambling and things like that. But as you have Heidi technical data, you cannot apply those principles because he could have misspelling the system may not be able to. Get, sometimes, and that's where you know I think. It's totally feasible to use. Resources to you know when you're dealing with. Tens of millions of patients and billions of detailed records. Using a I'd even identify those patterns of either. Inconsistent data or missing data it's also very powerful just to. kind of flag in identified. Areas that need to be focused on to lead to a better analysis. Greg Wait Be Hefty. Use that information somehow did is a belt of information that you know and so it just filtering into decision processes that the are really losing it. So hopefully getting improving in that dimension I've jumping to another paper bittersweet interesting. So it's entitled rates and predictors of using opioids in the Emergency Department Katrina Treat Mike Dean in Young Otto's and so so this is sort of a machine learning exercise you have gone through to locate you know coup is getting prescribed. OPIOIDS water the conditions for the Democrat not Nestle demographics but different different maybe age and things like that gender. and and then ask the question desert has some effect on addiction. In the long term rights. So that project To great example of team science though. We. Assembled a team of subject matter experts in neurology pain management. And Data Science and. The neurologist and pain management experts. Identified an intriguing question that we decided to pursue with data. In their question was. Based on anecdotal observation and so we thought it'd be interesting to see how well the data supported that. Observation is that. for youth and young adults Treated or admitted into the emergency. Department. With a migraine headache that. All too often they were treated with an opioid. And so we Use the same day to resource that we were discussing earlier. To explore that. Question. And using data from a hundred and eighty distinct emergency departments. We found that on average twenty, three percent of those youth and young adults were treated with. An opioid medication while they were in the emergency department. In general, it should be almost zero percent in general. There's really Better medications to us, four people presenting with a migraine. and. So this fits into obviously the OPIOID crisis it. it demonstrates the. Scenario describing that. You know using real world data. You can identify patterns of clinical behavior that. Don't match guideline. And the good news is that the? correctable and so through. Training and communication there's great opportunity to. To, manage this. Really. Striking. So fifteen thousand or so inevitably the encounters. And nearly a quarter of this encounters you say involved inoculate. and these are not just Misha and Congress right. It is not filtered down to migraine encounters. Okay. Okay. So these fifteen thousand just might in encounters might vein being repeating disease So once you. If you make a statement and. This or not Easter conditioning issue here. So you get your pain, you go to an emergency department and you get treated with an opioid you get quick tactical relief. From pain. auditing condition expect that in the next episode. So you can say we didn't pursue that particular question, but that is Definitely key part of. Managing the OPIOID crisis is that drug seeking behavior and so Part of our goal was to quantify that and use this as an opportunity to educate providers that. You really shouldn't be treating migraines with an opioid in there are better alternatives and. So we we felt that this was an important contribution to that national dialogue, but we didn't specifically pursue the question of whether the patients we analyzed. Within. Encounter show up Subsequently. With the same symptoms. Right right. Yeah you it develop into period when problematic patterns of drug use comedy. FEST MERGE THE PREVALENCE RATE OF OPIOID misuse estimated to be two to four percent and debts in each goofy just young adult drew from overdoses are rising. and. You say that literally prescribe IOS has been slumping loose future opioid misuse by thirty three percent. Betas Mehta say really huge number. I think just validates the importance of this of this work. Interesting mark. I don't know you exploded on data. Last the question if you look at the aggregate data, it'd be flying opioid. Misuse. what percentage of the total number. Actually started from. You know some sort of medical encounter has mike or some sort of. related encounter that could be completed otherwise was three a bit opioid. in that encounter documented resulted in that misuse. So what so If you look at the active misuse problem that we have today. do you have a sense of what percentage of that goal is actually started I? Think the exciting thing about this type of research is for everyone questioned that you pursue you have. You have ten new that you can pursue. We haven't. Delved into that specific area, but it's It's very ripe for further analysis and A considerable part of where I end my colleagues and our time as. We do this type of work to get an initial analysis published. And then You know in my leadership role I just WANNA. support people like my colleagues on this paper Mark Connelly Jennifer Bickel. in in using data to. Support their research into identify those follow. I mean, he tests policy implications. So it's sweet important work. and. If you find it direct relationship here than you have to ask you know from from a medical perspective what is right intervention? maybe is not just added of care just best practice but clearly should be the bay You know things should be looked at you say you're American Academy of Neurology has included avoidance of using opioid to treat gain one of stop top flight choosing wisely recommendations. For high-value duck in this gives Really evidence to to support that. The other thing that's really intriguing is this level of variation from site to site in. Some Sun facilities are very much aligned with the guidelines. Others are at the you know well, above twenty three percent. And that gives an opportunity for a really precision. conversations about you know, where does our organization stand on that spectrum? Yeah that's a that's an interesting avenue to right. So you know one could ask he says some sort of push sliced Intervention if we can fly goal of patients who who had gone an opioid sexually don't have an addiction problem. that as you know Anna, the kofoed does. if you can fly those type of patterns than you can think about. A customized within electronic health record systems. There's. The ability to provide decisions poor. There's certainly phenomena called pop up fatigue were physicians. You know they don't like having so many pop up windows but at the same time. It's Within the capability of an e e Hr to do that if then logic if patient has. migraine medication order equals opioid. encourage the provider to pause and reconsider that. Right, right and so this is supervised machine learning type analysis where so you have. you have number features that comes directly from each else. So each sex race ethnicity. insurance type. Encounter prostate suggest duration. time of the year and so on. and you have labeled data in this case I guess you have able tater because you would know if op- inscribed on trade. Okay and so are the two questions here. One is to ask the question given a new patient and those features. you could assign a probability that that patient will be prescribed will. Definitely. Impress the data from that predictive Minds. Right and then can you so that data definitely tell you if the patient is going to progress into some sort of an addiction issue. So. Earn Predicting Substance Abuse. So. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. There's additional diagnosis codes that document. whether a patient has a history of substance abuse disorder. and. So it would be feasible to. Identify the with those diagnosis codes in than really look at their prior history. Of What other conditions were they treated for? What medications were they give in? to develop that model. One of the things in this case that helped with this study is that just in general, it's not advised get. So there are other things that are much more of a gray area. Or whether opioid is as useful, but in this case. The really not. Considered. To be helpful for migraines compared to other options and so that help us have a fairly clear cut scenario to do this work. Yeah. This this won't be the data like you say once you do something like this, you have been other things you could. You could stop asking. So unquestioned that that been to my mind as you know, how did they hugged the actually prescribing opioids? Is it the patient asking for it all so? Off that was another scoping thing with this project is focused on what happens within the emergency. Room. So it's it's. Really, medication order in administration that happens. In that emergency room setting. Whether or not the patient. was. Requesting that you know if they came in and said, this has worked for me before. Can I have it again? we don't have visibility to that. Right. Right. And so from a practical perspective So the the analysis that you did slightly ended up with the Family Clyde power we think it is. Compelling. Pretty compelling. So as as a new patient gets into e D either high. and what I mean by that probably is if there is a history of substance abuse property. the physician has really think twice about. The use of may be the well, and in this case, even without that history. Just because it's not considered to be an effective treatment. You know encouraging them to pause in that decision making. In this particular case is as effective as wall. Right. So looking forward. In if you think about both of these issues, one is the data quality data aggregation data standardized recent problem in the the right of Utah Systems have did that the talked about? And then if we can get to a level that we can look at cross a large data set. Beacon, ask. More. US specific questions, treatment. Optimum treatment type questions. subpoenaed. US The mark big think B be hunting. Certainly, the volume and variety of data that we're able to work with will be even greater I, think the. Opportunity To. Look, holistically at how upstream data capture. Effects Downstream data. Analysis. example I frequently give is if we have a Aggregate Data said we identify. Ten patients whose way in that data such shows up as being. Something that's completely infeasible. let's say they're documented is being. Fifty year old person who weighs two pounds. Clearly air. What's important is? Creating the process to communicate that back upstream. Because that clinical decision. Support. Many drug dosing things are evaluated using weight based logic and so. That same logic that's Evaluating the appropriateness of dosage. It's going to be running against an incorrect value in that may or may not always be visible. So I really am intrigued with that holistic opportunity. In it I am I remain just we have three or four additional papers coming out. About other examples where Provider behaviors not aligned with Best Practices and I'm just excited about you know when you compare that to how long it takes to develop a new drug or how long it takes to. To a really long term research. This research has the opportunity for a pretty quick turnaround on an effective intervention. A really that. Other so much that right. Providers. been taught in a no, but they're. Not always using that in practice and so to help them. Identify, those topics in just modifying behaviors is. In the scheme of things, it's a very straightforward way to improve. So. You know the entire spectrum from essentially getting the data. Right or cleaner like you know Missa mischaracterized or miss input data like wait or something like that. To to get. Better diagnosis better treatment modalities. policies there and from a femme perspective clearly inflammation therefore clinical trials. I was even thinking about drug interaction type. Inflammation. I haven't been involved in the former de for awhile but. Typically, this type of data doesn't get back into automatic processes that fast but I think that is all I know there's strong interest in Pharma in. Working with this type of data there a again looking at real world behavior. This is an excellent resource for off label medication use at. you know where Pharma's Always interested in repurposing existing medications the. Regulatory Processes, much more straightforward for that because the safety is already been. Evaluated and so. The. Significant Opportunity With this, there's also just exciting. Patterns of you know. What are those unrecognised correlations? That's where the machine learning opportunities are really exciting where. You know we're not always asking the right question. And the data can show us what we should be. Yeah exactly. So if the machine a sort of red flags something or create hypotheses. that Cubans have missed sometimes, those types of things are extremely powerful. because maybe that sometimes it's countering tutor. and so we all look at data with an Incan bias. The beauty of machines that at least on the surface began deploy Michigan. This volume of data. Techniques like machine deep learning can recognize those subtle but consistent associations. Wait quite. Excellent. Idea this has been great mark Thanks so much time with me. I enjoyed it very much. Thank you. But

Gill Eappen Mike Yesterday Dr Mark Hoffman Children's Mussa Hospital Turner Electronic Certner Migraine Inflammation Federated Networks Stan Day Squatty Michio Kato University Of Minnesota Makita GIL Federated Kansas City
Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

Scientific Sense

44:57 min | 5 months ago

Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new Ideas Affect Society? And, help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense. Dot? Net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense dot com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen Dot Info. Mike yesterday's Dr Mark Hoffman, who is a research associate professor in the University of Minnesota Against City. He is also chief research inflammation officer in the children's Mussa hospital in Kansas City. Kiss research interests include health data delayed indication sharing initialisation Boca Mark. Thank you for inviting me. Absolutely. So I start with one of your papers Kato you need the use by our system implementation in defy date data resource from hundred known athlete off my seasons. So Michio inflicted. Data aggregated for marketable sources provide an important resource for my medical research including digital feel typing. On. Like. Todd beat to from a single organization. Guitar data introduces a number of analysis challengers. So. So you've worked with some augmentation log and in almost all cases be used. Data coming from that single macy's listen primary care behavioral. Or specialty hospitals and I always wondered you know wouldn't be nice. Get a data set. That sort of abrogates data from the radio on-ice. Asians but a lot of different challenges around that. So you wanted to talk a bit about that. I'd be happy to the resource that we've worked with. Is primarily a called health fax data resource. It's been in operation for almost twenty years. And the the the model is that organizations who are. Using these Turner Electronic. Health. Record. Enter into an agreement was turner they agreed to provide data rights to sern are. The identifies the date of affords aggregated into this resource. And certner provides data mapping, which is really critical to this type of work. It also the aggregate the data. And for the past probably six years. Then, they provide the full data set to especially academic contributors who want to do research with that resource. And I've been on both sides of that equation Lead that group during my career there, and then now I have the opportunity to really focus research on that type of data. So before we get into the details smog so e Itar Systems. So this is. Essentially patient records. So he gets dated like demographics out family history, surgical history hats, medications, lab solves it could have physician nodes no snow. So it's it's a combination of a variety of different types of data, right? A couple of things on the examples you gave it includes demographics. Discreet Laboratory results Medication orders. Many vitals so If access the blood pressure and pulse data. It does not include text notes because those can't be. Automatically identified consistently. So. We don't have access currently to TEX notes. Out of an abundance of caution. That his Hobby Stephen, physician writes something down they could use names they could use inflammation that could then point back to their. Patients Makita Perspective been the data's aggregated, the primary issue shoe that date has completely the identified, right? Correct. So. So yeah. So the data that we receive there's eighteen identifiers. Hip requires be removed from data. And those include obvious things like name address email addresses are another example One of the. Things. That is also part of the benefit of working with this particular resource. The. Dates of clinical service are not allowed to be provided under hip. White is done with this resource that allows us to still have a longitudinal view is. For any given patient in the data set the dates are shifted by A. Consistent. Pattern that for any given patient it can be. One two three four five weeks forward or one, two, three, four or five weeks backward. But that preserves things like day of the week effect. So for example, you see -nificant increase in emergency department encounters over weekends and you don't WanNa lose. Visibility to that. but it also allows us to receive. Very, granular early time stamped events in so. We can gain visibility into the time that a blood specimen was collected, and then the time that the result was reported back. And so we're able to do very detailed analyses with this type of resource. Right right and I don't know the audience our market is fragmented. Tau himself e Amorebieta providers out there. and so two issues. One is sort of. Standardization as to how these databases are designed and structured and others even that standardization that the actual collection of the data. In itself is not standardized played. So vk CAV vk potentially lot inability coming from different systems. Correct and that's part of what the paper that you mentioned Evaluates so. Often, night you out in the field in conferences you hear. Comparisons kind of lumping all organizations using one. Vendor lumping all using another together but as you get closer to it, you quickly learn that. It's not even clear. It's within those. Vendor markets. There's variation from organization to organization in how they use the e Hr and so. Because the identities of the. Contributing organizations are blinded to those of us who work with the data. We have to be creative about how we. Infer those implementation details, and so with this paper, we describe a couple of methods that We think move things forward towards that goal. Yes. So I'm not really familiar with that. So you mentioned a couple of things here. One is the the merge network. So this initiative including electric medical records and genomics network and pc off net the national patient, centered clinical research network support. Decentralized analyses that goes disparate systems by distributing standardized quotas to site. So this is a situation where you have multiple systems sort of. Communicating with each other and this net folks at allowing to sort of quickly them In some standardized fashion. So In this type of technology, there's janitorial core models. One is the. Federated or distributed model, the other is a centralized data aggregation. So there are examples including those that are mentioned in the paper where. Queries are pushed to the organization and. They need to do significant work upfront to ensure that there are standardizing their terminologies the same way. And once they do that upfront work than they're able to perform the types of queries that are distributed through those. Federated Networks. With. Okay. So that just one click on so that the police have standardized. So all on the at Josh site, then they have like some sort of a plan slater from from Stan Day squatty do all the data structure. And in many cases, they work through an intermediate technology. that would be. In general, consider it like a data warehouse. And so the queries are running against the production electric. Health record. That has all kinds of implications on patient care where you don't want to slow down performance. By using these intermediaries They can receive queries and then Follow that mapping has occurred. Than, they're able to to run those distributed queries. Okay. And the other model is You know. You say the g through the medical quality, improvement consortium and sooner to the health facts initiative. So this says in Sodas case, for example, in swags. This is essentially picking up data from the right deals, clients and Dan standardizing and centralizing data in a single database is that that is correct. One benefit of that model is that Organizations who for example, may not be academic and don't have the. Resources to do that data mapping themselves by handing out over that task over to the vendor you get a broader diversity of the types of organizations so you can have. A safety net hospitals you can have. Critical access rural hospitals, and other venues of care that are probably under represented in some of those. More academically driven models. And clearly the focus on healthcare about I would imagine applications in pharmaceutical out indeed to right I. Don't know if it s use and bad direction there has been some were performed with these data resources to. Characterize different aspects of medications, and so it does have utility in value. In a variety of. Analytical contexts. I was thinking about you know a lot of randomized clinical trials going on into Kuwait context and One of the issues of dispatch seem development toils that are going on that one could argue the population there are not really well to percents. it may be number by Auditees, men, people that deputy existing conditions. and. So he will serve at my come out of facedly trial. granted might work for the population. Tried it minority have sufficient? more largely. So I wanted this type of well I guess we don't really have an ID there right. So clearly, you don't know who these people are but they could be some clustering type analysis that might be interesting weight from It's very useful for Health Services Research and for outcomes research for you know what I characterize digital phenotype being. they can then guide. More, more formal research. you know you can use this type of resource to. Make sure. You're asking a useful question and make sure that there's likely to be. Enough patients who qualify for given study. Maybe you're working on a clinical trial in your casting your net to narrow you can. Determine that with this type of data resource. And is the eight tiff date who has access to it typically. So for this data resource on, it's through the vendor so. You need to have some level of footprint with them. which is the case with our organization. They're definitely a broadening their strategies. So they're. Gaining access into health systems that aren't exclusively using their electronic health records so. It's exciting to be a part of that that process. and to again work with them to. Analyze the data. I think. To the example you gave a formal randomized trials. In key part of what were growing our research to focus on is because this is real world data. You learn what's happening in practice whether or not it's well aligned with guidelines or formal protocols. And doing that there's many opportunities for near-term interventions that can improve health outcomes simply by. Identifying where providers may be deviating more from. Best Practices in than taking steps through training and education to kind of get them back towards those best practices. This data is a fresh on a daily basis. It's not. It's because it's so large and bulky? Typically we've received it on a quarterly basis in since it's retrospective analysis that's not been a major barrier. But. mechanistically, on onto soon aside is data getting sort of picked up from this system that it's harvested every day and then it's aggregated bundled and distributed on A. On a different timescale. Okay okay. So. From again, going to the, it's our system designed issue and implementation You say many HR systems comprised of more news at specific clinical processes or unit such as Pharmacy Laboratory or surgery talked about that. But then then people implement them this of fashion right they they implement modules by that can be a factor or sometimes they may want. One vendor for their primary electronic health record, but another vendor for their laboratory system. and so that's where you don't see a hundred percent usage of every module and every organization. And detailed number of different you know sort of noise creating issues in data one. This is icy speech over from ICT denied ten. and I don't know history of this but this was supposed to be speech with sometime in twenty fifteen. That's correct. So there is A. You know. There's a date in October of Twenty fifteen where most organizations were expected to have completed that transition. When I see with researchers who aren't as familiar with the you know the whole policy landscape around `electronic health records that? you can imagine researchers who assumed that all data before that date in October is is nine and all data after that date would be icy the ten. While we demonstrate in this paper, is that that transition was not Nearly, that clean and it was a much more, you know there are some organizations who just It the bullet and completed in twenty fourteen, and there are other organizations that were still lagging. In. Two Thousand Sixteen. Potentially because they weren't as exposed to those incentives in other things that you know stipulated the transition so. Part of why were demonstrating with that particular part of that work was that. you know these transitions aren't always abrupt. Yeah and and and so that is one issue and then you know a lot of consistency inconsistency issues fade. So we see that in in single systems and one of the items note here as you know if you think about the disposition code for death. you could have a right your race supercenter, right? It's a death expire expedite at home hospice, and so on. if this is a problem for a single system, but then many think about aggregating data from multiple sources this this problem sort of increased exponentially. Absolutely. So one of the challenges with documenting and and finding where you know if a patient has A deceased that. There's just multiple places to put that documentation in the clinical record. The Location in the record that. We have found to be the most consistent is what's called discharge disposition. By as we show in that analysis, that field is not always used document that and so if you're doing outcomes research and one of your key. Outcome metrics is death. And there are organizations that. Aren't documenting death in a place that successful. You should filter those out of your analysis before moving forward. And so part of what we wanted to promote is the realization that. That's the type of consideration that needs to be made The four. Publishing. Your data about an outcome metrics like death that. You're not. If you're never gonNA see that outcome it doesn't mean that people are. Dying in that particular facility, it just means it's not documented in the place that successful. Right. Yeah. So you know you on your expedience. Unique Position Mark because you you look at it from the from the vendor's perspective you're in an academic setting you're also in practice in a hospital. What's your sense of these things improving the on a track of getting getting this more standardize or it's camping in the other direction I think in general there is improvement I think The. Over the past eleven years through various federal mandates, including meaningful use and so forth. Those of all incentive organizations to utilize. Standard terminologies more consistently than was the case beforehand. I think there's still plenty of room for improvement and You know it's it's a journey, not a destination, but I think things have improved substantially. I was wondering there could be some applications of artificial intelligence here to In a clearly TATECO systems and you'd like the most them pity human resource intensive Yvonne to get it completely right. So one question would be you know, could be actually used a Dick needs to get it maybe ninety nine percent white. And that the human deal with exceptions I definitely think that that's an exciting direction that You want those a algorithms to be trained with good data, and that's a big part of what's motivated us to. Put this focus on data quality and Understanding these strange nuances that are underpinning that date has so that. As we move towards a in machine learning and so forth. We have a high level of confidence in the data that's training those algorithms. Right. Yeah. I think that a huge opportunity here because it's not quite as broad as NFL, not natural language processing it is somewhat constrained. that is a good part of it. The back part of it is that is highly technical. and so. you know some of the techniques you know you can have a fault tolerance in certain dimensions such as you know, misspellings lack of gambling and things like that. But as you have Heidi technical data, you cannot apply those principles because he could have misspelling the system may not be able to. Get, sometimes, and that's where you know I think. It's totally feasible to use. Resources to you know when you're dealing with. Tens of millions of patients and billions of detailed records. Using a I'd even identify those patterns of either. Inconsistent data or missing data it's also very powerful just to. kind of flag in identified. Areas that need to be focused on to lead to a better analysis. Greg Wait Be Hefty. Use that information somehow did is a belt of information that you know and so it just filtering into decision processes that the are really losing it. So hopefully getting improving in that dimension I've jumping to another paper bittersweet interesting. So it's entitled rates and predictors of using opioids in the Emergency Department Katrina Treat Mike Dean in Young Otto's and so so this is sort of a machine learning exercise you have gone through to locate you know coup is getting prescribed. OPIOIDS water the conditions for the Democrat not Nestle demographics but different different maybe age and things like that gender. and and then ask the question desert has some effect on addiction. In the long term rights. So that project To great example of team science though. We. Assembled a team of subject matter experts in neurology pain management. And Data Science and. The neurologist and pain management experts. Identified an intriguing question that we decided to pursue with data. In their question was. Based on anecdotal observation and so we thought it'd be interesting to see how well the data supported that. Observation is that. for youth and young adults Treated or admitted into the emergency. Department. With a migraine headache that. All too often they were treated with an opioid. And so we Use the same day to resource that we were discussing earlier. To explore that. Question. And using data from a hundred and eighty distinct emergency departments. We found that on average twenty, three percent of those youth and young adults were treated with. An opioid medication while they were in the emergency department. In general, it should be almost zero percent in general. There's really Better medications to us, four people presenting with a migraine. and. So this fits into obviously the OPIOID crisis it. it demonstrates the. Scenario describing that. You know using real world data. You can identify patterns of clinical behavior that. Don't match guideline. And the good news is that the? correctable and so through. Training and communication there's great opportunity to. To, manage this. Really. Striking. So fifteen thousand or so inevitably the encounters. And nearly a quarter of this encounters you say involved inoculate. and these are not just Misha and Congress right. It is not filtered down to migraine encounters. Okay. Okay. So these fifteen thousand just might in encounters might vein being repeating disease So once you. If you make a statement and. This or not Easter conditioning issue here. So you get your pain, you go to an emergency department and you get treated with an opioid you get quick tactical relief. From pain. auditing condition expect that in the next episode. So you can say we didn't pursue that particular question, but that is Definitely key part of. Managing the OPIOID crisis is that drug seeking behavior and so Part of our goal was to quantify that and use this as an opportunity to educate providers that. You really shouldn't be treating migraines with an opioid in there are better alternatives and. So we we felt that this was an important contribution to that national dialogue, but we didn't specifically pursue the question of whether the patients we analyzed. Within. Encounter show up Subsequently. With the same symptoms. Right right. Yeah you it develop into period when problematic patterns of drug use comedy. FEST MERGE THE PREVALENCE RATE OF OPIOID misuse estimated to be two to four percent and debts in each goofy just young adult drew from overdoses are rising. and. You say that literally prescribe IOS has been slumping loose future opioid misuse by thirty three percent. Betas Mehta say really huge number. I think just validates the importance of this of this work. Interesting mark. I don't know you exploded on data. Last the question if you look at the aggregate data, it'd be flying opioid. Misuse. what percentage of the total number. Actually started from. You know some sort of medical encounter has mike or some sort of. related encounter that could be completed otherwise was three a bit opioid. in that encounter documented resulted in that misuse. So what so If you look at the active misuse problem that we have today. do you have a sense of what percentage of that goal is actually started I? Think the exciting thing about this type of research is for everyone questioned that you pursue you have. You have ten new that you can pursue. We haven't. Delved into that specific area, but it's It's very ripe for further analysis and A considerable part of where I end my colleagues and our time as. We do this type of work to get an initial analysis published. And then You know in my leadership role I just WANNA. support people like my colleagues on this paper Mark Connelly Jennifer Bickel. in in using data to. Support their research into identify those follow. I mean, he tests policy implications. So it's sweet important work. and. If you find it direct relationship here than you have to ask you know from from a medical perspective what is right intervention? maybe is not just added of care just best practice but clearly should be the bay You know things should be looked at you say you're American Academy of Neurology has included avoidance of using opioid to treat gain one of stop top flight choosing wisely recommendations. For high-value duck in this gives Really evidence to to support that. The other thing that's really intriguing is this level of variation from site to site in. Some Sun facilities are very much aligned with the guidelines. Others are at the you know well, above twenty three percent. And that gives an opportunity for a really precision. conversations about you know, where does our organization stand on that spectrum? Yeah that's a that's an interesting avenue to right. So you know one could ask he says some sort of push sliced Intervention if we can fly goal of patients who who had gone an opioid sexually don't have an addiction problem. that as you know Anna, the kofoed does. if you can fly those type of patterns than you can think about. A customized within electronic health record systems. There's. The ability to provide decisions poor. There's certainly phenomena called pop up fatigue were physicians. You know they don't like having so many pop up windows but at the same time. It's Within the capability of an e e Hr to do that if then logic if patient has. migraine medication order equals opioid. encourage the provider to pause and reconsider that. Right, right and so this is supervised machine learning type analysis where so you have. you have number features that comes directly from each else. So each sex race ethnicity. insurance type. Encounter prostate suggest duration. time of the year and so on. and you have labeled data in this case I guess you have able tater because you would know if op- inscribed on trade. Okay and so are the two questions here. One is to ask the question given a new patient and those features. you could assign a probability that that patient will be prescribed will. Definitely. Impress the data from that predictive Minds. Right and then can you so that data definitely tell you if the patient is going to progress into some sort of an addiction issue. So. Earn Predicting Substance Abuse. So. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. There's additional diagnosis codes that document. whether a patient has a history of substance abuse disorder. and. So it would be feasible to. Identify the with those diagnosis codes in than really look at their prior history. Of What other conditions were they treated for? What medications were they give in? to develop that model. One of the things in this case that helped with this study is that just in general, it's not advised get. So there are other things that are much more of a gray area. Or whether opioid is as useful, but in this case. The really not. Considered. To be helpful for migraines compared to other options and so that help us have a fairly clear cut scenario to do this work. Yeah. This this won't be the data like you say once you do something like this, you have been other things you could. You could stop asking. So unquestioned that that been to my mind as you know, how did they hugged the actually prescribing opioids? Is it the patient asking for it all so? Off that was another scoping thing with this project is focused on what happens within the emergency. Room. So it's it's. Really, medication order in administration that happens. In that emergency room setting. Whether or not the patient. was. Requesting that you know if they came in and said, this has worked for me before. Can I have it again? we don't have visibility to that. Right. Right. And so from a practical perspective So the the analysis that you did slightly ended up with the Family Clyde power we think it is. Compelling. Pretty compelling. So as as a new patient gets into e D either high. and what I mean by that probably is if there is a history of substance abuse property. the physician has really think twice about. The use of may be the well, and in this case, even without that history. Just because it's not considered to be an effective treatment. You know encouraging them to pause in that decision making. In this particular case is as effective as wall. Right. So looking forward. In if you think about both of these issues, one is the data quality data aggregation data standardized recent problem in the the right of Utah Systems have did that the talked about? And then if we can get to a level that we can look at cross a large data set. Beacon, ask. More. US specific questions, treatment. Optimum treatment type questions. subpoenaed. US The mark big think B be hunting. Certainly, the volume and variety of data that we're able to work with will be even greater I, think the. Opportunity To. Look, holistically at how upstream data capture. Effects Downstream data. Analysis. example I frequently give is if we have a Aggregate Data said we identify. Ten patients whose way in that data such shows up as being. Something that's completely infeasible. let's say they're documented is being. Fifty year old person who weighs two pounds. Clearly air. What's important is? Creating the process to communicate that back upstream. Because that clinical decision. Support. Many drug dosing things are evaluated using weight based logic and so. That same logic that's Evaluating the appropriateness of dosage. It's going to be running against an incorrect value in that may or may not always be visible. So I really am intrigued with that holistic opportunity. In it I am I remain just we have three or four additional papers coming out. About other examples where Provider behaviors not aligned with Best Practices and I'm just excited about you know when you compare that to how long it takes to develop a new drug or how long it takes to. To a really long term research. This research has the opportunity for a pretty quick turnaround on an effective intervention. A really that. Other so much that right. Providers. been taught in a no, but they're. Not always using that in practice and so to help them. Identify, those topics in just modifying behaviors is. In the scheme of things, it's a very straightforward way to improve. So. You know the entire spectrum from essentially getting the data. Right or cleaner like you know Missa mischaracterized or miss input data like wait or something like that. To to get. Better diagnosis better treatment modalities. policies there and from a femme perspective clearly inflammation therefore clinical trials. I was even thinking about drug interaction type. Inflammation. I haven't been involved in the former de for awhile but. Typically, this type of data doesn't get back into automatic processes that fast but I think that is all I know there's strong interest in Pharma in. Working with this type of data there a again looking at real world behavior. This is an excellent resource for off label medication use at. you know where Pharma's Always interested in repurposing existing medications the. Regulatory Processes, much more straightforward for that because the safety is already been. Evaluated and so. The. Significant Opportunity With this, there's also just exciting. Patterns of you know. What are those unrecognised correlations? That's where the machine learning opportunities are really exciting where. You know we're not always asking the right question. And the data can show us what we should be. Yeah exactly. So if the machine a sort of red flags something or create hypotheses. that Cubans have missed sometimes, those types of things are extremely powerful. because maybe that sometimes it's countering tutor. and so we all look at data with an Incan bias. The beauty of machines that at least on the surface began deploy Michigan. This volume of data. Techniques like machine deep learning can recognize those subtle but consistent associations. Wait quite. Excellent. Idea this has been great mark Thanks so much time with me. I enjoyed it very much. Thank you. But

Gill Eappen Mike Yesterday Dr Mark Hoffman Children's Mussa Hospital Turner Electronic Certner Migraine Inflammation Federated Networks Stan Day Squatty Michio Kato University Of Minnesota Makita GIL Federated Kansas City
"stan" Discussed on Think: Digital Futures

Think: Digital Futures

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"stan" Discussed on Think: Digital Futures

"One pot of Stan culture. That makes it so hard to understand and ultimately address is that some stands will hide behind their profiles keeping who they really are secret. Who are these people who are these people is an anonymous aspect to it? It's really Hodgson. Descend from the outside and it's everywhere for every acce. How big? or how. Small Leah whether it's Taylor Swift or Mickey stand him exists on a complete range of a celebrity and of odd and also across genre across awesome medium is all inclusive and it feels like the only way to appreciate an office is to use a Stanford popularity which fills birth very exciting in one way because it creates like his lovely community but also very limiting in that it loses criticality do then content creators the the subjects of fandom have a responsibility to call out toxic fan behavior. Because if if you think about it you'll ultimately coaling out the people who support you. How divisive is that or should you be doing? Should the concentrate is becoming out toxic Phantom Phantom research a Chris commented I think having the people who make those shows and films calling out the ardent sectors who you have gone and crossed the line. There's something to be said on the positives of that but I think it also can then create a bit of a bit of a problem where you ask who decides that that Phantom has gone too far so if you have the creator of a show who goes to a fan and says you've talked my late actor you've you've sent death threats to my director your talking about how you want to get. The show cancelled. You're clearly not being critical. You're just being horrible. Dot kind of thing is pretty cut to drive. But I'm just I'm leery of how critique of toxic Phantom would be done and whether it would be done with finesse and nuance. He wants because just simply calling them out. Construct them further and can invite reprisal and can You know the old adage of faith the troll Can definitely we make that More of a problem with no real way to hold stands to account. Chris worries that for many Stan. Culture is damaging being the fan experience. It makes it harder to be a fan of something served. The example there for me is rick. And morty I got completely elitist turned off watching the show by trying to participate in the Phantom there because it is a very odd and overly passionate and nothing wrong with having having a lot of passion for it but like this particular kind of very aggressive passion for the franchise that made it hard to be a casual viewer. And and wh- how exactly just talking nonstop about the maims about the How great every episode was not really inviting a lot of critical discussion? Chris ads these spaces that have typically being inviting in about connecting with other fans of becoming exclusionary Marie. And you've got the sense that if you didn't come already having seen every episode twenty times knowing everything in and out you're going to be on the out and there's no real space full casual view Louis. Jared Richards from Junkie says what can make Stan Culture in the pop music. World exclusive is. The language stands will use terms phrases and in jerks. That are more casual fan. They might not understand. Even the word Stan itself you may have heard it being used throughout this episode as a verb that he stands someone. It's an act. You are standing to some. This might not make sense. But to jared rather than feel Excluded for the most part he finds what stands say pretty Funny Lady Gaga Sun. A lot of really great things stand Stan and least am yeah. We have no choice even like even the language of like we. We have no choice but to stand. We have no choice but to stand is a phrase thrown around a lot in stand cycles. You do have a choice like I use it so often as well and it's very funny like that's the thing about Sam Culture it's inherently funny one of my favorite things that they do is that they'll be tweet about something about Donald Trump and then somebody underneath would just put a Gif of a k pop star and say stream them. And it's it's like you're doing God's work really pushing them. How baking their eyeballs across it? But you always have a choice to. It's not just standing standing on not standing. I'm curious if there's anyone whether it be pop star or not that you personally have passionate fan experience towards and how that might differ from what you see occurs in stand circles. Yeah Yeah I mean. There are a lot of artists that I feel passionate about is. Why would I do but wasn't quite used as a bob against other other people? I definitely think there is much more of a platform to be vicious. I'm sure they stand in the eighties going around getting into arguments. Have Baas about Madonna's best singles Fest Polar Abdul and the like but stream people uh-huh but now there is an immediacy of this argument the discourse is just so fast paced. That there's always something fast. Ansari talked about while the toxicity and exclusion in stand culture. Lives on the word. Stan is slowly taking on new life. A less aggressive life to the words Stan is blending into the mainstream language of the Internet where people who on stance using the term to show support towards the person progressive idea standing for something. Good you can have people and say some of these cultural critics on twitter. Who are using Stan? Chris Confident as a verb and from a place of that passion that stops short of being obsession and repression of others. So for example. Sample saying that you love eleanor from the good place. saying I Stanford Illinois just saying you love her and she's a great character and you love Kristen Bell but the way that says if anyone was to say that she wasn't a favorite character you hunt them down and bend their house down. Where instead the word Stan used somewhat ironically could alert more to the toxic side of stand? Dems maybe this attempt to reclaim the term or shift the meanings behind it into something a little more benign or a little bit more per social jarred richards from junkie. However isn't so shaw saying stuff like we simply have to stand all using stand language either? Ironically Yosemite ironically perhaps only forty five is that community community there's just so much content around it and so many memes and so much discourse that the sheer volume is unlike anything we've ever seen before I think.

Stan Culture Chris Confident Jared Richards Phantom Leah Yosemite Donald Trump Kristen Bell Taylor Swift morty I twitter rick Illinois director shaw Mickey Ansari Marie Baas
"stan" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"stan" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Eighty. W A. Okay. Stan. Now. Stop this. Thirteen. You're. No. Okay. Juicier. Don't get. Here on a question. John, I'm going to ask the same as Janka shoot. If no one can match me, my dollars impetuous might defended impregnable. And I'm she's I want your heart out of handcuff lightning undoing ban. Only last week I murdered around ngelo stone, hospitalized a brick. I'm so mean I make medicine sick. New hoodoo plan talk thirteen Awa okay, the voice of the community. Your brother dot the upkeep flood up. Get the native seven to.

Stan John Janka
"stan" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"I am now betrayed STAN. Van gundy. I didn't get a good shot of him because he was moving around and stuff, but he was feeling bad Mike because he had publicly declared that he would wear the David Stern shirt if we send it and so he called me FaceTime me. And he may or may not have been wearing the shirt, I could totally tell, but it I took a picture of him without him knowing it because I think I think STAN Van Gundy needs to be publicly shamed for this. I don't even care what he thinks of it either. By the way, like if this Rex our relationship, then so be it. I got no problem with that. Because I always leave the van Gundy's to be people who were truthful, especially their parents like, and Jeff and STAN have been stained by him promising to do this for us and then walking it back because he's afraid of thin-skinned David Stern. So my brother is stained by me going back on my word, the Van Gundy name, all of Gandhi name all van Gundy's sly kids, everybody am I wrong. Yes. Your kids. Everybody. Am I am? I wrong. You want to defend yourself because you sound like a broken trying to defend myself. I did go back on my word. I decided that that was not something that I should do. But I don't think that should affect anyone other than me. It's not how it works on his shows. No. Oh, wow. We just put her on television. I I think that's pretty incriminating. Mike, Mike that looks pretty incriminating to me the shot. I got him. Also gonna put it on Instagram. So you can weigh in Lubbock toward show. All right. Yeah. So the betrayal as are just hanging me out to dry here. That is correct. And you will eat it. Let's talk some basketball with STAN Van Gundy. This is what I want. I want to give you some numbers. Here's two guys because the Boston Celtics were almost finals good last year or quarter away from being finals good last year. They added Kyrie Irving it's been season of no fun at all the Philadelphia. Seventy Sixers standing and Gundy last week told us that's as good as starting five. Now, you add Tobias Harris. That's a good starting five as anybody. But the the warriors and yet Boston every damn time. They play Philadelphia they wipe the floor with them. And Furthermore, Joel Embiid was a physical specimen of uncommon size and strength. He gets neutralized all the time by the old man game of Al Horford. Listen to these stats because Boston is ten and two in his last twelve games against Philadelphia. You saw that without kyri and Gordon Hayward. They dismissed Simmons and Embiid and five games in the play on might say, the Celtics have their number so Horford when when Joel Embiid is guarded by Horford. He is twenty-five of seventy when he's guarded by anyone else. He's forty eight for fifty two. Stan what the hell man Al has Joe number. What the hell no question that. And that's really the reason for the for the mismatch between the two teams. Now, I think Brett Brown made the point after the game. And he's absolutely right. It's a whole new team for the Sixers, and they haven't been together at all. So I don't think that they're necessarily overly worried about having to play them in the playoffs..

STAN Van Gundy Van Gundy Mike Boston Celtics Sixers Joel Embiid STAN Stan David Stern Al Horford Philadelphia Brett Brown Boston Rex Tobias Harris Lubbock Kyrie Irving basketball Joe number Jeff
"stan" Discussed on Double Toasted

Double Toasted

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on Double Toasted

"You can't have you can't have a bio pic unless you have the people who can pull off the subjects were very important to tell that story. And I have to say, you know, that's one of the things people gonna be talking about how will this Steve Coogan and John C Reilly who play standing law respectively? How would they pull pull their parts off and up in the moment? I saw the trailer thought. Okay. Steve Coogan got it down, man. Yeah. At STAN laurel, Steve Coogan is a great impression is anyway. But I never questioned him as STAN laurel man, light is elected character because one take it and take as much makeup. May they poked his ears out a little bit more take much makeup? But like how much weight he lost? He he's he's a Macy's it from the Steve Coogan, I'm used to member for semi trailer. It's a long time to recognize that was even him. Really? Yeah. Yeah. You know? I didn't even I didn't even think about that. Because I, you know, I'm because he became the characters so much to me that I just I was watching STAN laurel. Yeah. I was I was quite impressed. I even the subtle moments the way he talked. He completely embedded in bodied. Stan laurel? Yeah. Yeah. You know, like, I say maybe laws way, maybe they've made his ears to Gallo bit more. But what's great about Steve Coogan? This is that Steve Coogan he has to play. If anybody knows STAN laurel bahory, I I'm not saying I grew up with this like, I'm a huge fan on aficionado something. I mean, I did grow. Watching a lot of how rotel Roach is the guy who gave us things like these old shorts like the little rascals and Harold, Lloyd. Yeah. In laurel. And hardy I grew up watching these man, and I love the here. Yeah. When they come on the day that come out to cartoons. Something kids really got into them later. Yeah. I'm wondering how much audience even knows them because it was like the three stooges who had they had the child audience coming on in the morning. Yeah. Afternoons and everywhere, but learn hearty mostly movies. So that was something that you kind of had to catch on the weekend. Yeah. Yeah. And I remember like Sundays on the middle of the day on Saturday midday movie, something neighbor show, STAN an Oliver. Laura hardy short, and so if the million with them are if you're not all of her album hardy was like he was the he was the fat one. You know, he was the one that was he was the one that was always getting exasperated mad because STAN laurel was he was he was quiet, and he was almost kinda shy kind of meat, but he was the bumbling. He was always getting them into trouble. That was the phrase sudden, another fine mess you've gotten me into. And. You dog? He looked mentally. Yes. Sometimes lost its own world. Well, all of stared at him like. But you're not even gonna look over here. They know. They would get into they would tear up shit. They would cause kind of trouble and STAN low just being like, I don't even know, right? Hi. Opioid. What's going on with you, man? But but they so. But like like a lot of these things go STAN laurel was the one was doing a lot of writing. He was the one that's creating a lot of material. He was the one that was the business guy behind it. And so what you had here with Steve Coogan plan that role is that you had a guy who had to be physically funny headed physical gags..

Steve Coogan STAN laurel STAN laurel bahory STAN STAN low Laura hardy John C Reilly Macy Harold, Lloyd Gallo
"stan" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"To this Adam McKay story, STAN as he's in the hospital, preparing for a complicated surgery getting that Steph put in you know, because they have to open up the artery, and I'm laying on the table, and I'm all drugged up ten different ways. So in my drugged up state. I just I really of the fact I just finished a Dick Cheney movie now this is happening. I decide that I have to tell these doctors that and I'm just like, you know, Dick Cheney movie can hear one of the doctors what and then realize avionic where I'm mentioning this. I'm going nothing nothing, but a tide of my right heard me, and I just hear this very clear voice goat. Dick Cheney great American. And then I thought in my head like I'm not gonna get into an argument right now. These people are saving. So I give the the honest answer. Which is I say, well, you know, it's very complicated. More than the guy goes what's complicated about it. He goes better than Obama. And I I can't believe this. Like having having this argument putting go well, look promise not perfect. But he goes well won't let any of the police do their job. That's why crimes through the roof, and I go. Well, that's just not true. The crime stats very accurate crimes definitely gone down. That's insane. That you sound insane. That is another pause. And I want to say like we stop arguing. For what you're doing? You know, I get it. The government's complicated, you're a different point of view. So I was like look I don't want to argue because probably saving my life. Just thank you for what you're doing. And then this time there's no answer the guys like either because I told them as FBI crime stat stuff with nuts or he was just done with his job. He was gone and the next day as the doctor my who was the guy to my right? What are you talking about? And I'm like there was a guy there like and both he and his nurse. Just immediately went oh, the med tech. I don't know. I guess in hospitals. It's obvious that that's what the guy would do that. I don't know. We really enjoyed that. Without a McKay, he was playful, and he wanted to be there, which is half the fight. So Mike tell the people what they need to be doing to support. What we're doing with the southeast session. Search Lumberton friends or south each sessions. Please subscribe to what we're doing that way. You get every episode councils that download and I get to inflates metrics. And you get every episode when they launched which will be every Tuesday next week Academy Award winner J K Simmons joins us. We're really excited about that. Please give it a shot. And also if you miss the announcement, yesterday,.

Dick Cheney Obama Adam McKay STAN Academy Award Steph FBI J K Simmons Lumberton Mike
"stan" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"To this Adam McKay story, STAN as he's in the hospital, preparing for a complicated surgery getting that Steph put in you know, because they have to open up the artery, and I'm laying on the table, and I'm all drugged up ten different ways. So in my drugged up state. I just I really of the fact I just finished a Dick Cheney movie now this is happening. I decide that I have to tell these doctors that and I'm just like, you know, Dick Cheney movie can hear one of the doctors what and then realize avionic where I'm mentioning this. I'm going nothing nothing, but a tide of my right heard me, and I just hear this very clear voice goat. Dick Cheney great American. And then I thought in my head like I'm not gonna get into an argument right now. These people are saving. So I give the the honest answer. Which is I say, well, you know, it's very complicated. More than the guy goes what's complicated about it. He goes better than Obama. And I I can't believe this. Like having having this argument putting go well, look promise not perfect. But he goes well won't let any of the police do their job. That's why crimes through the roof, and I go. Well, that's just not true. The crime stats very accurate crimes definitely gone down. That's insane. That you sound insane. That is another pause. And I want to say like we stop arguing. For what you're doing? You know, I get it. The government's complicated, you're a different point of view. So I was like look I don't want to argue because probably saving my life. Just thank you for what you're doing. And then this time there's no answer the guys like either because I told them as FBI crime stat stuff with nuts or he was just done with his job. He was gone and the next day as the doctor my who was the guy to my right? What are you talking about? And I'm like there was a guy there like and both he and his nurse. Just immediately went oh, the med tech. I don't know. I guess in hospitals. It's obvious that that's what the guy would do that. I don't know. We really enjoyed that. Without a McKay, he was playful, and he wanted to be there, which is half the fight. So Mike tell the people what they need to be doing to support. What we're doing with the southeast session. Search Lumberton friends or south each sessions. Please subscribe to what we're doing that way. You get every episode councils that download and I get to inflates metrics. And you get every episode when they launched which will be every Tuesday next week Academy Award winner J K Simmons joins us. We're really excited about that. Please give it a shot. And also if you miss the announcement, yesterday,.

Dick Cheney Obama Adam McKay STAN Academy Award Steph FBI J K Simmons Lumberton Mike
"stan" Discussed on Millennial Money

Millennial Money

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on Millennial Money

"Some Bank accounts investments, retirement accounts, just make sure that you a have named someone and be that is going to somebody that you really want to not like an ex boyfriend girlfriend or next friend or something like that. Otherwise, they're going to get a really amazing surprise if you just leave it that way. And you know, it's probably a good day for them. But I really want you to give the money in the stuff that you've worked really hard for the people you actually want to give it to. Another thing that I learned from STAN is trusting your gut, and again, this is something he learned later in life because he didn't really have a gut check as he's told me many times early on. But if something doesn't few right? It's probably not right. Whether it's career or people you hire your finances. Whatever it is you gotta trust your gut, and if something feels fishy pause, take a break and spend some time figuring out whether it's fishy for reason. And I think lastly, the biggest thing that I learned from STAN if I have to summit all up is just to love your life. Love the messy and the good the easy and the hard an all the in between and he's somebody who you could sit down with. And he would tell you about the good stuff. But he'd also tell you about the stuff that he didn't do so well, but he learned something from it, and he would carry those lessons through and he was also somebody. That was really open at saying. I learned a lot of my lessons about money and people in my seventies eighties. So we're talking many many decades took him to to figure out. Okay. I I actually need stand up on my money, and I actually need to figure out if people are good people to work with and all of those lessons. So I learned very powerful exercise recently that really made a difference for me. I do it almost daily, and I wanted to share it with you grab a piece of paper and write down three things that make you angry three things that make you sad three things that make you fearful and three things that make you worry any three things. Don't even censor yourself. Just write down three things. Then when you're done with that. Right. Twelve things that bring you joy. It's like the best therapy. You're ever going to get and you don't even have to pay for it. I swear I saved quite a few therapy bills just by doing this exercise. But stan. In loved life. He loved the good the bad all the in between and he stayed committed to what he does best. And while did he do it. Well, and so many of us are so thankful. I'm so sad. He's gone. I'm sad. I'm never going to be able to ring that doorbell on his office again and say, hey, stand number one. We're here for you. But I know that he did everything in this life that he wanted to do he had a committed marriage. He had a family he had this amazing career. And he just went for it. He didn't he didn't censor himself. He wasn't scared of pushing the boundaries. He wasn't scared of trying something new he just had this vision. And he just started put that vision down on paper. And he would do it every single day. If you want someone that you can hide allies for commitment. Stan is that he never said, I'm sick or hurt too tired or heck? Ninety five years old I needed to have he never said that he just caught up every day. He was so joyful so happy, and he just went out and truly lived his best life. Hey, thanks for joining us on this episode of millennial money back on Tuesday with a fresh episode for you to check out. In the meantime, if you love this podcast love this episode, and I found value in the content. We share with you. I totally appreciate it. If you do me a favor had an over to I tunes rate and review the podcast promise to be your BFF for life.

STAN Ninety five years
"stan" Discussed on Sleep With Me

Sleep With Me

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on Sleep With Me

"Sit like some arms and legs is just you spin Okeyo. Connections or parochial type stories in also the downside to that. I mean that there was never anything. Right. I said, oh, this is. But I mean, I guess like honest, John ray-ban really say rhymed actually till just now like having some sort of influence ever. There was a strong just because they feel extend impo while STAN has some innocence like Pinocchio stands highly. Intelligent, intrude don't know Pinocchio possessor shrewdness, maybe been okay developed assuredness, which STAN was much more from just dealing with me. And my b s you know, staying is just a different being in Pinocchio. Like child in some sense. But actually, someone that unlike Finocchio Pinocchio wanted to be a boy is STAN wanted boyhood is. So it's going to two different things in you know, wanted a boy's body. Not a wooden bat. I in no no strings to hold me down. And STAN wanted a body. So those some so there's some emotional juice air of like, hey, and again like also going for deeper stuff. Of like, hey, would you really want? What does that part of you that connects with STAN or scooter in what part are you stand wants to have these summer camps? That's your dream that he can imagine in pitcher. It makes him feel good. And it's stirs him up. And then he says, yes, this is what I would like I think I would like this in scooters there too. Can encourage STAN in triumph power him. But it's the same time. Like a hope there was something relatable in there. Even if it's a team like a vibration that you're like, I mean, I truly believe that this stuff, even if you're not hearing it is that it is like it as pupils in DisneyWorld, or whatever that it's like that's there for you empowering your -bility sleep through it. In. So was my point. So I guess there's are there associate years and then so in the writing process. So then by day five or six it's like, okay. This is how we think the story is going to go in. Then after that. It's kind of like to be honest. It's really. West of the wild or something like after that. Usually after the first two days. It could go any which way..

STAN Finocchio Pinocchio John ray-ban two days
"stan" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

The Complete Guide to Everything

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

"All right. Tim back to Stanley. Stanley, STAN Lee Lieberman or Lieber but not anymore because he changed it legally to Stanley. Yeah. Anyway, the first this guy came out of the at one point correct me if I'm wrong, STAN Lee was a young man when he started he started at what alternately became moral things. Like, atlas comics at the time. Maybe. Something else before that. But and this was just comic books movies. Yeah. Oh before then this was pulp. Yeah. This was when like comics weren't even necessarily superhero, they were like there were a romance, comics and. Allow western comics mystery comic. Maybe Tom ask have zone romance series comic books Yang going adventures of Thomas. Present a series of romantic comic books. But the first story that he wrote on was like a filler captain America story because captain America was around from the war. No before the war. I think and. You know, the big one. When did Stanley start like how old was he was like seventeen. Okay. And at the time he was basically an intern. He said that he his job was filling ink wells. But I mean that can't fill a whole day. I don't know. Maybe they'll go through that quick maybe the holes in the ink wills where you put the ink in. We're really small and it's not like he couldn't go at it. Like, you porna- glass of wine. Narrator. Yeah, we're guests everywhere. He has to just do it. So I see head to be careful. But so the first story they lay them right on with last two seconds in the comic business. Eric thank you'll be better. This way. He wrote a captain America thing that was supposed to be just like a filler throwaway thing. But in that story. Learned this just today. My research he established the idea that captain America. Can Rick shea his shield when he throws it. Kevin in America. Throws a shield throw the shield ricochets like a like a pool ball a Cuban. You know, Nazis heads. Does it always come back to them like a boomerang? If he does it, right? Yeah. I like, I don't think it's. It's not like technology in the shield that does that. But like he's. Geometry, major something. And he knows like throw it. It's gonna hit that wall hit that knucklehead hit that numskull hit that dope. And that's gonna bounce back to me. And I mean. Jamach entirely. Yeah. Well, then Jamaica's who got away with it. But he doesn't know hit the wall that's going to. Nice. He's gay go. Did it though? Captain America got his famous catchphrase. That it though. So he didn't create captain America being creek, captain America. But he added a at the shield ricochets was captain America throwing his shield, and then just having to go retrieve it, I think so. Yeah. And I don't wanna look Stanley seems like he's a very creative mind, but like tomorrow and after panel after panel captain America running shield back. You would think like maybe we find a way to get it back to. I think it was just a matter of necessity from Stanley where he was like, look, I can cut, you know, a few pages out of each comic. If we don't have to show captain America running after shield to refill the inkwell so much cause they'll be shorter. So but eventually like, yeah. That that company. I forget exactly how it happened. If they were bought by Noah, they turned into marvel or like a like a few companies kind of came together. And you know, the new name was marvel. lowbrow garbage publishing. Right. And like it was pope. Yeah. Like there were mergers. Backstabbing? Oh, yeah. Well, and that's the thing..

captain America Stanley America STAN Lee Kevin Eric STAN Lee Lieberman Thomas Tim Noah Jamaica Lieber Tom Rick shea Yang two seconds
"stan" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on KNSS

"Stan Lee one of the towering figures in comic book history has died at age ninety five Stanley Martin Lieber was born in Manhattan in nineteen twenty two and began working at timely comics at age seventeen I heard there was a job open at this publishing company. And I was the best proof proofreader you ever saw. 'cause I enjoyed those stories I couldn't wait to read them. And then they let me do some writing. Because there was nobody else around the early nineteen sixties, the small company was now, marvel comics and STAN Lee was teamed with artist Jack Kirby to create new superheroes. I wanted to change the name I felt that we. Had we had started something new new kind of superheroes. We a big fan following there. I was the fantastic four which started a run of iconic characters heroes with human flaws that would define marvel Spiderman the X men, the iron man and more first of all you have to have a character. Whether it's a superhero or not the people care about your lead. Tara must be someone understand. Relate to and see the care about and you want to do. Well, these gift for promotion, both of comics in himself helped take the entire media to another level. After retiring, he lived to watch marvel go from comics to global media giant breaking box office records with the heroes. He created and making light hearted cameos in almost all taken the things that I created. And then making them look better than ever. And I'm getting the credit Brittany doing all the work. It's the greatest situation. We remember the true hero of the marvel comics universe. Stan lee. Rosie the skunk atmos- entity. You might think I make a bad smell. You do. You. The my stinky fragrances nothing compared to the smell of a gas leak because that could be dangerous. You think you smell elite or encounter other side such as hearing a heating or blowing sound or seeing a Baber cloud blowing dirt or bubbling water? Do not smoke talk on the phone turn on or off equipment or vehicles. Anything that could cause us lead the media, then call nine one one and atlas energy atmos- energy will send a trained technician to investigate the situation. Gas leaks just played steak seriously. There's no gray area here when dealing with.

Stan Lee Jack Kirby book history Manhattan technician Tara Brittany
"stan" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on Front Burner

"Hails from across the spectrum of of John Russia, and you know, with dubious levels of creative quality being put into them, but they were being sold as like, STAN Lee created this character or like, STAN Lee co wrote this or whatever and Powell entertainment never really took off. And by the its final years, it was hemorrhaging money. And then on top of that you had all of these legal and financial troubles that STAN ran into with his family and people closest to him, you know, people who'd worked with him very closely, and that stuff gets very tricky. Because a lot of it is competing narratives that are mutually incompatible. And you don't know is lying making something up and a lot of the details. Pretty lurid. But suffice it to say that there were a lot of people in stands life, especially after the death of his wife Joan last year who were trying to take advantage of him and trying to extract money from him. Mm-hmm. Get you know, legal rights that he could offer, and it it was a really ugly situation that was very tragic and much discussed within the comics and and entertainment world, and it's just sad that that was the note that he went out on that was the last set of things that were being discussed about him. And you know, it is what it is. He he told many an interviewer, including me that one of his great regrets that he wasn't a better businessman, and that really showed his final years. In april. I understand he was accused of sexual misconduct by Chicago area. Masseuse do you know what ended up happening with that case? I don't know what the exact legal status of it is. And it'll be interesting to see what happens now that he's nog with us. But it's so hard for me to comment on because I it was part of this larger tapestry of accusations that were going on between people who worked for STAN. And we're close to him. And there are allegations that the allegations are made up, and it's just another difficult. Passage from the last few chapters of stance life. I just want to pick up on one thing you mentioned about his regrets over over not being better business person. This this was a really fascinating thing for me to hear because over the last few years, especially you look at these movies dominating the box office. Black Panther made a billion dollars just assumed that Stanley was a billionaire. He had a lot of money, but not as much money as you'd think because he sank a lot of money into these bad business ventures. He was not as wealthy as he could have been if he had either had a better deal cutting him into a percentage of all the movie profits, which for various reasons, he did not have. And he probably could have been better off if he had made wiser investments or just retired and stopped investing money in these new projects, and he really did. Regret that. And yet seemed somewhat unable to stop the train when it had gone off the rails in those final few years. He didn't die penniless the way that a lot of comics creators from his generation did, but he went through a lot of turbulence. And for you having spent a lot of time thinking about Stanley's, work and his complicated legacy. Is there an anecdote that really sticks with you about having Hanoch so interesting, I think the anecdote that sticks out in my mind, actually, something from my childhood. I went to a comic book convention. My first cop convention has sixth grade, and STAN was doing a signing engagement there. So I had him sign a copy beat up old copy of fantastic four number forty seven. And as he was signing, it somebody took a picture of me and him, and he looked directly at the person who took the picture and said you've immortalized me. And for some reason that just stuck with me throughout my life. And throughout the time. I spent thinking about STAN and writing about STAN he was somebody who really did become immortal along while ago. So no matter what happened in the final few years of his life. He's going to be is memory is going to be preserved and honored by countless people. For as long as people are carrying about these characters, which I think is going to be for a very long time. I must've absolute silence. Exactly. Aw. Stanley died at the cedars Sinai Medical

STAN Stanley STAN Lee STAN Lee co Powell entertainment Chicago John Russia cedars Sinai Medical Joan Hanoch billion dollars
"stan" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

05:10 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Your saying. And now time stamp in good top NBA, nuggets only Wednesday show. The thingy. Stan Van Gundy has had theme related nuggets. The last couple of weeks is this theme related or is this just a hodgepodge of free flowing. Doug it. No, it's theme related again. Then. All right. Well, what are the three nuggets? Well, our theme today is NBA centers. And we'll start with a blast from the past the four fifty point games already this season from NBA players. Got me looking at the history of fifty point games in the NBA. Michael Jordan is second in NBA history with thirty one fifty point games. But the man who is I will Chamberlain had forty five fifty point games in one season. Hundred eighteen in his career, the still. Thanks for being useless as number two. Stan. Nikola yokich. The Denver Nuggets center is currently tagged with LeBron James for seventh in the NBA in assists at seven point seven a center has not been in the top ten in assists. Since Wilt Chamberlain was second in the league fifty one years ago. That joker wilt this stilts that and the number one nugget from STAN Van Gundy this week is I'm gonna go with one of my former guys here last year. Andre Drummond became only the second player in the past twenty six years to average fifteen points and fifteen rebounds in season. Now, he is on pace to become the first player to do it in back to back seasons. Since Moses Malone forty years ago. Drummond mohan. Can you guys? Can you guys? Find for me. The worst fifty point scorer in the history of the sport teric rose. Is it Willie Burton Willie Burton really trail at Tracy Murray. Who was a bench guy at his whole career? Got the actually the timber wolves have a bunch of weird fifty point scores mobile. Did it recently Derrick rose just did it and Corey brewer who I didn't think it was capable of doing? It has a fifty point game. Very brewer has a fifty point game. Wait a minute. He does not who did he get fifty against an a guy guard named should be out of the league. Okay hero. Put it on the poll. Plays is Mike. Ryan a dirty liar by claiming. That brewers still scored fifty Darren Williams. Well, but Tarran Williams Williams was good though for a long time. Well, what's the most surprising that Dana Barros Alonzo Mourning? I I was there for those fifty it was against George Mira sun and Zo just kept running down the middle of the floor. George could not catch. It was pretty bad. Okay. This one certain make sense Corey brewer scored fifty one points against the rockets in two thousand and fourteen. Corey brewers are shooting guard. It's offensive matchup like when James harden. Mike, would you be kind enough pleased to find for us Kevin Mikhail talking about how it is? The James harden went about getting him fired at every turn we will play that after twenty three and me we will play for you that sound Kevin McHale talking about James harden on defense. I just want to make sure everyone knows that Saint has made an argument potentially for James harden being out of the league. That's right. That's what just happened. This. Hold that sun. Let's sell some ATs. We will get to that sound of Kevin McHale telling you what it was like coach James harden on defense in a second donlevatar, yo chicken times to God's smarter gob. These live at our show with Stu gods on ESPN radio. Mike Ryan has nominated. Cory Booker is the worst fifty point brewer excuse me as the worst fifty point scorer of all time. I'm going Tony Delk or dolph Shays Dolf shales Shays was good player. Yeah. The funding is become clear during the break and on the air that you don't know how to play this game. No, not know, Tony dunk is. Okay. But you continue to nominate hall of famers all start. If adults Shays was doing it two points at a time. Like, it just seems and it was a different time. I just have a hard time magazine Alonzo Mourning scored fifties a hall of Famer I understand but again, two points at a time. Just Zoe was no are scoring. Are you what I wasn't known for scoring? It was known as a score John defender. Rebound her he could get fifteen free throws a game guy. What are you talking about? How were you comparing Tony Delk to Alonzo Mourning in what world?.

Corey brewer NBA James harden Stan Van Gundy Mike Ryan nuggets Alonzo Mourning Drummond mohan Dana Barros Alonzo Mourning Wilt Chamberlain Kevin McHale Tarran Williams Williams Andre Drummond Doug Tony Delk LeBron James Denver Nuggets center Willie Burton Corey brewers George Mira
"stan" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Stan Van Gundy in with us as he is Wednesdays during basketball season, we will get to his hot nuggets is hot basketball nuggets in your face in a second. But let's go around the room, and guests, you guys have a theory or a guess on where STAN Van Gundy side in the Kyrie Irving debate. Where Murray's going for fifty at the end of the game all of a sudden Kyrie's flipping out about unwritten rules, and that you're not allowed to shoot. When the other team's not playing defense it guys trying to get to fifty do. We have some predictions here before I go to STAN Van Gundy on what STAN Van Gundy opinion is going to be on this. He's not happy with Kyrie not happy with Kyrie. Why just because you can't be throwing balls into the stands? Okay. Do you have a theory here on which way, this is going to go? We did this on Instagram live. So I'm going to recuse myself. Okay. Mike Ryan, what about you? Both are. Wrong. Both are wrong both of the players Murray. And Kyrie Irving are wrong. That's my take that his that's going to be his take ROY. Do. You have a do. You have a guest. Yeah. He's going to side with Kyrie. Don't try to run up the score me. He's gonna crush all Murray. All right. So that we've got every option is taken. Let's see which one stand. Choose not every option someone wanting to say, he's not gonna have a problem with it. It's cool across the board. All right. Well, that's another one of the options. Alright stan. So which is it. Well, look, I mean Jamal Murray maybe shouldn't have taken the shot. But I don't like people crying about you know, guys running up the score and things like that. What kyri should have been upset about is that Jamal Murray got forty eight on him. And if they got their butts kicked, that's what should have upsetting the rest of that stuff is stuff. I'd never complained about Bobby Bowden. I think said it best when he was at Florida state the responsibility for not getting the score run up on. You is the team that's getting beat. Well, it's so strange. Kyrie Irving is reacting like an old person. Isn't he twenty six? Well, he's look he's frustrated. I get it. You know, everybody on that team. Anybody would be you know, you got beaten. You're good team in Boston season hasn't gotten off to his great start as you know. Like, you thought it would then you're getting beaten and the guy had a great game against you. You're frustrated. That's all it was. So I don't read too much into it. But you know, look he shouldn't have shot it but come on. I mean, that's not the issue. The issue is we got to play better in and get a win. Stan you say he shouldn't have shot. But why not? I mean, it's Jamal Murray hasn't had much to be happy about over the last couple of years what I'm trying to get his fifty. I mean, why not get fifty? I mean, look again, I wouldn't have if I was on the other side, I wouldn't have any complaints. But I would if that were my guy walking off the court, I wouldn't make a huge deal about it. I would just say look, that's just something. You don't do in that situation Dez Bryant has signed a one year contract with the saints Dez Bryant is going to be a Saint. But we segue seamlessly from that putting STAN van Gundy's nuggets in.

Kyrie Irving Stan Van Gundy Jamal Murray Dez Bryant Bobby Bowden basketball Instagram Mike Ryan Boston saints Florida one year
"stan" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Stan where do you side with the Packers just sending him away? Clearly, clearly, I message of you will not do that to our team. Well, yeah. And we don't know exactly. What happened? You're right. His explanation sounded credible. But clearly Green Bay didn't buy it. And when you have a guy doing something like that that they considered selfish against team interest. I'm not sure they really had a choice to do anything other than what they did. But have Aaron Rodgers blows off a play call and does his own thing. He's fine. Right. Well, look. Yeah. I'm not going to say everybody's treated equally and Aaron Rodgers you're going to get upset, and if that happens, and you're going to have a discussion, but Aaron Rodgers can win you a lot more games than time. Had come recant. That's the bottom line, Stu gods. This is one of the major tools in the store is to God's toolbox. He loves to point out that the more. Valuable guy gets away with more as if it's an observation. That's eliminate like he. Thomas the more valuable person. No, they would not pack the bags of Aaron Rodgers even if he punched might McCarthy in the face now. You're right. I I don't know why I see I feel the need still after all these years to pointed out every single time. Let me ask stand in Gundy this question because I've asked Pat Riley this question, Pat Riley, we've asked him as a coach if Dwayne Wade punched you in the face before game seven what happens. Pat, Riley's answer was he plays game seven I need to win game seven STAN Van Gundy, you have Aaron Rodgers on your team..

Aaron Rodgers STAN Van Gundy Pat Riley Packers Dwayne Wade Stu gods Green Bay McCarthy Thomas
"stan" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

Relevant Podcast

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

"Stan. Away. Keno. Having. Has to the sky. On that. St way. Standing..

St way Stan.
"stan" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

WCBS-FM 101.1

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"stan" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

"Close Stan Morning Shelby z..

Stan
"stan" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"stan" Discussed on 790 KABC

"The studio with a co host kristin herald our producer debbie d the great roger ponce criminal defense attorney get this down ponce law group that a r c gentleman stands something i actually abc stan i told you we spoke languages thinking let me do that again like poems delay on ponce law group got a pc chris christie harrell wrote on my notes also he without donna all right let's get into the law a little bit so you guys you handle immigration laws i'm good thanks for taking my call no seriously barry what what you problem what's your issue how me and a partner are looking to buy very early stages a car wash on the central coast and as you can imagine a lot of the workers undock napi undocumented so you know what is the risk how do you protect yourself you have to have all documented workers or i think it's a very good question.

attorney donna barry partner kristin herald producer roger ponce ponce abc stan i chris christie harrell