26 Burst results for "SMA"

"sma" Discussed on TechNation Radio Podcast

TechNation Radio Podcast

07:57 min | 4 months ago

"sma" Discussed on TechNation Radio Podcast

"You're going for. I would say even more where we're going for a treatment that reduces the risk for even getting the disease and this comes back to the idea that age itself is what's called a risk factor so being eighty versus being fifty. There's a higher risk for developing a disease. So even before you get the disease you're becoming susceptible to that disease. And if we're successful we would actually be treating that susceptibility so we would love to thank and this might be different for different people and in other words it might be different drugs for different people depending on their raced pending on their body mass depending on their Their diet that different people would require Different treatments that would maintain their low susceptibility to disease for a longer period of time now for a longer period of time we would love to think that we could keep the incidents of heart disease. That one has at the age of thirty for decades and decades and decades or the risk of developing alzheimer's disease. You know instead of the risk going up with every decade we push that out so your risk it at ninety is the same as your risk at fifty. So we're not at this point focusing on any particular disease. We're focusing on this. Issue of age being a susceptibility for disease. Okay so how do you put this in a clinical trial get. It passed the fda scratching my head here. How do you do that as you should. Scratch our head about this a lot. I mean this. This is a current challenge for the field of aging research and therapeutics for aging The fda does not at this point recognize aging a disease. And we can talk about that whether it is. Call him up. I get that. Think about that But it's not even possible to to Get a trial approved in which the outcome is some aspect of aging. So you can't say to the fda. I wanna treat you know a thousand normal people the age of fifty and then treat them for some number of years and measure these these aspects of aging. The fda is much much better at looking at individual diseases. And saying you don't want to treat these thousand people with heart disease and show that they get better so the field is really at this interface right now in trying to come up with ways and i don't mean to fault the fda i mean that's that's how it developed and has not yet figured out with us a way to do this But that's where the interface. How do we take these ideas of this issue of susceptibility and measure it in a way that the fda agrees okay. That's a legitimate measure that we want to treat and so we're not there yet. But that's that's a big challenge and i think that's something that will change in the next ten years if not sooner Well everyone of the fda is also getting older so something something to do with it Now you've screened. I guess. Thousands and thousands of molecules And of course you. You're developing algorithms to look at them and the factors and all that kind of thing but you're looking for certain things you may do. You think you'd go back and look at the same ones again and again maybe looking at different aspects i mean we we will look at different aspects in the sense that we are currently screening these compounds using certain kinds of cells but the body has thousands of different kinds of cells. So even if we find that these drugs that we call hits meaning meaning they work they. They seem to rejuvenates old cells from the blood vessel. For example to those same drugs do the same thing to their rejuvenate heart cells and brain cells and liver cells so we will continue to expand the screening to get a better understanding of how a drug might work and which sells might work on it. I mean you know in our in our dreams in the ideal world if we get a hit and it works on one sell. It will work on all cells. Do we know that we don't know that yet. So that's something we have to continue to explore but you you think that might be true. You know. I think it might be true. Because you know every cell ages and and aging universal and you can look across animal species so if we're right in if we're really looking at this fundamental process that drives these changes over time then if we can reverse at one-cell it's my belief that was likely will reverse it and also but that remains to be proven. Well my i've one brother and one sister and you begin to understand that Well you really more like the that had the family up through the the women and you're taking after these guys over here and take an after you you can. You can trace it. You can see the differential in the mix that you're you're coming out of different portions of your family and part of that is you know How you age and how long you age. We have a part of our family that lives a really really long time versus another part. That's sort of a normal age span. And so i think this is a really interesting question you know for us. We've been all excited about twenty three and me and things like that. What's our dna but the whole idea of tra trajectory and how faster we aging It's clear that it's different for different people even in the same family. I mean that's absolutely true. In fact if you take genetically identical people twins or if you take genetically identical animals being there truly inbred a genetically identical and you just age them and you watch how the age and when they die. There's variability there so clearly you know. There's there's a lot of variability in terms of how we age even if even for genetically identical individuals but for genetically distinct individuals that variability is even greater. And we're very interested in that basically the the heterogeneity the variability of aging and dewey age. Because you know one of the tissues and our body ages faster that does some people age because their liver ages faster and to some people age differently because their their brain faster. And there's actually some data that was really came out of actually out of stanford a not long ago that suggested that there are different kind of fina types of aging based on The organ system that seems to be driving the process. Now if you're lucky and you're from a family that has you know great jeans and you have so-called centenarians. People live to be a hundred in your family. There's a good chance that you will have a longer healthier life. So the genes play an important role but jeans are not the only factor that determined that trajectory. Do you think that every year will go in and When we get our annual blood tests should we go for an annual exam and you know they take all that blood out of you and they have reams and reams used to be of paper now. It's all online. They keep you know. Check it out but we fan. Do you think they'll also do that with ourselves. Where do you think this is more than warlike dna where once we see your cells we kind of know we.

fda alzheimer's disease heart disease stanford
"sma" Discussed on TechNation Radio Podcast

TechNation Radio Podcast

07:50 min | 4 months ago

"sma" Discussed on TechNation Radio Podcast

"For patients either infants or patients under the age of two years of age so this now provides a treatment opportunity for a large percentage of people who are living with esa may who haven't really had the opportunity to have to experience one of the new breakthroughs in the past. Six s means that they can live. That's the bottom line. The success means that they either they can live so for example for some of the younger patients who otherwise would have needed a a ventilator after a year or two of age that we were one of. The findings are clinical trials that we can prevent that and many Babies or toddlers but also who have been living with it They are also benefiting. They're they're seeing their disease stabilized so they're not seeing Sometimes the decline of of motor function that they had seen before as measured in various ways. So we think that we are seeing benefits across the broader population of people with you measure those benefits differently depending on how they are. This is a really good question. I mean this is a serious disease. You don't withdraw treatment from these people to see if your drug will work. How do you go about doing clinical trial. Well the clinical trial that the way we designed it. There are well established ways of measuring whether proper movement is happening. Or if it's being lost. How quickly is it lost. So for example in the study that we did We could show that the the ability of infant to sit up without support for several seconds for five seconds which you know at some point in the natural disease course of estimate. Infants lose that ability. Well we were able to to preserve that or i in Significant percentage of infants who took everest similarly this issue of needing breathing support needing ventilation to help you breathe For a lot of babies after a year or after a couple of years They need that. We were able to help many infants to survive without permanent ventilation and we measure that at twelve months measured at twenty three months. These are some examples. There are many different ways. Of course you can measure movement but those are some examples of meaningful differences. That could be made by this medicine. And it's not hard to imagine why this is the kind of thing you want to achieve for patients excitement here at but you really had to take several years to actually see. Is there a difference or a decline and were they at other treatments. So in some cases this was the first treatment that patients have been given and other cases they had been given other treatments and this was given afterwards and we could see these kinds of results regardless of whether they had been on a prior treatment or not to believe. You gotta believe to make that happen. Of course it started with animal studies. What did you the animals in which animals well so as with Most medicines there is a relatively standard approach of how you so you start in the laboratory. Is the medicine doing what we hope. It could do. A little dish to sell exactly. Can you see that and then when you go into animals and actually there are also animal models of the disease that you can study and so that was done. So can we see. Do we see in effect in animals that we would hope to see patients by model. Do you mean like on a computer or no. Actually what we mean is that you can. Using genetic engineering technologies you can create mice that have characteristics of the disease. And you can see all if i give this medicine or this or this chemical not a medicine yet. Can i change that. Can i make the symptoms better. And so those. Those are often studies that are done And then we of course want to make sure. Is it safe. So do we see any worrisome side effects and you always start in animals before you go into people and so all of that was done. And and this is where we had great partnership with Company ptc therapeutics and we. We started working together with them early on to do these kinds of studies and and finally ended up with the medicine. That not only woods doing what. We need an intern of the replacement protein. But also safe. We didn't see worrisome side effects. So this is Let you know well. Basically we're like no one way or the other but of course you're always nervous you you you may see. You may do animal studies and say oh. This doesn't look too bad. It looks pretty safe and animals that you'd never know people it's different until you does the first patients you never know and now let's go to the other condition in m. s. Careful i am to make you say all the terms seems is why we use acronyms normalize optical spectrum disorder. Sad so this is also a neurologic condition. But it's not a genetic condition that you're born with it can happen over time. It's sort of like a inflammatory or autoimmune disease where you get this abnormal inflammatory reaction. That's its periodic. It can sometimes relapse it can flare up at various times but when it flares up it can cause damage to your nervous system in various ways and in fact that because it's an inflammatory response the damage sometimes it can be permanent. So so really. These relapses it's not like oh you got flair and then it completely resolves and you're back to normal sometimes. The damage can be permanent. So this is actually. Although it's a rare disease it it can be debilitating disease so in spring similarly based on scientific advances. It's designed to block a pathway that cells that immune cells use to do inflammation which of course inflammation is part of the natural immune response but when normal. It can be a problem. But if you block that pathway. You can't play into a cell. Pathway meaning the approach that the cell uses to To to go around and do it normally does which is the normal function of inflammatory cells is if you get a wound it heals the wound or few become infected. They get rid of the infection and that's all good but if they start Misbehavior are being too active. In different ways it can. That can lead to autoimmune disease various types and so that's kind of what's happening in as de- except that it's tacky attacking nerves that you need to move or to since Things and so. That's the problem. You get too much activity or of the wrong kind of inflammation and now all of a sudden. You have this problem. Where you're you're you're having neurological Whether it's movement or that kind of thing so so basically in spring can prevent those kinds of relapses and and we are. Clinical trial was really one of the largest of its kind in patients with intimacy. Do and we showed that we could reduce the frequency. That the number of relapses that would happen and also extend the amount of time that patients are. Free of relapses so of course. Both of those are are important milestones in a in a disease like this. How do you take this track so in spring is it's given what we call a pre filled syringe so A patient can. It can do a an injection under the skin They are taught by a healthcare provider. They do it themselves or they can have a caregiver. Do it for them and so you. You do a ejection under the skin every month and but once a month yes so but but this too is an example of a medicine that you don't have to go to see a doctor to get it. You can be trained to give it yourself for to have a caregiver. Give it in your home. So both is and spring are examples of anytime as you pointed out but especially in the pandemic the ability to to be at home and have access to medicines. that can be very important in terms of Your disease prior.

Company ptc therapeutics abnormal inflammatory reaction autoimmune disease
"sma" Discussed on TechNation Radio Podcast

TechNation Radio Podcast

07:36 min | 4 months ago

"sma" Discussed on TechNation Radio Podcast

"Then dr thomas rando was speak to us about what each and every one of our bodies is doing at this very minute. Aging he's the director of glen laboratories for the biology of aging and the deputy director of the stanford center on longevity and he's co founded a new company fountain therapeutics based on some very interesting science. Technician is underwritten in part by mind k. a global software development force in a world. Where every business can be global on the web at mine k. dot com now. Let's turn to rare diseases. We don't think of them as getting the attention of pharmaceutical companies. Simply because we say there's no market there and it's expensive to produce new drugs in the us. It takes twelve to fifteen years from the lab bench to an fda approval and the industry numbers say from one billion dollars if you already have the money to two plus billion if you have to go out and get venture capital to fund it. Then there's the failure rate for every nine promising new drugs which enter phase one clinical trials years later. Only one drug will succeed. That's nine to one making it. Through the three grueling phases required before the fda will approve the drug for both safety to all. Take it and efficacy. Does it work for those conditions. The drug is meant for so what about the drugs which are needed for rare diseases. Well certainly the orphan drug act has provided incentives for companies to work on diseases which have under two hundred thousand patients but even then what about rare diseases substantially under that threshold to get a handle on drugs for lots of people versus drugs for just a few since. I'm speaking with the chief medical officer of genentech. Let's look at a genentech drug which you may have heard of re toxin. It's used a treat. A complement of autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and certain types of cancers just considering rheumatoid arthritis where every hundred thousand people in the us four hundred fifty people suffer from it. And that's just one of retired sends many uses for the conditions. Were talking about today. S a which is spinal muscular atrophy. Ten people out of one hundred thousand and an mos de niro my elitest optical spectrum disorder one to ten out of one hundred thousand people so there are the numbers in terms of one hundred thousand. That's ten potential patients versus four hundred. Fifty plus across america perhaps thirty thousand potential patients at most versus several million potential patients all in for a texan and yet genentech. Who brought us. Richardson now brings us a treatment for sama as well as one for an. Oh sd doctor levi. Getaway is the chief medical officer of genentech. Well dr gary way. Welcome to biotech nation more. Thank you for having me today. Genentech is part of hoffmann-laroche but years ago as an early biotech company one of the first to go public. Actually there's a famous story about her boy or one of your co-founders and when he was asked how to pronounce it is at genentech or genetic. He responded famously pronounce it anyway. You want just by the stock. My question is have you worked that out yet. You know. i've never been asked that question. I think i usually say genentech. It's almost like potato potato. Like maybe context where i might say at the other way. So there's no company you know you'll get thrown out your bed. If you said there is no eat it this as they'll shell pronounce it this way. Okay now now we have it. That means. i'm still confused. We'll go with genentech today you watch. I'll probably screw that. I probably will as well now. Genentech is often known for its well known medicines and people have heard of texan or her sept- in for some unfortunately unfo- common medical conditions. You also develop medicines for very small populations of patients very rare diseases. And you've had to successes in that area lately. Let's talk about those successes absolutely correct. We've had two medicines. One is called everybody and the other is called in spring and each of them is meant to treat a neurologic condition. One of them is a rare genetic disease and the other is a rare kind of inflammatory disease. But you're absolutely right but what they have in common though is that we understood the science of both diseases well enough to design a treatment that we thought could have a quite a meaningful impact on People with the disease i think. The this whole idea of following the science to try to make meaningful advancements for patients whether or not it's a common disease or a rare disease. That's really what drove that now. Let's talk about sm may i. What did those letters stand for. What's the condition absolutely. Fema stands for spinal muscular atrophy. So that's why we call it estimate because it's a little tongue tied to say spineless go all the time but this genetic disease results in a mutation in a protein which is required for proper function of nerve cells specifically nurse cells that control movement. So if you haven't mutation in that protein the nerve cells that help us move around move her hands and feet and sit up and those kinds of things they start not functioning well and eventually they can die out so that's the problem that people have with that sometimes. It happens quickly like even with babies or toddlers they start not being able to move And even sit up and even breathe over time so in other instances a little more gradual and so it happens over the course of childhood or adulthood but either way. That's the problem you lose the ability to have proper movement and so what have rizzi does is essentially allows a replacement protein to get generated. So it's not the same protein but it's kind of like you have to take your car into the shop and you need a loaner car or if you had a brand new laptop. And it doesn't work and so your. It department gives you a loner. I got a lotta right now and it works. Couldn't there's kind of like that right. But i'm getting my work dad's right so it's not the exact protein but it's a similar protein. You're giving it's good enough to get the job done yes. It's not what you prefer to have. But it gets the job done and the whole idea of giving a replacement protein. That's a first of its kind medicine. Most madison's you what you're doing is you're you're blocking the function of some abnormal or overactive protein. This is unusual in that. You're you're allowing a replacement protein to be made in these nerve cells. Now let me ask you. What have they done todate. Is that unusual this treatment. I would say that it's quite unusual to have a medicine that works by causing a new protein or a new variation of approaching be made anywhere disease most of the time. You're blocking the function of existing proteins.

Genentech dr thomas rando glen laboratories biology of aging stanford center on longevity a fountain therapeutics rheumatoid arthritis fda spinal muscular atrophy dr gary us hoffmann cancers levi Richardson inflammatory disease rizzi Fema madison
"sma" Discussed on TechNation Radio Podcast

TechNation Radio Podcast

05:44 min | 4 months ago

"sma" Discussed on TechNation Radio Podcast

"On tech nations success in treating several very rare diseases success as in new. Fda approval through treatments in sm spinal muscular atrophy and n m s de niro my elitest optic spectrum disorder. I speak with dr levi. Getaway the chief medical officer of genentech to talk about these breakthroughs then a condition. We've had all our lives and the fda doesn't even recognize it as a medical condition. Aging i speak with dr thomas. Rando co-founder of fountain therapeutics and a professor at stanford university school of medicine. All this and more coming up on this week's tech nation. Let's take five with more gun this. It's five minutes two thousand fourteen. I was able to speak with dr savante. Pabo the author of neanderthal man in search of lost genomes. I asked him. We used to wonder whether neanderthals ever interbred with modern. Humans is that debate over. Just i would say so. So by looking at the genomes neanderthals can now really show that pieces of their dna. Made it into people live today. So that's the talk. Leave on a little bit if you like in people today if your ancestor comes from europe or asia so it's not everybody but we can tell the the the people who migrated through the europe and asia. The northern part could have a little piece. Yes so everybody who comes from outside. Africa have pieces some down the tatyana dna in them whereas people in africa do not now remind us forty thousand years ago. Some band of people left. Africa emerged out. And that's really where everyone else came from today And they when they made it up into northern europe that's where the neanderthals were yes. Oh our best model for how this happened. Was adamant modern. Humans emerged in africa. This of course not only in africa although out of africa and they then have had to pass by the middle east and we know whether neanderthals in the middle east at that time. Forty fifty sixty thousand years ago and those people there if they then mated with neanderthals and became the ancestors to everybody outside africa so they sort of absorbed a little bit of the yuna from neanderthals and then carried it with them when they spread across the world so that we find neanderthal dna today in people not only from europe and western asia when the have existed but also in native americans or people in southeast asia shower in the pacific even places and banana never existed. It was carried through other people getting there now. George church was here. The famous harvard geneticists. I've got even more neanderthal in. Take a look at me. So there's variations as to how much you might have in. There's a little bit of variation it's not that much radiation in rural. It's in order of one percent of all of the dna of an individual it slightly more actually in east asia and there are good evidence now that one may did. At least another time yonder toss perhaps in the central asia or so when people migrated to the east now the neanderthals they existed well before the homo sapiens. Yes so depending a little on how we define neanderthal morphological from there remains their bones. They appear something between three. Or four hundred thousand years ago in europe and western asia whereas modern humans appear somewhere between one hundred two hundred thousand years ago on starts spreading out of africa or something like fifty sixty thousand years ago my goodness they started and they ended in. We're still going. Yes and they existed even longer than we have existed so far on the planet's lesson to us yes so sort of puts it in perspective with humor successful now. How long have you been trying to get. dna from. Neanderthals are so. This really goes back to the early eighties. When i started in molecular biology. Back in sweden i'd had previously studied egyptology. Thought would become an egyptologist disenchanted with that Went to medical school. But it was unaware that were thousands and thousands of mommy's both animals and humans in museums from egypt and started looking into if people had tried to extract the dna replicated in bacteria from these things. And as far as i could make out no one had tried so i started. Dodges the day pabo directs the department of evolutionary genetics. At the max. Blake institute for evolutionary anthropology in leipzig germany..

africa asia dr levi dr thomas Rando co fountain therapeutics europe dr savante Pabo stanford university school of genentech middle east Africa Fda fda George church east asia harvard sweden
Hunter Biden Says He Wouldn't Take Burisma Job Again

Planet Money

00:54 sec | 8 months ago

Hunter Biden Says He Wouldn't Take Burisma Job Again

"S. The others were made by Fizer and Madonna. As the FBI continues to investigate a laptop reported to belong to Hunter Biden, the president's son is speaking with regret about his relationship with the Ukrainian oil company, Bary SMA when his father was vice president. NPR's Scott Simon reports Hunter. Biden doesn't say he was wrong to serve on the board of the oil company at acknowledges the bite name was an asset. But he told us in an interview that he grew up in politics and should have foreseen it would become an issue for his father's 2020 presidential campaign. At the end of the day, the question was whether it was wise well. What I know now is that it was certainly not wise in this political environment to create that perception, and that's why I would not do it again. No investigation has found any evidence of impropriety. Hunter. Biden's memoir, Beautiful Things, which is

Fizer Hunter Biden Bary Sma Scott Simon Madonna FBI Biden NPR Hunter
"sma" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

03:28 min | 10 months ago

"sma" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Into what was going on with Biden and his son, all that stuff with Marie Sma. But it was oil and gas. Resource is plus access to the sea for the Soviet Navy. That's why they wanted to Ukraine that little to do with any territory was access to the sea in oil and gas. The I don't know. Maybe I'll stop there and let it all right. Very good, Anyway to Jimmy and East. Liverpool, Ohio Good evening. They're taking. What are you doing here? There's three questions. I wanted to ask you. The one was about this just, uh, aircraft parts manufacturer in Michigan that was sold to China. And they had some sort of an odd vibration system. The Chinese got from that factory that they bought here in the states and put it on there. J 20. I think it was for our 35 or 22 aircraft, and I'm just wondering How did that happen in the Bidens, you know, ended up with like a big percentage of that, and it would not have to be all cleared, like through Congress or something. There are there are rules in place. I don't know if the Bidens personally profited from any of what you're talking about. Although These days. I can't say it would surprise me if that proved to be the case. But there are supposedly standards. I mean, let's let's be blunt about this Brian Boyd. The fact is that there are in the ranks of our fine Capitalists, many people out there that make money and create jobs. There are in the ranks of those people. Ah, lot of total horrors. They are the very people Vladimir Lenin was talking about when he said. When it comes time to hang all the capitalist they shall be found bidding on the rope. You have to have laws that say, Yeah, that's a way to make money. And no, you're not sending critical technology to a country like China. Period on their criminal gotta be criminal penalties attached that and I don't mean finds. I mean prison time for some of these executives. So without going into the specifics of what Jimmy brought up that kind of thing. Has been a problem. I remember when we were there was some company I think back during the Clinton administration that was offering to China ways to more accurately put satellites in orbit. And apparently it had to be pointed out to the very same technology makes I C b m warheads More accurate your thoughts. Well, the issue with China is very straight forward. You have to understand that China mentality every person coming from China with tourists of students, somebody working or working in a congressman's office. Are obligated not morally but obligated to be spying for the Communist Party. They are required to do that. It's not a casual thing, so they're like millions of ants all over the country everywhere they go, but their credo their requirement is to report back all intelligence gathering to the Communist Party. So we don't seem to comprehend. That is an American people. We don't quite catch on the fact that every one of them are taught to spice, so it doesn't matter in a small university or working in a plant. And everywhere they possibly can. They're trying to steal stuff promise, so it doesn't all have to be military secrets. But it could be all kinds of other things of economic advantage and write every we'll come back here the second we're overdue for a break. But I think the point that's being made here is that we have far too many dealings with China. Period and we'll be back in a moment..

China Jimmy Soviet Navy Bidens Vladimir Lenin Communist Party Marie Sma Biden Ukraine Brian Boyd Liverpool Michigan Ohio Congress Clinton administration congressman
Buying Science, Healthwashing Labels, & Sparking Real Change - With Guest Vani Hari

The Model Health Show

06:43 min | 1 year ago

Buying Science, Healthwashing Labels, & Sparking Real Change - With Guest Vani Hari

"Our guest today is New York Times. bestselling author Vanni Hari and body was named by Time magazine. One of the most influential people on the Internet. And she's been such a powerful force of change and influencing how major food giants like Kraft General Mills Subway Chick-fil-a in starbucks create their products in her advocacy has steered them towards making more helpful policies. She's been profiled in the New York, times the Atlantic the Financial Times Wall Street Journal USA Today the Dr Oz show the doctor show CNN the list goes on and on she is such a powerful and important voice that we all need right now she's demonstrated how powerful we are. She is just one person who stepped up and setting noth- is enough I'm not going to allow these things to be in our food system into injure unsuspecting consumers to injure children all over the country all over the world we can change this and she stepped up and made it happen. All right. So Vanni is one of the big reasons that there's been so much change in fast food and in processed foods and she is she is just one person but she is powerful. She is remarkable as you are. She said, yes she just said, yes. Stepping into her mission and being an advocate for change and again I'm saying because I want to remind you of how powerful you are. We all are powerful beyond anything we can imagine. And, it's wonderful to have these conversations and talk with Bonnie to see how she did it to see what he's up to to hear what she's thinking about right now in the context of what's happening in our world today, you know in her leaning into this discomfort with all of us and seeing what is, what is she going through? What is she thinking about and also she's got a new little surprise that she's. Developing right now herself you know a new addition to her family. She's got a corona bonus. You know at this time there's also Within the terminal, those also these things of beauty. There are moments of opportunity and beauty, and it just depends on what we are able to see the questions we ask and the actions that we take, and if anybody knows about action, an advocacy is our guest today Vanni Hurry. So it's jumping to his conversation. With the amazing New York, Times bestselling author food advocate the Food Babe Herself Vanni Hari Viney Welcome back to the model show how are you doing today? So Good Sean is so good to see your face. Let me just tell you that I wish person. I wish it was in person. So I give you a big giant. Fat. Wet Hug. And there's a reason behind the fat portion. Beautifully plump is you have you're having a baby your daughter's about to be a big sister. That's right. She's GonNa be a big sister to a little boy. And Yeah, I'm getting ready him. It's it's coming up soon I gotta get gametime on. I. Got Up early, this morning and worked out was pumping iron and shared on my instagram. I was like, Hey, guys give birth is a real athletic sport. You need stamina you need physical endurance especially if you WanNa do it naturally you you really gotta be in shape you can't go into that. Experience being shape. Let me just tell you. That is so true. Same thing mirrored by you know my wife and so many other women just sharing this story is just getting prepared for it. You know and this is something we have evolved doing just being active out gathering, taking care of things but you know this is just a big shift that's taking place and even right now it's probably been a little bit more complicated for a lot of people just to get outdoors and just to be active so I just want to commend you for that. Pumping Island. Getting for the baby you know that's awesome. I'm just so thankful gyms are open back over here. You know for the for the first, half my pregnancy they were closed, and that was really tough mentally because I had to I had to have that motivation to get in that Jim, my own little home gym at home. Every day and in our basement and it got old after a while and not having that external motivation and doing everything on a screen. You know it was just it was very tiresome. So I'm so glad to be able to go back in in the community and workout and have that external motivation in loud music and all that is just it's the. Best. Yeah I feel the same way you know and this is one of those things and I'm I'm so grateful to talk to you and this even in intro that I put for you just you're such a inspiration to me you're such a hero that we all need right now and I'm so grateful to have you on to have these conversations because. For some folks, the Jim has been it's not just about the physical health side is their mental health mental emotional wellness being able to get access to that, and it was just kind of been this big law even here in I'm in Los Angeles, all the gems is still closed. I literally would have moved I would have to move away a lot of people have. Had to be away because you know that's what it is for me. It's like my anti anxiety medication, right? It's my anti depression medication. It's that you know that routine every single day I start my day and I go to the gym and do my workout class when I come back and it's It's it's a game changer. SMA- meditative practice that I have to do and four something to take that away. Was An insult on my body. For the government to take that away and you know I shared actually a interesting me on instagram when when our governor continued to close gyms but would allow. People to for example, Golf Club or tennis clubs, but they wouldn't we go to a gym. There's all of these kind of. These rules that didn't make sense and I said you know, hey, if you got McDonalds open open my freaking. Jim You. Got McDonalds open open my. Goodness sakes

Jim You Vanni Hari Vanni Vanni Hari Viney Vanni Hurry New York New York Times. Time Magazine Noth CNN Kraft General Mills Starbucks Wall Street Journal Usa Pumping Island Golf Club Bonnie Sean
Genentech Drug Offers Oral, at-Home Option for SMA Patients

The Bio Report

04:35 min | 1 year ago

Genentech Drug Offers Oral, at-Home Option for SMA Patients

"Levi thanks for joining us. Danny. Thank you for having me. We're GONNA talk about spinal muscular atrophy, the recent approval of Genentech's every, and which is the first oral at home therapy and what this means for patients with the condition. Let's start with spinal muscular atrophy few though what is it? Absolutely, and Danny really appreciate the opportunity to talk to you about this spinal muscular atrophy. The use S. M. A. for Short it's a neuro muscular disease is actually quite severe and progressive. In fact, it's the leading genetic causes of infant mortality and so ESA affects approximately one in ten thousand babies. So this disease is caused by a mutation in a gene called S. M. in one, it means survival motor neuron one. So it's a mouthful, but that mutation causes a deficiency of the protein the. Protein, and this is a problem because that protein is required for the proper function of nerves that control our muscles there for our movement. So without proper s him in protein function, those nerve cells, they don't they don't work well, and eventually they can become lost over time and that leads to progressive muscle weakness and as you might imagine in the fall, time. That that weakness will affect someone's ability to move their limbs to eat the breathe on the round and depending on the severity. Some people may eventually require constant caregiver support for daily activities even simple as getting dressed, brushing their teeth going to the bathroom, etc. So overall people with FEMA, they lose their ability to perform critical muscle movements and that that can often impact their ability to participate independently. And Activities of daily living and may become debilitating. We've seen new treatments. Merge for patients with us. What's the prognosis for Well. So certainly as I mentioned earlier. May remains a severe progressive disease. It can be fatal in fact, and yes, there have been recent advances but despite those advancements, the majority of people in the US with FEMA. So let's say sixty percent or so still aren't treated at all and so therefore they're they're has remained a need for continued innovation for new therapies. And and so. As I mentioned throughout their lives, you still have this progressive ability potentially to lose. Critical movements and So that's why we're excited about Israel as wristy, which we think it's first of a kind mechanism. It's at home delivery is oral dosing. All those things represented important advancements, an treatment options. For patients with? And how does wristy work? So as I mentioned everybody, it's the first at home treatment for Esa May to be FDA approved. It's actually approved for for adults as well as children who are two months of age or older, and the way that it works. The technical term is it's called a splicing modifier. So I'd describe the the SEM in protein. and. I mentioned that the primary problem for patients with SA is a mutation in gene called SM IN ONE It turns out that so they've lost. The a function, but there's a there's a second gene called sm into that can make a related former the protein but but most of that pro team, it's not it doesn't come together properly. So it can't it can't rescue a can't serve the purpose of estimating one. But what frizzy does is it causes a specific form of the SIM in to function to be expressed with actually can rescue can substitute for estimate. So you now have what we what we call a functional rescue. You have a different variation of estimate protein that can do the job that the men one protein was opposed to do, and so if you do that, if you can increase the level of that of version of in two in nerve cells and other cells in the body,

Spinal Muscular Atrophy Muscle Weakness Fema Danny S. M. Levi Genentech ESA United States S. M. A. FDA Israel SA
Kids Know How To Occupy Themselves. We Need To Let Them Do It

Parenting: Difficult Conversations

06:46 min | 1 year ago

Kids Know How To Occupy Themselves. We Need To Let Them Do It

"One of our own NPR colleagues Mike Lean decline. was actually feeling this stress big time she's been working quarantined with her husband and her daughter Rosie. WHO has four? She is like a firecracker, right? She is strong willed. Through life with this intensity, which is fantastic, she learns really fast, and she's fearless, but you know it's like when she wants something. There is like no giving in, and it was these constant demand demands to draw neurology. Video, Mama, make a Sandwich Mama set up. My Zoom Circle Time Mama you know all those little interruptions that completely obliterate your concentration I would lock the door. I slid down the back of it and I just cried I. was like what am I going to do like I have this book deadline in July and it was just really like this is. This is not going to be good for any of us. Like things are going to deteriorate really quickly in this House Mike Lee and actually wrote about this moment in a new. York Times. OP, ed recently, and it's related to the. The book that she's working on, so it's called. Hunt gathered parent, and it's coming out in March twenty twenty one, and it's all about what American parents can learn from other cultures including traditional cultures, because the pressure to keep kids constantly entertained well. Mike, Ian says that's really specific to American parents and culture. There is huge amount of pressure like I have been fighting it and I still feel it. You know I still wake up in the morning I'm like. What are we GONNA do today. What are we going to do this morning, right? You're like per child entertainer part event planner. I mean it is like we're planners. If you think about it, right, it is late. They are little tech CEO's that have like a day planned for them, and we are there to usher them in, and not only just usher them, but make sure they enjoy it or something out of it or like. There's feedback afterwards, right? There's a cruise director like there's hustler service aspect to it. It's having a good time. Did you find your except my kids are those trolls on Yelp that always give the two stars, the One star now, not good enough, not good enough. Maybe they're trying to tell you something so in this episode of Life Kit. It's all about turning kids from customers. You have to please into good coworkers Mike. Leeann is gonNA share what she's learned from her reporting on other cultures to help our kids learn to entertain themselves. Michelina Club says that she got this idea from her reporting that she could sort of retrain her daughter. Yes, she was thinking about a scene. She had read about in an anthropology book by Jean Briggs who studied the inuit in the Arctic in the sixties, the anyway still lived in pneumatic lifestyle, and in the winter they build Igloos to stay warm, and the mother had two young children I think that the time they were about three and six. Six, so this is a part of the world. That's one of the coldest parts of the world in so there were many days where like the little girls couldn't go outside there. They had nothing to do right. There were no videos legos, no children's books and there's these scenes in the book where the children literally spend like an hour or two in the morning under a blanket playing without bothering anyone yet. That sounds like a real dream culture. I cannot wait to get to that point and so looking at these cultures to do this. You see striking similarity, and that is that they do not feel the need to constantly entertain, educate or stimulate. However, you want to think about it children. It's a very different approach to the way they treat a child's time. And I. Think because they don't demand the child's attention. You do this now now. You're doing this now. You're doing this I. Think in return. The child stops demanding the parents attention, and so that's what I really wanted to test out to walk us through. What did you do? I stopped trying to demand Rosie's attention. Right I stopped trying to say now. It's nine o'clock. You're going to watch this video or we're gonNA. Read a book right? I stopped being the event manager for her. And I started doing the things. I needed to do and expect her to come along with me. And welcomed her right so another thing that like these other cultures do that? We tend not to do is welcomed the children into our worlds right? There's a very separate world child world. And I think in order for this to work. You have to welcome them into your world, so hey, we're cooking now. Come over here and you know probably stir these eggs or now we're cleaning. Help back you. It's not forced. It's not like you have to do it, but I'm not gonNA. Draw you a Narwhal right now. I'm cleaning and they do this with all of their work. It's not just cleaning and domestic chores, but also you know their businesses. The children are there. The children are welcome into the world of and so so I started doing that, too. I said well. You know what I need to write. I need to write like four hours a day. And Yeah me. Sitting on a computer writing is not very interesting, but neither is like sewing and an Igloo and so I said okay. I'm going to write I. Need Quiet. And you are welcome to sit here with me the first time we did it, I started small like thirty minutes, and if she really was upset at the beginning, I would stop I'm not trying to like force anything and make a lot of chaos in their house. It's really the opposite like if she was really like in the beginning, if she was really escalating with you and getting really upset, you would would give her some time. Yeah like I. I would really try to ignore her. Because I was really teaching her like this is quiet time and it's not time for me to give you attention. But? But if it got really bad and then I'd be like okay. Let's go outside. Let's take a break you know. But you guys the first time I did it. She was kind of stunned. She actually said to me. I can do anything I want as like. Yeah, you can do anything you want as long as you don't damage the house. Like you know she just couldn't believe it, so started sma- and after about a week we had worked up to lake. Hour hour and a half chunks in by like two weeks. She wants to do it even she'll be like. Are you going to write a? Show. Ask Me and so you built up to it and her main thing that she does. Being is what she will sit here in color with me for an hour or so, and then she kind of runs around the house in desert. Thing she can go outside she cooks quote unquote, which means like mixing different things in the kitchen and she makes them S. There's no doubt there's a message. To be honest, she latched onto it quicker and better than I thought it was going to be I mean. It is one child in one house, but it's backed up by all these other families right that I that we've seen in these cultures

Rosie Mike Mike Lean Mike Lee NPR Michelina Club York Times Yelp Leeann Hunt CEO Jean Briggs Director Arctic IAN
"sma" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

1170 The Answer

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"sma" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

"The underlying data they're not talking about the doctor felt she two please thank you for U. S. secretary is our ten million people say they've lost their jobs in the past two weeks so how is the stimulus money part of Fiji mingling to tighten the numbers of uninsured and it would not be easier if we open the markets for SMA okay so for an individual who had employer insurance that's what I mentioned in my remarks if you were employed and had insurance through your employer and you've now lost her job and lost that insurance you now do have a special enrollment period where you may enroll in the individual exchanges of the affordable Care Act so that's that's existing law then what we're doing is taking from that hundred billion dollars to providers taking money and saying if you are a provider and you care for anybody who's uninsured we're going to compensate you for doing that and we're gonna compensate with the Medicare reimbursement rates and you are not allowed to build that uninsured individual anything so in many respects it's better for those uninsured individuals they're going to get first dollar coverage they're gonna get care in the United States and the provider is going to be made whole from this program so it's really an unprecedented on what president trump is doing here with this money is an unprecedented disease specific support of care for individuals to make sure that people get treatment so we live our what about nine hundred to a couple questions as one to specifically on New York and the question of ventilators.

secretary Fiji United States trump New York SMA president
Ukraine opens probe of possible surveillance of ambassador

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

08:02 min | 2 years ago

Ukraine opens probe of possible surveillance of ambassador

"All of this information coming out about possible surveillance and alleged possible threats of a US ambassador to Ukraine. Where Eric is the secretary of State who was supposed to protect those ambassadors? Mike Pompeo as a member of congress was outraged endlessly about what happened to our ambassador Benghazi but he has nothing to say nothing to say in these last twenty four hours. Do you believe that part of the motivation to get rid of Ambassador to get her out of post was because She was in the way of this effort to get the government of Ukraine to announce investigations have Joe Biden. Those only motivation that was the only other. Donald Trump told the president of Ukraine in the phone. Call that got the president of the United States. Impeached that the American ambassador to Ukraine Marie amount of rich who donald trump had just removed was quote was bad news and the people she was dealing with in the Ukraine. Were bad news so I just WanNa let you know. Oh that she's going to go through some things to donald trump on under surveillance through Guiliani and his associates including love partners. The evidence left handed over to the house. Intelligence Committee includes texts from trump contributor Robert. Hi to left harness. Yes that indicated Mr Hyde. How the ambassador under Surveillance Rachel? I love about that repeatedly. It appears to be giving you very specific information about the ambassadors movements about her location about her security situation calls the B word it over and over again. It's very hostile to her and seems to be monitoring her whereabouts. What why did those exchanges happen? What was he trying to tell you? I don't believe I think he was either drunk or he's was trying to make himself bigger than it was so I didn't take it seriously and I was trying to see. I didn't even respond to most of the time if I did it was like something. Lowell or okay or great or something like that just to because I wouldn't respond for a long time and then I didn't want him to get rowdy if I saw him next time and say well. Why didn't you type those texts? Were taken very seriously last night when they released last night by the diplomatic corps the United States all over the world. Dennis Schell Smith is a former career foreign service officer who served as ambassador to Qatar. In the Obama administration she held several positions in the State Department tours of duty posts around the world. She speaks Arabic Chinese Spanish and Hebrew and she knows the kinds of risks are ambassadors face including threats that she herself faced when serving as ambassador after the news broke last last night of the threatening language used in these newly revealed tax about embassador Ivanovich. Donna Shell Smith tweeted. Many ambassadors are used used to hearing about threats and various malign actors surveilling us. It's the fact that it was Americans plotting associates of the president put. That takes this just beyond January discussion. Now is former ambassador. Dennis Schell SMA. Thank you very much for joining US tonight. And I WANNA to get your reaction to the new evidence entering into this picture tonight of love partners saying oh no worry about it. That was all just a joke. Mr Hyde died is just a drunk and I didn't take him seriously. Mr Hyde himself appeared on another a network saying yeah I was drunk all joke. What is your reaction to that? It was is all a joke defense. Well thanks for having me Lawrence. I mean my reaction is that it needs to be investigated. I hope it was just a joke. I hope for that landscaper in Connecticut. who was drunk just happened to be texting about an ambassador in Ukraine and with very specific things like what her electronic devices were doing and the layout of the embassy buildings so yeah? I hope that was a joke but it really just does need to be investigated if we take it and think of it in a different context maybe from regions where I've served if you knew a group wanted you out of the way and then you saw that sort of text exchange change. I don't think anybody would be very relaxed about it. Can you imagine a in any previous administration a secretary of state being absolutely silent after the revelation of evidence like this Lawrence. I joined the Foreign Service when I was twenty one years old. I worked for eight secretaries of state. Five presidents I've seen leadership this is. It's unbelievable I know. I cannot imagine any secretary Terry. Having been absent every hour. That Secretary Peyot is silent or tweeting about other things is just. It's more unconscionable unsuitable and just a complete abdication of his leadership role or let's take a look at Rachel going at this issue again as I said she questioned about this repeatedly Let's listen to more of your questions about this questions about this. But the texts where he was supposedly reporting on the whereabouts of the ambassador went went on for a week. I mean it wasn't like one drunk night correspondent for seven days couldn't have been drunk the whole time of year old. He wakes up and is drunk he starts at six. I mean I've never seen him not drunk so you thought that this was him making it up. You didn't believe he actually had the ambassador under Alan. Absolutely so the defenses. It was a joke. He was drunk. But what you're calling for is an investigation. And I. I know if you were still an ambassador inservice. You couldn't be with us now. Having this conversation and calling for this investigation I have a sense that you are. We're speaking for ambassadors United States ambassadors around the world. Tonight they haven't asked me to. I may have the sense that I'm speaking for some of them as well. But I'm I'm here with my own opinion but I don't know how anybody could listen to that interview and not walk away and say there needs to be an investigation of the threat and of all of these surrounding issues You had an earlier guest talking about our foreign policy being hijacked by this group of people with no official role in no oversight. There's a whole host of issues that need to be investigated and I think anyone who cares about our national security feels that way and such an investigation would be under the jurisdiction of the Attorney General of the United States in the last hour in that interview. We just heard live police. Say The attorney. General William Bar is on the team. He was part of this entire endeavor of trying to influence Ukraine. How does that make you feel about the possibilities of investigation? Well I can't speculate on what might actually happen in an investigation. And I'm really grateful that Chairman Angle and the House Foreign Affairs Committee is is calling for an investigation as well and I believe planning to conduct one. But I will say having spent you know two and a half decades explaining blaming American institutions to foreign publics and talking about our justice system as the finest in the world and our system of checks and balances. It's heartbreaking heartbreaking actually to even contemplate that our system might not work and. I'm not talking about what the outcome is. I'm talking about an investigation and let the investigation happen and see where it leads. You investor Dan Shell Smith. Thank you for your service representing this country country around the world and thank you for joining us tonight really appreciate it thank

Ukraine United States Donald Trump Mr Hyde President Trump Mike Pompeo Joe Biden Benghazi Dennis Schell Smith Dennis Schell Sma Congress Eric Donna Shell Smith House Foreign Affairs Committe Embassador Ivanovich Secretary Peyot Barack Obama Dan Shell Smith State Department
Organizing Your Crafting Space

A Slob Comes Clean

03:31 min | 2 years ago

Organizing Your Crafting Space

"The thing that feels so silly. Is that like so much of the crafting stuff that feels so important. I have like literally never used or have used like once which sounds so ridiculous. So where would you knit. We're like sitting sitting here in this room in this home in this. Like little couch thing on. Okay so do you have a knitting basket. Yeah so that's some of those bins like one is yarn and one is tools. Do you have a current project. Bass get a SMA. She guilt box of excessive in started but not finished. Okay is is your goal to finish some of those or is your goal to start a new one so I usually end up. Starting new ones is anything I just need to get over the guilt and get rid of the ones that I'd like board with and we'll never finish and like maybe I'm not a project minute or maybe maybe I'm just still like I enjoy knitting but not ever finishing anything. Well I mean I would view that as two separate times types of containers I you know. It's are limited spaces like a basket like even one of those baskets is up there. That maybe doesn't have stuff in it right now or whatever can be your project basket that you have next to this seat where you like just an actually knit. This is and when it gets full. I either have to give up on a project acting. Get rid of that. You know that's never going to happen or finish a project because that's a legitimate right. That's a legitimate way to declutter is actually finish it. And then wear the sweater or whatever it is that your knitting so so that that triggering that and then there's also the storage steph right. There's the the storage spaces of that limiting how much supplies that you can have for the future and I I. This is such a creative person thing. I mean this is such a you know. All the possibilities are really maybe just telling yourself that. I am going to declutter one of the things I am doing to declutter is I am finishing this chain. A project like this is legitimate use of my time in this whole cluttering because it also might help you go. This was a fun project or this. It was a really not fun project. I hated it and so I'm going to be able to get rid of all this similar to that type projects you know but when when it's just sitting there as a possibility it's herder. Yeah Yeah so give yourself permission to use your time to actually finish some things just to to get going. Yeah yeah now and just go through that I mean I would. I would work on just straightening that area I and giving yourself that permission. Listen to just do the easiest possible thing. Because you're going to like that `rumour you're going to be able to see more. You're going to have a lot better awareness of what's in it And as you you do that you know be following those ticket there right now and those things that the easy stuff especially that reveals itself. You're like Oh okay because most likely like you said overflow situation that's my experience you know it's like if there is a pile I'm going to make it bigger. You know so there are probably things that have just ended up there that writing have a home somewhere else so working on the easy stuff and taking it there right now is going to help you see that

Cluttering
Key takeaways from Ukraine diplomat Bill Taylor's 'explosive' opening statement

Erin Burnett OutFront

01:16 min | 2 years ago

Key takeaways from Ukraine diplomat Bill Taylor's 'explosive' opening statement

"Explosive testimony from was top diplomat in Ukraine Bill Taylor behind closed doors for ten hours and if you read just his fifteen page prepared opening statement you know that trump offered a quid pro quo period full stop end of story according to Taylor this opening statement itself is thorough it is detailed in Act for Taylor to read these fifteen pages took over an hour Taylor telling lawmakers that president trump used the powers of his office to push Ukraine to investigate Biden and the two thousand sixteen election and debunked conspiracy theory linked to that one of the most alarming admissions refers to the text message sent by Taylor to the ambassador to the EU Gordon Sunland back in September let me just remind you of that text message it said are we now saying that security assistance and White House meeting are conditioned on Investigations Solomon Response Calming Well Taylor revealing exactly what was said on that phone call and this comes from the opening statement. I WanNa read some of these lines that are really important he says during that phone call ambassadors Sunland told me the president trump had told him that he wants residents Alinsky to state publicly that Ukraine will investigate Burri sma

Bill Taylor Gordon Sunland Donald Trump Ukraine President Trump EU Biden Burri Sma White House Alinsky Ten Hours
"sma" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"sma" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"T. SMA M. el Paso is newsradio six ninety news radio I'm Brian shook Donald Trump is calling the impeachment inquiry against him a hoax speaking in Washington the president accused California democratic representative Adam Schiff of lying all over the place and that there was nothing wrong with this phone call with the president of Ukraine in July a conversation that I had with the Ukrainian president Phyllis Kay was a very good come it was a very cordial very good conversation tribes that a president cannot be impeached for doing a great job the president's taking heat from all directions for intending to pull troops out of northern Syria Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said a precipitous withdrawal will only benefit Russia Iran and the Assad regime while house speaker Nancy Pelosi called the move flat out foolish trump's former U. N. ambassador Nikki Haley labeled it a big mistake Kansas city mayor David all the says the weekend shooting in Kansas that left four people dead and five heard was not a random shooting but related to the suspect being kicked out of a bar hours earlier police chief Michael York said they're still searching for thirty year old Hugo villain a waiver more allies who is believed to be armed and dangerous nearly a hundred people were arrested at a climate change protest in lower Manhattan today James flip and has details the rally for the extinction rebellion a series of events planned worldwide to call on governments to do more about climate change the protesters looking to display what they view as the potentially dire consequences of inaction staging mock deaths near the New York Stock Exchange and throwing fake blood on the wall street's charging bull statute traffic was halted for a time on Broadway near Bowling Green as demonstrators were removed James Hoban NBC news radio New York health officials in Boston are reporting the state's first vaping related death there have been dozens of reports of possible long illness is caused by E. cigarettes in the state the only nine cases have been confirmed your listening to the latest from NBC news radio officials in Ohio are warning about a recent spike in overdoses in Columbus sandy Collins has that story it could once again be bad drugs on the streets the latest community in Ohio to put out a warning about a spike in overdoses is south of Columbus in Ross county five people have died in suspected overdose is in the last five days with three happening over the weekend toxicology reports are still pending but in similar instances another Ohio cities is often the unexpected presence of the powerful painkiller fentanyl mixed in with heroin people are encouraged to have the anti overdose struck the locks own handy it's available at the Ross county health district Amazon is unveiling its first kindle for kids it has a feature that will automatically provide the definition of difficult words it'll also turn any word looked up into a flash card the kindle kids edition sells for a hundred and ten dollars and pre orders begin today the device comes with the case two year guarantee and free books for a year for the first time on married couples visiting Saudi Arabia will be allowed to share hotel rooms a leases the has more until now couple said to provide proof they were married before they be allowed to share a room this is all part of a larger effort to attract tourism to the area and only applies to visitors from other countries foreign women traveling alone will all still be allowed to book rooms for the first time no longer being required to have a male chaperone like twenty thirty Saudi Arabia's hoping to attract one hundred million visitors every year and have tourism make up ten percent of the GDP or again is one of the best places to brew beer at the great American beer festival over the weekend breweries from the beaver state took home fifteen metals with Portland's break side brewery grabbing three the festival is considered the nation's most prestigious beer competition in all breweries from Oregon took home four gold medals Washington state took home fourteen metals but the state that won the most was California with sixty eight but.

All about TMAO with W.H. Wilson Tang, MD

Nutrition Rounds Podcast

14:22 min | 2 years ago

All about TMAO with W.H. Wilson Tang, MD

"All right in today's episode we we are with Dr Tang from Cleveland Clinic. I am beyond honored to have after Tang on the podcast. He is absolutely brilliant and I cannot appreciate appreciate more tank taking the time busy busy schedule to talk with us about. Tma Island off the research is not so thank you Dr Tank for joining us. Oh thank you Danielle pleasure to be here. Thank you so I I would want free to just introduce yourself and tell everyone kind of about what do and what your work is a cardiologist researcher well. I'm actually a heart transplant cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic and my day job I see patients with heart failure and trying into identify potential courses and trying to delay the progression and if unfortunately they get worse I try to see where what we could do with mechanical devices or transplants and then actually take care of them after wits so obviously that's very different from my research were which is trying to prevent that from happening it is too many people heading towards the same cliff and we definitely need to find ways to prevent ben from developing heart disease and more importantly heart failure absolutely and your research is is just outstanding. We'll everything you do is incredible. The heart failure and transplant is obviously very amazing aspect because so much is changing with our different not only medical therapies irby's but now with transplant and some of the mechanical circulatory support so it's really a dynamic changing an unbelievable feel. Your research is so groundbreaking and fascinating to me so I would love if you could give everyone. There's a lot of physicians scientists and Science Lovers listened to my podcast and a lot of them are interested interest in the work you did so. I'd love if you could kind of give an overview just starting kind of about what tm Ao is an and your work and how it relates to cardiovascular disease sure so I've always been fascinated by how heart how the heart interacts with other organs and in particular the kidneys and so for a long time I've been working with a different researchers to look at how the heart and the kidney interacts and my translational research has actually headed towards that direction early on where we were trying to find molecules in the blood that distinguish between those who progress develop you know kind of the events versus those who do not aw and early on I measured a lot of small molecules that we actually know to have kind of aspirations something like the adm a is symmetric saw Janine which is really an endogenous Netra. I'll say synthase inhibitor and also different small molecule metabolite so that's actually actually where I started looking at oxidative stress and nitrogen stress and how you know kind of using blood and urine we could actually detect early triggers that can can help us identify. You Know Progressive Diseases so we have this kind of. I did that potentially many unknown substances in the blood at also tell the same story and when we first started we have a mass SPEC machine that could identify different small molecule us and we have samples of patients who subsequently develop diseases that we have collected early on with a control group of those who did not develop disease so we actually try it over and over again using different incase controlled comparisons to look at a vast array of molecules small molecules usually under like a hundred Dalton and so America weight a hundred and trying to figure out you know these sma- accused whether they could distinguish patients who have events versus don't have events events and as you imagine when we keep going this case control you know comparison over and over again using different cohorts of samples we ended up saving down filtering down you know less and less number molecules until we hit about eighteen of them only after like multiple secessions off ah case controlled comparisons and so that actually seeps out from thousands of molecules through eighteen but then they all kind of in molecular weight the we actually don't know what they are art we knew one or two of them but we didn't know the rest and and so it's a hard work of a few postdoctoral fellows from Dr Stan Heathens lab that started working on literally figuring out the permutation combination of these potential compounds and then of course we have to validate date them as you can imagine many many difference. Amok you have to say molecular weight so if you think about it literally doing trial and error at that point that was it's kind of a hectic work but then we we certainly find three molecules in these eighteen that seemed to be correlating into each other and we were very perplexing what they are so we actually focus assets in looking in a band and it turns out the all having a Trimbe Isao group so three mess me sell that linked to link together and one of them seem to be a by product that is conversion version by humans but it was generated by bacteria in the literature so that's how we actually you know mentally got into the whole field of Gut microbiome grown obviously never predicted that this is going to happen but we started to be able to specifically identify the NFL which was try Michel and and Tommy fell and oxide superbeets I mean and so this is actually how we act on that and so after that we have you know obviously other samples that had long term outcomes and we started to kind of off generate and the perspective cohort of patients who we know over time had you know so a number of people have diseases and we started added to you know analyze those ampoules identify independently identify the pro value of Cameo in those cohorts which which was independent of all the traditional sectors and to demonstrate that indeed it may be a causative factor we have to turn to animal role models and conveniently the most model that we had had the bacteria and got that produces a good amount of tm that with your Mayo we learn about subsequently because some mouse actually don't have those bacteria that makes him a which becomes very very convenient for us otherwise but we the most common laboratory mouse list electric miles and in fact it does generate a lafayette meal when they were Fed with choline rolling diet chain a really comes from bacteria consumption of substrates that we the food that we eat every day so anything anything with me saw groups that they could actually use as food the bacteria used as food. ended up generating this torturing us. I protocol brought a copy emmy which it goes into the blood and through the liver and deliver. I should convert it to Tamil so the foods that are most post high in choline and carnitine which are the precursors when they go through the microbiome to go from t t mail so these you find find highest in you would say things like eggs and at red meat yeah meat liver. You know things that actually have high cholesterol electro. It's kind of some people even called it the third cholesterol and it is something that that the other thing that we as cardiologists tell patients to avoid for good balanced diet half high choline content now just be aware that choline is important some people. I feel quite strongly that in early development we do need cold into a precursor for Coleen which obviously is important for neural zero development so that's why it's actually Africa as a supplement for pregnant women and actually consumption guidelines guidelines for that and some older patients also use Coleen for that purpose thinking that they may actually help with reducing cognitive decline fine except that obviously the data there is not very strong but I think it is important to recognize this is where we found out later and improbably interesting to your audience that another compound that is common in foot- groups is commenting which is a meet and red meat in particular and that certainly has a different type of enzymes in different types of bacteria that convert the connotation into and subsequently lead to production of TM L. so I think that's where we have the the a unique opportunity to truly understand what the environment in this case that dietary intake and different food groups particularly meet and how that impact the body's response and also the metabolites produce when eating red meat. I not eating red yeah. That's fascinating and so when did you start to make the connection between TMA. Oh and Athar Genesis Platelet let aggregation atherosclerosis things like this yeah. This is actually quite early. Once we actually got the animal models going recognized at the mouth that we use indeed indeed when eating Choline fossils you're calling in particular lead to production of Cameo. Obviously we were able oh to start using the mouse model to look at after genesis so what we do is we were able to feed the mouse with without the choline content in detail and then this is the type of mouse flex most at more prone to development of Roma. This is so call eight now mice and so studies have actually shown that with like accelerated girls and and interestingly when we were well we were able to demonstrate firstly the bacteria is involved in this by giving both anybody and see whether the the cameo levels go down which they do but also for germ free mice when they don't have any gut flora where we did them choline lean diet they don't generate male or female but then when the mouse was exposed to kind of you know the the wild meaning they start doc accumulating gut bacteria `timeo production increases and the presence of this elevation leads to more through through ask the Roma and they order and when we give short-term anybody with a triple regimen something that you know stays in the bow for the four the mice we actually found that is attenuated. All these really have a direct cost-effective this now we could demonstrate you know almost like the cost postulate that we learn in in infectious disease microbiology that the presence of the bacteria is essentially making the metabolite and obviously tm AOL is also present some food particularly fish and seafood the task you I I was this is like the number one question to ask. You is in a preformed. TM In fish does this raise your humans ends and if so is a rise from that form of TMA. Oh bad for us it actually it does in fact if you actually have you you know just otherwise healthy individuals eat a wide variety of food which people have done experiments on that the the main food component that leads doue transient rise and fall and cameo is dish and particularly but not off fish half the email. You think Judy Logically Cameo. Oh is made by the muscles of the fish particularly deep sea fish because changes the melting of the the freezing point of the muscles. I was actually the muscles antifreeze so it provides a protection for the deep sea fish so that's why doesn't look like the fish in the freezer it actually make make make sufficient up freeze and so so impact people have done a lot of work in marine green biology on on this and in fact the enzymes made in fishes muscles that actually convert TMA os well alm aw generate and also eliminate because when fish you know moves from Coda to warmer waters. Actually some of this also changed so we actually actually know that not auditions created equal to not only from cameo levels but also their fish oil levels so you actually measured him. Ill level in say you know lake fish will Shallow Water Trish they actually timmy levels are quite low in back some of them. Are you know non you know very very low. Concentrations whereas deep sea fish like called and like you know a fish that we actually tuna in you know or

Cleveland Clinic Dr Tang Coleen Tma Island Dr Tank Danielle Irby Researcher Carnitine Janine Gut Microbiome NFL Mayo Trimbe Isao BEN Dr Stan Heathens Africa Dalton AOL Postdoctoral
"sma" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

06:23 min | 2 years ago

"sma" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Don't you dare not you had no don't SMA shorter shake your head laughing whatever shake your head right what's the stupid thing and you know I'm shaking my head SMA tried executive presidency Donna some aging check your you have because this in Facebook because she knows she knows if she is a very popular wildly successful center and possibly could overtake Biden and be our next president madam president she can do what Hillary couldn't she's amazing I was reading a book well no we just this woman is a native American you know should be our first native American president she was right about that a harness she speaks he rails against the people that make tons of money and companies but yet you know it's funny though she's been pushing as a as a Democrat senator US senator for years in championing expanding student loan acts sin having the government take over the student loan program as it has which of course has balloon and mushroomed that college debt well it's all made her a millionaire the very person she rails against she ash her husband a bold Harvard professor at Harvard is a not for profit institution just so you know and Pocahontas and her husband have now are now worth over twelve million dollars thanks to the Harvard salaries in Harvard jobs and Harvard pensions and Harvard savings accounts whatever just wonderful so now that she's a millionaire now you know now we had a million is a bad and the people that run the companies that own the companies are millionaires are bad but anyway let's just take her logic was all but one other thing she tells us amazing I write a column today about how she will not tell us exactly what her health care plan is because she does not have one but it is a Medicare for all it is taking away one hundred million Americans private insurance and she knows it because she agreed with Bernie Sanders plus don't one million dollars what the heck did all right don't leave me all of this well she wants to do his plan which is Medicare for all single payer system the hundred out the hundred million of us who have a private insurance will lot will lose it but the funniest thing is when asked repeatedly and repeatedly and repeatedly as of right now she continues to not give an example she has a she has no plan and don't believe me but don't believe me think I'm being hyperbolic go to her website yes Chris tell your listeners to go to my website you know what you'll find on her website her campaign website you will find an apology to the native American peoples for ripping them off for enriching yourself to become a millionaire by claiming she was a native American which she did all the way up until after she became the right after she right when she became tenured she pulled off and you stop calling seven American like that publicly on the all the applications and everything in that amazing right when she became ten years the she stopped doing the native American dance around the fire and you know all the chance but what did tell me I've got high cheek bones all you people like that you all have the check book I want to view so she apologizes for offending native American peoples for people's but she has nothing listed for a plan on healthcare she has no plans she only says well I'll do this this there's no plan like listed specifically okay don't believe me go to our website what shell shell project the ones that give your plan there is no plan now let's go do the big thing which she tells us that when when she was growing up you would make a you can support a family on a working at a burger joint are minimum wage okay Kamal Harris feels this way too by the way and then at her and once at least fifteen Bucks an hour now here's what Warren said and then we'll give the facts when I was a girl full time minimum wage job in America would support a family of three you tell he's put food on the table today full time wage job in America will not keep a mom all end up baby out of poverty that's wrong and that's what I mean in this fight so she wants to bring us back to what was going on when she was growing up as far as minimum wage right you know to meet so you can you can work a burger job and support of family three okay so that's what she wants to bring us back to where it was when she was there so let's go back to where she was and let's take the real dollars and see if that works Warren was born in nineteen forty nine let's assume her girlhood ended the age at age eighteen okay fair enough that's an if that's maximizing right when I was growing up okay eighteen nineteen sixty seven and I'm quoting John the glory from Ethan Allen institute in nineteen sixty seven the federal minimum wage was a dollar forty okay sounds low but that was nineteen sixty seven all right inflation assume the breadwinner work full time forty hours a week because that's what they say about it.

SMA executive twelve million dollars one million dollars forty hours ten years
"sma" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"sma" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"SMA M. el Paso is newsradio six ninety well federal prosecutors say they're planning to continue their investigation into the sex abuse allegations of Jeffrey abstain despite his death one of his accusers speaking out Lisa Matteo is more Michelle a cada attended Jeffrey apps dean's arraignment last month I'm I'm actually glad I got the chance to see him in the position where he was and where he was handcuffed and the judge was questioning him and lawyers were questioning him Licata says his death has brought her some type of closure her testimony was instrumental in the judge's decision to keep I've seen in jail without bail until his trial Lisa Matteo NBC news radio New York senator Ben Sasse chairman of the Senate Judiciary oversight subcommittee says it is inexcusable that abstain took his life while in federal custody he adds it is a failure on behalf of the government that he was not on suicide watch says calls up steam the serial rapist says his victims deserve deface their abuser in court but have been denied justice a seventy five year old man is a hero by all accounts after apparently averted a possible mass shooting at a Norwegian mosque Saturday a man in his twenty shot through the mosques locked door to gain entry as he was coming into the mosque the older man overpowered him with the choke hold until police arrived only one person suffered minor injuries in the mosque attack a former NFL quarterbacks preparing for a hearing Tuesday after admitting he broke into his ex girlfriend's apartment and tried to killer defense lawyers representing Brandon browner are asking a judge to allow their client to vacate his no contest.

M. el Paso Jeffrey Lisa Matteo Michelle Licata chairman Brandon browner Jeffrey apps dean Lisa Matteo NBC New York senator Ben Sasse Senate Judiciary NFL seventy five year
"sma" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"sma" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"S. M. K. T. SMA M. el Paso is newsradio six ninety news radio I'm Brian sure president trump is taking another route to making sure he knows how many non citizens are in the US trump abandon plans to ask about citizenship on the twenty twenty census but announced that he's ordering federal departments to turn over data on people's citizenship at the White House earlier today trump spoke about the new plan we will be able to insure the twenty twenty senses generates an accurate count of how many citizens non citizens and illegal aliens are in the United States of America trump also said that this data could help states determine how elections are administered officials in Louisiana are keeping an eye on the flood threat from tropical storm berry flooding will be the biggest threat from berry but forecasters now say that levees in New Orleans will likely be able to hold the rising Mississippi River the river was expected to rise twenty feet which would have matched or exceeded the height of levy walls president trump is slamming social media companies for discriminating against conservatives trump claimed during a social media summit that they would love to shut conservatives down trump said his own tweets are by passing a corrupt media establishment retired Boston Red Sox star David Ortiz underwent a third surgery earlier this week for complications from the gunshot wound Ortiz's wife says big papi is recovering well and in good spirits at Massachusetts General Hospital Ortiz was shot on June ninth at a bar in Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic authorities say the friend Ortiz was sitting with the was the intended target of the shooting Tom Roberts NBC news radio the sky diving company behind a fatal Hawaiian plane crash reportedly didn't have the proper state permits on June twenty first eleven people died when a sky diving plane crashed on a while who marking the worst civilian airplane crash since twenty eleven public documents released Wednesday show that the state department of transportation didn't have adequate permits on file for the company awhile who parachute center LLC you're listening to the latest from NBC news radio authorities are planning to arrest of thousands of illegal immigrants this Sunday following through on previously delayed raids in ten US cities James flippin reports immigration and customs enforcement agents have been ready to carry out raids in late June but those were put on hold apparently there were concerns that too much about the operation had been leaked to the press and made public the goal per reports is to target certain groups of illegal immigrants within so called sanctuary cities in which local authorities don't observe or enforce federal immigration law isis said that as circumstances allow families arrested together will be kept together at the tension centers in Texas and Pennsylvania where as many complain about parents facing charges being separated from children at the southern border James foreman NBC news radio New York AT and T. is becoming the first wireless company to automatically block spam calls the company said Wednesday it will block the nuisance calls by default the service is free and comes a month after the FCC voted to allow phone companies to block suspected spam calls by default the FBI is investigating a group of tattooed Los Angeles county sheriff's deputies in East Los Angeles some are calling the group Bandidos with badges the feds are looking into allegations of beatings planting evidence harassment and writing of falls incident reports the group brands themselves with matching tattoos of a skeleton outfitted in a sombrero with a loaded showcasing bandolier around its chest and a pistol the LA times is reporting that the FBI is also looking into similar groups within the department but sure if Alex Vienna waiver hasn't said anything about it yet Jason Kempin Donia NBC news radio former NFL great Joe Montana and his wife Jennifer have put their five hundred acre estate in napa valley up for sale the asking price of twenty eight point nine million dollars is actually forty one percent lower than what the couple listed at ten years ago back in two thousand nine the home belonging to the long time San Francisco forty nine or had been listed at forty nine million dollars Brian shook NBC news radio Hey guys it's soo pass or your favorite sexual health expert with another version of ask the pro this month I got a letter from sandy in Seattle about explosive bedroom secrets she and her husband recently discovered she writes dear sue my husband I used to have a great life in the bedroom but in the last few years he has struggled he's tried about everything but nothing has worked then one day he came home and gave me a night I will never forget he told me about the secret formula knocks a trail that changed her life in the bedroom once and for all well sandy you beat me.

S. M. K. T. SMA M. el Paso forty nine million dollars nine million dollars five hundred acre forty one percent twenty feet ten years one day
Ask the Points Guy for best deals on credit cards

Talking Tech

05:20 min | 2 years ago

Ask the Points Guy for best deals on credit cards

"Hiring is challenging, but there's one place you can go. We're hiring is simple. And smart that place is ZipRecruiter. Where growing businesses connect to qualified candidates. Try it for free at ZipRecruiter dot com slash tech talk. Ziprecruiter, the smartest way to hire. So we all wonder about some of these amazing deals with some of the new credit cards, and Sarah Silbert who is senior editor at the point sky specializes in a lot of these new cards from chase and American Express and other companies. She looks at all them to figure out who has the best deals. Sarah is with us here on talking tech. Hi, sarah. Hi fi here. Thanks for having me. Let's start with some of these deals. Sounds so incredible one hundred thousand miles sixty thousand miles eighty thousand miles to sign up from some of the new cards where should people start with making the decision? Yeah. Obviously can get extremely overwhelming looking at all these offers that why you always say it's like it's think about what you want to get out of mile. What are your travel resemble? If you want to travel Europe, looking at a carpet earned south West Point is not going to be your best option because they don't travel. So it's really all about looking at what you actually want to do with your travel rewards. And then picking the car that help you accomplish those goals. Okay. So there's a new Mariette bun vay card, which is offering one hundred thousand miles through April twenty fourth. I believe it's conveyed cost a the charges ninety five dollars in you have to spend five thousand dollars within a three month period to get your hundred thousand miles. I'd like to go to Japan to free tickets. There you go. Now, what did I miss on that one? Route. Yes. So the Marriott bombo boundless card. That's from chase. That is offering one hundred thousand points, what he needs to know there is that your own earning Marriott points, which if you re with Mary, I you can obviously book hotels within the combined Marriott, and Starwood brand you can also transfer them to various airlines could very well. Use that bonus to buy tickets or get Sma ward flights to Japan. Obviously, there's a little more work involved. If you're looking at transferring the points over to airline partners and looking at those different award charts, but Marriott points are very flexible. You have a lot of options in this great that you mentioned that. And they has now is a great time to sign up for that part. If it is interesting to you because you have opportunity to earn that elevated sign up on seven hundred thousand so many people have written d- the chase. Sapphire card was actually the best card. They were giving. One hundred thousand I think it's now's fifty or sixty thousand and but you have to pay four hundred fifty dollars a year to get it though, they pay some of that money back. Now, are you saying that a card like that will be more flexible on what airline you wanna fly on? Rip the cards take fire preserve and AmEx card. Like, the AmEx platinum you're able to redeem your points directly through to issue. So you don't necessarily have to transfer them to an airline or a hotel. But you have those options that by reserve like you mentioned it's currently offering a fifty thousand points nine opponents after spending four thousand dollars and check out the points guy for the latest reviews of credit cards, Sarah Silbert, reviews them, all and has them in her purse, right? Yeah. My birth my wallet. My my thoughts are mix. Okay. You can find Sarah's work at the point sky dot com. Right. Exactly. And if they want to read you on Twitter or anywhere else where how can they find your socially? I am parents Robert affair with an eight on fritter and on Instagram. All right. Sarah. Thanks so much for doing talking tech with us. I'm Jefferson Graham, thanks for listening to this show. You can find me on Twitter at Jefferson Graham, please subscribe to talking tech wherever you listen to online audio and I'll be back tomorrow with another quick hit from the world attack. Hiring used to be hard. It was and still is one of the biggest challenges businesses face before it meant dealing with endless stacks of resumes flipping through them. And hoping the perfect candidate would jump out at you and the manual review process wasn't any easier. But in today's high tech world hiring can be easy. And you only have to go to one place to get it done. Ziprecruiter dot com slash tech, talk with their powerful matching technology. Ziprecruiter scans thousands of resumes to find the most qualified contenders for your job. And actively invites them to apply. Ziprecruiter is so effective that four out of five employers who post on the site get a qualified candidate within the first day and right now talking tech listeners can try ZipRecruiter for free at this exclusive web address, ZipRecruiter dot com slash tech talk. That's ZipRecruiter dot com slash T. E C H T A L K, ZipRecruiter dot com slash tech talk. Ziprecruiter, the smartest way to hire.

Sarah Silbert Ziprecruiter Japan Marriott Twitter Marriott Bombo Jefferson Graham Europe Senior Editor Sma Ward West Point American Express T. E C H T Starwood Robert Mary Four Hundred Fifty Dollars Five Thousand Dollars Four Thousand Dollars Ninety Five Dollars
"sma" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"sma" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"At the end of twenty seventeen Chinese company called by dance. But musically for nearly a billion dollars the already owned a separate app called tick tock, which sort of did what musically did. So they merged two and tick tock as we know it today was born ready to take the world by storm the company grew and morphed into these social media giant the new kid on the block with more than five hundred million monthly active users worldwide, that's according to their own figures. And so under scrutiny the company brought in new tools and policies to handle some of the problems that had plagued musically. Kids have a little bit more control over their accounts in the settings. That's Christine Elga Sma. She works for a nonprofit organization in the US called common sense media. They advise parents on how to help that children U stech -nology safely. She's been looking at some of. The tool stick talk brought into play in recent years. So there's a privacy and safety section where kids can control if they're accounts are private or public. They can control who can comment if people can comment who can contact them. And there's also a restricted feature that is password or passcode protected so that if parents want to try to limit the amount of explicit videos that kids can see parents have that option. Now, ask yourself if this is inap- which children in the early early teens can be found can really guarantee they'll be safe online. Can they guarantee that while on the app these teenagers can be shielded from sexual comments made by adults from grooming? Even that's coming up next. I'm.

Christine Elga Sma US billion dollars
"sma" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"sma" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"If you haven't heard it, just see Sma. Let's lawyer says that he small wet fought the Nigerian brothers were white because they were wearing makeup. The Nigerian brothers put on Whiteface Smolensk thought that they were white. That's why he thought that they were Trump agitators. For crying out. Would you look at the literal pollution of everything public in this country that the left ends up touching? Whiteface the Nigerian brothers put on white face. There makes me think that they were trumpets. So the racism triples down now. In addition to the insanity. Here is President Trump last night explaining. Why he hasn't declassified all of the FIS documents. And all the investigation documents. They'll let everybody know everything that has been memorialized on paper about this investigation. I do I have plans to declassify and release by have plans to absolutely release. But I have some very talented people working for me lawyers. And they really didn't want me to do it early on. I'm glad I didn't do it. We got a great result without having to do it. But we will one of the reasons that my lawyers did want me to do it is they said if I do it they'll call it a form of obstruction. You know in politics here transparency would make it transparent, and they'd call it obstruction knowing the people we're dealing with. So frankly, I thought it would be better if we held it to the no, but at the right time, we will be absolutely released. I'm gonna tell you what the temptation, I'm sure to declassify. This stuff has been overwhelming. And he's right about something. They would have called an obstruction. And it doesn't matter that it would not have been in no way. What declassifying that the anything, but informative? It would further the investigation along it would help people to better understand what happened, but I'll Garin damned here. The New York Times the Washington Post and all of those reprobate cable networks Trump's exactly right? They'd be harping on the fact that it was nothing, but obstruction, and of course, it narrative, it'd be created. And that's all that anybody would be dealing with Mr President, Mr president you obstructed by by bye. And as much as we wanted that stuff declassified. It was probably a wise call, but the time to do it is now. The time is now move on. After don't move on. Don't be passive declassify all this stuff. Move onto audio sound bite number four, and this is rand Paul this morning, FOX and friends Brian Kilmeade. What can you tell us about the lead that you got rand Paul is telling everybody in a high level source told him that John Brennan was behind the dissemination of the doc-. My source tells me that the intelligence community Obama's intelligence community, Brandon Clapper, Komi they were frustrated because they had this Russian dossier. But nobody believed it was real nobody would publish it. Because it was so scandalous on verifiable and likely fiction. So finally, they decided well what we have to do is attach this fake dossier to an intelligence report what they do is they stapled to the report the Russian dossier. So now Obama's officially seeing it, and then also it's.

President Trump rand Paul Whiteface Smolensk Mr President Obama FIS Brandon Clapper Brian Kilmeade John Brennan FOX Komi Washington Post The New York Times
"sma" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"sma" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Newcomer to the scene because he's a newcomer. I'm assuming he's a little bit on the younger side thirty nine forty five. Wow. Yeah. See? Yeah. He seems older. But because he's so new I thought he was younger Vigo Mortenson go Morton. Fifty fifty. Sixty. Wow. Yes. Stephen Dorf also came up on this list. How old is Stephen door? He's got to be a forty. I'm going to ask you the same age Sma Herschel, a forty five you are exactly right. Exactly, right. Anybody else Rami Malik Rami? How old is Rami Malik. He's a young guy. I would put him at. Thirty. How old is Rami? Malik four thirty four thirty seven. We'll get you out of here with two more Octavia Spencer. Forty. Eight. Dispenser. Forty six years old one year older than Mahershala Ali. Let's get to a fun one here. Sam Rockwell Sam Rockwell. Forty. Thanks. You do fifty years old. And thank you. Welcome to the bonus round. Sam. Seventy three seventy four good..

Rami Malik Rami Rami Malik Sam Rockwell Sam Rockwell Stephen Dorf Stephen door Vigo Mortenson Sma Herschel Octavia Spencer Mahershala Ali Forty six years fifty years one year
"sma" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"sma" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Relative newcomer for the scene. Mommy, because he's a newcomer assuming he's a little bit on the younger side thirty nine forty five. Wow. Yeah. See? Yeah. He seems older. But because he's so new I thought he was younger Vigo Mortenson Vigo Mortenson. Fifty six. Sixty. Yes. Stephen Dorf also came up on this list. How old is Stephen door? He's got be forty. I'm gonna ask you the same age Sma Herschel, a Forty-five. You are exactly right. Exactly, right. Anybody else Rami Malik Rami? How old is Rami Malik. He's a young guy. I would put him at. Thirty. How old is Rami? Malik four thirty four thirty seven. We'll get you out of here with two more Octavia Spencer. Forty. Eight. Dispenser. Forty six years old. Older than Muhammad Ali. Let's get to fun one here. Sam Rockwell Sam Rockwell forty. Do do fifty years old. The game. And the thank you. Welcome to the Buddhist round Sam. Seventy three seventy four good..

Rami Malik Rami Rami Malik Vigo Mortenson Vigo Mortenson Sam Rockwell Sam Rockwell Stephen Dorf Stephen door Sma Herschel Octavia Spencer Muhammad Ali Forty six years fifty years
"sma" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"sma" Discussed on Accelerate!

"But I think you're absolutely right this and you talk about throughout the book about the value of the relationship. And it's funny though, the early two thousand eighteen there were people you, and I both know talking seriously semi seriously about the value their lack of value of relationships and sales, which I have disagreed with more strongly. And and said so at the time, where's that come from? Why when your opinion, where's it come from? I think right now for some reason in particularly on linked in for some reason, there tends to be the statement of an idea as fact that excludes any other idea from being able to exist in the same space. So you can either be likable or you can be competent. But you can't be both. So. So you can be really smart and have great ideas and challenged people or you can have good relationships with people where where you have trust in carrying and being known liked and trusted still matter and every time I see this. I think the person that when you see an idea that's displayed in those terms take the word or out and throw it away and just put an end because you should be super competent and super smart and able to challenge someone's view, which I call mindshare ship shifting the lens at they're looking at the world through and you should be somebody that they actually want to do business with those two ideas are not musically exclusive. But I think some of the conceit ear that you see in Lincoln as because I'm not likeable, then I'm going to say that it doesn't have to be important in the mistake. That's being made there as the detriment is not being a likable person being likable is super helpful. And look if we're being honest, if you're super attractive, you've got great Krimmer Sma your. Super likable year reports goes are probably faster than everybody else's because that's the unfair way that the world happens to stretch..

Krimmer Sma Lincoln
"sma" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"sma" Discussed on Accelerate!

"You're gonna your next book you have to play on that more specifically. A and sales. Yeah. I don't mean. Artificial intelligence. We manage our entire sales process. There we go perfect. But I think you're absolutely right. I met this. And you talk about throughout the book about the value of the relationship, and it's funny. The early two thousand eighteen there were people you, and I both know talking seriously semi seriously about. Yeah. The value their lack of value relationships and sales, which I have disagreed with more strongly. And and said so at the time, where's that come from? Why when your opinion, where's it come from? I think right now for some reason and particularly on linked in for some reason, there tends to be the statement of an idea as fact that excludes any other idea from being able to exist in the same space. So you can either be likable or you can be competent. But you can't be both. So you can be really smart and have great ideas and challenge people or. You can have good relationships with people where where you have trust in carrying and being known liked and trusted still matter and every time I see this. I think the person that when you see an idea that's displayed in those terms take the word or out and throw it away and just put an end because you should be super competent and super smart and able to challenge someone's view, which I call mindshare ship shifting the lens at they're looking at the world through and you should be somebody that they actually want to do business with those two ideas are not musically exclusive. But I think some of the conceit your that you see in Lincoln as because I'm not likeable, then I'm going to say that it doesn't have to be important in the mistake. That's being made there as the detriment is not being a likable person being likable is super helpful. And look if we're being honest, if you're super attractive, you've got great Krimmer Sma, you're super likable, your reports are probably faster than everybody else's because that's the unfair..

Krimmer Sma Lincoln
"sma" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

03:17 min | 3 years ago

"sma" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

"What would most human beings if we do if they missed their first four in the first quarter? He missed four threes in a row. What would most people do they'd go right in the tank and say, I'm not even gonna try it anymore till I can go have own golden MB Kaku Sma has no conscience. He has no memory. He has the greenest light in the NBA I- Negra hard, well or a Russ, you know, one of those. But but the point is he doesn't have any idea. What just happened? He's gonna shoot it again if it comes to him he's going to shoot it again. So we get all the way to the third quarter, and he makes seven of ten shots third quarter including four or five threes because his shot looked off to me when he missed the first four it's like he's looking at his hand like it just looks wrong. Like, he's like. Sort of pulling the strings, Jack. And all of a sudden he found the magic flow, and it starts to fall and he made so many four threes in the third quarter. He didn't play a minute of the fourth quarter and scored forty one points. That's hard to do. There are not many who can do that in this league, not many humans can do though that is second star quality that you saw on. Right. Okay. So the other shocking stat last night on this team was if I told you that only two Lakers would score in the fourth quarter albeit against Detroit, but it's still an NBA game only to Lakers would score points in the fourth quarter. But they would win the fourth quarter twenty four to twenty three who would be your likely candidates Kuzina, B I, Josh hark, SEP what right guess who scored for the Lakers only two guys in the fourth quarter. Michael Beasley scored fifteen in the fourth quarter. That's also hard to do that's fifteen and one quarter. He get buckets the rest of the game on. But I'm just saying he's he's a nice addition esteem trust me down the stretch if they do make a run up to the four spot. He's going to start having more and more to do with this because he has a gift, man. He can just flat out on the floor is rare, and you guys do bites had nine plu. So those are the only two guys scored because no starter played in the fourth and it's twenty four to twenty three Lakers over pistons and the fourth well that shows you the depth and the firepower you got on your bench this team magic Pelinka. They put together a pretty nice ride. And the thing I like I like their three headed monster at center with mcgee's zoo botching entice, and they all give you different looks obviously Chandler's veteran. I like that kouzmine Winnie was off initially. He drove he started driving to the vast guests, which is something or does it do a ton of. So he went to the whole. And obviously got hot friends. How coups my had a grand total last night, I zero assists. Okay. Let's who he is. Okay. And Lonzo he sort of got back to doing Lonzo stuff. He had eleven assists. And he had that one signature play where he went down and blocked shop behind got the basketball, drove it up, and he dimed it between two pistons on the bounce boom. I think we're going to see it right here blocked from behind takes off. This is Dan this is vintage now that's a sweet that's LeBron asked Ron would throw touch pass to touch the donate to MaGee with him. Is is that..

Lakers Michael Beasley Chandler Russ Josh hark Jack NBA pistons basketball Detroit MaGee Dan Kuzina LeBron mcgee Ron one quarter