35 Burst results for "SOC"

Data Shows MLB Teams that Sell the Most Hot Dogs Win the Most Games

Morning Drive with Casey and Elliot

00:45 sec | 2 months ago

Data Shows MLB Teams that Sell the Most Hot Dogs Win the Most Games

"Secret to why Major League baseball teams are summer successful and some flat out stink. It has to do with the sale of hot dogs. Really? Yeah, you This is your cause and effect their national hot dog. Soc Sausage council has put out data. The L, a Dodgers, Chicago Cubs, New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox and ST Louis Cardinals each S o more than a million hot dogs and sausage each year, and they're the most successful major league baseball teams. Now listen to the bottom five teams that so the least amount of, huh? The Detroit Tigers. The Cincinnati Reds, the San Diego Padres, the Chicago White Sox and the Baltimore Orioles. Kidding awhile, That's that's rough on,

Soc Sausage Council St Louis Cardinals Baseball Major League Baltimore Orioles Chicago Cubs Dodgers Boston Red Sox Detroit Tigers Cincinnati Reds San Diego Padres Chicago White Sox
OnePlus Announces the OnePlus 9 Phone Series

Daily Tech Headlines

00:33 sec | 3 months ago

OnePlus Announces the OnePlus 9 Phone Series

"Oneplus announced the oneplus. Nine one plus nine pro and the budget oriented oneplus. Nine are the nine pro and nine. The qualcomm snapdragon eight. Soc get hasselblad branded cameras with the sony amex seven eighty nine main center and claimed distortion. Free wide angle with the nine are getting snapdragon. Eight seventy and smaller sony. Five eighty six center. The pro differentiates with the largest six point. Seven inch q. Hd screen compared to these six point five five inch full hd screens on the other night series includes a three point three x telephoto camera and sixty eight rating

Oneplus Qualcomm Sony
pisode #35  Le voyage initiatique de la maternit et parentalit avec Bianca Thuot - burst 3

Conversations pour Elle, partages de sagesse féminine

05:02 min | 4 months ago

pisode #35 Le voyage initiatique de la maternit et parentalit avec Bianca Thuot - burst 3

"With us on the lobster savvas zone. The was pm almost young. Duncairn unix daniels on punk combined and his sons pissy ticket shows kush toll bagel Fox replays on. He added shushma There mickey soc nine now was super allows. this was so in motion. And i'm on the the kiss jan mumbo from the in toss financial concerns me yet put down stairs committee. All the polar dogs s become should body police secret dossiers even modern jeep indefensibly young put on the hostile metro area. Don't kill lou wop are highly. Listen you can lose moisture inch normal analysis To new to new number. don't care. Skiing mongrel geneticists tizzy komo privacy solutions. More lab senior key can you. He ended up. Don't do these emotion. Keith's manifests komo. Hover says it said burial laps yemen ad. Foam kiss turned ma on the. Da shows moldova's young till noon. We'll see a pattern allergy. Lucy bacall tunnels on a cd-rom metal set. Espy la pursue clash. Pf of wa. Who passer washington komo On a duty newly well spa style Example second level year until voc grew in neon new palette bent medlock A sorta p pallet fantasy. Not man and knock them up. You can see on this deserve. Speak here look trap. Kalani fungus kong secure. This is super sandy Tom put the point. Back by the copa habita- homes bhaskar bessemer dot. There are five are were doto the question and data sonate signed on as all put dorothy house. Ski faker bail you. Devolve year this town under file a cuisine and mia to new white house signed on it cuts the and bounce kotova. You're just took on paschi spouse wall septum farm. So michael community agreement signed docile cume of peer pundit poor pe- can you dr pair basketball dominate bonanno cast cylinder labus much. Craig glossy found league dick's p male fiscal sur. Five are tom of walk. It's just a kick acre cuisine. Could to serve democra- chris european malcolm dot com massacre And super attack my bhakta. The league belle pound. I love the minds found evil just wonderful spots if oh nouveau producer. Spirit said whenever say formats if calmly copeland apple dies on me the a mark. I'm so the fam- keep rooster while dope pass on liz off downscale. Vp conquer a nozzle bikes hotter yet. Dope person give the shows but panay ms similar p dishes the savasta savage Plant the kootenai against the for his social museum nesper. Pacifica defy fan cone factory the global and our cats in addition the performance. And the rest. Of the sixes. Not after the war. Just explain me them jobs. We have come up with a quantum abi of board. don't just get dot com. Donald took sa- salad come Less bengals facilitator. Some mr scuola. Paul son vie to see up. You don't don't the caribbean on the wii sipple. Total if die but access simba's school for dawn that built

Shushma Mickey Soc Jan Mumbo Lou Wop Lucy Bacall Espy La Sandy Tom Dorothy House Komo Daniels Labus Craig Glossy Moldova FOX Chris European Malcolm Skiing Keith Allergy WA Bonanno
Charting of the Human Genome, 20 Years Later

Science Friday

05:27 min | 4 months ago

Charting of the Human Genome, 20 Years Later

"We're talking about challenges for genetic research. 20 years after the first draft of the human genome was published with my guests, Dina Zelinsky, a bio infirm, a Titian with the Paris transplant group. And elite scientists for civil tech and crystal, soc and indigenous geneticist bioethicist with Vanderbilt University and the Native Bio Data Consortium Crystal I introduced you as a co founder of the Native Bio Data Consortium. Which gets to an issue we've talked about in different ways on this program in the past indigenous sovereignty over genetic data, please remind us how big an issue this is. Yeah. So when we talk about precision, medicine and health were always promising that the next advantages and innovations will be conferred to those individuals that contribute the genomic information. The pandemic has shown that preventive healthcare and structural barriers to access to health care probably highlighted more about health disparities than this UN pronounced supposed to future advantages of healthcare. Indigenous peoples have You know, willingly or unwillingly contributed their didna for the supposed betterment of humankind Need I remind everybody what happened after the completion of the Human Genome Project. We had the completion of large scale diversity projects such as the Human Genome Diversity Project and 1000 genomes project, which were denounced by over 600 plus indigenous nations worldwide that went to United Nations because they were concerned. About privatization and commercialization and exploitation of indigenous genomes and what has happened to those biomarkers collected from indigenous peoples from Central South America. Those bio markers are now freely and openly accessible to companies such as ancestry, Didna and 23 Me ancestry. Edna has hosted revenues over a billion dollars every holiday quarter since 2017 so we always have to ask yourselves. What exactly are the protections? Really? This data privacy and commercialization. The rate of technology outpaces our regulations, these new technologies and while we think that these protections are conferred by laws, which is the genetic Information nondiscrimination Act Last change. Companies are bought and sold. So we have to ask yourself what's the commercial value? The data that we're being asked to freely give away and how can we look to communities and empower communities to self directed decisions that are being made using their data? Dina, you contributed your data, and you gave it away freely. Do you not feel the same kind of threat here that exist? Not quite in the same way. No individuals of European ancestry make up the vast majority of genetic studies, and that's really problematic because they only make up 6% of the population. And I, I completely understand the threats to underrepresented populations. We should be sequencing these underrepresented populations, but we should be sequencing them with the idea of Making genomics research more equitable of giving back to these communities, not just taking from them. That being said, I can't even explain how useful data like that from the 1000 genomes project has been. I've used it in most of my projects. I have whole human genomes at the tip of my fingers. When I'm accessing this data, as well as other scientists, I think We generally have good intentions, so I currently use it in a study to better understand Parkinson's disease. That being said. I think in many cases, a lot of this data has restricted or limited access for researchers versus commercial entities. I agree here that we we really should limit what industry can or cannot do with with our data. Krystal. You mentioned preventive care and the pandemic. The human Genome Project. I remember promised to tell us everything about her genome. Doesn't this sort of tell people Hey, we know everything about you now and ignore the nurture part of the nature nurture debate. What I can tell you as a geneticist. My first skepticism and what I always tell tribal leaders is that genetic data is just the easiest type of data to collect. But genetic data does not. Predict as much about disease risk than we think. Other things such as access to care, cultural factors, colonial factors relating to help probably contribute more to the health differences and outcomes than actual genetics itself. Things like diet environment and lifestyle are things that we should be looking at. And definitely socioeconomic status by factors. But these are the hardest bits of data to collect. And so we really can't build truly robust models without looking at these other factors related to health. So looking at genetics and biological factors is sometimes a little bit of a cop out. You don't necessarily properly convey the limitations of genetics and biological research to the lay

Dina Zelinsky Native Bio Data Consortium Human Genome Diversity Project Central South America Vanderbilt University Human Genome Project Paris Edna UN Parkinson's Disease United Nations Dina Krystal
AI driven Privacy tool developed to protect COVID-19 tracing data

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

05:48 min | 4 months ago

AI driven Privacy tool developed to protect COVID-19 tracing data

"Welcome to carry tv and ad tech insect weekly chris coverage on the editor with more security media. And this is al. Friday morning episode. Normally stream live on tuesday afternoons and on fridays and today's episode where with dr did hornets strategic advocacy manager would stand into strategy and up the sushmita rush at senior research scientists with data. Sixty one gonna be looking at data. Sixty one's recent ion driven promising tool. Personally my shin factor. I think it's go piff and with with don't this mehta rush a senior research scientist with data sixty one. Thank you very much for joining us. Law soc me that look thank you. So much We covered off. And we're gonna be talking about It's great to have data sixty one on obviously as well but this caught mile. I released a new data privacy tool for a anonymous covid. Nineteen tracing data and keeping that secure. And it's cold personal information factor or this. You're the senior research saunas on the project. Might be the adult. Talk us through It's a big topic. Accident had to stop. Whether we start with the i ought to the covid. Non tain tracing data Update class. I can just a little bit about fifth avenue. Exactly the information and Just to be fit. That need talk about why we are doing this. And one of the use cases of course the covid nineteen of data about this is a much more universal kind of a tool which which actually helps to share data a to protect the privacy of individuals whose data is there in the assets and its stock. V personal information factor is essential information content in the data affect and. Just imagine that if i were to the custodian was to release the state asset. Then it looks reveal definitely information individuals so freshman is that went to release and when not to release and this personal information factor is a measure of that information content in that deep affect the identified data and what the tool does is that not only. Does it publishes the data in an in an in some kind of transformed fashion. But it's also evaluates. The risk of free identification. Is very very important. Like when i when i want to share my data. The first thing that i ask is that what is happening to my data. What are the risks associated rely. We get out in this whole list of data that has been you know released. No you can. I ask you. Is it reverse engineering. The fact it's released. And we reverse that. Can i identify that will happen. Writer the tool essentially doctor that you know it. I evaluate what happens. What are the risks. And if it feel that you know the risk is low then it's released the data at the high than it suggests very thoughts of transformations Aggregations techniques so as to make the data more suitable to be released that in it's not reeducation is not possible so the two of you know a lot lot more. To protect the privacy of individuals this is donald sixty runs on another saying albumin. Doctor men whose new south wales chief scientists it shifts on and We've he's also hit it up. We'll previously headed up. The new south wales at data analytics as well is that this is all great working together on this because we've heard from duct tape and previously about the work that they're doing with a lot of this data across the south wales in sydney in particular. Very interesting work. But yeah it's that that The day anonymous anonymously information and they identified. Information is a challenge. Because if you join. The dots suddenly can start to identify. They so yeah. This is actually a on oprah man. The project actually started with the initiative of yet overman dr yang obama and what we are essentially trying to do at the data was also involved from the very beginning. But what we are trying to do. Is that enhance that tool so we want to enhance such way that weekend. Mitigates against various attacks so we are trying to identify what other attacks. What are the attack vectors. That are possible that might breach the privacy of individuals and beth. Israel comes into picture. We are essentially studying what a- what the attacks are and can be do it in a more sophisticated sway to learn from the attack and suggest suggests techniques to protect the privacy of individuals of be it aggregation be. It's probably secure Secure approval private algorithms for like Differential privacy or there would be other solutions that can help to the data at make it fit to be

Mehta Rush AL Chris South Wales Dr Yang Obama New South Wales Donald Trump Sydney Oprah Beth Israel
Uganda's Museveni Faces Tough Challenge In Presidential Election

Morning Edition

06:52 min | 5 months ago

Uganda's Museveni Faces Tough Challenge In Presidential Election

"New seven E, who has been in power for 35 years. Is facing a strong challenge from Bobby Wine. Ah young singer turned politician who's half his age. MPR's Africa correspondent later Peralta is in Uganda's capital of Kampala. And he interviewed the president and he joins us Now with this exclusive and ater. Where did you meet the president? So we met at his ranch in she. SOC, which is about a five hour drive from Kampala and his cows were grazing in the distance. And you know, he came in making jokes. He was carrying a travel mug and wearing his signature broad brimmed hat, and we sat under this big tree to talk. Guess before we dive in. Can you tell us a little bit more about him? Yes. So he helped topple to dictators in the seventies and eighties. But now he has been in power. Since 1986. Uganda has changed the Constitution twice to allow him to stay in power, and he is now running for a six term in office. The election is on Thursday. So I started with a pretty simple question. What is it that you haven't accomplished in 35 years? You plan to accomplish this time around and as most 70 is bound to do, he gave me a history lesson and colonialism. And he said that he wants to work to bend the arc of history on the continent, including to change what he said was a culture of not working hard. Not with this huge continent. With a small population. Has a good Mentality for its people. They don't have to work hard. No, this would be the struggle week. These know it all. Promotes. I don't know. Because in other parts of the world People are pressure to work either by the environment. Which is horse died. Oh, by competition between man and man, But here Fool's gonna survive. Don't tell that really harsh thing to say about you just recorded to record that is really harsh, so he didn't talk about a five point plan about issues like building roads or improving schools. No. I think he was insulted by the question because he said that it implied that he should leave office after 35 years. He says that he's trying to accomplish historical things, and he looked to George Washington as a model. The Americans are the most powerful country in the history of man. I want to do. What Washington did work for the economic and, in some cases, even political integration of Africa. So using the United States is an example. You and here I told President Museveni, the George Washington gave up power after eight years to make a point that the American presidency was not a lifetime appointment, and 70 argued that Washington could leave because the American electorate and its economic system was more sophisticated when the social direction Over society. Is already set. It would have been run it. Probably with you know, kids, the dentition is not set. So it's very risky, very risky age, actually, from the lack of seriousness off those who talk the way you were talking That you you just go. Just go. People don't know whether the world North or South And you see you just go. Yes, if before already clear that the direction is the North. David. The body's no longer There's no more argument about that. Then anybody thunder candidate. I can see it now. You know the way that you go. But your people are smart and they're entrepreneur Ng and I mean to to be totally honest here. I think what you're saying sounds really condescending toward your It's not under city. It is a struggle to J. A society which we know where Which, of course you don't know very well. Hmm. So transition is risky, he's saying but later what does his record after 35 years actually show Hey, look, there's no denying that most 70 has brought peace to Uganda. There's a saying in the rural parts that suffered tremendously under the terror of the L. A raise Joseph Kony. But at least they can sleep. But look, Uganda is still deeply poor and corruption is endemic. And I asked him specifically about his foreign minister. A few years ago, the FBI found that he took a $500,000 bribe from a Chinese businessman. You know, after they looked through some emails of hiss yet Sam Kutesa is still one of president was seventies. Most trusted men. What do you tell Ugandans who see this pass by and you don't fire your foreign minister? That one is is terrible. I have not read it. But what I read it on. I really I despised And Condemning or policy. It's I'm happy to send you the indictment, which has the email in it, you can reuse do But look, The truth is he has had years to read this, so he must have known about this. Okay Elections, as we've mentioned are on Thursday. Is he campaigning? He is He's everywhere in Uganda, but he did still take the time to drag me around his farm to show me his cows. Yeah. These and these cows or his prized possessions, and you know they're beautiful, and he has 10,000 of these cows. But as he was walking away, he wanted to explain what made him different from his young opponent, he says. Bobby Wine is too focused on the lumpen proletariat or the thoughtless masses because what you do with the money the income generated by the By us the farmers. The industry's That would happen Who would head up in the ghetto people? Hmm? So he's saying if you can't hear it, that it is the rich like him, who will help the ghetto people. And this is coming from a man who has 10,000 cows in a country where many people eat meat for special occasions. Maybe for Christmas or for ead. This is so fascinating. Aitor will have more of your interview later today. What will be here? So we will ask him about elections will talk about his opponent and why security forces have reacted so violently to protests. And maybe it won't surprise you. But President was seven E is unrepentant. That's NPR's ater Peralta. Thank you later. Thank you, Tanya.

Uganda Bobby Wine Kampala President Museveni George Washington MPR Peralta Social Direction Over Society Africa Washington Sam Kutesa Joseph Kony NG United States David FBI Aitor Ater Peralta NPR
"soc" Discussed on Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

03:18 min | 6 months ago

"soc" Discussed on Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

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"soc" Discussed on Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

04:04 min | 6 months ago

"soc" Discussed on Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

"That are there to manage represent the threat landscape for the entire organization. But the moment you go into the rest of the markets now. It's a cross functional team that wants to use it for a purpose where the tip as a dedicated solution really means they are looking for threat. Intelligence management in the context of their mission so in the context of i'm Fed hunting or using it in the context of i'm responsible for detecting cyber-threats managing threat intelligence content to detect and respond effectively to become kind of a candy functionalities of a threat intel platform provide value in the context of that process. And if the answer today is yes. Dip might be dead but threat until management isn't but then threatened to management needs to be part of a larger solution. So if you're a vendor like ourselves that are just telling this dedicated kenneth single purpose solution. Then you're gonna find limited applicability there unless you make it part of something much bigger which is at our company strategy and Which rolling out in if something we see we see very happy customers in very large environments which is kind of our specialty in a way large central governments of large enterprises dedicated until teams. But as we take an offering downmarket it's part of a much larger play at Recent acquisition in the end point space building offering there. I'd be happy to talk more on. But that's where. I think it begins for us. It's threat. Intel management is very much alive. Everybody wants to take control over what they used in their security process. They want to manage detection rules. They want to manage A minor attack iot meth things. They want to visualize it when something happens. They wanted to use all these things as part of something else i care about well i i think i think the first thing to say is tip is dead long live tim there you go but basically with you. You're absolutely welcome to seal that. And maybe i'll maybe i'll get the. I'll beat gardner to at this time. But that's the thing i think. We saw the evolution of and you had threat connect. You had anomaly. You had all these different Intel sharing in processing platforms in word sort of always felt like it was going was into this space..

Intel kenneth tim gardner
Christen Brandt And Tammy Tibbetts Are Making a Difference

Good Life Project

05:29 min | 6 months ago

Christen Brandt And Tammy Tibbetts Are Making a Difference

"Right now You're hanging out in new york Your working with is really interesting organization. That will dive into but This was not either of your original path or intention when you thought about. What you doing in your quote grown-up lives. Don't we sort of Start the story. Probably i guess it makes more sense with tammy and then we'll criminal ring you into the conversation. Then we'll just sorta like dive into the whole mix. Tammy i know one of the things. I've heard repeat over and over in different. Conversations is that you grew up as a kid. Shy how curious. I know you said that. What i'm curious about is how did actually show him in your. You know what's funny as after this conversation. I actually have an interview with the editor in chief of my high school newspaper. The viking vibe which is to be the editor in chief bub. So it's like a full circle moment. But that takes me back to. When i was seventeen when i was in high school. I dreaded speaking up raising my hand in class. Standing up in front of people to speak was my worst nightmare. And i really found myself expression and some confidence in writing which is why i was drawn to journalism and decided that when i went off to college i would be a journalism major with the dream of one day being a magazine editor so senior year of high school. There is the tradition of the superlatives in the yearbook. Many of us can remember. That and i was voted in a fairly large senior class of a thousand some students. I was the one who is most shot and i remember posing for that picture in the yearbook. They asked me to stand in the lobby of the high school. And there was this hiller and they asked me to hide behind it and pretend as if i was just scared of the world and in my head i was like this is a terrible thing to be known as most shy. This is ridiculous. But i went along with it and i just silently promised myself that i would make this most shy title a great irony one day and i would be anything but and i would go off to college and i would go where no one knew me and become the young woman i wanted to be. So that's kind of where everything changed for. Me is when i began my journey as a first generation college student. I mean i'm curious also whether soc is interesting word and it's a loaded word and it's also really impress ice word these days right because you know it. It often speaks to this spectrum that ranges from severe social anxiety to introversion. And what's interesting to me about that. And i'm curious about how you experience it is you know we. We have looked at generation -ly Shy or introverted was the functional equivalent of broken. There's something wrong with you. the has to be fixed. I think susan canes quiet hope and so many people's eyes including me. Because i'm definitely more than the introverts side of the spectrum and really made i think a lot of people wake up to the fact that is there. There's this sort of like spectrum and it's not there's nothing wrong with being on the more introverted side of it you know unless it manifest in exile or things that actually stop you from living life. You want live. That's why i'm curious how you actually experience it like. Did you experience this as just this. Just the way i am. And i'm actually pretty good with it but for the social reactions to it or was it actually more of leaning towards like a social anxiety type of thing for you so i am an introvert and i think that is different from being shy and a christians and extrovert so i we complement each other. Really well An introversion has actually been a great strength in this year of twenty twenty. You know it's made me very well equipped for quarantine and and given me a lot of resilience But as a kid as a teenager being shy. I was really afraid of judgement. That other people would make me. And what i had to say and i no longer identify as shy because i i think i realized that i had to make my voice matter and stand up for something and when you do reframing and recognize that you can push yourself to To speak up and be a leader to serve others. That was my way of overcoming. The fear of Other people's judgment was i socially social anxiety would label it as that Because i did have friends. Who like the studious. Quiet bunch who. I had good relationships win. But i never went to a school. Dance a Ironic we can talk about this later. But i i. I worked for seventeen magazine before starting. She's the first. I would be part of a magazine that i never felt cool enough to read because i didn't feel like my clothes were stylish. I didn't wear makeup as a teenager. So i think those i think my insecurity came from what now. In retrospect piece it together this way of seeing these images of what a cool confident girl looked like. And i didn't think that aligned with who i who i was at the time.

Tammy Hiller New York Susan Seventeen Magazine
"soc" Discussed on Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

05:53 min | 7 months ago

"soc" Discussed on Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

"You know mo- personnel can work from home you know they probably use a vpn was strongest indication. They do and they do their work from home. They can do it from anywhere so sack physical sex kind of a myth that we built up which i think. It's a good thing that we broken the myth because he shouldn't have to invest money in it. When there's a lot of other things will be spending in well to be fair. Think i think that myth was like humpty dumpty shoved off the wall and it fell to. Its death that i i don't i don't i don't foresee i remember those days where we had fifty sixty. Well let me correct that. We had fifty sixty chairs and even point in time. About ten or fifteen of them were occupied. The rest of them were for staff that were not on rotation or Actually i don't even know half the base was ever actually taken. It was like you said like. Tsa it was meant to look good. Scary yeah i. I've been a couple of those socks But those things were horribly impractical super expensive. And i think the most expensive thing that in those in those socks. The monitor's thousands of dollars for workstation monitors. Anton got this. Look on your face like like. You're either confused or you're ready to drink a counterpoint out Yeah sure but it was just like kind of bizarre to me like why you when you guys both went down the salk as a room slash facility path and i'm like apart from you guys dating yourself. Dula ninety s. I don't actually have any other explanation because this is really not how anybody thinks about talk for like ten years because it was a brief time when people will say virtual socked mean not that but today we just call it a sauk. Even if it's the people people who never met in person like sock to me is a team as a union at the center of excellence for monitoring monitors chairs facilities blackouts. Don't matter i mean. These are probably the arctic artifacts of the nineties. So still you heard the dna of a sauk. Sure they exist right. Yeah so if salk becomes a sort of like virtual salk where people from home from whatever from tahiti from whatever location. It's still a song. It's just a modern salk. It's assault that salk for a modern distributed. Enterprise there's nothing to about salk death. It's just the salt. Today is not a big room. That's it and he might've is it no longer though. So it's not security operations centers. Security operation cloud still keep sock. I guess but i mean center like a grand central center center of excellence may be i mean it's a team it's a bunch of people skills follow the protests some of them hans. Some of them do other stuff. But like has little to do with a room though all right sandra teary voice with our getting english or is that a is that ozzy i don't know let's let's move on those okay so we can agree that the physical thing of a sock is. I don't think it's gone. I think it's not right away the dinosaurs and the dodo but.

salk Dula ninety center of excellence for monit Tsa Anton arctic tahiti sandra teary hans
Obama memoir sells a record 1.7 million copies in first week

Chris Krok

00:40 sec | 7 months ago

Obama memoir sells a record 1.7 million copies in first week

"That's just flying off store shelves? Boxes. John SOC A As the story. The book is called the Promised Land, and it was written by none other than Barack Hussein. Obama, the former president's memoirs selling like a new Harry Potter. How about 1.7 Million copies in just its first week is a big numbers big enough That sales are among the highest ever for a non fiction book. Michelle Obama's becoming also a major hit. Selling 10 million copies worldwide since 2018 back in 2000 and seven author J. K. Rowling is Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows sold over a million copies in the 1st 24 hours of release, John Saucy, a Fox News and from the Rexall

John Soc Barack Hussein Harry Potter Michelle Obama J. K. Rowling Deathly Hallows John Saucy Fox News
"soc" Discussed on PC Perspective Podcast

PC Perspective Podcast

02:13 min | 7 months ago

"soc" Discussed on PC Perspective Podcast

"It was identical to the other four cores but in the actual manufacturing they kind of adjusted. How the process was able to lay down layers and and and basically changed the the the sales a little bit. So you know. They're not as fast but less leaky and more efficient. And then it would. It would san certain things like you know your your touch. would go to that. That small one You would have much better performance with it and accuracy and it's not running on one of your big cores and so it it. Was you know it was kind of a win win. And in that kind of case. And so i wonder if apple did that. They had identical course. Bet when factoring in design you know again you you designed for lower leakage lower performance. But do you can have better efficiency again. Get i don't they don't they. Don't ever go into those thinks deeply. Do they know. I mean non tech used to but then they hired a non so that he couldn't do that in an email but i will say actually his presence at apple. It's interesting because his focus has been efficiency like hey. You've already got enough performance single threaded from these apple chips. Let's work on how to make this more efficient. How to get more battery life out of it. How to put more tasks onto these low with low power high efficiency cores and that was the big push leading up to the last major architecture. Change with their a series. Soc's on iphone ipad and obviously the the learnings from that as they say probably resulted in a lot of what we've seen from m one so far and this is this is jen one part. That probably has great performance for a low power envelope in something like a macbook air. Intel's not happy about it at all. Obviously because they're they're literally showcasing performance against not. Just i thought i they were gonna show case against us. Check your bone stock medicare and if you read the test configuration information from their benchmarks. It says they're using the built.

apple Intel Soc jen
Instagram redesigns its home screen for the first time in years, adding Reels and Shop tabs

Daily Tech News Show

02:46 min | 7 months ago

Instagram redesigns its home screen for the first time in years, adding Reels and Shop tabs

"Instagram began really not an update that puts shopping and reels on the apps. Bottom navigation bar. The reels button is now in the middle of the bar. Which replaces the new post shortcut with the shopping tab. Replacing activity activity and new post. Buttons are now placed in the upper right corner next to the messages box. Us shoppers know that black friday sales are no longer limited to the friday after thanksgiving and the world's largest online shopping holiday singles day is doing the same thing today normally takes place just on november eleventh. One one one that's part of the signals thing but the discounts started as early as november. I this year and alibaba the leader in singles day sales estimates that a gross merchandise value of three hundred seventy two point. Three billion yuan was taken in in its singles day sales. That's about fifty six point. Four two billion dollars. Us it's a new record for the event for alibaba however the record falls under the shadow of new proposed anti competitive rules in china that would limit pricing flexibility to kind of their celebration. Samsung announced the x. Knows ten system on chip a premium. Phone chipset that offers eight. Cpu cores ten gp cores and an integrated five g modem capable of both sub six gigahertz and millimeter wave. The knows ten eighty is built on a five. Nanometer process includes a dedicated neural processing unit and dsp with an image signal processor capable of supporting a two hundred megapixel sensor. Samsung didn't have any launch devices for this news. Soc just yet speaking of arm based processors first benchmarks for max running apple's new m one chip or showing up on geekbench and they look pretty good. The macbook air recorded a single core of sixteen eighty seven and a multi-core score of seventy four thirty-three that single core performance outranks any other available mac benchmark on geekbench the multi-core score beats all of the twenty nineteen sixteen inch macbook pro models as well Benchmarks are good for the other ones as well. Thirteen inch macbook pro. Shows a single core score of seventeen fourteen multi-core sixty eight. Oh two and the mac mini shows up at sixteen. Eighty two single core. Seventy ninety-seven multi-car. Back in september pudgy. Mobile was banned in india due to its ties to ten cents. The south korean pudgy corporation. Now says it plans to create a new indian subsidiary to oversee a relaunch of the title designed for the indian market the game would maximize data security and cater to local preferences and feature changes like characters now starting fully closed no needy or using green liquid instead of blood and setting the game and a virtual simulation training ground rather than real life

Alibaba Nanometer Process Instagram Samsung United States China Apple India
Doin' Good by Grasses

In Defense of Plants Podcast

06:07 min | 8 months ago

Doin' Good by Grasses

"All new to me like the past five years of been. that. It's been my job as technician but it's been an education as well and you know doing the various projects and they're a really came to understand too that these grasses are also a lot of the food we eat. You know like corn is an Ghani. So. It would really fascinating and also you know how ecosystems that they dominate learning about the prairies system and the Tigris vary system here what it what it was and I just I didn't have that appreciation before it's it's kind of it's really sad to think about like most of its gone. But what's left is I feel I don't I? Feel like there's just something. So magical about like a remnant prairie especially like in the Midwest, I don't know if he's been to the Flint hills in Kansas unfortunately I haven't and I'm dying to get out there I recommend that even just for like a weekend trip or something it's just so cool I mean it's from song words like where the Buffalo Roam like literally you're standing on Kaban Hill and as far as you can see is just you know grasses and and Bison That's nice. You can hear it with the way you talk about it and it's something that You know when people get bitten by the quote unquote bug of sort of just prairie or grassland ecosystems even if it's not grasses at the focus, it isn't magical thing and then unfortunately you do have that realization like Oh God it's all gone practically but I still get chills when I walk into a remnant prairie I mean if you walk along an old railway or something like that you realize. What this is not fell to plow ever you know it's it's an amazing experience and it makes you appreciate it and I said this since I've moved here. It's almost like the lack of prairie and realize realization people have about what we've done to. It makes people more passionate about a and some of the most passionate botanist biologists, ecologists I know are grassland ecologist. You know these people that spend all their time trying to understand and even try to restore these ecosystems. Yeah. Some of the people that I work with like if I'm in the field collecting and stuff i. I. Tend to kind of go towards protected areas in state parks and such and most of the time people are so helpful and interested and passionate even if they don't know that much about grasses when they. Know when I asked them if they'd like to join a long or something there'd be just so into it. But yeah, I I wish more people in the general public kind of understood the importance of grasses and General I? mean. Sometimes when I tell people I, work on grasses, asking questions about their lawn. A. Yeah. Yeah. Speaking of we were talking before we started recording of. I get a lot of lawn care specialists trying to promote like net. You don't understand what the goal of this podcast is. A well. But it's cool that you dove into this and you found a passion for grasses and and you know whether you truly sort of start to understand them or not like it no matter where you are on that scale, you realize it's a world that you open up. So many doors of discovery and like you said, there's everything from the food we eat to the species that form the backbone of major ecosystems on this planet. You know this is a really important group of grasses and I mean I was embarrassed when he sent that email I started looking I, was like Oh Yeah I. Don't I don't pay enough attention to this and I looked up Andrew Guinea. I really need to because there's a lot of species that are really important things I know things I should probably know a bit better I mean this is a large group and it's really cool one to have fallen into which is a Yeah and they're also beautiful like bigly stem and little. Like this time a year. They're gorgeous and you know I'm really big into like native RV to. Especially, after reading Doug amies latest spoke earlier this year I've started kind of like a string, all my and family. Native but. But I you know even like in Missouri Illinois, you don't even have to try hard to find really gorgeous plants the other native here. Just you know we barely have to do with new yard like I planted a bunch of grass and little bluestone earlier this year is. That's really exciting and it is beautiful and it's something that I think needs to be demonstrated more. So Kudos for setting up sort of like an aesthetic. Gardner. I'm assuming you know and I don't i. wish I could really kind of think back to my early days of thinking about what a grassland would look like or would my perceptions are expectations of it were because it's never the case and its till this day when I get into different types of grasslands I'm always surprised that the structure the. Complexity and just the overall feel of what it's like to have different species of grass oftentimes within close proximity to each other and again, a lot of those are Andro Guinea. So what makes this group? So special I mean you mentioned there's a lot of them. Some of them are really important for crops in our society but there are also from an ecosystem standpoint really important. I mean, is that Kinda what the motivation of working with the Andrew Bogan e is because there's there's other graph groups out there. Yeah. at the Danforth Center you know the big mission there is to work to to feeding the world population with the effects of climate change, growing relations and stuff like that. So a lot of the work there is food focus, but I definitely come from a more conservation approach with that I'm just more passionate about it but. Yes. So these grasses you know there's the big four in various here so that it makes up three of those switch grass dean grasp wisdom. The pretty dominant. Yeah and their mode of photosynthesis while SOC- for really efficient and fixing carbon emissions and the water efficiency

Technician Andrew Guinea Midwest Doug Amies Andro Guinea Danforth Center Andrew Bogan Kansas Flint Hills Kaban Hill RV Missouri Illinois Gardner
TheLatest Brexit News

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:39 min | 8 months ago

TheLatest Brexit News

"Older listeners may recall a time when October fifteenth was last ditch do-or-die deadline by which agreement between the UK and the EU had to be reached else the UK would sail full steam ahead and damn the torpedoes towards a no deal brexit on December thirty first that deadline yesterday and almost as if the UK government is desperately bluffing negotiations appear to be very much ongoing after a you leaders conclude a meeting in Brussels UK Prime Minister. Boris. Johnson will speak on this subject later today one join with more on this by Stephanie, Boston UK and Ireland correspondent for developed. Stephanie How Does the EU take the UK's deadlines at this point the. Statement suggested that it's now up to the UK to quote. Mike necessary moves. I think the the European Union never took that deadline series at all I. Mean after all as you just set a new introduction. To have been so many deadlines I admit I'm also old I forget. deadlines that Boris Johnson has been giving thirty to thirty. First, of January, thirty first of December now, it's the fifteenth Tober. Never took it seriously because if you talk to the people who really understand the? Material Challenges in drafting legal texts they were saying First of all, there were two big gaps in really crucial issues and the second is even if you then can fill gaps politically, you have to then do the precision work of legal wording and that can't be done. In the Metro for night and so there was always an expectation that this European Council will come and go, and then they will sit down again and by early November conclude hopefully. So what are those gaps as things stand such sticking points as there are what other? where the main thing is state aid or what would with the would of other term state aid is meant which is well the Europeans rather call it playing seal that is something that has been written into the mandate from the very beginning back in twenty seventeen. And that means that because the United Kingdom is not a member of the European Union anymore. But is so close. It's a neighbor and should have free access to the European market. The British government needs to follow also the rules of competition. So for example, state eight, I remember in the summer I was in Berlin and someone in the German government made the point to me that. What the Europeans cannot accept for example, the British government giving millions and millions to Japanese carmaker. Attracts them to come to say Sunderland Create fifteen thousand jobs not fulfill the standards that the European Union expects for this kind of production and then be able to. Export freely into the European market. So basically dumping wages dumping competition that's something that is not not on the cards. For the Europeans, we would be deeply cynical view for the EU to take but then this is politics. Do they feel like the pandemic and the associated economic damage caused by might actually have strengthened the E. US hand in these negotiations, which is to say the UK will be much much less keen to risk the further disruption and expense no deal brexit. Yeah I think I mean you might say that's a bit cynical but of course, they looking at the situation in their own countries and of course, at the situation, the economic situation in the United Kingdom, which is very, very dire expected to be many many job losses in the months to come already we had. An economic downturn of almost twenty percents of GDP, of course. If there wasn't the pandemic, it would be easier for Boris. Johnson to walk away also had in mind when he won the election year ago December twenty nineteen, he campaigned on the platform saying I have a deal. So people believed him and he they voted him because he had an oven ready deal now, not even twelve months later he comes back and says, oh, by the way, I don't have a deal and that means that will be tariffs that will be used on the border. They will be higher prices they will be again problems to have everything in the supermarkets to the towards the end of the year early twenty twenty one. So that doesn't really go down well with his new voters in the north who were expected to not only brexit but sunlit landscapes. I mean from your point of view covering all this for a a German readership how hard is it to keep them interested in this especially given the the pandemic, which is much greater priority for all countries to do you get the sense that not necessarily European leaders but European public still paying any attention to this at all. They do a little bit of attention but to be honest yes, I mean in Germany because of rising number SOC new infections and new rules coming in and quite a lot of tensions now between Democrats and the the region's a difficult to to get attention I'm I think there is also an image problem for the United Kingdom now because all the news that are coming out whether it's with German TV radio or even pay person. Is Rather say not very complimentary of the British government in how they manage covet in how they manage. Brexit. But I must say when I read David tweet class. WHO's the chief negotiator for Britain and he said he was very disappointed and then set the prime minister said something on September nine, which was if there's nothing we can work with on October fifteen we will walk away. I think is a slight chance. He might walk away because they have been reckless if you remember the internal market bill with which they brought. Have Broken International Law I. Think There's a certain recklessness in this government so I don't completely exclude that in two or three hours whenever he announces stays, he might walk away. So on that from, there's been a lot of talk in British press. This week of those aerial photographs of sections of Kent being turned into a lorry parked does it strike you that perhaps those are actual serious preparations rather than more theatrical bluffing. No of course, these are serious preparations you have to be prepared and not only even in the case of a deal. If there is if there's no deal will be catastrophic even if it's the deal, still the fact is the United Kingdom has left the European single market, and therefore they have to be checks on the border whether it's from Franz coming into job. I think it's around ten thousand lorries a day in maximum times that have to cross go back and forth in this tiny little place pulled off Dover. And therefore you have to expect massive queues and they they already started with these preparations I remember like almost two summers ago when you drove down to what Folkston, you would see these additional catch that we're building. Now they're building the parking spaces. So obviously we have to expect. Destruction and maybe severe disruption Stephanie. Balls and. He's joining us.

United Kingdom European Union Boris Johnson British Government European Council Stephanie Brussels Prime Minister Boston Berlin United States Mike Ireland British Press Germany Kent Folkston Dover
"soc" Discussed on Risky Business

Risky Business

05:03 min | 9 months ago

"soc" Discussed on Risky Business

"So it is a case management platform it's a web APP. . It's typically deployed into a security operation center and it just helps you keep track of all of the activities that people working on. . So this is like highs management software essentially for specifically for talk is that right? ? Exactly, , it's case management for security operations. . Okay. . What sort of things do you use the software to do like about doing real deep deep dives on incidents because a lot of the time when we think of like response software, , we think forensic. . So whatever this isn't really that isn't no this is. . An ailing people to collaborate better and a K pot of that. . We noticed that often the way the white people do security operations using generic ticketing systems, , and there are pine to us. . They require extensive customization to do anything close to. . What we would be regarded as best practice and <hes>. . You know the the data entry is often a complaint pine I'm so we've aimed to make an experience that's really easy to use and is already set up to security operations. . I can sorry this is really designed to replace like Jira in the sock. . Yes. . We we do often generic atheist platforms and yet this is a big step up from that. . Okay. . In what sense right? ? So if I upgrade from a generic ticketing platform and I get myself side on what is getting me that those platforms I'm can't give me so. . We have a built in workflow that is based off the computer security incident handling God from this. . In fact, , we steal all of our best moves from the computer security instant handling God. . It's the best advice. . We could find a way not to tell people how to do their job we just by us, , but best practice as out as out benchmark Yep. . So you steal the workflows and create some yeah krantz. . Can Software? ? I haven't spoken to anyone about this but I think you know imitation is the sincerest form of flattery and I think would probably be glad to know that someone out there is hitting their advice. . Yeah. . Well, , I mean I think they put out this advice so that people like you will do things like this. . Can you give us an example of like <hes>? ? A typical sort of incident that's commonly handled through this platform and what the collaboration component looks like. . Right? ? Because I'm thinking what sort of collaboration do you really need outside the Salk? ? Why? ? Why do you need a you know an actual platform to handle that So what we've is that many of our customers not only have internal tailfin if it's small internal team, , I'm thinking they might have managed service provider that that gives them out of our support and depending on the nitrogen incident if something escalates and and there's people involved and there's conjecture about insider threats or other sensitive data coming out of the system, , you don't necessarily want all of that data to be available to everyone who's who's collaborating, , but you still need to have a tight look you need to be able to collaborate without much hassle so. . We've we've used I access control to enable collaboration. . Okay. . So this is this allows for the discussion of sensitive incidence because quite often. . In the case of a major incident, , people will spin up their own slack. . That's sort of the way that the. . Slack specific to that incident but this is more for the work. . Day. . Incidence. . The incidents of all shapes and sizes and can I say I very careful using slack for incident response it does still local copies of your information on every device that is logging into that channel. . So that is why to make sure your sensitive response dieters scattered around many many. . It's a good way to make sure your sensitive daughter is in as many places as humanly. . Possible. . Exactly, , and certainly, , those baynes among some instances of wears slack has slack as a useful vector for an attacker if you WANNA move laterally. . Maybe. . Having a rummage through someone's slack files is probably a good way to start getting ideas about. . Passwords or other things you could connect to yeah. . Yeah. . Yes I think slack for incident response is you know it's a default it's a default option people use because it's it's easy and it's got a nice user experience. . So the question we ask you what if you could take over the rig of a case management platform which sounds very serious. . But make it as easy to use as something like slack. . Do you actually have a chat function in the in the platform? ? Not really a chat function. . It looks a little more like like using a conversation in twitter old Lincoln it's more like a threat in that sense. . Yeah. . That makes a Lotta sense right? ? So it's Malaysia DMZ but everything would be cataloged logged and it's it's it's sort of like sounds a little bit more serious than slack but a little less serious than. . Help me out. . Then what? ? Out To. . Throw too many vandals under the bus. . But there there is some some shockers out there just just stuff like. . Why are you recording notes in notepad? ? All will case management system is is kind of awful. . I only use it once a day from force to.

Vaughn shanks ball Boskin Patrick Gray Sidhom Sama Bob chief executive Co founder
Vaughan Shanks Pitches the Cydarm Soc Incident Management Platform

Risky Business

05:03 min | 9 months ago

Vaughan Shanks Pitches the Cydarm Soc Incident Management Platform

"So it is a case management platform it's a web APP. It's typically deployed into a security operation center and it just helps you keep track of all of the activities that people working on. So this is like highs management software essentially for specifically for talk is that right? Exactly, it's case management for security operations. Okay. What sort of things do you use the software to do like about doing real deep deep dives on incidents because a lot of the time when we think of like response software, we think forensic. So whatever this isn't really that isn't no this is. An ailing people to collaborate better and a K pot of that. We noticed that often the way the white people do security operations using generic ticketing systems, and there are pine to us. They require extensive customization to do anything close to. What we would be regarded as best practice and You know the the data entry is often a complaint pine I'm so we've aimed to make an experience that's really easy to use and is already set up to security operations. I can sorry this is really designed to replace like Jira in the sock. Yes. We we do often generic atheist platforms and yet this is a big step up from that. Okay. In what sense right? So if I upgrade from a generic ticketing platform and I get myself side on what is getting me that those platforms I'm can't give me so. We have a built in workflow that is based off the computer security incident handling God from this. In fact, we steal all of our best moves from the computer security instant handling God. It's the best advice. We could find a way not to tell people how to do their job we just by us, but best practice as out as out benchmark Yep. So you steal the workflows and create some yeah krantz. Can Software? I haven't spoken to anyone about this but I think you know imitation is the sincerest form of flattery and I think would probably be glad to know that someone out there is hitting their advice. Yeah. Well, I mean I think they put out this advice so that people like you will do things like this. Can you give us an example of like A typical sort of incident that's commonly handled through this platform and what the collaboration component looks like. Right? Because I'm thinking what sort of collaboration do you really need outside the Salk? Why? Why do you need a you know an actual platform to handle that So what we've is that many of our customers not only have internal tailfin if it's small internal team, I'm thinking they might have managed service provider that that gives them out of our support and depending on the nitrogen incident if something escalates and and there's people involved and there's conjecture about insider threats or other sensitive data coming out of the system, you don't necessarily want all of that data to be available to everyone who's who's collaborating, but you still need to have a tight look you need to be able to collaborate without much hassle so. We've we've used I access control to enable collaboration. Okay. So this is this allows for the discussion of sensitive incidence because quite often. In the case of a major incident, people will spin up their own slack. That's sort of the way that the. Slack specific to that incident but this is more for the work. Day. Incidence. The incidents of all shapes and sizes and can I say I very careful using slack for incident response it does still local copies of your information on every device that is logging into that channel. So that is why to make sure your sensitive response dieters scattered around many many. It's a good way to make sure your sensitive daughter is in as many places as humanly. Possible. Exactly, and certainly, those baynes among some instances of wears slack has slack as a useful vector for an attacker if you WANNA move laterally. Maybe. Having a rummage through someone's slack files is probably a good way to start getting ideas about. Passwords or other things you could connect to yeah. Yeah. Yes I think slack for incident response is you know it's a default it's a default option people use because it's it's easy and it's got a nice user experience. So the question we ask you what if you could take over the rig of a case management platform which sounds very serious. But make it as easy to use as something like slack. Do you actually have a chat function in the in the platform? Not really a chat function. It looks a little more like like using a conversation in twitter old Lincoln it's more like a threat in that sense. Yeah. That makes a Lotta sense right? So it's Malaysia DMZ but everything would be cataloged logged and it's it's it's sort of like sounds a little bit more serious than slack but a little less serious than. Help me out. Then what? Out To. Throw too many vandals under the bus. But there there is some some shockers out there just just stuff like. Why are you recording notes in notepad? All will case management system is is kind of awful. I only use it once a day from force to.

Lincoln Salk Twitter Baynes Malaysia
How Philanthropic CEO Carmen Rojas Learned to Lead as Her Full Self

Latina to Latina

06:14 min | 10 months ago

How Philanthropic CEO Carmen Rojas Learned to Lead as Her Full Self

"What would you do? If you had millions of dollars at your fingertips let me clarify what would you do if your job was to take that money and spend it in ways that would make the world a better place that's the question that Carmen row house is confronted with every day. Carmen is the president and CEO of the Marguerite Casey Foundation. She stepped into the role justice cove nineteen hit, and this moment is inspiring big questions about generosity giving and the future of philanthropy. Permanent. Thank you so much for taking the time to do this. Oh thank you so much. I'm such a fan of you of your show and so I'm so glad to be here. I. Love When Interview Start That way? much of your career has focused on improving the life of working people across the country what about your own upbringing drew you to this work? My mom immigrated from Nicaragua and my dad immigrated from Venezuela they landed in San Francisco and the immigrated at this really weird moment and Hyman US history where it was the peak of the civil rights movement, the peak of the Labor movement, the peak of the feminist movement, and so my parents with middle school education's both from very rural places came to San Francisco and we're able to make lives for themselves in for us for their kids that were so far beyond the things that they could imagine. So my parents. For Middle School and I got a PhD from Berkeley I. Think a lot about how that time that my parents emigrated SOC shaped the opportunities that were available to me, and how from that moment to today we've seen that window of opportunities shut for the vast majority of people both immigrants people of Color. Native folks black people that this moment in time we were expected the squeeze the juice out of a grain of sand. And I looked around me and one. was exhausting to be one of the only women of the very few women of color one of dot of Latina's in rooms and just made it very. Sort of. Clear decision to really focus all of my energy on making sure that I'm not going to be the only one that I won't be the last generation of people that gets to benefit and enjoy from these moments in time and to try to figure out ways to create more moments in time for more of us to be better off. Growing up how was generosity displayed in your home? My mom is one of seventeen and my dad is one of ten. Seventeen all birthed by the same woman, all birth by the same woman. My mom was the first one of her siblings, the MIGRATES, united, States, and my dad was as well and so my mom tells these really amazing stories. Her siblings were sisters especially wanted to come to the United States. She would like work all day work most of the night, spend the nights like filling out immigration paperwork, taking them in for seventeen siblings and our house really became sort of a beacon I can't remember a time in my childhood where we didn't have other people living in our house. My Mom, my mom worked cleaning office buildings. She worked sewing clothes worked at last LEVI's factory in San Francisco, our? House? I feel like was what what I think is true philanthropy this desire to give this desire to open up. Some might think of yours but others think of hours so that so many more people can enjoy the ability to live lives of dignity. When did you first learn about philanthropy as a formal concept for disseminating help? Yeah. I was an Undergrad I. got this really interesting fellowship at this organization in San Francisco called the Green Lining Institute my summer project was to try to figure out in the state of California of all of these institutional donors how much of their money went to organizations led by people of Color and immigrants and it turned out these numbers haven't changed much but it's like less than five percent. and. So my job was to call us institutions to do the tally board and be like, okay, blessing one percent and it was really striking to me because philanthropy is one of those things that is benevolent and powerful we think about is inherently something good to give but we don't ever tell the back story like philanthropic institutions again, like my own are often built on twice stolen wealth wealth that's extracted from our economy on the one side and on the other side, won't that people aren't paying taxes into our social safety net into our government to actually try to resolve some of the instant issues that foundations are trying to solve. Once it became visible to me that these institutions existed that these people were giving money and that they were only giving money to sort of social service programs are to help people from the base of generosity. But these were actually shaping our political and economic experience. We can tie the rise of charter schools to philanthropy. We can tie the rise of privatizing public goods philanthropy wants it became visible to me. It was something that I couldn't unseen and I. Now am in a really interesting position because I in this moment the moment that the covert moment, the economic crisis moment, the social unrest moment. Has Really, invited me to think about philanthropy as this intermediary step

San Francisco United States President And Ceo Carmen Marguerite Casey Foundation Nicaragua Middle School California Hyman Berkeley Venezuela Green Lining Institute
"soc" Discussed on Cybersecurity Effectiveness Podcast

Cybersecurity Effectiveness Podcast

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"soc" Discussed on Cybersecurity Effectiveness Podcast

"Can we cut? A pinpoints the modular automation pieces, so if you if let's say if you start with something small, you have five playbook are workflows, and you identify that you're analysts. Do the same thing across all of them. You can make a modular automation for a certain task to let's say that task is just querying a lot of open source databases to determine you know what is the record on this entity, or whether that be an ip address, url or something like that, but that is a very mundane action that a lot of your analysts are going to do probably fifty times per day. So you know the ability to automate something very small like that very crucial for us also for US looking at whereas in in our position, we're working with over a hundred different agencies if I need to notify. All hundred agencies are more of a similar type of event than to be able to to have to do that in a manual fashion is like. Very. and. It's almost disrespectful to the time of my analysts so we looked at very modular in our workflow such as that type of. An automated those things I and so so automatically that allowed us to look at from a metric perspective. How is this improving? The efficiency of our analysts in that is Whereas it took US thirty minutes to notify all parties now take US light takes us about five seconds. You know so, that's. Yeah so. That's where the power of automation lives for US and not to say that. because a lot of times when people think about the automation, they think about like Oh. The robots are coming in our jobs are in jeopardy so it and it's not like that at all, and it's really just relieving the analyst from doing very mundane activities to now doing the things that require their brainpower, the reasons why we hired them in the first place. Yeah let it let us security analysts, security analysts, and not have to find out one hundred different contact emails, and things like that or spend spend hours researching something that can be automated very quickly. That's awesome that you guys are. Really, you know fine. Tuning the sock through through these tools and through automation absolutely. And I'll a lot of the things that we've done around that. Even with an Intel is like. We're operationalizing our cyber threat intelligence right so in betting in into the incident life cycle, so not only. Do you just get Intel on the front end, but you'd get it throughout the cycle as well so where until his able to contact to an incident, so then you are able. Our analysts aren't than to maybe change the trajectory of how they were analyzing a specific type of incident. You know based on the intelligence that's coming down the path as doing their investigation, so those are some of the things that we think about when we consider quote, unquote, true ops, and you know really meshing together the the workbench of intelligence, security operations and any type of incident response. Clearly, you're on the. The the level of maturity when it comes to socks today, I mean what you're doing. Today is what I've heard. A lot of socks say they'd like to achieve at some point whether it's public sector, private sector and quite honestly even private sector I haven't seen the threat intelligence immigration that you're speaking of leverage with the automation as well as you've laid it out so Kudos to you and your team for being able to pull that off at such an awesome awesome endeavor. As, we wrap up here..

US Intel analyst
"soc" Discussed on Cybersecurity Effectiveness Podcast

Cybersecurity Effectiveness Podcast

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"soc" Discussed on Cybersecurity Effectiveness Podcast

"Let's, let's say like. Someone to compare ourselves with if it's other cities, etc, but from a local state federal perspective, we have really strong relationships throughout in a lot of that is is managed by not only our executive team, but also within our intelligence team. No that makes a lot of sense. There's there's definitely a need for the soft side skills right when you're doing this. Not just the technical bits to keep those lines of Communications Open A. How often does somebody in your role communicate with? Deputy SOS from other big cities and I know what that it'd be like Los Angeles Chicago Dallas. What what have you is is that? Is there like a monthly consortium as their? You know email list. How how do you guys other sort of abreast of what's happening? We kind of manage that through our Intel channels. Now at at executive level, just from like WC source see so to see so perspective I would say that it happens, but it's not. On like a cadence and maybe that's something that should occurs or annual like previously there was like one hundred resilient cities, and there was good stuff that was coming out of that organization where they brought together. A lot of the different municipalities in was able to talk through. Not only you know how what people are dealing with from a threat perspective, but just some of the. Organizational struggles and I know a lot of people look to New York. City to ask us. How did we come up with this charter? Get to a point where we have an executive order. That's backing what we do, you know so. While the cities are very similar, because we're all municipalities and facing a lot of the same challenges are makeup is fairly different. Yeah yeah, absolutely and I would think that you know every major city, but every large city compared to a smaller city, different resources, different approaches tactics as well, but definitely new. York, city would be one of the tips of the spears I think for sure so that's great to hear that there's that level of communication happening. Let's let's switch gears a little and kind of go back to sock operations and these days it's hard to say that word sock operations out saying autonation at least within three or four words of saying that. We know it's really changing our industry right now, How do you in New York City our you using you know automation orchestration, and some of these new new approaches, or maybe aren't that new, but newer approaches to cyber security to help your responders. Sure great question and and kind of going back to that that study that I mentioned earlier I read another stat on automation, and it was about How only fifty three percent asakusa rarely update their play books, and that can be you know just very manual written playbook Laura from A. Perspective, but the way we look at that as our play books are living in. and. They're going to continue to operate. As we mature so from automation orchestration perspective I would say that as I mentioned earlier. We kinda look at as we developed all of our playbook. Where can a lot of these the automated, and even if it's not into any type of automation,.

executive New York New York City A. Perspective Intel Los Angeles Dallas Laura
"soc" Discussed on Cybersecurity Effectiveness Podcast

Cybersecurity Effectiveness Podcast

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"soc" Discussed on Cybersecurity Effectiveness Podcast

"So another piece of that puzzle is as metrics right so one of a recent study that I read was that forty two percent of socks don't measure instant response metrics and I just feel as though you can't grow what you don't measure. And how do you look to improve the effectiveness efficiency efficacy of your program of your people, etc, if you are not identifying where you are so metrics is hugely hugely important to us and another thing that we focus on pretty heavily building in context in this is both from a technology perspective, but also from a business perspective, and what that actually means to was is how can you build in context of? Let's say you know. You're using a data lake or a similar tool with Sarah but there's a lot of information about your environment that you know that can be built in to then allow your analysts to have more. More. Insight to be able to make faster and better informed decisions right so let's say if it's about host you can build that context and to say that this host belongs to this user in this user is in this area, and maybe this is a high end user group so that context allows your analyst to just better decisions based on information that they now have at their fingertips as soon as they're triaging an incident. Yeah, go ahead. Yeah. I was just going to jump in there for a minute. So I was I was down at an infra guard New York Metro meeting a few years ago, and all the buzz at that point was fusion centers and the communication between city and state and federal government and the disparate intelligence agencies in this and that. Is that we're in. This was a few years ago a. how is that communication now between the city and state and federal? Is it where you want it to be is is going in all directions is still a bit of a struggle. I've I've heard different things from from different You know different departments and organizations, and and but what's it like for? New York City. Yeah great question I would say that our communication channels are very strong and I think that's all based on relationships, so I think when you ask someone that question will vary based on the organization, and the relationships therein so we were very adamant about building those relationships in those partnerships early on because we're only as good as obviously our own program, but you the partners that we have in who we can call on whether that's from an intelligence perspective, sharing perspective, or just you know getting a pulse on where others are being able to use them as somewhat of.

analyst New York City Sarah New York
"soc" Discussed on Cybersecurity Effectiveness Podcast

Cybersecurity Effectiveness Podcast

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"soc" Discussed on Cybersecurity Effectiveness Podcast

"HOW ARE WE SPEEDING OUR EFFICIENCIES? How are we enhancing our Incident Life Cycle? How are we developing our playbook? That is being managed bars ETA 'em in their supporting all of the different groups in and making sure that happens. I see I see very interesting, you know. Whenever I hear hear this and you know all these moving parts put together I always think of the the actual sock and the men and women that are that are in that sock. You Know Day to day. Security operations teams they're they're engaged in this. This constant struggle to keep up with the the volume of security alerts and managing the incident response process, and there's just always this this you know Juggling Act if you will what are some of the best practices for creating a highly efficient and effective sock That's you know to to address this. You know this issue of volume and velocity and vigour of these different attacks. Yeah, great question, and I think a lot of security operations I mean this is not a new thing. Right? sox have been around for many many years but in my experience and what I've been seeing in the industry is that? They're not fully operationalized in and I think we. We talk about something internally. Trump's and When I came into the organization I really looked at where we were in Kinda came up with this three year roadmap and we're in year two now. so I think there's a few key strategies one assessing your current state really setting a maturity goal in in I think maturity. Go can be something that is 10x right We try to think very big, so one of our goals is to. Establish the city's incident response as among the highest performing in the industry by twenty twenty one and you know allowed people might say like okay. Good luck. You know but that's the way we're thinking about it. So all of the programs that were building how we work on iterating on our processes how we work on the -veloping our workflows is all in support of achieving that goal so I think assessing your current state. State setting the maturity goal, really developing your use cases because you can't boil the ocean Um you have to start with some finite use. Cases really developing your playbook in. I think we really looked at our play books as we wanted to define every predictable scenario, and we really took the time to game. Those and we wanted to determine also like which of these can be on it to some degree. so we find that automation is very important in our in our organization, but at the same time it's not achievable end to end for every situation so orchestration is also something that we depend on quite heavily because you might want to automate five steps in your workflow, and then maybe just orchestrate the rest. because often times not all the time depending on the business process. Are you able to automate the whole thing so?.

Trump twenty twenty
"soc" Discussed on Cybersecurity Effectiveness Podcast

Cybersecurity Effectiveness Podcast

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"soc" Discussed on Cybersecurity Effectiveness Podcast

"So I think that's what I've been spending a lot of time thinking about and coming up with some type of models that we can really provide to other municipalities to follow to Kinda lighten the load, and and being that. We're putting so much effort into doing this I don't think everyone else needs to start from scratch. Yeah Yeah. It's great to look to. The city of New York, who obviously has a You know the issues that pretty much every major city would have, and probably some that some cities don't but look to look to you guys as a leader in the space, and now I've spoken to people on the federal side as well, and it's interesting about cyber, because as you mentioned cyber kind of. Of its own thing, but at the same time it touches almost every other aspect either a large percentage or a small percentage, but it touches almost every other aspect that you have to concern yourself with when it comes to you know physical security and ports and everything else so You know it's it's from from my perspective. I'd love to hear more about. New York City's threatened management program a you oversee this as your role as as deputy see so, but you know, tell us a little bit more about the how the entire threat management program works, and and how you deal with these cases where it's, it's not just cybersecurity you're. You're thinking about cyber and its intersection with physical and so many other aspects, absolutely and I think I always say that. It's like I work for over one hundred different companies. Because you know there's over one hundred agencies throughout this city that we provide the service for so it's it sounds wonderful and horrible all at once. Absolutely so a little bit about that the right management program within it. We have four pillars. We have our security operations center, which is your traditional twenty four seven eyes on glass, doing monitoring, triaging some form of detection and response. and that team is the epicenter of everything that we do right, so they're. The ones are constant droughts, and all of our agency communications flow to our security operations center, etc, then you have our computer emergency response team, and that is somewhat of your tier three team highly skilled responders were analysts forensic specialists. ETC and we're working on. From response efforts to working with the different teams within New York cybercrime in our technology, our security sciences to really enhance the security posture of the organization, and for the city in general and Darlie, we have our cyber threat intelligence team, which pretty much focuses on two arms, one strategic tow, and the other more operational tactical intelligence, and we're working on a myriad of. Of Different intelligence products that were disseminating to agencies also using C.. T I to enhance the incident life cycle with within our security operations center in our Sur analysts so Intel is really backed in driven our incident response processes driven by our intelligence, and then lastly, but not leases our counterpart Automation Team C.. Ta, and that team is really focus on. Pretty much enabling our mission, so they are somewhat of the glue for the rest of their management's. Whereas they're embedding themselves in into these other three pillars to really understand the workflows to identify where automation can occur, were orchestration can occur in how everything can be integrated so when you think about..

New York City Intel New York Darlie
"soc" Discussed on Cybersecurity Effectiveness Podcast

Cybersecurity Effectiveness Podcast

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"soc" Discussed on Cybersecurity Effectiveness Podcast

"For security. The help you manage measure, improve and communicate security effortless. Host Brian Contests, and we've got a really special yesterday. Joining me is key essence Phillips welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you for having me Brian. So I've got a lot of questions that I want to get to you. You have a really interesting role but before I do. Could you give us a little bit of information about your background and and kind of what got you? You interested in cybersecurity originally sure things so I would say I've been in the industry for about twelve years most of my time spent in private sector so I started my career with the Federal Reserve Bank of New York working on a variety of teams there everything from event detection to incident response some threat intelligence shortly after my time at the. The Fed I moved on to work with a startup providing threat intelligence for financial sector That company was called looking glass I, then worked for about four years and Barclays POC working on the US incident response team leading that effort, and then that landed me here, at a New York City suburb command, and I've always been interested in security probably since my. My later years in university, I've always been driven by root cause analysis, so I initially wanted to be a computer engineer. moved over to software, thought like it would be a really interesting merger. If you will to learn about like really reverse engineering with this cybersecurity thing was very early on, and I think I found my sweet spot so I've been here ever since. Robots awesome. What a what a tastic background and I WANNA talk about your current role because it. It doesn't sound like you'd get any sleep in this role, which is your leading the threat management group for the city of New York what? What's that role? Entail it just. It just sounds like one of those roles that like you're always in the middle of one hundred things. Yeah I think that is accurate. I think we're doing so much for the city and being that. We're very young organization. We're only just over two years old so when I joined this organization We started from nothing right so. So New York City the way cybersecurity was done. Originally, it was very decentralized so our charge was basically to bring all of these centrally in spearhead security from one organization and that is a very high level description of what we're doing but a lot of the things that I think about in this role is. How are we properly preparing ourselves for? For any type of incident response like what is our role in readiness and preparedness always I spent a lot of time thinking about not only the operations of our program, growing our program with shoring it, but then also, how are we building somewhat of a blueprint for other municipalities to follow so definitely go into our role in that dynamic in all the teams with. With Threat Management but a lot of the things that I think about for sure is around like. How do we assess security inputs into emergency preparedness? Because if you think about New York City, emergency management, they do with every different scenario that you could possibly think of odd that would affect our residents and cyber security is an input into almost every.

New York City Brian Contests Federal Reserve Bank of New Yo Threat Management Phillips Barclays US engineer.
"soc" Discussed on Chicks in the Office

Chicks in the Office

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"soc" Discussed on Chicks in the Office

"The beginning of the show. Let us know what you WanNa hear about some topics. Tv shows movies. Let us know we'll recap it all? We hope you have a fantastic week. Stay safe out there. And we'll talk to you guys on Thursday salutes. Soon SOC- Four SOC- burs do Sure scope.

SOC- Four SOC
Tobias Wolff: This Boys Life

Bookworm

11:00 min | 1 year ago

Tobias Wolff: This Boys Life

"This show began over thirty years ago and one of the first books that was on. This show was a book. A memoir called this boy's life. It's by my guest Tobias Wolff now the original publisher Grove has published a thirtieth anniversary edition of this boy's life. I'll tell you if you do a book show and I know you don't you. Don't get to re read the books that you read thirty years ago and so I re- read this boy's life. It's better than I remembered it even originally and I loved it originally. Tell me. Did you ever expect that your hands would be dirty? Buy this book again. Oh you never know what to expect with With a book what sort of life. It will have When you finish a book you're pretty much thinking then about the next book Elliott has a wonderful line in the four quartets. He says For us there is only the trying the rest is not our business and it it that something that Iraq had better take to heart. Will this always life? It's one of the first memoirs in this huge movement which restored memoir to respect ability. But also although you insist on its factuality it stands at the beginning of what becomes the train of auto fiction people who are writing about their lives as honestly as possible. The question is what about? The structure of the book. Turns it into readable fiction then as I was reading this boy's life what I saw again and again in each chapter was that you'd structured the events around crises and capitulation 's that allowed the book to make its way from beginning to end without seeming like a memoir seeming instead as if life itself the thing we hope is an adventure But this boy's life sees him through his mother's divorce his first and terrifying stepfather his escape from home to a prep school. He is thoroughly unprepared for and in the process allows US SOC- what goes the making of a writer's life pretty good for someone who really was at the start of a career. It was one of those books that I almost didn't choose to right at that. Sounds mystical and and and writers should avoid mystical language about their about their projects in their process but It it always seemed to me a a genre to be avoided the memoir and even though I loved some memoirs Mary McCarthy's memories of the Catholic girlhood is a great favourite of mine. Loves NABOKOV SPEAK MEMORY AND My own brothers Duke of deception. Which in fact was yet another reason. I thought that this was something that I wasn't going to do. I thought go get my family's been covered in this way so it really hadn't because my brother grew up with my father continente way from my experience growing up with my mother and we rarely saw each other but No I was Sort of in some strange way dragged kicking and screaming into the writing of this book but once I got started and and I don't mean by anybody else I mean by inner promptings But once I got started I threw everything else. Aside I found myself caught up in these memories and I suppose like many writers I tend to remember the past in terms of stories. I've told stories about my past. And there's no doubt that without my meaning to the shaping of a memory and two story involves SOM editing that that I'm even unaware of And but these-these. This is what happened this noise life was your entrance into my permanent memory. Not only that it have unforgettable beautiful cover still does. They've kept this cover But somehow or other the care with the writing is something different from the care with a story and sentence by sentence. There's so much betrayal of the care being taken this no show of stuff. It's very carefully done but not artfully done. You're concerned with the pains of this boy's life. Because Boys Life. The magazine that was for scouts was telling about every boy's life and now we were going to hear about this boy's life now too biased. Wolf can you remember at all about talking about this book on Bookworm years ago? Oh I remember talking with you about it I don't remember exactly what we talked about though. Yeah I would I loved was just as I recognized. Jewison Reiner you recognize me as a reader and subsequently you would sign your books to my best reader and I was saw flattered and honored by that and I think I want to talk to you about the relation between writers and readers because over these years between the people who've read the book and the People who've seen the movie that is very loosely based on the book There are people in the world who think they know you? How do you feel about that? I especially feel uncomfortable about it when When they think they know me because of the movie. Okay like I've had people come up to me and say Y I I read your book. And how did you know so much about your mother? Sex Life and I try to be polite but there's nothing in in the book that would lead them to ask that question. That would have been in the movie. Which as you say is very loosely adapted readers people who are readers They understand understate. You know look they understand that. We shared difficult experiences that And that's why they would read a book like this and finish it and so the kinds of conversations I have with people read it. Have been actually very gratifying to me. Often they'll say I had a you know. I had a young boy in my class. Who really seemed to be going off the rails and I gave him your book and it seemed to mean a lot to him. He felt like he had some company in the world. And that didn't have to go badly. And you know if somebody says something like that to me. It just lifts my heart and gives me fuel for the work ahead so I on the whole. I'm I'm very grateful for the way in which people respond to this book. I'M TALKING TO BIAS. Wolf on the thirtieth anniversary of his memoir. This boy's life a book that I had the pleasure to go back and reread. And you know. It's such a detailed book that on my first reading. I didn't realize how haunting it is in Hemingway's Nick Adams stories. We remember phrases. That are unforgettable. You specifically rejected. It seems to me that kind of writing for writing. That's much more detailed and to the point of the places you lived so there's a town up north called concrete. Yes that's where I went to high school. I didn't actually live concrete. Was the metropolis if you will. Where I went to high school. I lived in a little village. About thirty five miles up the Skagit River from concrete And we took the school bus down every morning and back home at night through this wind e dangerous road And and that was but that was the name of the the town where I went to Crete. High-school hundred high school scribes the dust. The cement plant left a pall of dust on everything. Sometimes it would be so thick in the air that they would have to cancel football practice and because they didn't have any concept of people wearing masks or anything but all the cars were all eaten by the lime in the cement dust and I mean it was. It was a company town The Lone Star Cement Company pretty much owned it And now the since the cement plant is closed. I've been back I went back. In fact during the filming of this and and now they errors pristine and they're these beautiful cascade mountains in the background and it's kind of a destination now for fishermen and stuff like that but it was rather squalid company town when I went to high school

Wolf Tobias Wolff Skagit River Iraq Nabokov Publisher Jewison Reiner Grove Elliott The Lone Star Cement Company Mary Mccarthy Writer Football Crete Bookworm Hemingway Nick Adams
Behind the Assassination of Yitzhak Rabin

People of the Pod

13:46 min | 1 year ago

Behind the Assassination of Yitzhak Rabin

"The nineteen ninety five assassination of prime minister. Yitzhak Rabin was a cataclysmic event in Israeli history it was the first nail in the coffin of the peace movement that Rabin himself had helped birth Israeli security forces had always. He's assumed that threats to the prime minister would come from Israel's foreign enemies like Iran or Syria or from Palestinians. The the idea that a Jewish person would murder. The prime minister was inconceivable. Almost until the moment that Yigal Amir pulled the trigger. I'm your was then a twenty five year old law student at Bar Ilan University and he decided to throw his promising life away in order to kill a prime minister stor who he feared was ruining Israel by contemplating giving land to Palestinians now twenty five years later Israeli filmmaker. Tehran Silberman has created a moving thrilling dramatic recreation of those awful days leading up to the assassination with his film. Incitement incitement won the twenty nineteen. Oh Fear Prize for best picture. Israel's equivalent of the Academy Awards and is now playing in limited release here in the United States. Your own joins us now to talk about the movie and share his perspective on the State of politics and extremism in Israel. You're on thank you so much for joining us my pleasure. Thank you say now before we dive in. I just want to tell you when I found out that this interview is a possibility. I decided decided I would go and see the show and I went with my best friend last week. Alex and I went. We saw the movie. It was beautiful it was haunting it was powerful and then my sister Mr. My older sister found out that I had gone and she was furious at me. I said I don't understand why you would go. You wouldn't tell me okay fine. She has a point I get it and she says don't worry about it. I'll go with a friend and so she goes to the movie on Saturday night and I get this tax from her movies about to start but look who's sitting like to rose rose up and it's a picture of President Bill Clinton and Secretary Hillary Clinton preparing to enjoy the film. And then I found out that Bill Clinton spoke afterwards words and so she doesn't get to be mad anymore. That's like you will your own like I said you've made a beautiful haunting powerful powerful film and I hope our listeners will seek it out in their home cities. We're not going to spoil anything about the movie because it hues very very closely to real world events but I wanted to dive deep into some of the choices that you made when you were creating and I want to start with the name of the movie which in English is incitement and in Hebrew Hebrew is Yamile Neuro team which refers to its base. And that's basically the Hebrew way of saying high holidays like Russia on Yom Kippur but literally it means those awful days and I was wondering what went into those two names of the movie. Okay so I. I met title that I gave the movie. Career Group humanoid him the reason being because yeah. It's a double play. A on those dates were really really terrible. Days for spectrums of political ideas and all sectors of the Israeli society. Such as you know you have the bombs on one hand the explosions and you have of course this nation nations which is a terrible traumatic events. So these were horrible days at the same time as you said rightfully so that it's the holidays elites which means these days. And they all four days of atonement days of soul-searching days of asking for forgiveness. And and I think the movie is also so much about that making you know for the society and all about their involved in all over the world metairie worth SOC- nation deal society under in extreme tension that the violence erupts. It's about soul-searching would do wrong. We have stopped it and does does. Of course we're involved in actual actions that led to the events. So that's why you had the other meaning. That was so important in English. Rush there is no double meaning to these words translation so anti choose and you want and I thought about you know what would be the right one and I wanted something again will encompass an important issue because I find this nation to ignite something very important discourse important conversation within society especially especially these days and all over the world and I felt incitement captured that essence of you know at the end of the day that for the film rights to show how the you know working of that and how hopefully in the future will be better citizens and now the movie follows Eagle Amir Era Rabin's assassin in the year or so leading up to the murder. Although it doesn't actually reveal the name of the character of the murder I think e Gol Amir's name is I said probably ten or twenty minutes into the film but it shows his romantic challenges. It shows the Anti Mizraki racism. That he he faced as a Yemenite Israeli. It shows his tough ideological mother in some respects. It seems to indicate that he was incited not only by politicians and by rabbis but also by his circumstances and one thing that I was wondering is whether the movie is too sympathetic toward him. Well it's got the door because at the end of the day saination and them and somebody who kills a prime minister that was pushing for peace peace between the two people that were in the whole styling Stephen Hall style relationships and therefore somebody who kills somebody and fight for peace. I think has to be a you know not somebody at the end of the day that you root for or for him at or however hey I I did want to tell a true story on his story about that person. I mean not about him. The stories about robbings summation but through the eyes of the fifth. And why. Don't you describe guessing. On a psychological level psychological thriller genre that they see. This movie belongs to then you have to tell all sides and these aside we then I discovered during the research so I want to tell the story in more rounded way so that we can look you you know into the eyes of their be as we say and get as much insight out of the story that you know that truthfulness will will bring about. So that's why I went with all the ways the first to say. Oh I'm not going to be a girlfriend that they were you know going through a journey tour getting married. You know because if I'm not telling that I'm not showing one asking. Do you know how this relationship ended. And I'M NOT GONNA say for not to sport it that there is a wave rape and and that has to do his temperament after and behavior also right. It affects him complete. I have to be both on otherwise wants to be here. So much of the drama in the movie comes from these small moments between Amir and his girlfriend between Amir and his mother or especially between when his father. How much of those quiet dialogues with his personal dialogues? Were you able to reconstruct based on interviews and research as opposed to you know. What did you kind? You have to simply imagine where leads the nation because the events themselves are oil based on research and words and auster researching for several years reading everything that he had to say that the setting Corp investigation in the national inquiry. I gotTA handles awake. Speaks speaks and logic and demeanor and I use debt extended that into these particular conversation. I was present but all these answers all the dot. Hello he's actually part of language and large so the answer is the combination rabbi's in many ways are some of the bad guys of the film and Rabbinic texts these kind of fundamental rabbinic texts. That underpins so much of Judaism today are shown as like these Arcane Arcane manuscripts that give a mere kind of pseudo moral backing my monetize the Rambam he turns to him in order to justify killing killing robbing. And it's true that extremists often find support in fundamentalist interpretations of Rabbinic tax of religious tax. Not only in Judaism and I and Islam and Christianity. I'm wondering what you think about that characterization and I'm also wondering if you think that the political left in Israel could benefit politically Kalihi from a greater fluency in those tax integrator embrace of a Jewish religion slanted more in their favor whether they could do that without compromising on those values and whether that might bolster the moral ground that they stand on okay so you you asked two questions and each one of them as you know many many answers but there are complex questions. But I'll try to address whatever it can within the time to have so first about read by you. Know I'd be definitely are already rabbis. Of course in Israel that would be a complete misleading. I'm showing rabbi. That are Meinie From the Herliman. You know The West Bank rabbis rabbis of settlements of leading settlements. And and I think that that proclaim the true story here and I'm not saying that everybody because that would be wrong of me but too many you know too many to inference nation. That was too many and yes. They use the scripture and there was a conversation about this book because Scripture Blight to robbing the nation and I think it was a huge mistake. Terrible mistake between cited for this nation. So I'm standing guided and yeah most showing Footage you know and you see what people say and it's only two single version but I wouldn't say the generalized that about all the religious population death not or read by that would be uncertain to say and wrong. So that's on that level but I do you know still still be a very very critical of many many rabbis that incited now and for your second question about whether the left should know more jails to know that many many figures the leading figures in the left on the left side of very well versed with religious scripture and everything thing religious. So it's not that they're not I I'll give you one example. She's norger like with with the booby. Shulamit Aloni name. She needs to be a prominent person and left founder of the Merits Party Foreign Minister of Education exactly and she thinks there and she says already in Austin boggles to massacre curse she goes on TV in the movie and see that the guy when she says that whoever listen carefully to the cold was poking on route shave our to the a settlement radio channel and wherever listen to you know we're rabbi said you did it was coming so she knew and she says she she referred to it because she knew that she knew and also if you stick store knowledge of religious scripture matters La La more thanks art is huge and deep. So it's not just a mess you know doesn't know they know going to help you in any way because I don't think that's viewed the argument. The argument liberal say that religious. Some tastic but that's individuals business and it should not affect the state uh-huh and also that these were is democratic Jewish state yes but democratic before everything else. That's what libro would say to you so I don't think there's an issue with the religion issue between left and religion. You're on let me just close with one final question. Incitements or habitat in. Hebrew has become a kind of buzzword in Israel today anytime any politician criticizes and other. It's hustle tides incitement. Whether they're coming from the left or the right you know you see you see the prime minister you see his opponents. Everyone is accusing everyone of inciting everyone else. What is this movie half to say about incitement extremism and the state of politics in Israel today? Well I think that the scores in many many cases you need sweat today on this level of politicians and also just leader etc crossed crossed a line where followers of the person that says that stuff. Could you know use particular words and inflict extreme violent one other person or group and I think that's where we are he's and you've seen time and again especially near elections near you know important events that happened politically. So Yeah I think we cross the line I think you see that also in the United States with Donald Trump and at the end of the day it's terrible and should be stopped but that doesn't you mean we can criticize in protest at all being critically super important for good citizenship and for society to progress and also You know again proteins. Issue's important tool of society as long as you do it without inciting to violence. That's the limit and I think that people cross the line urine. Thank you for making making this beautiful movie. Congratulations on the awards and on its run here in America and good luck on all your future endeavors. Thank you so much. Thank you so much. I appreciate this conversation patient.

Israel Prime Minister Yigal Amir Eagle Amir Era Rabin Murder United States Bill Clinton Bar Ilan University Academy Awards Tehran Silberman Shulamit Aloni Syria Mr. My Alex Donald Trump Secretary Hillary Clinton Russia Stephen Hall America Iran
Venezuela in crisis

Correspondents Report

04:56 min | 2 years ago

Venezuela in crisis

"Venezuela is a country in freefall as economic mismanagement an international sanctions. Combine to create desperately difficult times for its citizens as global debate centers, on who's to blame successive, socialist governments or countries like the US, who are putting the squeeze on the government of nNcholas Maduro, people are struggling for basics like food and medicine. US correspondent Zoe Daniel has recently returned from Venezuela as gentlest Venezuela is not an easy country to work in media vases, difficult to get and even with them in hand report is closely monitored by the authorities and government backed armed groups called collective owes rooms need to be checked for bugs sensitive interviews must be discussed in hushed tons movements should not be telegraphed and should never happen after dark time spent in each location needs to be limited violent crime is also close to the w-. I in the world and much of the story that needs to be told is in the slums, or barrios, where poverty hunger and disparition exacerbates that risk. There are also the gangs who trade in drugs, and ruled the roost in recent months, escalating political tensions have added the risk of protest rallies, turning violent clashes between opposition activists and government troops and proxies, all of this means that the stories of ordinary Venezuelans are infrequently told but when you give them the chance this sentiments a clear. Something by women and men young and old have to realize the critical situation, the country, is going through these days, hunger, misery, repression and unemployment. We spent a week in the slums of Caracas and surrounds talking to people about life and politics. Well, I. Research says that nine out of ten people in Venezuela, count afford enough food, because of hyperinflation, which is rented the local currency almost valueless government food parcels that handed out monthly a dwindling. Sometimes now, they come only every second or third month, and they're often missing case applies like milk. There's widespread frustration and people are starting to voice it. Even with the risk of recriminations, Ropeway sediment Settimio, nothing seems to improve it all gets worse. So I think they should be change to give the opportunity for someone else to rule the situation has created a window of opportunity for opposition later. One guy who was backed by the US, and ustralia among dozens of other countries when he declared himself president after twenty eighteen elections that are widely condemned as flawed, although you get the sense that it's a case of right place. Right. Time rather than one guy DOE, having specifically captured the public imagination ROY Innis weather. It's not just a problem for Venezuela, what the international community has done so far is very important. The recognition of our constitution and of me as interim president Australia did that to what's important. Now is to keep the pressure up the dictatorship won't voluntarily leave. And fortunately them enduro government wouldn't respond to the concerns raised by those who can't get enough food or medicine at a time when political division globally runs deep Venezuela's, plied attracts, at a response almost all of the Venezuelans that I've encountered blame the economic collapse, on mismanagement by successive governments who've nationalized, assets, subsidized goods and services failed to manage the country's oil revenues and allowed endemic, cronyism and corruption. They don't always mention soc. Realism specifically many still harked back formerly to the days of logistics, under, former president Hugo Chavez. But for many observers Venezuela's become a symbol of the broader failure of the socialist model, that's gained particular traction as lift and right retreat to their corners, the world over. However, defenders of socialism, attack outside nations for interfering in Venezuela, particularly the United States, which is imposed harsh sanctions and an embargo on oil Russia, China and Cuba continue to back the Madero administration. And that's a K driver of US involvement. The big picture issues, but for ordinary Venezuelans who've seen they country go from the richest in Latin America to a basket case they just want something to change, so they can feed their families, but from Caracas that's North American correspondent, Zoe Daniel.

Venezuela United States Caracas Zoe Daniel President Trump Nncholas Maduro Roy Innis Interim President Hugo Chavez Madero Administration Latin America I. Research Australia Cronyism Cuba Russia China Milk
Apple might make its own modem chips to get to a 5G iPhone

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:47 min | 2 years ago

Apple might make its own modem chips to get to a 5G iPhone

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by aqua. The open source digital experience company. Brands, often struggled to find a comprehensive solution to power their drubel websites and applications aqueous platform enables you to build operate in optimize at scale as the open source leader. Aqua gives customers around the world the freedom to build tomorrow on their terms. Learn more aqua dot com and back. Click share with click. Sharon, your meeting, you can share your scream instantly from any device, click share instantly projects any speakers laptop, tablet or phone unto a presentation screen. So everyone can work together. Share their ideas and create something great. That's the click share effect. Visit click share free trial dot com to learn more and sign up for your free trial. I'm gonna talk about chips and modems and stuff, and it's gonna sound really hard core. But the point is when is apple going to have a five G foam? Right. Interesting from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Ali would. Last week while com and apple settled their big legal battle over royalty payments, and they signed a multi year agreement for apple to use Qualcomm, five G, wireless chips or modems in its phones before that apple was gonna use five G modems from Intel. But Intel was having trouble delivering an earlier this month Intel got out of the mobile, five G business altogether. So apple is a little delayed in putting out of five G phone, and now might be feeling a little too reliant on Qualcomm. So despite that deal to use Qualcomm chips analysts think apple might also start to build its own five G modems, the company already makes its own processors and recently, it's been making moves that suggest it's ready to build the whole bear on shell SOG is an analyst at more insights and strategy. He says this story all starts in San Diego. The actual gears have been emotion for at least twelve twelve months late last year. They announced they were going to be hiring thousand people and San Diego. Making their own office down here. We should point out here that San Diego is where Qualcomm is currently located. Yes. And not just Qualcomm, but all their their vendors and their suppliers and their competitors as well. And I think that you know, San Diego's definitely a wireless town now new there's MediaTek is here wall ways here an Intel as you're actually so I think apple is going to try and poach from the best of everybody. What would be the advantage for apple and making its own modems in addition to making its own processors. Well, first of all you can save money, which I love to do. But also, you know, in terms of user experience in product improvement having a modem integrated into the SOC like Qualcomm is doing with their Snapdragon chips reduces power allows you to tighten the integration even more. Because now you can custom build every comp-. Coenen for what you wanna do to optimize for power performance and battery life, so as a result, you know, if if and when I don't think it's I think it's more when apple builds their own modems, you know, it's a question of whether or not they can reach quad comes level of wireless, you know, performance. But I think you know, it will definitely result in better battery life. What's the biggest challenge to apple creating its own modem? I think the biggest challenge is going to be working around existing patents mostly held by Qualcomm. Yep. Qualcomm 's Ericsson's Nokia's patents because they licensed those patents to everyone. But the other thing is just wireless is really hard and building a modem that is both low power and high performance is incredibly difficult as into has shown what are the odds? Are there any odds that apple? Might just go ahead and acquire Intel I'm kind of curious about Intel's future. Like if apple just wanted to sort of jump start its its activities, they're apple won't acquire Intel. But I do believe they will acquire their modem business. I think there's two ways that they can accomplish that one is that they let, you know be shut down and they acquire their IP in higher away the people they want or they can just buy it from Intel and and not wait for them to shut down the division. But in my view of the strategy. I always saw apple querying Intel's modem business once they became their sole product, you know, purchaser on Chelsea is an analyst at more insights and strategy. A report this weekend says apple poached Intel's top five G modem developer just a few weeks before the Qualcomm deal. And now for some related links as you heard on shell SOG say wireless is hard. So even if apple throws a bunch of money at five G modems and hires away, the top talent, it might still need Intel's modem business. And according to a report Friday, the company has already been in touch with Intel about a potential acquisition. The Wall Street Journal reported that the talks stalled right before the deal with Qualcomm. But that Intel might be looking to sell the modem business. No matter what the report also suggested that as I phone and smartphone sales generally have started to taper off apple might be more interested than usual in big dramatic acquisitions, which I don't know people. Never get tired of saying that about apple J P Morgan made a list in February and suggested potential targets ranging from Netflix to activision blizzard two Sonos. Yeah, I'd like to buy all those too. But not for nothing. Apple reports earnings today after the bell and the iphone is jus-. Not the star of that show anymore. Diversification is coming. I'm Elliot, and that's marketplace tech. This is APN. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by click share, an award-winning wireless presentation system with click share, and you're meeting, you can share your screen instantly from any device. No more awkward small talk or wasted time as you wait. For tech problems to be fixed. Click share instantly projects any speakers laptop, tablet or phone onto a presentation screen. So everyone can work together. Share their ideas and create something great. That's the click share effect. Visit click sheriff retrial dot com to learn more and sign up for your free trial.

Apple Qualcomm Intel San Diego Aqua Analyst Sharon ALI Mediatek The Wall Street Journal Elliot J P Morgan Nokia Netflix Ericsson Chelsea
LA Galaxy II fall 2-0 on the road to San Antonio FC

Joe Pags

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

LA Galaxy II fall 2-0 on the road to San Antonio FC

"Saturday's win overly galaxy to marked a big moment for San Antonio FC. Striker Bradford Jamieson twenty two year old galaxy homegrown product netted his second goal in his many games in an eventual victory for the home side. James new scored ten goals in fifty six matches galaxy to help AFC improved two to three and one on the season and climb to eleventh in the Western Conference table San Antonio's on the road Saturday away at real monarchs SOC before returning home Friday, April twenty six to meet Tacoma

San Antonio Fc Bradford Jamieson San Antonio Tacoma AFC James Twenty Two Year
"soc" Discussed on Dispositivo Sonoro

Dispositivo Sonoro

06:03 min | 3 years ago

"soc" Discussed on Dispositivo Sonoro

"Too, as in Jesus Kajiya precision occasional book, nice color map to get Royal chief while mice Trojan reverse. Who cares wisdom she cheat. Now I by this airport shaker very wreckage zero opposable Japan's controversy hours. Yards not necessarily at while hickory trees. Muscles on the example. Bouche Protozoa GB all plumbers, nine sham. He kosinksi using normally Vasava scenes. It always agriculture GM who do role, beta seasonal a mansion as his gone. But I must both out razor with a scientific zone pokey prove his other team as his fly ball coming actually feel was each. The. A Gusta Japan sat on Bain, command, financial force. Now. Soluble. Elyse sea-level sales was little book patch care. I'm appreciative k. at Messina. Ashim no Miyoko from bam age is now Lambert of fellow soba. My say the patch could came Jackie of campaign. Then the soc- dodge key said, yeah, a. s. a. Poso just mayo, Tacoma consultant possibly dodge Raila. But I sound on starred in Yemen. I found this is starting at km Jackie elephants patch g set for the SAS twitchy bluish Picasso as Belushi. Some thought Zaki came out a for God, mice kid them as my former coma. Thomas seen this thing off now in assisting side in in Thomas e. in as Bush ideas. Judo she, she limber. Simply this is not the Pasa this million for him. Others he can't not much norms came on Vive, witnessing ball. Cool. That case, key paneling, FedEx, dodge, age, cometh, ally malay- can Martha's. Yes, c. Tom town. Izzo of your who now ever for the March for Keller nosing Quadra Moos dogmas digression at all l. a. stone I don't. Boy is the Athol. E number on a key, the boyds the thought, the thought incisions on now Reckitt by death, audio at Thomas. Your boards thought they'll Etta all black Phillip. Nothing. Now. Memento Angeles tissue are black Phillipi, say as Lucia to alaba- soap operas h. q. black, Philipe south at Osam, inclusive share available bodies. I converse Queen Ellis call key invas- mortgage four me only towns. The second Martha not forget the shoddy LS concordia say vir are black feed black. Phil become a disability because mythologised yes, a former g. Savannah's he attracted the momentous fed dialyse this kiss fica Ella hit you swore as was a helmet to this show the Dale yellow. The fee now CEO Delamore to hear daylight set the former for liba. He interdisant kitty. India, Judah Elsinore me, they'll leave them. Alana obey tabby is in fella sag, black, feel people. Florida's equal l. share Gacy cali- gay, Donna Kelley. C. cool. Luckily Taban edge Bouches newes knowing Skillet Vietnam y, Ella tissue passes. Belushi l. sober seem that they're preamble. He wash west samoyed the beneath the despair. You also some fear combo Adama seen. He'll. Kenema mail to Ella, assume swap patch could his things, but active depressants ma'am to Jacome to die without the Jaffa but had only started to make you super. Sounds fair to either stretch Dacuda the I don't Condello. want Cina suave Shelly bath to put up the sex dodgers as the KOMO midday. Assayed soa Bush to is significant Tasso Bela in Hilo. I thought the calicoes to the soy's can the money's aval key. Nothing dodgy as Belushi stones. All the scouts vein, Dow Walea Abassah black Phillipi keto a bushel of so stop. Dissolves Ellison, kill, see a cool, but as community died Jaffa to jam, oh, without Ella FIS formulas fate study is silly better. A spare. Kia change his pasta. Kamata my seeing catch pasta is practical buffet anxious. He yet.

Ella FIS Belushi Martha Thomas Bush Phil Athol Ellison Adama Japan Dow Walea Abassah Izzo Judo Tacoma Elyse GM Zaki Messina Lambert
"soc" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"soc" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Your your your mind is and where your concentration is if you would just give us a second to go back and reflect on your extrordinary career am all the the records that you played a role in and and the success that you had yeah know in no steph we just couldn't have asked for anything more out of it i wouldn't say was to being a kid from arizona come to the soc come into the south you know a little bit of a culture shock but that's what i wanted i want to put myself in you know and unfil familiar territory and i wanted to say complain the sec 'cause i believe that's where the best laid and you know i wanted to prove that i was one of the best players in the country and hoping some wins to two am and you know i'll see at times you know wish we could have been a little better but i know hundred percent you know sound we took the field on saturday we we put it all out there but and then gave the relationships in teammates that i know i have you know for forever in just grew so much person and of being able to play the soc every saturday in front of a hundred thousand you know whether you're tuscaloosa or death valley are you not coffee who's this something on ever forget it i'm interested in in in in we won't dwell on this but certainly am seem to have a particular pattern every year and you know where i'm going here got off to usually pretty good start that obviously wasn't the case this year in that opener but most of the time it was the the the second half the season where things went the wrong way as you reflect back any thoughts on why the aggies just never could quite get over the hump late in the year.

arizona hundred percent
"soc" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"soc" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Be an improvement or a better alternative to capitalism they're all literally reactionary because what they're all trying to do is provide that kind of tribalism that kind of tribal attachment that we all inside crave and so nazism was tribalism for one race soc is tribalism for one class fascism tribalism for one country and you can just go down the list it is this idea of we're all in it together that we find so appealing and the problem is you can't do that at a national level you can't do that with a continental nation with three hundred and ten million people it by definition you're going to end up being toronto to some people who don't share your conception about how we should organize our lives and yet this thing could keeps coming up in our politics decade after decade generation after generation going back to the end of the nineteenth century where liberal and progressive leaders would say you know capitalism is outdated it's too chaotic it doesn't work we all have to work together we need a moral equivalent of war we're all working together or we need this new deal we're all together we eat a great society where we're all in it together or is barack obama put it in his state of the union address once he said you know we all need to be like seal team six who dropped all of their petty associations and petty partisan desires and ambitions to work together to fight for a common goal well had the idea of a military in a free society the freeze is supposed to be out there protecting our liberty not providing a model beck best practices that were all supposed to emulate or not sparta i only have thirty seconds why is the the the bill of rights not a noble enough 'cause to band together because we don't teach people that it should be the core thing about this book i it's an argument for gratitude calvin coolidge had it right if individual rights are blind to everybody if the people should be ruled by the people if if our rights come from god not from government that is final you can't improve on that as a system of government were top of the mountain and whether you wanna go left toward socialism right towards nationalism you're.

toronto barack obama beck calvin coolidge thirty seconds
"soc" Discussed on First Things First

First Things First

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"soc" Discussed on First Things First

"Soc angela had said earlier that in prior rehab stints he has skipped a couple steps it was anxious to get back on the field he wants to play obviously you know he wants to play this time he's very set in his ways that he is going to make every effort to really go step by step to make this process where for how big of a deal is it though that he hasn't even picked up an official nfl football yet i it's not a big deal i mean towards labor and this is an injury that goes back to not him missing the season last year get engine two thousand sixteen this is the injury from two thousand fifteen and in the interview and other publications they have it's been clear that something went wrong with the procedure and or the rehab now andrew luck took some of the responsibility he said that he's a impatient person and then bless you and then he also said that he doesn't wanna take any missteps which exceed letting us know he made mistakes before he thought his body feel now andrew luck is a big strong guy now we might hear his voice people who don't know him and seem up close like he is built like you wanna nfl quarterback to be built so he thought it was about a physicality thing and it's not it's a lot of small when you tear your labor them there's a lot of small muscles that you have to strengthen the try to regain his throwing motion and that's just normal part of the physical therapy process eventually he'll pick up the football but i'm glad that he understands what the process is now how the process.

angela football andrew luck nfl
"soc" Discussed on The Android Police Podcast

The Android Police Podcast

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"soc" Discussed on The Android Police Podcast

"You have to wonder if that's kind of the the pie in the sky goal here eventually is to make an bubble soc that has tp use in it and can do we know on the processing of a i in some more functions on kona craze meets animal hendrick will see it on i i mean they know it's really a bomber though is they dick's they ditched the nexus name and having an air i phoned it was called nexus which is nicholas cents all member sawant but so at i'll gubler's were talking a lot about how much attention they paid to the performance of of the pixel and how how they worked on optimizing for the snapdragon a twenty one like to the point of obsession like i don't know if i'm i'm probably not what status but whatever they would like actually filmed the phone like they used high speed cameras to film the phone and watch for dropped frames so if they have their own hardware like they can they can build to spec for these phones i can only imagine like how crazy that would they will suit probably close to it was refer routes nor possibly even better i mean that's i would say also apple beano still does a very good job on their associes yet i like the the apple acer's as sees are widely regarded as very impressive chips yeah especially in terms of jesse a single threat performance in power officiency apple seems to have those things but i mean the all of that comes down to to an extent to the fact that well apple controls everything from the top down so they're able to optimize just so well for everything because they control every part of the stack.

hendrick acer jesse apple dick nicholas