36 Burst results for "SCIENTIST"

Fresh update on "scientist" discussed on City Lights

City Lights

01:49 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "scientist" discussed on City Lights

"Believes that the United States and Russia can have a stable and predictable relationship that there are areas where we can work together like arms control. And that the U. S. And Russia should sit down together at the leaders level in a summit between President Biden and President Putin to discuss all of the issues facing our relationship. He spoke to CNN. Inspector general for the U. S. Capitol. Police will testify at a congressional hearing today. NPR's Claudia Gonzalez reports he's issued an explosive report about the agency leaders failures to properly respond to the January 6th insurrection. Inspector General Michael Bolton is expected to tell Congress that Capitol police must shift from a reactionary role to a protective posture. Bolton is expected to share findings from his extensive report detailing how the agency's leadership decisions hampered their response. Here's Ohio Democrat Tim Ryan, whose committee oversees Capitol police mean these men and women were betrayed by their leadership. And and put in unwinnable situation. And now we're you know, dealing with the fall out of that. Bolton said The agency also failed to prioritize its own intelligence that the capital would be the target of violence. Cloud, agrees Ellis NPR NEWS Washington On Wall Street, the Dow was up 272 points. The NASDAQ is up 168. This is NPR. The Labor Department says first time requests for unemployment claims dropped sharply last week to 576,000. This is the lowest level for initial claims since the pandemic began in March of last year. Data point to a recovering economy after Congress passed trillions of dollars in relief aid and the steady rollout of covert 19 vaccines. For the first time, scientists have created embryos that are part human, part monkey. The scientists created the embryos for medical research. But as NPR's Rob Stein reports, the experiment raises ethical concerns. An international team of scientists injected 25 human stem cells into 132 monkey embryos. And we're able to keep these part human part monkey embryos alive for up to 19 days, The researchers say the experiment provided new insights into how human and animal cells communicate. That could lead to important clues into human development, aging and the cause of many diseases and eventually help them grow human organs and animals for transplant into patients. But some bioethicists worry someone may take this work even further and try to create fully formed creatures that are part human, part animal. Rob Stein. NPR NEWS The United Nations is asking for international help for the eastern Caribbean island of ST Vincent. Islands Active volcano has erupted several times in the past few days..

Claudia Gonzalez Rob Stein Congress CNN Ellis Bolton Tim Ryan 576,000 25 Human Stem Cells NPR Washington Last Week 132 Monkey Embryos Trillions Of Dollars United Nations 272 Points 19 Vaccines St Vincent Russia January 6Th
Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine will remain in limbo a while longer

AP News Radio

01:03 min | 18 hrs ago

Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine will remain in limbo a while longer

"U. S. health advisers are telling the government to keep the Johnson and Johnson covert nineteen vaccine on hold for now while they seek more evidence into the rare occurrence of blood clots developing the U. S. centers for disease control hosted an emergency public meeting on the risk of blood clots developing after the J. and J. cobit shot was administered the health advisors say they need more data to first decide if the six cases of blood clots are from the shot and if yes then how large is the risk European regulators are looking into similar reports with AstraZeneca scientists dare say it's possible some people are experiencing an abnormal immune response to the vaccines forming antibodies that are disabling their platelets U. S. health officials say don't be worried by the flu like symptoms that often follow a vaccination it's severe headaches and severe abdominal pain one to two weeks after the shots that are under investigation Jackie Quinn Washington

U. S. Centers For Disease Cont J. Cobit Johnson Government Astrazeneca FLU Headaches Jackie Quinn Washington
Interview With Ylan Kazi of UnitedHealth Group

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

02:40 min | 1 d ago

Interview With Ylan Kazi of UnitedHealth Group

"So we always love having guests on our podcast because they bring such different and unique perspectives as we have mentioned if you've listened to our podcast in the past cognitive because research and education firm. So we do spend some podcasts interviewing guests and other podcasts key insights into the ai and cognitive technology market also explain how different industries are applying artificial intelligence. And so ron mentioned it's always great that We get to talk to people from so many industries because we get to see what's going on so our guest today were so excited to have us alon qazi who's vice president data science and machine learning at united health group high ilan. Thanks so much for joining us. You first we'd like to start by introducing yourself to our listeners. And tell them a little bit about your background and your current role at the united health group causey. And right now. I lead a team of data scientists at united health group. My team focuses on improving. Health outcomes for medicare members in using science in earnings focused on quality within healthcare. In terms of my background. I come from a little bit more non traditional background than the many of my peers. Those rules still action started off. My career in healthcare resulting. And i was mainly doing consulting with provider organizations and some healthcare. It consulting in there. I actually moved number. It's for a huge retailer. And i was working for their healthcare division a focusing a lot on different business analytics and really starting to Use different needs and from their got movie. Where for five and a half years. During that time. I've led many different types of not only data science teams but also different teams And a lot of what i know today was actually more than ten years ago to get into science at do a lot of that work on my own hired more data scientists along with just learning learning prevent irene very talented very hard.

United Health Group Alon Qazi United Health Group High Ilan Causey RON Medicare
COVID in Your Genes: The Risk Factors

Naked Genetics

02:33 min | 1 d ago

COVID in Your Genes: The Risk Factors

"Since march we've been discussing how. Covert nineteen varies between different people depending on their genes and back at the start. The evidence was patchy. Look how far we've come a recent study combines. The work of a couple thousand geneticists using dna kindly contributed for millions of people around the world to pin down which common genetic variations are doing us dirty. The study hasn't yet been peer reviewed. But it's such a large collaboration that we're going to spend the whole program learning what they've found hughes geneticists nathan pearson from the cove in nineteen hosts genetics initiative. We have uneven examples where human genetic variation shapes who gets given infection and maybe shapes how severely they get it at cetera so we had kind of a hunch going in like other infectious diseases. This might play out similarly and given. That's our expertise. That's our our bailiwick. What can we bring to the table along with everyone else from you know. Virologists themselves to public health. Scientists to people are studying all facets at every scale of society and our response to it. What can we bring to understanding. How responses vary perhaps in part by the genetic spellings the dna in us. And did you have a hunch. About how much of role. Genetics would play personally. I didn't go in with a strong hunch. Either way and i think that people who are more expert in corona viruses or in viruses generally in in our responses to them might have gone in with stronger or weaker. Hunches on that front but for me it was sort of an open question and i think for a lot of our colleagues we felt similarly we. We weren't gonna put all our chips on that part of the of of the board but that we might have some say let they give you an example. There you know one of the better studied viruses before this one that afflicts people was hiv. And we know for example that human genetic variation in a couple of parts of our genome strongly shapes who gets hiv generally controls the load of that virus over time. It's a very different kind of virus so we can't extrapolate too much from hiv because it stays in us. It's a retrovirus. But we knew that it played a role in addition to the variation hiv one hiv to etcetera in the virus. Itself

Nathan Pearson Hughes
Japan to start releasing Fukushima water into sea in 2 years

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:29 min | 2 d ago

Japan to start releasing Fukushima water into sea in 2 years

"Japan's government decided on tuesday to start releasing massive amounts of treated radioactive water from the wrecked fukushima nuclear plant into the pacific ocean in two years. An option fiercely opposed by local fishermen and residence the decision long speculated but delayed for years due to safety concerns and protests. Came at a meeting of cabinet ministers who endorse the ocean. Release as the best option. The accumulating water has been stored in tanks the fukushima plant since two thousand eleven when a massive earthquake and tsunami damaged reactors and the cooling water became contaminated and began leaking. The plant's operator. Tokyo electric power company said it. Storage capacity will be full late next year. The prime minister said the ocean release was the most realistic option and the disposing. The water is unavoidable for the decommissioning of the fukushima plant which is expected to take decades some scientists say the long term impact on marine life from low dose exposure to such large volumes of water is unknown onto the basic plan adopted by the ministers. Tepco will start releasing the water in about two years after building a facility under the regulatory authorities safety requirements. It said the disposal of the water cannot be postponed further as it's necessary to improve the environment surrounding the plant. So residents can live there safely.

Pacific Ocean Japan Cabinet Tsunami Earthquake Tokyo Tepco
Odds of Leaving Military Double After Sexual Assault

WBUR Programming

00:49 sec | 2 d ago

Odds of Leaving Military Double After Sexual Assault

"Floyd staff. Groups who experienced sexual trauma are more likely to leave the service early. That's according to a report released this spring by the RAND Corporation. Carson Frame of Texas Public Radio has more on how sex crimes impact military readiness. The rand surveyors found that sexual assault double the odds that a service member would separate the term for leaving the military within 28 months. Meanwhile, sexual harassment was associated with roughly 8% of all separations during the same time period. Andrew Morale is a behavioral scientist with the Rand corporation. We all know I think that sexual assault sexual harassment has tremendous costs to the individuals involved in it. But Think less attention has been paid to what the institutional costs are Moral says most of those who separated did so by choice, often sacrificing

Carson Frame Texas Public Radio Rand Corporation Floyd Andrew Morale
Israel Appears to Confirm Cyberattack on Iran Nuclear Facility

PBS NewsHour

02:00 min | 2 d ago

Israel Appears to Confirm Cyberattack on Iran Nuclear Facility

"A major explosion disabled parts of Iran's uranium enrichment facility at Natanz south of Tehran. Iran quickly blamed Israel as John Yang tells us this also comes is in direct talks between the U. S and Iran over the 2050 nuclear deal are set to resume later this week. The facility was knocked off line just hours after launching its new advanced centrifuges. Tehran said Sunday's blackout at the Natanz facility, considered a centerpiece of Iran's uranium enrichment program had caused a fire. They called it an act of nuclear terrorism and blamed Israel on all the various sources confirmed that the Zionist regime was behind this incident, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said Natanz would be rebuilt to more quickly enrich uranium state media quartered him is saying Zionist wanted to take revenge against the Iranian people for their success on the path of lifting sanctions. And he said Iran will take revenge for this action in Israel media widely reported that the country's spy agency orchestrated the sabotage even though officials have not claimed responsibility. But speaking in Jerusalem today, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Israel would never permit Iran to have a nuclear weapon. I will never allow Iran to obtain the nuclear capability to carry out its genocidal goal of eliminating Israel. And Israel will continue to defend itself against Iran's aggression and terrorism. Hostility between the two countries has played out in recent years. There were serious of clandestine attacks from a mysterious explosion at Natanz last July to November's death of the Iranian scientists who launched the nuclear program decades ago. And Iran intern is carried out its own attacks on at least two Israeli owned cargo ships.

Iran Israel John Yang Tehran Natanz Facility Mohammad Javad Zarif Natanz U. Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Jerusalem
COVID-19 Infections Are Increasing Globally

PRI's The World

01:57 min | 2 d ago

COVID-19 Infections Are Increasing Globally

"Is kind of the pulse of this. Pandemic globally right now alana. Where are we at with infections. Well the big picture of marco is that the world is actually experiencing a steady increase in infections leaders at the. Who again sounded the alarm today. Because it's been seven straight weeks of rising infections actually is some of the highest surges yet in the pandemic and it's been four weeks streep of reisen deaths would areas most impacted. We have a sense of that. So i talked with ali mokdad about this. He's with the institute for health metrics at the university of washington and he's been modeling this pandemic since the start he says what's going on in five regions really stands out so i that is an increase in brazil. That snow started to come down so brazil is the big one. Neighboring countries like argentina and chile are now starting to experience rises to and then here the other hot spots this a big rise which still going on in india pakistan bangladesh at bark that is an increase in europe and the middle east following. What's your doping seeing. That is a. It is in cases in the philippines and that this is in south africa and african country. That's now started to come down so the fact that infections are increasing globally even parts of the us. We don't want to forget that. That really worries him. I mean it sounds like overall the world is just not close to controlling this virus. Do scientists have a handle on why cases continued to rise even with vaccines. Is it now all about the variants. Not points to the variance and lots of scientists do variants like be one one seven have become a dominant in europe and this has been found to be more transmissible. But there's another strong message. I'm hearing from a lot of scientists like angela rasmussen. she's just at georgetown. And as of this month the university of saskatchewan which is that these rises are not just from variants like the breakthrough masking and distancing another really important prevention

Ali Mokdad Institute For Health Metrics Alana Brazil Marco University Of Washington Chile Argentina Bangladesh Europe Pakistan Middle East Philippines South Africa India Angela Rasmussen United States University Of Saskatchewan Georgetown
St. Vincent residents evacuating amid volcanic eruption

Purity Products

00:52 sec | 3 d ago

St. Vincent residents evacuating amid volcanic eruption

"On ST Vincent are fleeing. The final evacuees made their way to safety. A day after the last U Fear volcano erupted with an explosion that shook the ground spewed ash skyward and blanketed the island in a layer of fine volcanic rock. The eruption is its first large one since 1979. Ash covered everything creeping into homes, cars and noses on a strong Sophus smell lingered in the air evacuate to wanna, Burke says she's hoping the eruption will end soon. I am scared. I'm just hoping for the best so that everything can be over so I can go behold, local resident foreigner Helix says She's been through this before you up. Did I was nine years old. Now I'm 50 years old. Scientists warn that the explosions could continue for days or even weeks and That the worst could be it to come. I'm Karen Sharma's news and

St Vincent Burke Helix Karen Sharma
Ash-covered St. Vincent braces for more volcanic eruptions

AP News Radio

00:59 sec | 4 d ago

Ash-covered St. Vincent braces for more volcanic eruptions

"The last few people remaining in the area closest to an erupting volcano in the eastern carribean island of Saint Vincent have face to get clear the final evacuees made their way to safety at day off to the last two free apple K. no rocketed with an explosion that shook the ground speed ask I would and blanketed the island in a layer of fine volcanic rock the eruption is its first large ones since nineteen seventy nine US covered everything creeping into homes because the noise is on a strong sulfur smelling it in the air evacuee to one a Bucks says she's hoping the eruption will end soon I am a bed I'm just hoping for the best set up everything comes over so I can go back home local resident veranda Hicks says she's been through this before did I was nine years old now I'm fifty years old scientists warn that the explosions could continue for days or even weeks said that the worst could be yet to come I'm Karen Thomas

Eastern Carribean Island Saint Vincent Veranda Hicks Apple United States Karen Thomas
New Research Finds Daydreaming Is Good for Our Health

Healing Quest

02:03 min | 4 d ago

New Research Finds Daydreaming Is Good for Our Health

"Just published in the journal Emotions. Suggests that directed daydreaming can really be good for us as compared with the standard daydreaming, which usually has a lot of anxious or negative thoughts. The study was conducted by Aaron West Gate, a psychology professor at the University of Florida. Along with colleagues at Harvard and the University of Virginia. They want us to turn our idle moments to daydreaming about pleasant thoughts, which will boost our well being. What they mean by pleasant thoughts. They suggest things like happy Memories. Future accomplishments are maybe an event you're looking forward to. Participants in the study say they enjoyed directed daydreaming 50% more than when they simply thought about whatever came into their minds. The goal is to direct your daydreaming along a positive path, Tioga yourself a sense of relief and happiness. The result could be a longer life. That's a good result. One study found that over 30 years happy people had a 14% lower risk of dying early compared to unhappy people. That doesn't surprise me really. And in fact, researchers even have AH, happiness exercise to suggest Step One is making a list of five meaningful and pleasant things in your life. Step two is is sitting in a quiet spot and breathing slowly and letting your mind wander over those topics for maybe about five minutes, And the result, scientists say, is that you'll have more optimism and resilience in your day. Sounds like meditation like to me. And it's Dobson another way to get that done. And by the way, if you can do your daydreaming outside in nature, the benefits are even bigger. Remember that story we did a while ago on the so called nature pill. Researchers at the University of Michigan have determined that taking 20 minutes to stroll or sit in a place that makes you feel connected with nature can efficiently lower the stress hormone cortisol in your system. Researchers did the study to give healthcare practitioners evidence based guidelines on how to help their patients deal with the stress of urban life.

Aaron West Gate University Of Florida University Of Virginia Tioga Harvard Dobson University Of Michigan
Electric grid 'accident' strikes Iran's Natanz nuclear facility

News, Traffic and Weather

00:17 sec | 4 d ago

Electric grid 'accident' strikes Iran's Natanz nuclear facility

"Iran's Natanz nuclear scientist apparently suffered a meltdown of its electrical distribution grid, state TV reports that happened just hours after starting up new advanced centrifuges that more quickly enriched uranium. It's the latest incident in Iran amid negotiations over its nuclear program with world leaders.

Iran
YouTube Pulls Florida Governor's Video, Citing Misinformation

The Car Guys

00:20 sec | 5 d ago

YouTube Pulls Florida Governor's Video, Citing Misinformation

"Is pulling a video of Florida Governor Ron Descent as for allegedly spreading misinformation. Video contains two sentences Roundtable discussion about covert 19 with a panel of noted scientists. YouTube says the video included content that contradicts the consensus of local and global health authorities when it comes to the effectiveness of masks, preventing the spread of covert 19.

Governor Ron Descent Florida Youtube
YouTube pulls Florida governor's video, citing misinformation

The News & Why It Matters

01:08 min | 5 d ago

YouTube pulls Florida governor's video, citing misinformation

"Youtube has deleted a video in which Florida governor rhonda's santa's and by the way a bunch of medical experts so actual doctors Questioned the effectiveness of having children wear masks to stop the spread of covid so the video was removed wednesday and there was so scientists was joined by oxford geologist Harvard professor Dr scott lists and another doctor from stanford and because they were contributing to covid. Nineteen medical misinformation. They had the they had the the whole video removed. So by the way to santa's at one point in the video asked if it was necessary for kids to wear masks in school and dr one of the doctors in response said children should not wear face masks. They don't need it for their own production and they don't need it for protecting other people either. Another doctor said it is developmentally in appropriate. It doesn't help on disease spread. And of course doctor said there's no scientific rationale or logic to have children wear masks in

Rhonda's Santa Oxford Geologist Harvard Dr Scott Youtube Florida Stanford Santa
Wet Notes - 4-9-21

Scuba Shack Radio

07:46 min | 6 d ago

Wet Notes - 4-9-21

"This is wet notes here scuba shock radio for april ninth two thousand and twenty one first up today. I'd like to give you an update on new netflix. Documentary see spiracy. You might recall that. I introduced you to this film in a previous segment of wet notes. Well it did premiere on netflix's advertised. And i had a chance to watch. She spiracy a couple of weeks ago. The film is eighty nine minutes long and it can be captivating and controversial. Like i said this is certainly raising a great deal controversy especially as it relates to sustainable seafood and fishing. There's a couple of organizations that they called out into spiracy earth island institute and the marine stewardship council actually marine stewardship council issued a response on their website within days of the premier and every day. I see something more coming out related to the controversy. But i encourage you to watch the film and then decide for yourself about what it is saying like. I said lots of controversy. That's spiracy on net flicks now. Here's something that. I found really interesting. I came across an article that talked about how scientists are using thin wales to map out what lies beneath the sea floor. Now according to to seismologists vaclav kina from the czech academy in prague and john nab elec of oregon state university in corvallis oregon the song of the fin. Whales are loud enough to penetrate the earth's crust and revealed deep structures. I guess they have a network of fifty four bottomed size meter seismometers that the tech sound waves traveling through the ground and they picked up the of whales as they were passing by. Now they have a one hundred and eighty nine decibels song and that song can last from two and a half to five hours as they did more analysis they were able to map the underlying rock structures. According to these guys this is just as effective as those air cannons that are polluting the ocean with all that noise how practical this is yet to be seen. But you've gotta admit it is interesting. Now here's an update on the lectured aluminum tanks situation. You might recall back at the end of february. I told you about luxembourg Decision to exit the aluminum tank business and that they were looking to sell their plants in the us and the uk more. Here's some good news. Metal impact out of elk grove village in illinois is acquiring the graham north carolina luxembourg cylinder plant metal impact is no stranger to scuba tank business. They've been around since nineteen fifty nine and in two thousand fourteen. They purchase worthington. Aluminum cylinders has been providing aluminum scuba tanks to excess scuba and see pearls for a number of years. We've got quite a few from excess scuba over the past couple of years and so we're pretty familiar with metal impacts. This is some good news for the. Us aluminum Scuba tank supply chain. There's absolutely no doubt that. The pandemic has had a dramatic impact on the scuba industry. But i guess it's not all bad news if you happen to be in the right place and it seems that hawaii is those right places especially for new diver certifications. There's a recent article in scuba diving magazine. Titled more hawaiians getting certified than before the pandemic turns out that even though the travel has been restricted to and from the islands more locals are turning to scuba aloha scuba on awad who had reported a one hundred and twenty percent increase in new diver certifications. In two thousand and twenty. They went from twenty seven in two thousand and nineteen to eighty three in two thousand and twenty spurred by whole families going for they're open water certification with some great diving. It certainly makes sense to mask up and dive in our aloha state. Last week i was trying to see if the ocean based climate solutions act of two thousand and twenty was being introduced in this session of congress. Well no update on that yet but i did come across something very interesting. There is a house select committee on the climate crisis now. This committee was created during the one hundred sixteenth congress. That was the last one so it hasn't been around long. But they did produce a climate action plan of two thousand twenty. And that's called the congressional action plan for a clean energy economy and a healthy resilient and just america committee is chaired by representative. Kathy castor from florida and the ranking chair is representative garrett graves from louisiana now. I watched their organizing meeting from march nineteenth. Let's say there's just a little bit of difference on the ideas of how to approach In the approaches in making the us carbon zero by two thousand fifty but as representative castor stated. It's time to turn recommendations into policy. Now i'll be tracking our actions and keep you updated here and finally you might recall. Last year the uss bonham rashard an eight hundred forty four foot long and fibia assault ship burned out of control for five days. Now that was in san diego california. But now senator. Marco rubio from florida is proposing that the ship be used to create an artificial reef down in florida little bit of background. The navy did some cost analysis On what it would take to restore the ship to operational status an estimated that that would be somewhere between two point. Five and three point five billion dollars but the cost to decommission and scrap the bonham rashard would be about thirty million dollars. Senator rubio didn't provide any details on where the ship might be sunk and be become an artificial reef but he did say that it could be done for less than thirty million dollars to scrap the ship. This word Happened it would be. We'll keep an eye on it and see where it goes. Fingers crossed that will have another artificial reef down in florida. Something that big to dive on. Well that's it for this installment of wet notes for april ninth. Two thousand and twenty

Marine Stewardship Council Act Netflix Vaclav Kina Czech Academy John Nab Earth Island Institute Graham North Carolina Luxembourg Scuba Diving Magazine Oregon State University Corvallis Prague Wales Worthington Oregon America Committee Bonham Rashard Kathy Castor
Scientists Find ‘Double Mutant’ Coronavirus Variant in California

WBUR Programming

00:17 sec | 6 d ago

Scientists Find ‘Double Mutant’ Coronavirus Variant in California

"Suddenly they're everywhere. A new variant of the corona viruses here in the Bay Area UK variant is now the most prevalent this be 117 Variant is a brand new ball. There's a new very that was first detected in India twice known as a double mutant. The threat is real, and it remains serious.

Bay Area UK India
Florida sues CDC, demanding cruise ships be allowed to sail immediately

Cruise Radio News Briefs

00:56 sec | 6 d ago

Florida sues CDC, demanding cruise ships be allowed to sail immediately

"The lawsuit has begun with the support of florida governor. Onto santa's florida attorney general ashley moody announced thursday morning that she had filed a lawsuit debating that the centers for disease control lift be conditional sale order for the cruise lines. We have filed suit this morning. Just before meeting with you here today against the administration. Hhs and the cdc florida governor to scientists later compared the crew situation to that faced by one florida's other big businesses theme parks in both cases. He said they have every right to make sure guests have a safe and enjoyable trip. All these other places have been cruising. That's work they've been able to do it well. But here's the thing if you're worried about americans and you think you should make the decisions for them. They're still going to cruise if they want to. They're just gonna cruise off a different coast for now if us residents wanted to take a cruise vacation this summer. They can fly to nassau bahamas. Bermuda saint martin or cyprus europe cruise lines have made no official comment on the

Florida Ashley Moody CDC HHS Bermuda Saint Martin Nassau Bahamas Cyprus Europe
Ocean Currents Predicted on Enceladus

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:07 min | 6 d ago

Ocean Currents Predicted on Enceladus

"New study claims. That ocean currents churning in the subsurface sees of this attorney an ice moon enceladus. The findings reported in the journal. Nature geoscience a based on the shape of enceladus twenty kilometer. Thick shell new hypothesis challenges. Current thinking that the moon's global ocean is a modulus apart from some vertical mixing driven by the warmth of the moons core and syllabus is a tiny frozen snowball just hundred kilometers wide. That's just a seventh of the earth's moon. It's the smoothest body. In the solar system is smooth as keeble and sold us attracted the attention of scientists in two thousand fourteen when a fly by the cassini spacecraft discovered evidence of subsurface after water was seen spewing out of guys alike eruptions through fissures in the circle tiger stripes in the ice neither moon south pole a spectral analysis of the water by cassini indicated that it was salty together with jupiter's iceman moon. Europa enceladus is one of the few locations in the solar system other than earth with liquid water. And that makes it an obvious. Target of interest for astrobiologists searching for signs of life but the oceans on enceladus are almost entirely unlike those earth earth oceans are relatively shallow with an average depth of just three point six kilometers. They cover about three quarters of the planet surface and a warmer at the top thanks to the sun's rays and cooler depth near the floor and they have carrots that are affected not just by the spirit of the earth but also by wind on the other hand and syllabus a piece to have a global spanning and completely subsurface ocean. It's at least thirty. Kilometers deep is cooler at the top. Of the i show and warmer at the bottom thanks to hate from the moon's core despite their differences the study's lead author analog from caltech says the oceans on enceladus do have currents based on the cassini measurements and observations on earth looking at the way ice and water interact drive ocean mixing. Dr

Keeble The Journal Caltech
How Does Cuttlefish Camouflage Work?

BrainStuff

02:02 min | 3 weeks ago

How Does Cuttlefish Camouflage Work?

"Cuttlefish be cephalopods stunning ability to instantly change color and texture to blend into their surroundings. Have another newly discovered trick. Researchers have found that these squidgy creatures can freeze their camouflage palette and lock it in place for up to an hour without any energy consuming input from their main nervous system that superpower to hold their disguise for long periods to avoid being detected and thus to avoid being eaten it also helps them snatch their own prey as they can remain essentially invisible as they lie in wait. The finding published in the journal is science not only reveals yet. Another clever strategy of these ocean floor dwelling masters of disguise. It also lends further guidance for engineers hoping to borrow from the animals tricks to develop new technologies such as much that can spring into three dimensions and soft bodied robots. That could say wrap around a human leg to provide support as with many discoveries. Scientists stumbled upon this one nearly by accident. The researchers were working at the marine biological laboratory in whole massachusetts. They were trying to trace. How the cuddle. Fishes nervous system directs. Its skin to transform its three d texture within seconds to blend into the background of say Kelp or iraq when these sliced through one of the two main nerves that runs along the side of a cuttlefish expected. The animal would lose. Its camouflage on the corresponding side of that narrative but instead the three dimensional texture provided by nodes on the skin of the cuttlefish called pathway stayed intact we spoke with trevor ward hill co author of the study and a neuroscientist at the university of cambridge. He said it was really quite surprising. In fact when i saw it generally when you cut input to a muscle it just relaxes and that's the end of it. We thought we did something wrong. But repeat takes. The procedures showed. The phenomenon was no fluke. The animals by the way. We're not killed by the procedure and we're able to continue swimming and feeding in a tank at the nba l. facility. The teams finding is the first time this kind of lock or catch muscle as it's known has been detected in any cephalopod

Marine Biological Laboratory The Journal Trevor Ward Hill Massachusetts Iraq University Of Cambridge Swimming NBA
"scientist" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

03:00 min | 10 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"Scientist to suck it up in your strong idea. Food, So you know, here I am in turn, take steps, and they're already being debunks roof over here. Doesn't think I can even do it. Do you have any kind of in your home.

Scientist
"scientist" Discussed on The goop Podcast

The goop Podcast

05:55 min | 10 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on The goop Podcast

"Thank you. Yeah, it's and it's so true right when we when we look at our daily actions, we try to control. What can't be controlled. And we don't try to control. What can be controlled right so we when when a change happens in our lives, we shake our fist at the gods, wishing that the universe had doubtless a better hand, which is a really futile exercise, because there are just certain things about our external circumstances that we can't change and trying to do that. It's like tugging at a flower to make grow faster right? It's not possible. It's far more useful to ask okay. The Universe dealt me this hand instead of wishing for a better. Better hands. How can I play? Best play the hand that was given to me of the pandemic disrupted the way that you're running your business. For example you can ask well can I use my skills, products and resources in a way that I haven't used them before. And how can I solve the problems that the world needs solving right now as opposed to the problems that that I expect it to solve, and I personally went through this when my book came out on April Fourteenth and my book was canceled. And I was really excited about it of course and I spent two very miserable days wishing for reality to be different than it was. And then I told myself you know it's time to walk the talk and think like a rocket scientist. And and go back to actually asking yourself what is within your control? What can you do now that your physical bookstores canceled to get the word out? And that actually ended up generating quite a bit of creativity and I did a number of virtual events in virtual book launches with other authors in a in in a similar position and I think in terms of promotion I ended up better in a better place than I would have had gone on a physical bookstore. Yeah I. Mean You talk about you right to you know in other words used you right?.

scientist
"scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Lonely and as as a scientist is he must have been feeling I was just I was just allies for few minutes there not sure what to say and not sure what to do we struggled for months if not years to make sense of that moment when it happened it was only with time that I came to realize that Roger should been struggling with the well the sadness that was far deeper than many of us probably imagined so we felt a lot of guilt wondering giving Mrs sign should we have been more supportive of him I I think back on those days as a child when I would walk around the construction site at home and have those conversations with him and I now realize that haps those conversations and that more than I had thought I feel grateful that I had the opportunity to have those exchanges with him because those are the few moments were assigned joy on his face and heard in his voice as he talked about what he loved which is architecture and construction I want to talk for a moment about the general connection between social isolation and loneliness and the phenomenon of suicide the numbers are really staggering the Vic forty five thousand people commit suicide in the United States every year worldwide it's about eight hundred thousand people it's really astonishing that we don't pay more attention to the problem not just in the United States but around the world well it is an suicide sadly although it's been improving in some countries around the world has been worsening and others including the United States and I think part there's so many reasons why I think we don't talk about a deal with suicide as profound an issue as it is I think it makes people uncomfortable number one and I think it also makes people feel helpless the roots of deep depression and suicide are complicated and it's not always easy to understand where they come from there are also lots of mixed feelings that people have about suicide with their with rooted in religious believe foreign cultural norms but the bottom line is when it comes to suicide when it comes to depression the one of the greatest resources we have one of the most powerful sources of healing that we have in our back pocket our relationships with others those relationships may not always feel available in the moment so we want them but it stands out to me despite being a doctor who is prescribing a number of medications over the years that one of them was powerful medicines we have his love and the vehicle through which that love is delivered our relationships and at a time when we are struggling with such high levels of suicide at a time we seen such high levels of depression anxiety particularly among young people I think it's more important than ever that we rethink and harness the power of relationships and recognize that they are not just nice to haves but they are necessary to have an essential part of the foundation that makes us healthy well and strong I'm wondering how is a doctor and his former Surgeon General you see these issues playing out in the context of the corona virus pandemic we're all being told to practice social distancing we're meeting few friends we hunker down with family or many of us hunker down by ourselves can you see this pandemic increasing social isolation worldwide I think there's a real possibility that the physical distance thing we're being asked to observe to tamp down this wave of cove in nineteen infection could very well contribute to more loneliness I think you could contribute to a social recession if you will mark by deepening levels of loneliness is we stay apart for longer and longer periods of time but I don't think it has to be that way in fact I think this is potentially an opportunity for us to re think and re center our lives around relationships to recognize once again and perhaps even more deeply appreciate the role and power that relationships have in our lives not just to our spouses and our family members and close friends but also the relationships we share with colleagues at work with classmates at school and even with strangers in our community and I'm struck that it in a moment like this when we're all being asked to separate them when I go for a walk around the circle in which I live and if I see somebody walking the opposite direction the way furiously and smile as if either just so hungry for human contact and you know what I wave back just as enthusiastically because I too am hungry for human contact I feel like we need appreciation for the strangers in my life for the faces that I don't recognize but for the relationships that I now see are actually quite valuable so I think that if we approach this moment with intentionality if we approach this time as it is with the mindset that we are going to double down and focus on both the quality of our time with other people as well as the quantity of time that we dedicate to the people we love and I think that we may be able to come out of this much stronger in terms of our human connections with each other than when we began we may be able to use code in.

scientist
"scientist" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Nitrogen liquefies ninety-six which means if he gets anything above one hundred ninety. Six degrees Celsius boils we can see kind of what a fact that will happen on a liquid liquid boiling by first cooling down this balloon. Feel sorry for a balloon. This is the first. This is just my own breath. You mentioned something happening to your putting the balloon in the thing and that is far too big a balloon to go into that flash normally so when you pull that out of the flask. You've tiny apple shape little balloon if you can see the little bit of liquid which is sloshing around in the bottom. Can people see little things about their? Tiny amounts of liquid is boiling to blow up the whole balloon again. So is that is that the air turns liquid liquid air which takes up much less space than gaseous so. The balloon shrank. Now it's boiled again. It's expanded about thousand times blitz. Which is why swallowing. Liquid nitrogen is a really bad idea. Expanding would be that. I don't WanNa be this balloon again because basically you're thirty degrees Celsius above motion boiling point. It's going to appoint immense pressure as it to into a gas container so housing for fact walk. Can we do with putting liquid nitrogen and somewhere? We're probably not supposed to unless you have scientific supervision written many many risk assessments over the years so this is actually one of two major ways. You can kill yourself with liquid nitrogen. The other one is doing lift with it or in some kind of confined space extremes oxygen and suffocate. This is fun but when we're looking at today is putting it into container so our fizzy drinks bottles the happier. Fizzy drinks drinks some advanced. Because they will come in handy later. Thank you square. My ear defenders poor in liquid nitrogen at the moment. This is completely safe from a little bit chilly. Not Complete relatively so. This is pouring into a fizzy bottle and smoking like a horrifying mad scientist experiment. The point we become dangerous is if I put the LID on the bottle because lemonade bottles are incredible pieces of modern engineering. They cost just a couple of pants and they're incredibly strong. Fail at maybe ten atmospheres. Ten Times the pressure. We feel now which is about one hundred tons per square meter so a lot of pressure so putting the lid on. It's what makes us dangerous to do that. I'M GONNA come over here. Good Safety I we have really been. We've been to contain anything flying out so wonderful video the naked scientists website of this blowing up with no really been and it's petrified so I could put a little shot the lead thirty three to one right anyone else a little nervous who's GonNa slowly creep cross the stage..

LID apple Ten Times scientist
"scientist" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Scientific detective stories and shining a light in directions. You might not expect like gene sequencing puppy or maybe tearing apart a flower. You've taken all the parts that one. I messed up. So that shows you how good he had to get it this and even drinking a bunch agenda. Don't miss out subscribed naked genetics. Wherever you get your podcasts this week we're bringing you a recording. Allied event from the Cambridge Science Festival that was recorded back on the eleventh of March featuring geneticist Giles. Yo Chemist Liliana Planet geoscientists David Robbery and animal behaviour. Expert Ellen drinkwater so let's dive back in with Christmas jobs. We we really should dwell on your science a bit so you are a geneticist. I am so tell us what you actually apply your genetics too. So I'm actually a geneticist. And perfectly upstanding thing to do. My mother-in-law still speaks to me so this is a good thing but people often use genetics to study a trait or disease and I happen to study body weight and actually the moment I say body weight obesity actually of which is one end of the spectrum. I suddenly become the bad prison and become the bad person because I'm perceived as giving fat people overweight people people with obesity and excuse which always an interesting take. If I was studying the genetics of cancer would be giving a cancer patient and excuse I wouldn't and the reason why I'm bad it's because people understand this right people say that well but that's why you'll get a size you while you eat too much. They say that to me thank you. I lost weight. I WANNA point out when I was Vegan anyway so much and that is true. Your Body Weight is going to be down to how much you eat and how much you right. But that the question is why and at the end of the day is because different people behave very very differently around food and there's a lot of genes that are actually involved. The physics is the first demo. Dynamics you've come magic the calories in and magic calories away but it's working up to the physics why we actually get to the physics. We get why we too much. That's where the biology is and I think by studying extreme cases of obesity. So these are not going to be normal cases of obesity. These are three year old children. Who are forty fifty kilograms? Okay so that's a lot of weight. I'm seventy five kilograms. For example. One of the partways. We knew disrupted and severe. Obesity is the fat sensing pathway. Where because there's a lack of a signal from the fact that brain that brain doesn't know that in fact of you and so you continue. Actually actually that is genetic let is genetic reason why you're fat doesn't talk properly to your brain and that makes two executives a hormone there called. Leptin and when there's actually a mutation in the Hormone Leptin then you don't have any left and then your brain doesn't know how much fat you have now. How much fat you have. The thing is Charles Y. I'm slightly skeptical. And Yeah probably disabuse me of my skepticism. Is that fifty years ago. The number of people who are overweight and obese vanishingly small and now he's very very large. Now we're not evolving. That fast are we. We're not why is there a different? Whenever people studied talk about jeans they think that geneticists only look at the genes in of themselves. And we do look at the jeans but we have to look at the genes in context with the environment it turns out that every single human trait as including our body weight has a genetic influence every single trait of behavior. The trick is to ask what role the environment place now your genes as you say. There are empirical you born with them. You die with them. They don't change anywhere in between but the environment does and as the environment changes the way your genes express themselves and change actually then changes as well and so what has happened is as we get to the stage where we have too much food today. I think there's not anything to debate. Suddenly it has unmasked susceptibilities of certain people who are going to eat more in the environment whereas it was just not enough food around for people to eat too much whereas now there is ample opportunity for people to take advantage of the environment or not advantage depending on you look at and actually get to lodge now as we said we promised you demos and it wouldn't be a proper naked scientist show without them so I'd like to introduce science demo superstar and former naked scientists. He's going to put the boom in this show. Please.

obesity Charles Y. Cambridge Science Festival Ellen drinkwater David Robbery scientist Giles
"scientist" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"scientist" Discussed on Short Wave

"Sarah's a scientist herself she does very cool squid stuff by the way and she felt like there. Was this disconnect between scientists and the public. So she thought won't okay. Let's bring them together. But I notice that there wasn't a super easy way for scientists to get in touch with the public sort of in a way that Easy for them to fit into their schedules. But Hey it's the twenty first century. That's what technology is for and so. I wanted to sort of have this streamlined. Way To get scientists talking with non-scientists. Just give people the opportunity To meet a scientist now the setups pretty straightforward your teacher. And you want to teach your kids about squids scroll through and find squid scientists and request him. Don't have a specific topic in mind. That's cool to just pick something more general like biologist fill out the form and boom. You got yourself a scientist so when you first started scape. Scientists part of your motivation was to clear up some misconceptions that people might have about scientists like who they are and what they do and what they're like. So what did you guys want people to know about scientists? I really wanted to show people the diversity of scientists. I think we really get this kind of over-simplified view of who scientists are how we behave what we're interested in outside of science in TV and movies. I mean you get this pretty much. Almost all white guys all straight people. All white guys are socially awkward with varying levels of social skill and so we know that scientists are just as varied as any other group of people. And so. It's not necessarily that. I WANNA say scientists aren't like this it's like scientists aren't only this. Scientists are all of these different ways of being and so in our program. We also ask our teachers if half of their students are from an underrepresented group in stem so that we can match them up with a scientist from that group because we really want to show everybody that there's a place for everyone in science. Yeah let's talk about that a little bit because I think we know now like scientifically we have data that suggests that when kids see people that look like them doing science they can imagine growing up to be scientists too. So you really build that idea into the scientists that you pair with the classrooms. Yeah absolutely we WANNA give as many students as possible a window into science that they can relate to. Yeah Yeah and speaking of relating. I WANNA play clip for you of microbiologist Ruth Eisenberg. She's reading a question submitted in live chat so the question is is there any advice that I would give to a young student right now that might show interest in becoming a scientists from a small town? Okay perfect so I actually come from a pretty small town where not? A lot of people went to college in general so if you have an interest in science say keep passion alive you can get involved in science activities like presentations or anything that the community can participate in a lot of colleges and I really liked that because it sounds like you know the scientists herself would have loved to have that program when she was a kid. Is that something that you hear from the scientists? Who Do these calls? That's part of why they participated in this. Yeah totally I hear that all the time. Yeah so a lot of scientists that are now adults working in science. Never really saw people like them when they were up and so I think that's one of the reasons. Scientists are so enthusiastic about participating in this program because they wish they had something like it when they were young. Yeah no I mean I do. Don't you I mean that's probably by? You made it right totally. Yeah Yeah Yeah I mean I think I remember the first time I met a lady scientists who specifically the thing that I wanted to do and that that was a transformative moment. I think yeah I hadn't even met a white woman scientists until I was a sophomore in even in my department studying Marine Science and we had zero female professors at all so I mean as a white woman so imagine how much worse it is for. Somebody other folks. It's just like yeah anything that we can do to show people How welcome they can be science the better. What other kinds of feedback do you get from scientists from teachers from kids? We've got a lot of feedback. I didn't necessarily expect to get for. Example are scientists will say that when they talk to people who have never really thought about their area of science before that they'll have these questions that are like. Oh my God. Why have I not gone way? You kind of get totally cool. Things that are like we'll blow the mind off somebody who's been studying this effort twenty years. Well Can I. Can we talk about that? Because that's a point that when when I think when people think about scientists doing outreach they really think that the benefit is only for the person that they're trying to reach out to but in reality you get these people who haven't been thinking the same way that all the other academics that you've been surrounded our thinking and you can get like really good ideas about your own science from having those conversations. Yeah absolutely a person who hasn't been taught to think in the exact rigid way that your field thanks. Having that kind of naive can be totally amazing. It's like it's definitely not. It's a two way street. And that's one of the great reasons to have conversations with people and not just deliver Information Athem. A lot of really awesome stuff can come from those conversations. Yeah so what has surprised you the most since launching this project so many things surprised me that it's kind of hard to pin it down. I think once I participate and they get like a bunch of fourth graders so like electrically enthusiastic about what they're hearing about that really remind scientists. How COOL THEIR JOBS? Because when you're working on a grant and you're reviewing other people's papers and you're trying to get your own work published it can kind of disillusion you on how totally cool our jobs are. And then when you have like a fourth grader. Just like beside herself shaking about hearing about your squid or your termites. Wherever you're studying it can be a real like just awesome reminder and get you excited to go back to the lab the next day. That's been amazing so I've kind of a big question for you. What does it tell you that people have this much interest in talking to you? Know Real live scientists over video chat. I think people are just really thirsty for authenticity today. I mean I think you get so many things kind of filtered through various forms of media. I guess and they're just they just want something real. I feel like a lot of people just want to see partially like behind the curtain of how things are really being done and just want something directly from the source and so I think that that's why our program has been so super successful because we get people direct access to the science right as we're learning that information. Sarah McNulty is the Executive Director of the nonprofit skype a scientist. You can find out more about their live sessions how to sign up all that jazz at SKYPE SCIENTISTS DOT COM. We'll put a Lincoln are episode notes to this episode was produced by Rebecca Ramirez edited by the way special thanks to Emily von for her fact checking in Production Madison via shortwave from NPR..

scientist Sarah McNulty Ruth Eisenberg skype Lincoln Rebecca Ramirez Executive Director Emily NPR
"scientist" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"scientist" Discussed on Short Wave

"You're listening to shortwave from NPR. Lock EVERYBODY TO SCRAPE. The scientists live just as a heads up. We are running these about once a day Monday through Friday ish during this delightful quarantine time that we're all in Sarah McNulty's just starting up video livestream. She's the Executive Director of the nonprofit skype scientists generally me matchup scientists with classrooms and other groups to chat about science and generally make science accessible for as many people as possible and make people feel as welcoming science as we can the CROON virus pandemic has slowed down a lot of businesses. But but skype a scientist so a massive spike in its audience over the past couple of weeks as schools have closed in more and more people stay home before we may have had like twenty people. Show up to a livestream And now we have over five hundred showing up every livestream which has been amazing. Plus Sara says they've had a similar boom in scientists reaching out to lead the live sessions. All right so I am a paleontologist and I'm so excited to be here today. I this is the team interaction. I've had in about a week so I'm real sorry really excited but had talked to anybody in a long time outside my house so I'm in these days. The questions scientists are getting are just as silly an insightful. As ever like do rats sparked don't know that's a good question. I don't know if they fart. I do know that they eat their own coup. But I don't know if they are. How DOES BACTERIA SURVIVE INSIDE SQUID? When the sweater babies they don't have any beneficial bacteria inside them so they actually get them from the seawater. There's a special organ in and of course. Have you ever eaten the bear? Have you eaten the bear? I don't know how to answer that question but no I have never eaten a bear.

scientist Executive Director skype NPR Sarah McNulty Sara
"scientist" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"scientist" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

"We're talking to the youngest scientist we've ever had on the podcast. Brother and sister Oscar in May Johnson were nine and twelve years old when they conducted experiments in the Galapagos Islands. Go UP AGO. S- like the most famous science place in the world absolutely in this episode may an Oscar or going to share their story of science discovery. Before we get to this week's episode. We've got some new patrons thank on Patriae on Abdulah an odd non argan Silas Henry Anton Stella and Joshua enjoy. We also have some more of our patrons that are having birthdays coming up. Liam whose birthday is on February twenty third Brady Happy Birthday on the twenty fourth Christopher in Grace Mom and dad are proud of you know you accomplish your dreams and happy birthday on the twenty fifth Luke Biggs who loves dinosaurs also. Happy Birthday on the twenty fifth. I like dinosaurs to tell you. Happy Birthday on the twenty sixth Emma White Happy Third Birthday on the twenty eighth Hazel Fades completely on us on the third of March Henry. Stella Mom Dad and your brothers love you so much along with your passion for dancing skiing and robotics and happy birthday on March fifth. And lastly Charlie Happy Birthday on March fifth. Thanks to all of you and to everyone who supports tumble on Patriot. If you'd like to get a shutout like these people or get a happy birthday wish from yours truly on our podcast. Just go to patriot dot com slash tumble. Podcast pledge at the five dollar level or higher once again that's Patriot dot com slash tumble. Podcast well Disneyworld. We all know it. We're do we because if you haven't been there lately well you.

Silas Henry Anton Stella Galapagos Islands Oscar scientist Luke Biggs Emma White skiing Liam Patriae Charlie Johnson Brady Christopher Joshua
"scientist" Discussed on Famous Failures

Famous Failures

11:09 min | 1 year ago

"scientist" Discussed on Famous Failures

"WALC ladies and gentlemen to a very special episode of famous failures it's a special episode because I have a new book coming out is titled Think like but I I wanNA share just a little bit of background with you and explain how you can preorder the book and get bonuses that for some categories are worth ten x the cost of the box if you want to check them out right away you can head over to rocket science book dot Com I was zoomed multiple identities over the so my life and one of the identities that I cherish the most is that of a former rocket scientist I was Astra Physics Major in college and worked on the opposite nations team for the two thousand and three Mars Exploration Rovers Project I've been working on this book for over two years now but in one sense I've been working on for my entire life because all of the was the knowledge practical insights I've gathered over the past thirty seven years of my life are all in this book and here's the good news you don't have to be a rocket scientist to think like one in the book reveal nine simple strategies from rocket science so you can use to make your own giant leaps in work and life whether it's landing your dream job accelerating your business learning a new skill or creating the next breakthrough act the book will inspire you to take your moonshot and enable you to achieve lift off I've been ecstatic with the early reviews of the book I want to share a few of them with you Susan Cain The New York Times bestselling author of quiet says thinking like a rocket scientist is not rocket science packed with witty writing insightful advice and integrating stories this must read book will change the way you see the world and empower you to change the world itself mm-hmm grants who is in Eurotunnel's bestselling author originals says that the book is bursting with practical insights Houston we have solutions Daniel Pink who is the New York Times bestselling author of books like when Dr and a whole new mind says by the time you finish reading this endlessly fascinating book your thinking will be bigger better and bolder Julian got three who is the best selling author of how to make a spaceship says this book will make you look at the world with a different Lens and we'll help you make your own seemingly crazy moonshot a reality to celebrate the launch of the book filed a set of amazing preorder bonuses which you can find by heading over to rocket science book Dot Com and if you'd like you can also just go over to my websites Roll Dot Com and head books at the top I won't go through all the bonuses here because they are listed on the on the webpage but importantly the digital version of the Look if you preorder any copy any edition of the book you can download the digital version right away so you can read the book now today before the the book is released to the public the digital version is available for all devices including kindle nook IOS android personal computers unit. You might be wondering why I am running a preorder campaign really is for two primary reasons the first is that pre orders carry enormous weight and Book Promotion Major Bookstores. is used preorder numbers to gauge public interest in the book and if the preorder numbers are high they'll stock more copies of the book which means more readers will see it and can preorder bonuses are my way of thinking you for supporting this podcast for supporting my writing and ensuring that this book will be one of many to come so if you plan to order the book please choose to preorder it and once again you can do that by heading over to rock assigns book without further ado here's a short cert- from the book's introduction in September nineteen sixty to President John F Kennedy stood before a packed Rice University Stadium and pledged to land a man the moon and return him safely to the earth before the decade was out it was an incredibly ambitious promise the original Moonshot when Kennedy gave a speech the logical requirements for a moon landing hadn't even been developed no American astronauts had worked outside a spacecraft to spacecraft had never docked together in space NASA didn't know whether the lunar surface was sufficiently solid to support a lander or whether the communication systems would even work on the moon in the words of one ASA executive we didn't even know how to do Earth orbit determination much less project Orbis to the moon getting into orbit around the moon not to mention landing on it required mind-blowing position it was like throwing a dart at a peach twenty eight feet away and scraping the fuzz without touching the body and what's more the peach which is the moon would be in rapid motion darting through space on reentry to the earth the spacecraft would have to enter the atmosphere at the right angle tantamount to locating one particular Ridge on a coin of one hundred eighty riches to avoid grinding too hard against the atmosphere burning to a crisp or skating across it like a stone skipping on water for a politician Kennedy was surprisingly candid about the challenges ahead here's what he said and they'll I realize that this is in some measure an active faith and vision for we do not now no benefits await us but if I were to say my fellow citizens that we shall send the Moon Two hundred forty thousand miles away from the control station in Houston a giant rocket more than three hundred feet tall the length of this football field made of new metal alloys some of which have not yet been invented capable no standing he stresses several times more than Eh experienced fitted together with a precision better than the finest watch carrying all the equipment needed for propulsion Guidance Control Communications Food and survival on an untried mission to an unknown celestial body and then return it safely to were reentering the atmosphere at speeds of over twenty five thousand miles per hour causing heat about half that on the temperature Zahn almost as hard as it is today and do all this and do all this and do it right and do it I the nicktator doc yes even the metals needed to build the rocket hadn't been invented we jumped into the cosmic void and hope would grow wings on the way up miraculously the wings sprouted in nineteen sixty nine less than seven years after Kennedy's pledge Neil Armstrong took his giant see for mankind a child who is six years old when the Wright brothers took their first power flight lasting all of twelve seconds and moving one hundred and twenty feet would have been seventy two when flight became powerful enough to put a man on the moon and return him safely to the earth this giant leap which was taken within human lifespan is often hailed as the triumph of technology but it's not rather is too great triumph of a certain thought process rocket scientists I used to turn the seemingly impossible into possible it's the same process that is allow these scientists who scored dozens of interplanetary holes in one supersonic spacecraft sending these spacecraft millions of miles through outer space and landing them exactly where they want is the same thought process that brings us closer and closer to colonizing other planets and becoming an interplanetary species and it's the same thought process that will make affordable commercial tourism the norm to think like a rocket scientist to look at the world through a different Lens rocket scientists imagine the imaginable and solve the unsolvable they transfer and failures in the triumphs and constraints into advantages debut mishaps has solvable puzzles rather than insurmountable roadbocks. They've moved by blind conviction but by self doubt their goal is not short term results but long-term breakthroughs they know that the rules are in set in stone the default can be altered a new path can be forced in the modern era rocket science thinking is a necessity the world is evolving yet dizzying speed and we must continue me problems in our daily lives those who can tackle these problems without clear guidelines and with the clock ticking enjoy an extraordinary advantage despite his tremendous benefits we often assume that thinking like a rocket scientist is beyond the ability of mere mortals without a special kind of genius has the common saying it's not rocket science we identify with Elton John's rocket man who despite being selected for a Mars mission laments about all the science I don't understand and this book will not teach you the science behind rocket science you won't find any graphs on these pages no aptitude for crunching numbers is required. lurking behind the elusive subject of rocket science are life changing insights and creativity and critical thinking that anyone can acquire You won't be a rocket scientist by the end of this book by you'll know how to think like one I once worked on the scene for the Mars Exploration Rovers Project which sent to rover a my rocket science past remains the most interesting part of my resume during speaking engagements the person introducing me inevitably says something like the most intriguing thing all of them were thinking talk to us about rocket science instead although we glamorize rocket scientists there's an enormous mismatch between what they've figured out these were necessary features during the pelvic age keeping us safe from things poisonous foods and predators but with this book my goal is to create an army of non rocket scientists who approach everyday problems as a rocket scientist you'll take ownership of your life you'll see.

scientist WALC Elton John Mars Exploration Rovers Projec thirty seven years three hundred feet twenty eight feet twelve seconds seven years twenty feet six years two years
"scientist" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

Not So Standard Deviations

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"scientist" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

"I won't ask found anymore at least not a like the drop. Exactly. Yeah. Like, yeah. So essentially like the pitch to the doctors has to be really consistent. So I mean, it comes down to that. Like like, I was doing the whole like design thinking, you know, empathy with these earlier, and which she obviously had thought about, but just you know, she was really interested in how you're trying to do that with stitch fix where you know, similar stuff where you have experts who are used. To finding signal in certain things. And that might not be as like, I mean, basically, it's not that the thing they think of doesn't have signal like knowing whether or not someone drinks, obviously is like extremely important for knowing what health effects, we might have. But like asking it might not be the most effective way at getting at it. So we totally run into that too. Where it's like asking someone about their style. You're not really gonna get anything that makes much sense half the time 'cause it's just hard to articulate, and you also have your aspirational like asking people if they work out like like, do you want workout clothes? I it's just like, well, obviously everyone's going to lie about. And so it's not really like at all. And so, yeah, I found this real correlation between people saying that they want to ask a question. But what they mean is they want that information? But you you can't just tell them. We'll we'll get you that information without asking the question. That's like not make sense. Yeah. It's not an it's just not like it's not being considerate of like the person where they're coming from. It is. I think it is difficult to separate the idea. At least initially stuff to separate the idea of like, it's useful to have this information as opposed. It's useful to have what they say about the information. You know? That always not always true that the ladder. It's useful. To know what they say about it. Exactly. Yeah. I could see how that would be difficult. And it's like what's interesting is that I think with fashion people would be pretty open to hearing like, oh like, it seems like you like this or you know, like, it's it's kind of like, oh, that's fun. They. Yeah. They're right. I never thought about that. But I do like that. Whereas like, if it's like, oh, we see that you actually probably binge drink all the time. Like that's like much more like, oh, that's terrible. Yeah. It's so it also maybe it puts the physician in an awkward position. If you're not pretty transparent about like. Well, this person said they never drink and everything we see says that they drink heavily. So they might, you know, be like having some issues not really honest with themselves about it. And so like, anyway, it's she that I really liked her talk. And I told her I was like you got me interested in like health statistics for the first time in a while like. I was still like on my like, you know, detox if you will like I just really she approached it in such a smart way, she really approached it the way I would think of a data scientist approaching it for lack of a better term or like she was like, I don't know someone who really thinks about machine learning because she was talking about bias data sets. And like she put it in terms that would be very comfortable for a machine learning person to like rock the problem. And I just thought it was brilliant. Because I was like, oh, yeah, you're right. And like, I don't feel like I ever totally thought about this stuff in that framing. So. Yeah. I really recommend her talk. And there was lots of other good talks. That's just one that. Like, oh, the other other reason I'm like promoting her as 'cause she was so cute. She came up in. I was talking about being she's like that's my dream job. Like, you know, if I ever leave academia, she was like either either there at sea. And I was like, oh, wow. Like little d you know, until you. She goes like, oh, no. It was really cute. So you might have been the same person. It's like, yeah. She later. She was like this is like me, you know, an alternate universe. We also had kind of similar speaking style. Yeah..

scientist
"scientist" Discussed on Got Science?

Got Science?

05:14 min | 2 years ago

"scientist" Discussed on Got Science?

"So so this is a program that places PHD scientists who are either early career mid-career late career doesn't matter in the government for a year to two years to see how they can use their expertise within the within a government setting. I'm trying to find where their expertise fits into policymaker. Gang and also figure out you know, how this big bureaucratic unwieldy seemingly a thing like government actually works. And so I wanted to to get a feel for how I could use my experiences in grad school, my commitment to wanting to democratize access to the products of research. So make sure that they're communicated to the public, and they're also communicated to researchers. So that we're really making sure that science has a place within the public discourse. So what do you see as the danger of science not being part of the public discussion? I see a lot of decisions that are being made based on emotions and emotions alone, which I am a very emotional person. And I find that for me to take a step back to identify in my emotions as fear or or. Or excitement or what have you take a step back and think well, why what does the evidence say, and what are the consequences if I don't act in in accordance with the ovens because there are some times when I take strange vitamins because I see them advertised advertise, they'll make my hair shinier, and I want that. And I look at the evidence, and it doesn't really back it up, but there's also no health risks. So I think well, why not just doing your own experiment. Yeah. Just doing my own experiment. And if it makes me feel better than that's fine. But then of course, there are other cases like climate change, which it's here it's happening and we've caused it. And if we don't act now than we are really risking the health and livelihood of our planet of our fellow people by by neglecting the evidence. So I think that's really the risk of of not of not communicating about where science falls in public discourse. Because. Sometimes it's benign to ignore the evidence and other times, it's completely catastrophic. I wanna pivot to inequity in and bias. I mean, many people think, hey, the science is the science there can't be inequities or by sees can you give some examples to our listeners. So they know what we're talking about. Yeah. So I think it is really a common refrain is that scientists are purely objective, which ignores the fact that scientists are people, and we can be trained to recognize our bias in the ways that they're creeping up into our research, but often that's not really something. That's very much explored in scientific training is identifying the biases that come up as a product of of how we're raised. How we're socialized how we interact with one another. And so I think that the way that this really crops up in the case of women minorities. Disabled people. People LGBTQ people is that people people's assumptions of, you know, I'll take me as an example. I'm a woman in case, you can't tell by my voice. And I've had people tell me that some of my bold ideas are over ambitious, whereas if that idea came out of the mouth of a male colleague of mine that would be seen as visionary or bold yet innovative, cutting edge and the way that that creeps up when I'm writing a scientific paper or applying for grant money is that they'll look at that over ambitiousness and say that it's unrealistic and not worth funding. And so that starts to hurt the careers of women starts to hurt the careers of people who don't conform to the stereotypes that we've been socialized to accept as as what a scientist looks like which is typically white SIS gendered, male and. So unless we're having these kinds of conversations about the ways that bias affect who gets to do science than we're really not going to be able to course. Correct. Despite how however many, you know, fun diversity initiatives we throw out there. Despite however, many kind of kinds of like by moments that we try to have unless we're really interrogating the bias that we hold even I as a woman hold certain biases that are implicit against women. Just because of how I've been socialized within this greater societal context. And I think that also if we're keeping certain people away from the bench, if we're keeping certain people out of these conversations, not giving them a seat at the table. Then we're really especially when you start.

scientist two years
"scientist" Discussed on You Are Not So Smart

You Are Not So Smart

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"scientist" Discussed on You Are Not So Smart

"Why don't you talk about how this is this technique of saying, I'm not a scientist is sort of this rhetorical crawfish. Ing you can way to get out of having actually talk about something. You don't know anything about? Why don't they just say, I don't know? I mean. Yeah. That's what that's what a scientist would say. Right. I mean, scientists are trained to to be fine with not knowing something to be fine with uncertainty and everything I think that's just a political tech. Right. I mean. I think politicians are generally trained to to never admit that sort of weakness. I I mean, I I would prefer a politician who just says, you know, what I'm not sure I will try and find out. But that's yeah. I mean, it probably just is a sign of, you know, trying to sound strong at every possible point. Yes, you know, in general politicians never going to tell you when they don't know something. So it's good to keep that as a rule of thumb when dealing with politicians Stroh. Yeah. So they they what they are telling you might actually be reworded version of I have no idea what I'm talking about. That is a good thing to keep in mind. I think you're right. So I assume you put the most important thing. I so we'll firstly we'll talk about his over-simplification. And if you could define what that means in your term. Based off the book itself. What is over simplification? Well, first of all, I would not say I put the most important one. I put the simplest one. I if you want to start with that one out. That's fine. Okay. We'll start with the simplest. And then you tell me what the most important is. We do that. Okay. Great. So the over simplification is sort of the more self explanatory titles at ease. I mean, it when a politician takes a often, very complicated scientific topic and boils down to sort of sound bite sized and completely ruined. The actual science in the process. This is I think it's important to make the distinction that decision. Just trying to explain something. Clearly, it is very important for both the scientists and a politician not to mention a journalist to be able to explain a complicated topic in simple terms. That's fine. If you're doing diligently, and well, it's when they take that idea of trying to boil something down and sort of use it to their advantage to completely ruined. In what the actual science is that you get the over simplification. And so like, what's like, a really good salient example, and you can pull one straight from the book if you want to be like sure, so the one that I that I led the book with that. I think is a pretty important one and just sort of interesting one is to do with a whole lot of politicians talking about a fetal pain the pain that a fetus supposedly feels while in the womb. You get every couple of years, and they did it again last year, the Republicans in the house and sometimes Senate ticket up they try to pass a Bill that they called the pain capable unborn. I'm going to get the name wrong here. Something about pain in fetus. Although they called an unborn child and the idea being that at twenty weeks. Scientists told us. The fetus feels pain, and they will get up in in the in the house chamber or in on TV and say this over and over and over and just those simple terms at twenty weeks, a fetus feels pain which sounds very sort of scientific like we've figured this out you get to twenty weeks, and suddenly you can feel pain. This is absolute bullshit that doesn't make any sense. Actually, what science does tell us is actually pretty difficult to say for sure, but it's probably closer to twenty seven or eight weeks before the sort of neuro anatomy is in place to actually feel paying too. But it's tough anyway. Because pain is subjective experience. I mean, I don't know that you're feeling pain until you tell me, you're feeling pain or screen about it. You know? But if you're a fetus, that's kind of hard to do. So they are taking this very complicated..

scientist Stroh Senate Bill twenty weeks eight weeks
"scientist" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Science Show

"Word scientist was uttered in public apparently hue didn't want to refer to the popular brilliant astronomer mathematician mary some ville as a man of science so is karen kupa says technically the first two sport the title of scientist was a woman philosopher stephen gawk raja some you'll tell the coleridge the poet the philosopher certainly thought that you couldn't pursue any cultural or scientific tiffany's without a firm theological grounding but she thought of in terms of anglicanism he thought that basic understanding of what he considered to be religious truths in religious precepts was necessary to frame any general views about the role of science and culture is very much on side with hugh in that case he was indeed and they were both very influenced by content in this respect even though it was in both cases it was a bit of a reworking of canton a more religious direction it took office century for the word scientist to be commonly accepted historian will add shwe hicfa to the term used to describe someone working in knowledge production was natural philosopher that is very ingrained a very prestigious term and all of a sudden you're trying to change to a new term to describe knowledge production to scientists so many is rather degrading the why was tom nology language why was it so important to that time massive changes in knowledge and hill is very king to police new scientific terms to make sure that the robust he was responsible for michael faraday is adoption of electrochemical terminology such as electrode cathode electrolysis and i on so in this way he'll became a powerful broker in the coining of new scientific terms and guiding the direction of scientific knowledge human into that built in the sixteen hundreds the oakpanelled renne library trinity is a book lovers dream pass me shakespeare's first folio on newton's principia mathematica delve into original milton works or one of the eighth century medieval manuscripts but no i visited trinity to look inside the huel archives which cat for by librarian nncholas bell where searching renne library looking at funding of lessons.

scientist michael faraday shakespeare newton nncholas bell karen kupa stephen gawk hugh shwe hicfa tom nology oakpanelled renne library milton
"scientist" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Good science that they can't stop themselves from falling yeah those kinds of traps it's an interesting question and it has to do with how deep does their philosophical understanding of science go and honestly you could be a successful scientist without being philosopher in that you could you could be technically good in your field you could be obviously very knowledgeable and you can have certain attributes like being creative being able to think outside the box right think of of new ways of explaining phenomenon thing you know being good at designing hypotheses and research to test those hypotheses and knowing how to move the ball forward you know in your research and yet not really understand the critical thinking element of science you know and those are the people who are technically good scientists and they may be brilliant at what they do but they just don't fully grasp the mechanism of selfdeception that we need science to protect us from and so they fall into those traps because they didn't really really fully understand them and we see the whole spectrum i think most scientists have a pretty good understanding of of process but a lot don't you know or they or their understanding is ultimately superficial which is why so many scientists fall prey to things like p hacking hacking i think is mostly a phenomenon of scientists who don't understand the critical thinking aspects of science so they do things and without understanding that that completely invalidates their research you know so that's we just need more i think more thorough in universal education in the sciences in critical thinking and selfdeception we've said it before i mean there should be courses that are in the canon that teach critical thinking it should be starting the earliest age possible and.

scientist
"scientist" Discussed on WSRQ Talk Radio

WSRQ Talk Radio

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"scientist" Discussed on WSRQ Talk Radio

"The hour he's the author of the formula for miracles worst science reveals the secrets of the spirit and rent talking about work programme being cut a push in this direction i think an instant healings when we when we're talking about health success talk about the power of intuition is it the most important and powerful tool we have had absolutely and one of the mit serve our world is that it's all about knowledge and and education and then a little color company that's not true at all the absolutely the most important thing we have in life is our intuition and let's talk science for a second uh people most people think we had well what makes great scientists this there's super smart someone like einstein uh if you actually read what einstein road and when he talked about key repeatedly emphasized the importance of intuition and if you look at all the great scientists of in history newton einstein pests like galileo etcetera all of them were intuitive s every single one of them and so if you're smart that can make you a mediocre scientist but you combine that with him tuition that's what makes a great scientist and of course if intuition it's important for a scientist of course it's important for everybody and it's unfortunate that most of us again another myth of our society that's not true at all most people think you're either born psychic or you're not no it's like a gene you have or you don't uh that's not true everybody has the ability to develop and build up their intuition it's just that some people have a natural talent easier for that but that's true of everything in life isn't it some people have a natural talent for singing were playing the guitar or running really fast but others don't but with the proper training everybody can develop their intuition everybody can learn.

scientist
"scientist" Discussed on Science in Action

Science in Action

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"scientist" Discussed on Science in Action

"The tremendously important their important both as the measure of being an excellent scientist bob it's also that influence on governments around the world every time a major ipcc report comes out it gets a lot of attention that probably the most important reports that a dumb in climate scientists and also important presumably for the careers of the people that right them yes i think so it can be prestigious the ipcc was awarded the nobel prize for peace in two thousand seven these reports he don't get paid to write md no you've done their purely voluntary so with the survey of how much women were having a presence oil having a voice at she was the difference between women having a presence in having a voice while you can have a lot of token women sitting round the table but if they're not given a chance to speak then then not really participating or influencing the report four amine we see this a law generally across sciences people sometimes remember oh we should have some women on that panel but then the question is to they get the opportunity to speak an all they listen to said what we try and find out with your survey how women felt about their experience with ipcc we were trying to identify the barriers to the participation and very importantly we were hoping to make some recommendations that would improve the situation what we asking them what did you find out from them i think the first thing to say is that many of them reported a very positive experience but interestingly a lot of women that said they didn't face barriers when we asked them about what the others did they reported the many others experience barriers i think the largest barrier that we identified was english language ability a lot of people saw that as a barrier to happing voice and of course that it would be experienced by men of.

ipcc nobel prize scientist bob it
"scientist" Discussed on EFT/Tapping Q

EFT/Tapping Q

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"scientist" Discussed on EFT/Tapping Q

"So the scientists in me looks at the emotional part the physical symptom that's coming up and then i look at the body part in the organs or the system that is giving you a sign and then is a scientist goes in and go okay gallbladder issues bile bile is a really nasty looking color it's kind of this yellowy orange color it's usually assoc associated with kinds of angers and frustrations so then you can start layering these things and go you know what i have a lot of anger and i have a lot of digestion problems because i can't digest the anger i'm feeling towards myself or towards someone else so then you can go beyond just this is the temporary have an ache or have a little bit of indigestion and then you can go okay what am i angry about who am i angry with is this new or is it old you know is this just my pattern or does it my family pattern for generations my family has been angry and then you can start dissecting the present moment and then you can sit down and start going through systematically and look at where in this example you're angry and start releasing all the issues about anger and then look at the patterns of where you've learned about anger from either your family members or someone in school or you know your boss or just society in general about what we need to be angry about than so then i kinda start taking them apart in i go through that kind of layers.

scientist