35 Burst results for "SAS"

Hurricanes complicated by COVID-19

NBC Nightly News

01:45 min | 2 d ago

Hurricanes complicated by COVID-19

"To natural disasters are making life even more difficult as those same areas battle corona virus outbreaks in Southern, California? It's a wildfire forcing people from their homes and in Florida tonight, it's a tropical storm strengthening slightly tonight, getting ready to move North Governor of North Carolina warning that during the pandemic, your home has been the safest place. But that might change we begin tonight with Kerry Sanders in Satellite Beach Florida. Tropical Storm Isa Years Hitting South Florida with wind and rain wreaking havoc in West Palm Beach and knocking out power along the coastline crews working to restore electricity to tens of thousands strong surf and rip currents closing Jupiter Beach and others, and the worry is not over with more than four hundred, Eighty, seven, thousand cases of Corona virus health officials are anxious. Some have held hurricane parties to ride out the storm I hope that there weren't any parties, but if were going. To, pay the price for it because likely corona virus would spread with people in a room together. Absolutely it is a Nin menacing infection that that translates very easily fearing they'd be hit by a Hurricane Health First Cape Canaveral hospitals surrounded by water only a mile and a half from the Atlantic Ocean evacuated its covert patients to another hospital, an hour's drive inland. So if this was a test, you passed repass grade and going forward now because we're still in hurricane season. We're more prepared. Now than for the next one, you know we'll get better and better, and that's the that's the goal is always get better. Instead officials say SAS has turned out to be a practice run the hurricane season lost another four months.

Hurricane Health First Cape Ca Satellite Beach Florida Florida Kerry Sanders West Palm Beach Jupiter Beach North Carolina South Florida Atlantic Ocean California Southern
Derek Black was groomed to be the new face of white nationalism. Now he's working against it.

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

05:49 min | Last week

Derek Black was groomed to be the new face of white nationalism. Now he's working against it.

"Derek Black was supposed to be the new face of white nationalism. His Godfather is David Duke his father created the White Nationalist Website Storm Front, black himself used to host a radio show and run workshops, pushing a white nationalist message, and then in college he changed. Listen to Derrick talk about his journey out of hatred. How belief in white nationalist ideals are more widely held than you'd think and the danger of the trump presidency poses to our nation as he rides white nationalist coat-tails here at all right now. Derek Black, welcome to the podcast Hey Jonathan thanks for having me on so I didn't know anything about you. Until my colleague at the Post allies SAS low sent me an email saying I've just written this book. called rising out of hatred. It is about this guy named Derek, black who was basically. That, the era parent to to the throne, if you will of white nationalism who came through on the other side and I read, the book was fantastic. Did the PODCAST WITH WITH ELI? put it out into the world. And unbeknownst to me. You were. A, subscriber to this podcast, and just was on a walk, and you were listening and discovered. You were the subject of conversation. That's exactly my experience. I was still living in Chicago, that point and I was doing my morning commute and your show came on, and it's it's that weird surreal experience where you you slowly realize that this is not just weirdly appropriately interesting, but actually it's just about you so. Specific, while what? What was fascinating about your story? Is How well one you know your story is. You know. In some ways, quintessentially American in you know white supremacy and white nationalism is woven into the DNA of America and hearing your story in the time of trump. Made it even more salient? Why did you participate with with Eli to do the book that he did? And then we'll get into present day stuff, right? Part of it was personal relationship. ilize that amazing writer and his real skill is in telling complicated stories and I. I feel like my story doesn't make sense without all the context of that I not proud of IT I. don't look back and try to. ask for any kind of praise from it in fact, I'm still quite embarrassed than like filled with a lot of shame. That I spent twenty years of my life, really committed to white nationalism, and so if if there was anything good, that was gonNA. Come out of it was gonna be in telling the stories of everybody around at that time all the people who who who were affected by my family's activism, all the people who still be engaged me whether that was in protesting the fact that I was on campus or whether it was. Was In my quiet conversations where they would dismantle all the evidence that I thought my ideology was supported by in all of that together felt like the the important part of it, so if I was going to wrestle with it it just it needed to be in the hands of someone and in a format that could really encompass all that Andy. Lie is such a fantastic storyteller of that. He was the perfect person to tell your story so now that we are a couple of minutes into this conversation and people are probably still wondering. Who is this Derek Black Guy who are you or who were you? I was born into one of the leading families of the White Nationalist Movement that my father founded the first white supremacist website online before the worldwide web even came online by his his closest friend, growing up was David Duke they come together doing white nationalist activism in the nineteen sixties and seventies They had run the clan together. They had quit the clan and gone into. Into politics together they had done all of that for decades by the time I was born, and I spent the first decades of my life, growing up with all these leaders of this movement that they had built coming over to the house or traveling around the country to meet people who had fought against the civil rights movement in the nineteen fifties who are now elderly men. Men sitting around the table, talking about how they were so worried about the direction of the country and I wasn't just a bystander. I got deeply involved at ran for Republican local county office in two thousand eight and been won that election, and became a national story in my own right, and all of that was up until I went to a small liberal Arts College and And had a year experience there being the most controversial thing on campus, because it was a a social justice oriented community that was now trying to wrestle with the fact that explicit premesis was living on their campus, and after many years there, my my experience was wrestling with how my ideology was was harming. People out was factually wrong how it was How is just in? It was not able to be something that I could continue committing to that I that I could be feel good about myself, and so publicly condemned in two thousand thirteen, and have spent the years then since then just trying to figure out what is my. What is my role in? What is my responsibility now?

Derek Black White Nationalist Movement ELI David Duke Derrick Chicago Liberal Arts College America Writer Andy
VCs and Startups Consider HaaS Model for Consumer Devices

Techmeme Ride Home

04:09 min | Last week

VCs and Startups Consider HaaS Model for Consumer Devices

"All familiar with software as a service right in a way. SAS has taken over the world. For software and all sorts of enterprise and consumer settings, but even increasingly. In all consumer settings as consumers have gotten used to. You know paying for digital things. I mean you can think of Netflix. As software as a service in a way. Well, are you ready for hardware as a service? Let me give you an example. Noura is a company that makes high. End earphones the NRA phone. For example is what the company calls the world's smartest headphones. You can buy the neuro phones today for three hundred ninety nine dollars, or if you pay ninety nine dollars, ninety nine cents up front and subscribed to pay nine dollars ninety nine cents a month. You can also own the near Afon. This is not rent to own. This is subscribed to us. As long as you keep paying, you can get a new neuro phone device every twenty four months. You can get the over the air software updates that keep the device improving, and Oh, yeah, keep the device working because if you stop paying, the device shuts off. Remember when there was that whole Brouhaha about Sonos end of lifing support for their earliest speaker systems. Yeah, get ready to hear a lot more about hardware service quoting techcrunch. In a recent email exchange Duncan Turner general partner at the x accelerator, which backed Noura described Hass hardware as a service as a great way to keep in contact with your customers and up sell them on new features most importantly for startups, recurring revenue is critical for scaling business with venture capital, and we'll help appeal to a broad set of investors, Haas also often has a low churn as easier to put. Put onto long term contracts and quote the upside to consumers clear. Don't pay for everything all up front, and your freer to experiment with new devices in ways you wouldn't have been otherwise. This is especially important in a world where brick and mortar experience is increasingly rare, even before retail ground to a halt courtesy of covid nineteen. There's also a clear appeal for those who are inclined to frequently upgrade devices quote. It's providing continuous value than it should be worth paying for Y combinator partner Eric Makovsky, tells tech crunch, if not stop using it and move on, it also is more sustainable hardware. These days requires a lot of software to work and the development and maintenance of that software costs money companies that have a continuous source of revenue will be able to continue to improve their product offerings through software updates and quote in two thousand eighteen. Eighteen study analysts parks associates noted a potential hurdle, however quote while a consumer reluctance to pay subscription fees is well documented. Haas models may get more traction. Where more value can be offered at less financial risk to the consumer, the challenges to create a service bundle with clear value that consumers find attractive consumers will pay for services that they perceive as valuable and complete tasks that they cannot or prefer not to do themselves unquote. As another VC is quoted, saying in the peace and I've seen myself over the last few months, startups don't have to be talked into Haas into this new sort of business model. Providing consumers can be talked into buying in as well if there is a new hotness right now in startup pitches at the moment it is basically subscription, but for x that sort of the new uber, but for X, and it's easy to see why this is so attractive to start ups. We've spoken endlessly before about how reliable and easily anticipated revenue is provided by subscriptions. But also if you have a subscription business, consider that you could achieve scale, not at the end of some years long slog through the Dark Valley of losing, money. Imagine, you could achieve scale and essentially bootstrap your way to it off. Your own cash flows from basically day one.

Hass Hardware Haas Noura SAS Netflix Afon NRA Dark Valley Covid Duncan Turner Partner General Partner Eric Makovsky
The 7 Best Hacks for Your Facebook Ads

Marketing School

03:39 min | Last week

The 7 Best Hacks for Your Facebook Ads

"Super committed to your success online. We've worked with them to a special offer. Just remarking school listeners, all you have to do is go to dream host dot com slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to another episode of marketing. Skoll I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today. We're GONNA. Talk about the seven best hacks for your facebook ads, so go first the first one around facebook ads is. I have been loving same with my team. Do the offer that we're pushing right now. We just love looking facebook library facebook. Ad Library I also at the same time. I like looking at what ads people running on Youtube and Google us into a call at beat for that, but by doing this competitive analysis or even looking at people are not direct competitors I get a lot of ideas and the ideas that I get their super important based on how facebook ads are designed, because the one thing that matters the most is your creative, and so if you can get. Get ideas from people that are running a lot of creative. It's GonNa save you a lot of time, and it's hopefully going to help you move faster. This requires a little bit of work, but if you rotate up your creatives, really really often like I'm talking about Multiple Multiple Times a day while you'll find is when you upload a new creative within the first few minutes. Jason tries to push more traffic to it to see how it does. Clicks tend to be cheaper impression. Send to be cheaper and then normalizes that you actually credit on the campaign and keep switching. Very very often. What you'll find is right when you switch him up. The numbers tend to be a little bit better number three so I mean people talk about. They've been talking about messenger out for the last couple of years we've had Mickael from many chat on the leveling up podcast before, and they're doing really well crushing mobile monkeys doing well and. FACEBOOK MESSENGER ADS. Depending on the business that you're in to be able to engage with people to drive ads towards your facebook, messenger bought and to be able to help them based on what they're looking for the segment people that's powerful, so I, still think not a lot of people have tried it i. still think it's worth look again. You can use a tool like many, or you can use a tool like mobile monkey. Number Four. Take your check page. Anyone who doesn't convert creative video talk not what it would be like to be a customer whether selling your product or service showed an video. You can even have customers on their with video testimonials edit the video pop it up as a remarketing ad, it'll be one of your heart is converting ads out. There works out well cool and similar to that thinking about when you're doing facebook guides I like retargeting people with even more content right so what I mean. mean by that so for us. Let's say someone visits ourselves marketing page so instead of telling them to convert directly I give even more content on it right so I spend maybe could be five to ten dollars a day. Trying to its elegant, we have a lot of people that reached page will use a daily unique reach option, and so we're gonNA reach unique people each day, and then they're just getting more impressions. They might not necessarily click on our ad, but the impressions count right because. Because we talk about the rule of seven, maybe be the rule fourteen, but you want to get as many impressions as you can on these people, so we're not spending a ton of money, or we're sending even more relevant content at ten dollars a day off SAS content targeting people that have reached maybe a middle, the funnel page or bottom of the funnel page, and then we're just constantly staying top of mind so whenever they're ready, they can take an action right, but it's look nowadays you. You already know people have landed on that page. You might as well take full advantage. I'd just be everywhere on facebook. ADS are a great way to do that. Number six celebrities tend to convert better than not using celebrities go to cameo, a handful of celebrities to

Facebook Youtube Eric Su Jason Mickael Neil Patel Google
Coca-Cola's stock surges, after profit beats expectations while revenue falls a bit shy

MarketFoolery

02:29 min | 2 weeks ago

Coca-Cola's stock surges, after profit beats expectations while revenue falls a bit shy

"Quarter results for Coca Cola Kate volume down profits down thirty three percent, the biggest drop in quarterly revenue. In, twenty five years and yet. Shares of Coca. Cola op couple of percent this morning. Jason Because CEO James Quincy says basically, the worst is over and so I guess optimism carries the day. I mean yeah, hopefully that is, that is the case you're right. They did note in the called that they felt like the second quarter of the quarter. This is reported was going to be the most impacted quarter. Further year in. You know it's interesting to think about the impact of this business because you would kind of think. Maybe it shouldn't be that bad, but that's only if you. Are Thinking about grocery store aspect right I mean. There's a tremendous F. and B.. Restaurant dynamic to this business in when you look at it from a global perspective that obviously. is going to make a big deal given all of all of the shutdowns in the restaurant sector over the past several months, and it does feel like. I! Say this only partly tongue-in-cheek. It really does kind of feel like coca-cola needs to do something. Different they need to change and I think that you know. We've always been really high on Coca Cola as distribution playwright. We've always talked about that. It's real competitive advantage so let's take that. Let's go one step further because clearly I mean if you determine that you are a SAS business if you call yourself as SAS business, no matter whether you're a SAS Iran. The market is going to give you a little love for that. A COCA COLA'S BEEN A. A very very bad stock known for the last five years. It just has the returns aren't there Pepsi's been a little bit better, but really cocoa has been falling short on a number of fronts, but soda as a service Chris Sas I. Mean Maybe we've had this discussion on the show before. I can't remember old confused but soda as a service. Maybe that's something that could at least helped light a fire, some optimism under the stock because you're right. Even with. The performance today I mean it seems it seems to us to be material, but when you look at the performance over the last five years it actually it is kind of meaningful, because this is not a, it's not not a company that's performing A. Liking it once used to, and I think that has to do with lot just the fact that they're selling. Drink. That is becoming. More and more obviously not good for us.

Chris Sas Coca-Cola James Quincy CEO Jason Iran Pepsi
Text-to-Speech Wizardry - Niclas Bergstrom, ReadSpeaker

The Voice Tech Podcast

04:27 min | 2 weeks ago

Text-to-Speech Wizardry - Niclas Bergstrom, ReadSpeaker

"Our? Our goal is to be the number one platform independent to specialists and what we do apart from developing selling web-based SAS solutions for learning management systems and educational content so forth speech, naming websites bill so develop high-quality custom voices spilled using deep learning methods that you can deploy basic on any hardware aging from embedded systems to high capacity servers, or in our cloud very nice. Okay, so that's the nicest distinct explanation. What kinds of applications do companies use your text to speech voices for then what the main areas you sees them being employed for. I think it's all the traditional industries if I've your call centers of course, but also since we have lots of the small footprint, high-quality Texas beach voice his where quite big in the embedded space as well so for can be anything from assistive technologies, these by people with impairments or Romans, or any non connected device, so that is I think one of how sorry I totally lost here. and. I'm thinking embedded devices, but these are things that help people speak. People have lost the ability to speak. Acceptability, on the web, we're kind of thing. Yes, accessibility for people that struggling with reading a lot of contents on the screen, basically so they can have help. Basically having their content read outs online directly into learning management systems or directly in the educational content again. Yeah, and then what we have seen of course in the last year of course, an explosion of a requests coming from burs, kinds of dialogue system so voice interaction platforms, virtual assistant, smart speakers, and that is why we started to focus quite a lot on streamlining our process to develop custom voices interesting, okay. Okay so this whether the businesses picking up on this speak aside then what kind of applications what kind of things that people actually using these custom voices for? Why would people choose to use a accustomed voice on a voice application as opposed to just the standard Alexa voice for instance with the Google voice well, I think there are a few different reasons I mean one is that if you have your own voice, your branded voice that are sort of well aligned with your your brand values and sort of its sounds like the company that you want to sound. Like. A, logo type basically so or graphical to sign that you use for your company voice is equally powerful in the voice space, because if if all the information and applications from older brands for example, not one of the popular platforms assistance platforms, if they all sound the same, so of course quite difficult to distinguish one brand for from an utter I think in the brandon voices like with lower types and. And stuff there are certain brand values that you can communicate to get war. Yeah, it's truly the what you're saying to convey the values of your brand to be more memorable. I guess as well so people recognize your brand through the sounders in addition to the visual kind of branding the everyone's today, not make sense you see. Guys produce high-quality text to speech voices using deep learning models to older. Older is that right? These are unique voices. You make for each company. Is that right? Yeah, yeah, correct I, mean we do have Jerem ninety different voices of the shelf to has more in a thirty five different languages currently. We're used to grow that quite a bit this year, but really even though if you can, you can tweak the existing voices have slightly different character and so forth but many. Many customers do want to have their. You know they have specific requirements on what their voice. Their corporate voice sort of should sound like some customers even have their voice talents. If they are currently using for can be in the VR system can be four different touch points like a radio commercials for TV commercials, so it's it's a voice that when you hear it. You immediately associated with this brand. On the the sort of sonic branding part, some the have very strong preference of having a specific sort of language, obviously gender age should be like very formal sound should be more like a young hip sound or How does your brand sound I mean that is the important question and that is identified is about scouting the right speaker that fits well with those requirements and basically start to produce a custom tedious voice.

Alexa Virtual Assistant Texas Beach Google
Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

Software Engineering Daily

54:31 min | 2 weeks ago

Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

"Blair and Chris Welcome to the show. Thank, you good to be here. We're talking about capital allocation today and I'd like you to start off by describing the problems that you see with modern capital allocation for technology companies. I'm happy happy to start there. So I think it might be helpful to give. The listeners, a little bit of our backgrounds so I was a venture capitalist at draper. Fisher Jurvetson for five years I worked very closely with Steve. Jurvetson and we were financing are very MD intensive. Technology projects that became businesses things like satellite companies companies that were making chips to challenge the GP you new applications of machine learning algorithm so on and so forth and I think the most important thing to recognize is that the vast majority of technology funding does not actually go to those kinds of companies. The venture space is a two hundred fifty billion dollars per year investment space. The vast majority of the capital goes to parts of businesses that are pretty predictable like raising money in in investing that in sales, marketing and inventory or building technologies that have a fairly low technical risk profile, so the vast majority of tech companies find themselves raising money. From a industry that was designed to finance crazy high technology risk projects at a time where that industry because technology so pervasive you know really do the great work of of many entrepreneurs over the past twenty to thirty years, technology is now mainstream, but the financing structure to finance businesses not has not really changed much in that period of time. Yeah, and then I guess I'll talk a little bit. My my background is I came from consumer education sort of background, so direct to consumer, thinking about how you use tools and make tools that ingrained into the lives of teachers, parents students I was down in the junior class dojo before starting capital with Blair. We were working on the Earth thesis He. He was telling me a lot about this. The the date out. There exists to make more data driven in data rich decisions. How do we go software to make that easy to access in self service and sort of servicing the signal from the noise, and we kicked around the idea and I thought that they were just a tremendous opportunity to bring. What Silicon Valley really pioneered which is I think making software that is easy to use in agreeing to your live into kind of old industry fund raising capital Haitian. The kinds of capital allocation that exist there's. And debt, financing and different flavors of these. Of these things say more about the different classes of fundraising in how they are typically appropriated two different kinds of businesses. So. You have the main the main groups you know. Absolutely correct, so there's. Equity means you sell part of your business forever to a group of people and as Business Rosen succeeds. They'll get a share in that. Success and ultimately income forever. Debt means you temporarily borrow money from somebody you pay them money, and then at some point in time that money's paid back and you all future income for your business, so equities permanent, not permanent. If you think about how companies are finance like. Let's take the P five hundred. About thirty percents of the capital that S&P five hundred companies use to run. Businesses comes from debt. In the venture world that's remarkably just two percent. And the thing that's crazy is this is two percent with early stage seed companies, also two percent with public venture, backed companies in places like the best cloud index, which is like a one trillion dollar index of publicly traded technology companies started their life, and in with injure backing many of them SAS companies, these companies, also just two percent finance with debt, but nonetheless within these these classes, the reason it's obviously economically much better for a business and pretty much every case to finance itself with debt because it's not. Not It's not permanent, and it can be paid back. It's much much cheaper to use debt. That's why you buy a house with a mortgage show. You know you don't sell twenty percent of your future income forever to your bank help you buy a house, but the reason that people use equity comes back to the risk profile so just like. If you lose your job and you can't pay off your mortgage. The bank owns your home. Same exact thing happens with debt in so restorick Louis, if there's very low. Certainty around the outcome in typically early stage investment you're you're doing a lot of brand new are indeed you have no idea if it's GonNa work you cope. You know over time that you'll be successful, but there's really quite a bit of uncertainty equities a great tool because you're. You'RE NOT GONNA lose a business, you know everybody can basically react to a failed. Are Indeed project. Decide what to do next had saints. Equity is kind of the continent tool for high technical risk, high uncertainty investments, and then debt is basically the tool for everything else, and it can be used as most companies do for. Ninety percent of The places that businesses are investing so if you're spending money on sales and marketing, and you know what you're doing and you've been running campaigns before. That were successful, very. Little reason you should use equity for that if you're buying inventory if you are a big business that's. Reach a level of success that on. Means you have a bunch of diversified cashless. Coming in businesses might take out dead on business kind of overall, so it's less important what specifically you're using the money for, but it's important to recognize that most companies are financed roughly fifty fifty equity versus dead, just just intra back companies that. That are kind of uniquely Equity Finance. Scaling a sequel cluster has historically been a difficult task cockroach. DB Makes Scaling your relational database much easier. COCKROACH! DVD's a distributed sequel database that makes it simple to build resilient scalable applications quickly. COCKROACH DB is post grass compatible giving the same familiar sequel interface that database developers have used for years. But unlike databases scaling with Cockroach DB's handled within the database itself, so you don't need to manage shards from your client application. And because the data is distributed, you won't lose data if a machine or data center goes down. cockroach D is resilient and adaptable to any environment. You can hosted on Prem. You can run in a hybrid cloud, and you can even deploy across multiple clouds. Some of the world's largest banks and massive online retailers and gaming platforms and developers from companies of all sizes, trust cockroach DB with their most critical data. Sign up for a free thirty day trial and get a free t shirt at cockroach labs dot com slash save daily thanks to coach labs for being a sponsor and nice work with cockroach DB. The capital that is being steered towards a recipient. It's often originating in a large source, a sovereign wealth fund or family office in it's being routed through something like capital allocators cater like a venture capital firm for example or a bank. How does this capital get allocated to these smaller sources? What is the supply chain of capital in the traditional sense? You know it's kind of funny to think about capital and things like the stock market in the form of a supply supply chain, but this is exactly how we think about it so at the end of the day. Capital originate. In somebody savings, basically society savings right you. You have a retirement account or your population like you know in in Singapore and Norway with a lot of capital, it sort of accumulated from. From the population and these sovereign wealth funds, or you're an endowment that's you know managing donations of accumulated over many many years, and ultimately you're trying to invest capital to earn a return and pay for something pay for your retirement pay for the university's operation so on so forth so that's Capitol starts, and it basically flows through the economy in theory. To all of the economic projects that are most profitable, inefficient for society, and so, if you step back, and you think about like how how is it that the American dream or the Chinese Miracle Happen? You know in in both of those cases different points of the last hundred years. Why is it that society basically stagnated? You know the world was a pretty scary. Scary place to live in up until about seventeen fifty, the industrial revolution started. Why is it that you know basically for all of human history? People fought each other for food and died at the age of thirty or forty, and over the last two hundred fifty years that it's totally changed. It's because we have an economic system that converts capital from its original owners. Diverts it to the most productive projects. which if they're successful, replace some old more expensive way of doing something with newer better way and so I think when when I described that like you know I, think most people can step back and say yeah, okay I. kind of see how capital flows through the system, it goes automatically to someone making an investment decision like a venture capital firm ultimately gets into the hands of the company company decides to invest in creating some great product that people love. Let's. Let's say like Amazon and then everybody switches from you know buying goods at some store that may or may not be out of you know may or may not being stock to the world's best selection of anything you'd never wanted. The most efficient price that's society gets wealthier basically through these these kind of steps in these transformations, but it's asking if you step back and think about it like nobody actually thinks it's processes as efficient as it could be like. We asked people all the time. People were interviewing journalists companies. We work with sewn. So how efficient do you think world's capital allocation is? I've never met a person that says it's pretty good. You know we're like ninety percent of the way there. In fact, most people think it's pretty inefficient. They think of companies like you know we work, and some of the more famous cases lately of of Silicon. Valley back businesses that that totally. underwhelmed disappointed. Their initial expectations and I think most people admit that the efficiency of capital allocation is either broken or nowhere close to achieving its potential, and so we basically we'll talk more about our technology and how we do we do. We basically think of this problem our problem to solve. There's an incredible amount of Apache inefficiency in how data that goes from a project or a company, ultimately funneling up to an investor flows, and so you know it's hard to place blame because there's so many people in the supply chain, but. But I think it super clear that if it's difficult to measure whether or not a project or a business is good at converting capital into value in wealth, and you know products that people want, it's nearly impossible for society to become really good and efficient at allocating its capital, so we're we're here basically to make the data gathering data transformation visualization communication of what's actually going on under the out of business as efficient as possible and you know from that, we thank some great things are going to happen to the economy. Goes a little bit deeper on the role that a bank typically plays in capital allocation. If you think about our bank works like let's take. Let's take a consumer bank that most people think about you gotTA checking account. Right, now you've got some money in that checking account. That account actually takes your money or dot and most people know this your dollars sitting in that account. You know just waiting around. You'd withdraw them. Your dollars are actually rolling up into the bank's treasury. There's somebody at the bank working with the regulators to say hey, how much of this money can we actually put into things like mortgages, commercial loans, all of the the uses of capital that society. Has In some some effort to. To, move the world forward and make the economy efficient, and so those deposits basically roll up into a big investment fund, and there's ratios that regulators set globally that say those dollars needed to be kept in reserve, versus how many are actually able to be invested, but with the portion that's able to be invested. It's there to fun. You know building a house to fund a business back -Tory to fund sales and marketing or inventory procurement for some other business, and so a bank was was basically the original investment fund, and a bank has unlike venture funds and other sources of. We typically think private capital. The bank has tricky. Problem were any moment all of the depositors holding the checking accounts could show up and say hey. I want my money back and so that's why banks have to deal with reserving capital predicting the amount of withdraw and classically everybody wants her money at once at the worst possible time, and so banks have to deal with quite a bit of volatility now if you take an investment fund on the other hand. Totally totally different structure, so your typical venture fund will have money available to it for a period of ten years from you know typically these larger pools of capital. We talked we talked about so very rarely. Individuals are investing retirement savings in venture funds, typically sovereign wealth funds down that's. Basically pools of that individuals capable. Win One of these funds makes a commitment to a venture fund. It'll say you've got the capital for ten years. You've gotta pay back. You know as investments exit, but other than that will check in ten years from now. We hope that we have more than we gave you the star with and there there's no liquidity problem because the fun has effectively carte blanche to keep the money invested until some set of businesses grow and succeed and go public and make distributions so one thing that's fascinating. The Tappan in the last twenty five years is private capital capital in the format of these kinds of funds. Have just grown tremendously and so today. There's a little over five trillion dollars. Of private capital being allocated in this way to think like buyout funds venture funds so on and so forth. Funds don't have the liquidity problems of banks. They can make much longer term for looking investments. This is created tremendous potential to make the economy more more efficient by taking out the time spectrum. You know this is why venture investors can do things like finance spacex or Tesla. Really. Build fundamental technologies in the way that a bank never could so this is an amazing thing it. However leads to a very long. You DAK cycle, so the incentive goes down when you take out the time line over which investment needs to pay back. To carefully monitor and understand what's going on in the business day today, so it's pretty interesting thing about the different pools of capital. There's not not to. Make it sound too confusing, but I think everybody will admit that the financial markets are incredibly diverse complicated we track basically about fifteen different kinds of capital, and they're sort of pros and cons with each one, but you know a bank is one. A private fund is wanted insurance companies balancing as another. You've got things like ETF and public vehicles that hold capital so there's quite a bit of complexity and the the structure of the financial markets. All right well. That's maybe the supply side of Capitol on. All kinds of middlemen and all kinds of different arrangements, but ultimately there is also the demand side of Capitol, at least from the point of view of companies getting started which is. Startups or computer in later stage with the maybe they're not exactly considered startup anymore, but they're mature. These companies have models for how they are predicting. They're going to grow, but oftentimes these companies are very. Lumpy in terms of how their their revenues come in how closely their predictions can track reality. So how do technology companies even model their finances? Is there a way to model their finances? That actually has some meaningful trajectory. Sure so first. Companies you know need need a base think of all the places that they're spending our money and. We're pretty. We Do I. Think a pretty good job of organizing this and making it simple so when we look at companies and we can, we can talk more about how the the cabinet machine operates, but when we look at companies, we basically think they're only a handful of places of money. Get spent you spend money on. Short term projects that you hope proficient things, sales and marketing. Houston money on paying for your sources of financing like paying interest on debt, making distributions to your investors, and then you spend money on everything else and everything else can be designing software building products on, and so forth, and so if you break the demand for capital down into just those three buckets. And look at them that way. Some pretty interesting things happen. The first is for the short term investments that you hope productive. You can track pretty granular nearly whether or not they are, and we'll come back to that. For paying back your investors, you sort of know exactly how much you're paying your investors so a pretty easy thing to track, and then for the operating costs you know most people will help us. Apax, that you're paying to keep the lights on things like Renton the your accountants, the CEO salaries on and so forth these are these are table stakes expenditures. You need to stay in business and so. Amongst each of those three things, there's different things that you wanna do to optimize and I'm happy to go into more detail sort of go through each one. If you think that'd be useful. Yeah Bliss a little bit more about about how these companies should be a modeling, their revenues are that is meaningful to model their revenue so that you can potentially think of them as targets for for capital allocation so. If we think about. Understanding what company might be a viable recipient of capital? How can you accurately predict the trajectory of that company, or or do they? Would they present a model? Would they develop a model good through a little more detail? How a company would serve justify? It's need for capital. So typically what what most companies do and this is not terribly useful or accurate, but I'll tell you what most people do I mean by the way like how central the entire economy predicts, predicts demand for capital works like this. Companies take. Their income statement on their. Balance Sheet historically. And they they basically have this excel file got a bunch of you know, rose and have different things like my revenue, my you revenue that sort of linked or my expenses that are linked revenue Mukasey could sold so on and so forth, and they grow each of those rose by some number that they hope to hit so if you want your revenue to double next year, you'll say my revenue one hundred dollars today I wanted to be two hundred. Hundred dollars twelve months from now I'm just GONNA draw a line between those two points and every month. There will be some number that's on that line, and that's why monthly revenue I want my expenses. You know everyone knows. Expenses are going to have to go up if my revenue goes up but I don't want them to go up as much as my revenue, so I'm going to draw a line. That's you know somewhere less than a doubling. and. You pull these lines together on one big excel file and there's your you know they're your corporate projections. In general, this is true for big companies small companies, but that's not actually how. Company revenue works because if you go back to the three categories, we talked about before, and you just focus on the one that talks about the short term investments. The. Way Company Revenue Actually Works is a company this month. Let's say they spend one hundred dollars on sales marketing. Well. They're hoping to get a return on that sales marketing, and so they're hoping that in the next you know six months. That's paid back. Twelve months that's paid back. You can actually track every time they spend money on sales and marketing. how quickly it gets paid back so it's that level of precision that can accurately predict revenue, and so what we do is we basically just get a list of every time? Money was spent on one of these short-term investments, so you sales and marketing for for an example, and then we get a list of all of the revenue that was ever earned. And we attribute between both of those lists causing effect. And we do that using a bunch of techniques that are pretty commonplace in your typical data, company or machine learning company. We use some math things like factor graphs. We use simple kind of correlations. We have You know a whole kind of financial framework to. Guess. What attribution should be because you learn a lot as you see different businesses and you see a bunch of different different patterns, which you can basically cluster on, but it is this linkage between spending on something like sales and marketing emceeing seeing revenue, go up or down, but makes or breaks a business, and you want to look at it and I is. Not a bundled. Entirety which is how financial projections are typically built? Okay, well! Let's talk a little bit more about what you actually do so if you're talking about early stage technology companies. Describe how you are modeling, those companies and how you are making decisions as to whether they should receive capital. When a company comes to capital they they come to our website. They sign up for this system that we built which which we've called the capital machine. And the first thing that they do is they connect their accounting system their payment processor typically, so think like a strike, and then sometimes they'll provide other things like a pitch deck or a data room, or whatever other information they have prepared. The system pulls down. All of the date in the accounting system and the the payment processor, and we look at other systems to these are the two key ones that all all dive into detail, and so, what ends up happening is from the accounting system. We get a list of all the times. Businesses spend money on these things like sales and marketing that we were talking about before. From the payment processor we get a list of all the revenue transactions in crucially we get it at. The level of each. Each customer payment, and so you know we scrub I all we really care about is having a customer ID, but once we have data at that level. We can start to do this linkage and say all right look. You know this business spent. A million dollars on sales and marketing and March of two thousand eighteen in April of twenty eighteen, and we saw revenue grow by twenty percent. That was a pretty substantial chain. You know what actually happened here. You can typically identify the subcategories of sales and marketing and start to do this link between these two, and this is really the you know the magic behind our our data science in our team pairing with our engineering team to figure out this problem and solve away that is, that's robust. Bud once we have these two data feeds, and the system goes through, and does all of these attribution. Populations were able to present that back to accompany a pretty clear picture of what's going on, and so we'll say things like hey. Your Business is pretty seasonal, and in the summer is when you're typically more more efficient at converting your sales and marketing dollars into growth so I, you want to finance growth in the summer. The second thing is only about eighty percent of your businesses financeable. There's twenty percent where you might not know it because you're not looking at this level of detail, you're busy building your business, which is exactly exactly what you should be doing, but Twenty percent of your businesses, not efficient. You're spending money on on your sales and marketing categories, product lines, and CETERA that just shouldn't exist and so if you get rid of those. If you double down on the part of Your Business, it is efficient. Then we predict your revenue will be act fifty percent higher, and we'll tell you exactly how much money you need to invest to raise money to to raise the revenue by fifty percent. We give you a bunch of charts that allow you to see how history and projections merged together and dig down. Inspect how we do that linkage to make sure you agree, but. This is what the capital machine does at its core. It Converts Company data into a fully audited completely transparent picture of. How business works where it sufficient where it's not efficient. And then that's where our technology stops, and where balanced she comes in, and so we then take this information, and we make balancing investments directly in companies, and so primarily at this point we lend money to technology companies that we see from their data are eligible for non dilutive funding. We make capital available to them directly. We basically allow them to access it through the capital machine. We use one system to communicate changes to the business. No keep both sides and form so on and so forth, but this is the kind of analytics layer that's essential to making these capital allocation decisions more efficient, and so I think you could imagine a day at least for us in the not too distant future when it's not just US using our balance sheet in this tool to make investments, but in fact, just like excel, every investor can benefit from a similar level of analytics and transparency, as can companies by getting more accurately priced faster access to capital less friction so on and so forth. Get Lab commit, is! Get labs inaugural community event. Get Lab is changing how people think about tools and engineering best practices and get lab commit in Brooklyn is a place for people to learn about the newest practices in devops, and how tools and processes come together to improve the software development life cycle. Get Lab commit is the official conference. Forget lab. It's coming to Brooklyn new. York September Seventeenth Twenty nineteen. If you can make it to Brooklyn, on September Seventeenth Mark Your calendar, forget lab, commit and go to software engineering daily dot, com slash commit. You can sign up with code commit s E. D.. That's COM MIT S. E. D.. And Save thirty percent on. Conference passes. If you're working in devops, and you can make it to New York. It's a great opportunity to take a day away from the office. Your company will probably pay for it, and you get thirty percent off if you sign up with code, commit S, e. There a great speakers from Delta. Airlines Goldman. Sachs northwestern, mutual, T, mobile and more. Check it out at software engineering daily Dot Com slash, commit and use code. Commit S. E. D.. Thank you to get lab for being sponsor. The inputs specifically if you think about a model for determining whether or not, a company should should be eligible to receive capital. I'd like to know how the the models are built. The the data science models that you're building are constructed from the point of view of the inputs. So how are you determining or how do you like company comes to you? How do you turn that company into some structured form of data that you could put into your models and determine whether it's worthy of capital. Yeah I mean it comes down to what what the data is your down so when we talk to a system like striper transaction records system, you know that that's the revenue of the company now where things get interesting when we connect to balance sheets in penalizing, it's of accompanying really onto understanding. Weighing. What exactly these numbers mean, and that sort of where we made our pipelines were built from the ground up to give us that granular. Of A company's cash family revolutions. Where's the money going where they allocating? And it's savable greenway or you once. What do you understand that data through that Lens? That let's build pretty sophisticated financial models Linda. And you know as soon as you have the picture of Company You can really do a lot of flexible analysis on the back leg distributed computation. Come stuff that you would never be able to excel and quite frankly a lot of these companies don't have the stacking internally or really the tools to understand for themselves, so you'd be surprised it you know when we surface this analysis back to the company by virtue of just being transparent on how we're making decision how it is perceived their business, the signals that were uncovering. These operators the CEO's the CFO's that are really focused on building company. Really surprising. They're really making these insights really transforming. How they think they should have capital. Should invest growing business. Are there any? Sources of Third Party data that you can gather to improve decision making. There are at a macro economic sense, and so it's actually quite useful to look at public company performance and say hey. SAS businesses in general. Most people notice, but facilities in general are seasonal in the fourth quarter. Budgets basically expire and people come in, and they buy a bunch of SAS. Software and so to take concepts like that basically shapes of curves, signals and apply them to private company. Financials is useful. Crucially though there is no private company. Data repository of any kind like it just doesn't exist, and you know notoriously even even with small businesses. It's actually quite quite difficult to get access to any sort of meaningful credit data, and so, what ends up happening is these aw. These businesses. Give you a picture of their business directly as an investor and you have to interpret it directly, and that's basically how this works totally unlike consumer credit, there's no credit bureau that people paying so most investors are analyzing the state and excel. Excel notoriously breaks when there's about a million cells worth of data, and so we've got this great visualization showing our data pipeline, and it's basically a bunch of boxes, and there's a little tiny. Tiny box in the bottom of corner that's excel, and there's a bunch of other boxes across the entire rest of the page that are nodes in our in our distributed computations, but accelerate very very limited, and so it makes it impossible to actually understand what's going on in business from the source data, and it's at the source that you see this variability in this linkage between profitable capital allocation decisions in unprofitable capital allocation decisions. Describing more detail, the workflow so a company comes to you and they're going to put their inputs into the. Would you call the capital machine? What does that workflow look like in a little bit more depth? Yes when they come to the website, they creighton count much like you would on. Twitter facebook account. When your details your email, you terrify your email, and then you on what's recalling like the capital portable on there? You have et CETERA. Tools to connect your sins record and these are typical offload. So you know people are very familiar with you. You know you say hey, let's connect by quickbooks you in your credentials and sort of be as secure way, and you click okay and the system checkmark by your quickbooks in the system start pulling that data out of regular cadence and. Depending on what system you're connecting you of the characteristics of that's not go systems of record, and how much data you have you know. The data's available anywhere from ten minutes to a couple of hours later and you know once we have Dr. System, we run that through our partake analysis pipeline in the users as a company. You get you get charged. In Tableau kind of call it, the insight Saban's these refused that we think would be helpful for you as an operator company understanding about Your Business in separately. We also get views of that data that are useful to our our internal investment team. Whoever is looking to capitalization systems? Are there certain business categories that are a better fit for modeling in better fit for the kind of. Predictable capital returns that you can, you can expect with the investments that you're making so like you ride sharing or Gig economy businesses or some businesses. What are the categories that are the best fit? Say Very few categories don't shit from the from the perspective of of linkages, but they're certainly models at their easier to think through and easier to understand, but our our system can underwrite today A. Lease on a commercial aircraft, a fleet of ships and Insurance Agency ask company the most important. Thing about our system is that the financial theory that underlies it is very general, just like p. e. rate is very general, and so that's kind of sounds crazy like. A lot of. A. Lot of people say what what businesses the best fit for your your system and you know it's kind of like asking what businesses the best for Warren Buffett like Warren. Buffett is a generalist. In any business, and he has a framework in his own head to figure out how to make ship comparable to American Express our assistant has a very similar framework. It just operates at the level of transactions instead of at the level of financial statements, but certainly within. That framework there's some examples that are just easier describes I think like you know thinking through the fishing of sales and marketing something. That's a lot more obvious than thinking through like the stability in refurbishment of commercial aircraft parts, which is a key question you know. Pricing pricing refurbished parts, which is a key question if your financing commercial aircraft and Our team, the ambassadors that use the capital machine internally which we primarily do internally do a little bit of partnering with without the groups to to use this as well. These people are all specialists in some particular area, but it's crucial to understand. They're looking at the exact same chance as all the other specialists and all the other areas, so it's like literally the the Fast Company and a commercial aircraft will have the same series of charts at investors. Are there two two draw their conclusion? Is the question for Chris. Can you describe the stack of technologies that you built in more detail? Yeah Yeah. Of course on the front, we are react type script, xjs, you know everything is on aws, and in the back, and we're. We're all python, and in really the reason for that is if you're doing any serious machine, learning or data science today can't really get away in python stack, so we're all python them back in. We have flasks. As a as our API late here and That's the that's a high level. And get a little bit more detail about how the data science layer works. Yeah, yeah, yeah, of course, so we put on the dea into basically a data lake the that goes down into Ardito pipeline in that's all air orchestrated on top of each called airflow, and we use a technology called desk for are distributed computation, and I think that this is a good choice. Choice for us at this moment you know I see us doing a lot of work on. You know using a spark in other distributed technologies in the future and his team and it turns out that when we pull this data down organizing the data was really important to us as we build a lot of attractions to make accessing that data, really easy for quantitative analysts. Important central to our whole technology is that we're able to do a lot of different financials experiment very quickly on top of this so the the implications of that really cascade down all the way into. You know what technologies where choosing how we structure our delayed. Even even how strokes are teams, so it really is brought up locations across all product. How is it when you're analyzing company that you have enough data that it warrants a spark cluster because I can imagine? The financial data around the company. How can there really be that much data to analyze how you do surprised in a lot of these transactions systems taking up the companies have been around a couple of years and their direct to consumer. These data sets can be can be pretty large. You know we're talking about in the millions and millions and millions of transactions that were pulling down and storing. Storing and that just on a per company basis. You know that's not even talking about if we wanted to. Benchmarks Cross companies, and also if we want to do scenario analysis, so you know one of the things we was part of a pipeline is take this data, and through like nine ninety nine hundred thousand simulations to understand the sensitivity of different variables on the performance of Your Business and If, you're starting out with starting that already large. Sort of a multiplying effect. On how much data the system is the old process? is you go through those different stages? And, can you tell me a little more detail? What would a typical spark job? Look like for a company that you're assessing. Yes, so first episode is ribbon. Our our financial didn't ingestion parts, so we download something on the order of you know forty fifty bytes of Tim's action data for for a company. We have to do all the work to interpret and understand what that means in reorganized that data in a way that are downstream analysis and primitives can. Make sense of and use for useful analysis so really the first step at this point job is is transformed the datum some it's useful, and then there's all the work on what are the clusters in order to machines and analysis in the computational. Resources needed to run simulations. You know not not just say local computer locally owned of fall over the only about thirty to sixty four gigabytes of Ram what league, so that's where workflow comes in creating easier faces into data, clusters and being. Should you know when you run a job? You know when it fails. You know it's done. You know when the team can't okay. This part of analysis done I had intermediate date asset to do more analysis on now get back to work is a lot of the time we spend developing internal tools to make. One other thing that'll mentioned that I think's important is. A lot of the underlying technology in our data pipeline it's no different than like what a tableau or you need. Traditional BI business would have access to, but what's fascinating when you have a vertically specific domain so financial data in our case you can make a lot of interpretations about the date of the let you do much more intelligent things, and so for example we. Don't have to make your own charts as a user of the capital machine. We make all the charts for you can of course. As a business we work with. Give us ideas for charts. You can mock up your own. We we basically have an interface for for business. The I team's to to write some code if they if they want to bought when you have clients who are thinking about financial risk, financial attribution across all of the companies that we see distilling that down into a series of indicators that are detailed, but generalize -able, and then publishing that back to all of the companies that use the capital machine to run their own capital, allocation, decisions and access, external fundraising and capital. Some pretty amazing things happen in so it's only with a vertical view. You actually having these we, we call our data scientists Kwan's, but but actually having these people who you know typically are graduate level economists, thinking for the first time about using transaction level data in their analysis, which is notoriously not not available to to normal economists that you get the kinds of insights and analysis the actionable for businesses, and then in terms of the data pipeline that then means we actually store a bunch of intermediate data that's opinionated in that way, and that makes it much faster to access much easier to benchmark much more useful across a network of companies, versus just that isolated excel model that. Explains only one business. One thing I'd like to ask you about. Capital intensity so there are kinds of businesses that are capital intensive for example where you have to pay upfront for a lot of ridesharing rides, and you know as Uber or lift. His has known in much detail. You allocate all this capital two things to subsidize rise because you try to win a market, there's all kinds of other capital intensive businesses. How does capital intensity change? What makes sense with regard to the equity financing the debt financing that you are shepherding for these companies? That is a great question and be because of where you focus in your audience. You totally get the most financiers don't so. The first point exactly like you said. Capital intensity means a business consumes a lot of capital. It doesn't mean a business has a physical factory or plant or railcars, so it is absolutely true exactly like you said that there are a lot of tech businesses that are incredibly capital intensive. If you are capital intensive business that means UNI especially if you're growing, you need to raise a lot of external capital, and so it is even more important that your capital or a big portion of your capital base is not dilutive. That's that's just essential. Table stakes because what you see with these businesses, the ride sharing companies are great. Example is by the time one of these things actually goes public the early owners in the business on a very very very miniscule. KEESA that business, still if you contrast that to company like Viva Systems which I think is one of the most capital capitol efficient businesses in venture history, I think that this race something like twelve or fifteen million dollars total before it went public in a at a multi billion dollar market cap. So capital intensity. Is a synonym for dilution your own way less. Than you think when you exit entities even more important that you figure out a way to raise capital non ludicrously upfront. Some broader questions zooming out in in getting your perspective. Do a thesis for what is going on in the economy right now where you look at. The fact that We have. Obvious pressures to. Reducing the size of the economy through the lack of tourism, the lack of social gatherings while the stock market climbs higher and higher, and it appears that the technology side of things is almost unaffected by Corona virus is there. Is there a thesis that you've arrived at or or their set of theses that through conversations with other people, you've found most compelling. Sure the most important thing to realize about the stock market is that it discounts all cash flows from all businesses in the stock market to infinity, and so the value, the stock market about eighty percent of the value. The stock market is. Pretty far into the future like more than three years from now, and so if you believe that the current economic crisis and this is why there's always a. At least in the Western, world, last two hundred fifty years after an economic crisis. If you believe the crisis will eventually revert, and there will be a recovery, then it only makes sense discount stock market assets by anywhere between ten and twenty five percent. If you believe businesses fundamentally going to go out of business because of this crisis, that's a different story, but that explains why something as terrible as Kobe nineteen and a pandemic. Only discount the stock market by by roughly thirty thirty five percent in a in March, but that's not what's actually going on today as you mentioned and so stock market prices now have completely recovered. That is something that we think is a little bit of out of sync with reality but I. I mention you know we're not. We don't spend too much time about the stock market beyond that we just look at you. Know Private Company fundamentals. We try to understand what's actually going on in individual businesses across all businesses that are network to see what you know what we can understand, and you know what kind of conclusions we can draw, and so if you take that Lens and you actually look at what's happening to businesses due to Cova nineteen, it's fascinating. Some businesses like think the food delivery space have gotten a lot more efficient, so those businesses lot like ridesharing businesses back twelve months ago, there was sort of a bloodbath between bunch of companies competing in local markets to acquire customers all all fighting Google and facebook console, and so forth you subsidies drivers, etc.. That's essentially stopped. These businesses incredibly profitable, the cost acquire customers has fallen by more than half a lot of cases. The channels were slot less competitive, and so if you're running one of those businesses. Now is a great time to be aggressively expanding. Weird things like commercial construction businesses. They're actually a handful businesses that we've seen do things like install windows and doors and commercial buildings whose businesses have accelerated because all of these buildings are closed down. Construction project timelines have gotten pulled up. All of these orders are coming. Do in they're you know sort of rapidly doing it solutions? There's obviously a bunch of other businesses have been that have been hurt by by the pandemic, but our general thesis are we've studied. Pretty detailed way the Spanish flu in nineteen eighteen, you know. These things eventually go away. There will be a vaccine. Economy will get back to normal, and as long as we can stay focused on working through this as as a society and of maintain our our fabric of of kind of economic progress then. DESAGUADERO values today will eventually make sense just sort of a question of of win for the stock market, and then if you're if you're actually running business in thinking about your own performance in isolation, really being clear about is now the time to invest and grow my business now the time to be very careful with my expenses interest, get through this for the next year or however long it takes for there to be a vaccine. So the way to think about your company, if I understand correctly if I was to to put in a nutshell, is that. I think of you as a data science middleman between large capital allocators, and and start ups deserving of capital, so the the sovereign wealth funds the banks the I guess. Funds of funds. These kinds of sources are essentially looking to you for guidance on where to direct the capital, and you're on the on the other side, absorbing data and creating opportunities from these startups to source the good directions of that capital. Just wrap up. Would you put any more color around that description or or refining anyway. Yeah I mean I. think that at the core of what capital is is where the. Core Technology Ambler of sort of. The private market if you think about public markets today, you've clearing-houses like the New York Stock Exchange, and you have companies that provide analysis on top of that like Bloomberg, you know we see a tremendous opportunity to shift the paradigm where you know the place where all the financial transactions happen. is also the place that collects the data improvise information for those making these decisions and yeah, so I think capitals really at the center of making a transparent technologically enabled financial marketplace. Guys. Thank you so much for coming on the show and discussing capital, and I guess one last question is. Do you have any predictions for how capital allocation for startups will look differently in five ten years? Sure so! The first prediction. And this is happening now. I mean the the infrastructure is. In place both within. And others. Most startups fairly early in their life. Think is equity only way to do this and. So. That's a cultural shift. That's that's already happened. People are starting to ask that question. The second prediction is. Seed and series a funding will be entirely unchanged. After series. There'll be a bifurcation between businesses that. Are Really. Capital intensive gigantic rnd projects think like SPACEX. The series, B. C. d. e. enough are really about building and launching a rocket. Those businesses will by and large not. Turn outside of equity to finance themselves, but there's very few of those businesses. Pretty much every other business businesses that you see raising a series B. Serie C. Will like any normal business in the entire rest of the economy raise maybe half of that capital nine allegedly either in the form of debt. Royalty financing factoring all of the other instruments that normal companies use to finance themselves in the void delusion that will happen roughly three years her. Now that'll that'll kind of we'll see obvious obvious signs of that from very early very early base, and then the final the final thing is. Steve Case talks a lot about this. With the rise of the rest, he's got this great venture fund that invests explicitly outside the coast, so kind of the rest of America and we've seen that there's there's a pretty dramatic distinction between being a coastal business non-coastal business from capital access perspective, but there's no distinction from an actual performance perspective, and so we'll start to see some of the regional. Differences in bias sees around where capital flows, go away. And so I would maybe put that on a five year timeline like raising capital is actually much more predictable, much less biased, and that's great back to the beginning of our conversation. That's great for the economy I mean every project or business that can convert capital, two products and services that people love should get finance. No questions asked doesn't mean it doesn't matter what the color of your skin is. What background you have whether you went to college didn't go to. College doesn't matter. You have a business with data that can prove whether people love it

Steve Case Business Rosen Fisher Jurvetson New York Chris Welcome Blair Silicon Valley CEO Restorick Louis Spacex Facebook Singapore
Fizz Fizz, with Fantastic History of Food

Your Brain on Facts

06:10 min | 3 weeks ago

Fizz Fizz, with Fantastic History of Food

"Dating back at least the seventeen hundreds people of Europe drank natural mineral water believed to cure of variety of illnesses like gallstones scurvy. Even bathing from these natural springs was seen as therapeutic. People literally went for the waters, though that freezes only hanging on its fingernails through the expression I'm not here for the water's usually set of someplace. You don't want to be like work. Many people tried to sell the water off site, but packaging and transportation at the time were prohibitively difficult and expensive, so they went with the next best thing. They'd manufacture their own water. Fine I'll make my own mineral water with blackjack and hookers. Most y'all are confused, but one person just snorted coffee through their nose. Mark my words. In seventeen sixty seven British chemist Joseph priestley tried carbonated water as you would beer by fermentation with yeast. The results were weak, but they worked in seventeen, seventy two. He published a paper entitled impregnating water with Fixed Air. priestley's apparatus, which featured a bladder between the generator and the absorption tank to regulate the flow of carbon dioxide was soon joined by a wide range of variants. However, it wasn't until seventeen eighty one that carbonated water could be produced on a large enough scale with the establishment of companies specializing in producing artificial mineral water. Others improved on Priestley's work, and while he did get respect from the scientific community, he didn't make anything for the invention that made possible a four hundred billion dollar a year industry. American, Inventor John Matthews designed a Soda Fountain that Could Produce Enough carbonated water for all his customers all day in eighteen, thirty, two, leading to the opening of the First Soda Fountain. In Their Heyday Soda Fountains were elaborately decorated places for rejuvenation more like a walk-through health retreat a snack counter and they were usually found in pharmacies. Pharmacists already used sweet tasting flavor syrups like lemon lime to mask the taste of bitter medicines like Quinine, an iron liquid medicine, being the standard form time rather than pills. At some sparkling water and you've got something new on your hands. Sas Parrilla for example was used to treat syphilis, supposedly and phosphoric acid and ingredient in most colas was thought to help with hypertension. The oldest major soft drink America Dr Pepper was created by Pharmacist Charles Alderson in eighteen, eighty, five and marketed as an energy, drink and brain tonic. Soda, the Effervescent News Hadn't medicine. We might be frustrated by. It takes a new medication to get to the market or top of mine a new vaccine, but it beats the old way of doing things at least from the consumer side from the manufacturer's side. The late nineteenth century, the era of the patent medicine was the best time to be alive. You could put anything you wanted in a bottle and call it medicine. You could still go around calling yourself doctor without having to prove it. Mix Up some tap water. Whatever's handy something bitter to make? It tastes like medicine, and then something sweet, so it's not too bitter, and of course if you can booze and hard drugs. Have Pretty printed with filigree and vague, sometimes contradictory claims and watch the money roll in. Behold the age of the patent medicine. Patent medicines are named after the letters patent probably letters patent since it was granted by the English crown. The first letters patent given to an inventor of a secret remedy was issued in the late seventeenth century. The patent granted the medicine maker a monopoly on his particular formula. The term patient medicine came to describe all prepackaged medicine sold over the counter without a doctor's prescription early English patent medicines sold like Jordan's in the colonies like dice Dr Bateman drops, whose original patent was granted by King George, the I in seventeen, twenty six, and was still available into the twentieth century. Not About to let the Brits make off with all the Lucre America began to cultivate their own patent medicines, an industry that boomed in the decades leading up to the civil war in the US very few patent medicines actually had a patent. You could get yourself a bottle. Love hosters celebrated stomach. Bidders Phero China John cleese Kella CEO. Bark and iron tonic reaches embrocations Emerson's Rheumatic Cure. Brooks's Barefoot Appointment SP Goff's magic oil, ligament or something just called salvation oil patent medicine actually played its own small part in the war. The government tax their sale along with the sales of matches, playing cards perfumes at L. to fund the war effort and repay military debt. Just like cigarettes today, patent medicines had to have a tax stamp on them for decades. Thirty years after the civil war, the government returned to Patent Medicine Taxation to fund the Spanish American war, which ran from eighteen, ninety eight to nineteen o two using a distinctive battleship stamp. The second half of the nineteenth century with the rapid growth of industrialization and populations in American cities was a high point for such hokum. Literacy was also improving with meant that they were more magazines and newspapers for patent medicine makers to advertise in and more people who could actually read the ads. There was also a pervasive and widespread distrust for medicine of the day. This was the era of heroic, medicine. Doctors went to extremes like bloodletting and purgatory gives to cure disease. We. Know now that making it already sick person poop their brains out or cutting them with a blade that you didn't know you needed to wash between. Patience is a bad idea, but back then it was no pun intended cutting edge stuff.

Joseph Priestley Patent Medicine Taxation Europe John Matthews Quinine John Cleese Rheumatic Cure Mark Syphilis Lucre America United States Dr Pepper Hosters Pharmacist Charles Alderson Dr Bateman Brooks Jordan
Cold Email Outreach with 20%+ Meeting Conversion - Kristina Finseth

Daily Sales Tips

03:56 min | Last month

Cold Email Outreach with 20%+ Meeting Conversion - Kristina Finseth

"Last week. Christina Finn Seth a senior account executive at inner. Seller road pretty compelling post on linked in about how she was able to achieve a better than twenty percent conversion rate to book meetings on her email outreach alone and asked if she'd be willing to share the details here on daily sales tips. Luckily for us, she agreed. Christina is a recruiter turned marketer. BB SAS sales professional focused on the HR tech space her bread and butter is helping people right more effective copy to deploy more powerful, highly personalized. Personalized email sequences essentially building more predictable client pipeline here she is Hey Scott thanks for inviting me to share my idea for personalized outreach on the daily sales tips podcast I wanted to kind of walk your real quickly through my secret sauce here it's really not rocket science, but unfortunately a lot of people don't take the extra time to personalize things, so what I'm essentially doing is I am using your own content so whether you're posting are commenting on sites like cycling, Jen as fuel for my personalized average, and so what's unique? Is that instead of using a three step email sequence? Sequence that has all template messages I'm essentially using my first message more as a building block, so there's a couple of pieces that I change out every time to make it very nuanced to the individual, and it's got me a really great return so just to put into context on the marketing side. I used to run much to say three hundred person email sequences personalized scale with you know first names, company names, and all of that normal stuff that you would see and I would get know one to two percent conversion to booked meetings, which is honestly quite respectable what I'm doing? Doing. Now is I'm running much. Highly targeted are more highly targeted sequences to let's just say you're twenty five people a day and I'm seeing a twenty percent plus conversion rate to book meetings, because of those extra steps, and so just to show you real fast if I'm looking at, let's just say Scott. Your comment on one of my posts, I miss essentially going to your page here and I'm using the tool that I'm selling. Enter Seller, which is a data finding, an email sequencing, talk and so I'm simply just looking for your contact information here and as I find that information. I'm then basically going to ask you to a very specific email sequence that I've created and so I'm going to ask you to one for the purposes of this example and when I hit save. It's going to enable me to use that building template to them. Put in some information. That's nuanced, so I could say something about you know. I noticed that you recently posted only about sales. Sales leaders saw some new faces wins so exciting. Whatever you get the point here and then I can change this out to a very specific comment doesn't really matter, but the biggest piece here is that there's a couple of places that I'm Kinda plugging playing. The rest of my message is very much the same. My Call to action is the same, but it feels very personalized and researched. When I hit save that I message is going to be personalized to you and just as quickly. Show you some of my stats here. This is a look at my email sequences. You can easily see here that might data does not lie, and you can also see. I've already added you hear something to remove you. But, these are all of my outgoing email sequences following the same approach, so would love to share that process document with anyone who's interested. I'm an open book. I WANNA help. Other people get better at

Christina Finn Seth Christina Senior Account Executive JEN Scott
AYURVEDA: The ancient Science of Self Healing and practical spirituality in the post covid-19 era with Acharya Shunya

My Seven Chakras

05:15 min | Last month

AYURVEDA: The ancient Science of Self Healing and practical spirituality in the post covid-19 era with Acharya Shunya

"What's up action, tribe, heroes, hose and founder of my seven Jucker as my seven chocolate dot com, the shore we help you expedients, effortless healing, awakening and abundance in today's episode we talk about some really powerful and embroidered topics, including what roared as I read a play in healing, the true nature of self, the importance of cleansing, and so much more, but before that I'd like to remind you that I have recently released a twenty four page pdf outlining some of my favorite ways to raise my web rations and fien better almost immediately to get your free pdf was my. Joker does DOT COM forward slash? Feel better now. That's my seven juxtapose dot com follow today's feel better now all right, so let's bring on our special guest today. Who happens to be our second dime? Guest Ajaria Shuna so a CIA is a globally recognized spiritual leader and Wittig Lineage Order, who awakens health and consciousness through thick sciences of Ira Way Danta and Yoga, and she's a driving force behind noble and online, nor for profit wisdom, school and worldwide spiritual community, and the author of the bestselling book on the Reading Art of mind, body and soul, wellbeing and health I iradar lifestyle, wisdom, and forthcoming second book with sounds drew of Italy's in two thousand and twenty sovereign self so a Ajaria welcome once again. Are you ready to inspire I? Am Ready to inspire and thank you for inviting me back. I really enjoyed our conversation last time create. I did as well. And, so to begin our session today to begin our conversation today. What is your favorite or that? One Inspirational Court that is on your mind these days, and how you are of applying it in your in your life I'm really been condom leading on our food for word, Sanskrit statement by a teacher of non-relative duality from India Shankar up, and he had said them Jagan Michio which it really means is that. Everything I see is a lower order of reality and the theater in me is of a higher order of reality, and that is allowing me to be more within and give less importance to what's going on without me if you know what I mean. Wonderful thanks a lot for shedding BRAHMA MUSSET SUTTON JAN meteorite. Yes, which means that what you see around you? That is allusively at his transient at his changing. What is done is your true self, your eternal self, and that is something that you have to discover for yourself and then, but there are things that you can do to help you and facilitate that process. Of discovering their sovereign cells, and that's what we're going to talk about today so a Ajaria. What is a you're either? Because there's so many definitions right, there are so many connotations I grew up in India so I have a certain view of Irish. You studied Iowa and learn from the masters all your life. So, what is your understanding or your definition of I read? The description of IRA denial weight is or in the sketches. These, are you show V? The High Veda which means the Veda Veda means the knowledge off life is. And so I was a teaching from the ancients years, if India, which happily were men and women known as we. She's into Shaka's. was really a putting together a lot of wisdom. That connects SAS to life to the source of life. Rich may be make on Rana, or you know soul or consciousness ultimately, and how does it play out in the different containers of life, which is the body, the senses, the mind, the, and even the soul, which is really an Ospent of that super consciousness, a carrier of that universal consciousness, and so therefore I another at the Incheon sages who? Who gave us? Yoga will give us meditation. They also give Messiah that today. More and more people call it holistic medicine, which is totally fine, because it's way more holistic than any other medicine that I haven't gone to. At least or at least it's compatible to a lot of holistic ancient traditions from the word, it's no way behind it and be discreet. Discuss some of that in our previous. Discussion, but to. I would say that it's spiritual. Medicine is spirits medicine. That's why in India. Sometimes they call it. It's God's own medicine. And they ancient does Aj may have these celestial healers known as the Ashini Chimeras these are these twin brothers who care of the all the medical needs of the gods, and they are said to be the first I obey. The doctors apparant the living today in the heavens, so I love all these connections of spirituality.

Jagan Michio Ira Way Danta India Dot Com Ajaria CIA Founder Ajaria Shuna IRA India Shankar AJ Iowa Inspirational Court Yoga Rich Italy Rana
"sas" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

05:19 min | Last month

"sas" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

"Next, so get your next next. What did they do to your next today? Fused three levels to levels WANNA do. Five to seven so just to level. Or Yeah. I think I was like in the last wave of the bone out of the hip, so I have nothing else to compare it to which, of course that was the bitch to heal the bone out of your hip walking. Me At all not now. You Have David Still. Mel I gotTA. Chalk up with a beer. Government. Out of my hips still because you had your neck done my young blood. Young blood when I woke up goes up. I, took a big thick bones. Hippy at Chris. He goes so used to be six hundred. Maybe it'll be six to now. Ribbon me help me on my basketball game show. You were down for what fifteen seventeen months. Fifteen months so then you come back and you ready to get back into action. Yeah, and they'd sit a year initially and I remember coming up on a year, and I was like I wanna be ahead of the curve, but I'm not I. Don't feel ready yet. Again you know that you WANNA. Push yourself and I felt a little like lame for not being on like they say a year I want at eleven months I. WanNa be back there, but I'm like I'm not. I'm not. Used Kate make bone grow. Go back to bone, yeah! Got So much muscle to to build back that because I remember at you're your limitations are such? Don't lift more than a jug of milk. Don't do you know so you're just like. Away. How was that for you I really to do a Lotta depression when when I went to my next stuff did ride around I've slowly right around my property on my phone. Wilderness cruise round had a bear on the back, and it was just it was. It was bad for me. Yeah, so, how far down did you go and then what? What brought you out of that? Wow, man that that that was tough I. mean because you're alone. Like this world all your friends and all your people that you deal with. that. Yeah. And so yeah, and you can't do anything you know only lifted jug of milk. You can't drive a hard collar for four months because of the broken bone. no I. Mean You know I mean? Yeah, so I mean I could take care of myself, but I do and. I just turned a Jello. Yeah, a lot of Mexican food, but but I couldn't lift weights and your. Whole life trying to build up left? I I I real-, really really depressed. I'd eat like box a little debbie, so that was that was my thing. With Mexican food. I used to do I would get my pickup truck and I drive down the road about forty miles and there was. An Fredericksburg there's a sonic and get an opinion Burger and helping you burglary, but you know today. Go through the front of your neck. Yeah, well, you know when going to the front. I got this big ass neck, and they pull stuff to the side, so I couldn't swallow very good. There's a couple times after go get my sonic. Burger I. think it'd be like. Oh, I've got a big chunk of cheeseburger lodged in my throat. Yeah, I'M GONNA die choking on a sonic. She's a Jalapeno Burger. It was ridiculous. Yeah, I saw. That happen to you. I've never checked Sonic Burger. What did you Joe You? Can't be the only person. It was messed up there. It's like the back of your neck. Was the problem now the front of your next problem until it kind of like? Fused back. I got used to being back where it needed to get back. I just remember. I felt so like wimpy and week and I hated. Take as much as I hated being in that hard caller I hated taken it off to shower, because the not now all my scrawny Milia is is uncomfortable so I mean I, just thought useless useless to everyone. I was sitting at home by myself, but yeah I didn't want to go out. There I didn't WanNa. Do appearances because I felt real gross and I don I don't want to. Watch business I think I. Didn't you know I'd probably have it on and then do laundry so I had something to kind of. Felt like I had to. And I should watch it and I wanted to, but it was. It was It was tough, so then when you get the the yellow light from Youngblood, and then the green light, so then I'm sudden kicking training back in, and you're ready to get back in the ring in. Any any doubts skeptical of what the body can do worried about your neck. Well I got into a decent head space. At first one I ended up. Doing was started volunteering at an animal shelter, and I gave myself hours like I as an employee so that I had somewhere to go and somewhere to be so that I wouldn't stay up till six in the morning watching TV and then sleep all day, and then go little ws so. I did that, and that helps helps me. Because I was like I can't help myself and I can't do anything I can help. You know it just made me feel like I'm doing something and then once I started able to work out more. It was really great and I and I was like. This whole new body, and I have my whole day based around working out I'd wake up and I'll do my cardio, and then and then I go do be curme Yoga, and then I come back then our weight train at night and then I I loved it. It was so great to start feeling human, and and when I came back, it was it was great like they did the do the annual Divas magazine, and it was in Mexico, so I did one TV kicked out, cleared House and came back. Shot shot a photo shoot in Mexico. Which is where I started so and then I'm like your face to like. Let's do this I. Felt Really Great and.

Mel I Burger Mexico Joe You WanNa David Still depression annual Divas magazine Kate Fredericksburg burglary Youngblood House
The Voice Layer - Jan Knig, Jovo

The Voice Tech Podcast

04:38 min | 2 months ago

The Voice Layer - Jan Knig, Jovo

"We covered the languages NC said it was type script or the judge. Javascript side, but you have to be a program code to be able to use Java what level of technical skills you need to be able to run the high walls, and then be able to actually deploy an application. Development Framework, so it's definitely built for developers, professional teams of developers, but what we're also seeing settled a lot of the. Beginners are using Joe's while to get started because like it's. Our hellawell example is pretty easy to set up. Just have to install one or two things. He just run the code in. That's it and then you can go from there and so I think for anyone who wants to get started with development. I think it's a good first thing to do because like when you're building a rapper mobile APP for example of many many different things to take care about. The officials. You have a back end fronton all of that. With the voice at least getting started as little easier like you get to your first halo worlds more quickly so I think the swipe. Many development beginners are are using for building by SAS right right well I was sent to simply because of the efficiency that you could just learned one one language and deploy to all the platforms as opposed to think well if I doubt on Alexa, then while by all the good L-, assistant uses, and then what about when he comes along I. Am I gonNa Learn all about as. Just. An individual, so there's definitely inefficiency on a scale element to it. US A rundown of the different components than the things that make up the job. Oh, framework, and the interaction model. Like wasn't a simulator or deep Bugah could give us a rundown to some of the components a lot of people when you think of Jogo. They really think mostly about the cross platform. What you mentioned that deploy ones or built wants to deploy everywhere component. That's one thing that we really focused a lot them to develop proficiency on building tools for professional teams to build great vice experiences so much we offer is a local development environment. For example. You don't have to upload your co to serve all the time to build experience. You can cut it on your computer. Computer, we have a debater which is digital browser based tool where you can test your Alexa Skill Google accidents on without talking to your device all the time than we have what you mentioned. The language model that that's also one thing I don't know how deep every when if you're. Listeners is into like the whole voice APP Alexa Skill Development, and so on, but on Alexa von Interaction model for like the speech recognition into natural language understanding, and for Google assistance use a service like dialogue flow for natural language understanding the problem. There is when you building for different. Platforms also have to maintain a language models in different places. What we offer is we offer the JOE language model which can be maintained. And then translated into, Alexandra tracks model into Donald. Floyd, we also like all analyst services that we support the Swale, and that's how we want to make that part easier while and then other stuff like staging with a unit testing framework, a lot of things stoute's help developers in setting up the right processes and deploying their vice experiences to different providers, and so that's really interesting as a recap. Mind standing because you've got the input. You've got the logic and you've got the response. Response you can handle all of that locally as if you had the Amazon. Says running on your own computer, so you can actually make requests and have a response. If it was Amazon Alexa, and then at the same time you could do the same full assistance you have. All of these phones loco dude have to make making these calls out. You'd have to worry about any kind of fees deployments. All of that kind of stuff that takes time by using these the party platform. Very useful speeds up development massively and you mentioned that the D. Bugger as well, but nowadays these platforms have ap visual interface, some kind of screen multi. Involved! Can you do all of that as well locally? Can you stimulate the response back and forth on the visual side who did so with the old hard to call again before it was like the display interface on Alexa order to render templates, we simulated or emulated these interfaces. The problem was with a p. l. guts Soubra complicated tractors Lebed's right now like even the Alexa developer Konzale. Kendra late trust the AP L. stuff that's displayed their into browser, and so what we typically recommend this to relate. It's painful, but to really test on on every device of. Before you, sit it

Alexa JOE Amazon United States NC Jogo Kendra Google Lebed Donald Trump Floyd Analyst Developer
7 Alternative Ways to Promote Your Content in 2020

Marketing School

03:32 min | 2 months ago

7 Alternative Ways to Promote Your Content in 2020

"Super committed to your success online. We've worked with them to a special offer. Just remarking school listeners, all you have to do is go to dream host dot com slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil. Patel and today we're GONNA talk about five alternative ways to promote your content in two thousand twenty saga I I? One is zest. That's Z. E. S., T., I S. so I mentioned this a couple of episodes ago, but zest is a little known basically promotion to especially. If you're doing marketing business related content, you can put your content out there i. think you can pan the CBC basis, but you can use promote your content number two most people. People don't do this and I. Don't know why I don't know if you do eric, but we've been using adds a lot recently for content, it works out really wellness, super cheap, and it drives a ton of traffic funny enough. We started driving pinterest at traffic to our content that has affiliate links, and we're getting a positive roi so cheap while I mean any ads are arbitrage I like. Oh, you're arbitraging, but that's like anything so anyway, but usually to fill. It links as hard to make a positive Roi right, but. Or so cheaper to say, this is great while number three, you can do to Boola out brain yet to boone out brain these. Are you know the little I? Guess content recommendations you see on the bottom of like CNN and all these other big website so those I've seen a lot of people may at work I personally haven't made it work before so anyway you can test it out number four and this one works like a charm i. do this all the time, but very few people cop me and I don't know why I push notifications same anytime. I have contact I collect. Push notifications, subscribers and I'll do blast out and I kid you not like I can get. Get seven ten thousand extra visitors to blog, plus just by being a push notification, and you can go to subscribers dot com to sign up for that, and then the fifth one fifth one would be twitter actually actually I don't think people utilize twitter, enough or just leave it at that, but I actually see the same people's promoted tweets over and over, and that does like the branding does affect me like I. Was Andrew Wilkinson from tiny Houston that you want to sell your business want to say like I. keep seeing it over time like that's kind of embedded in me now, so twitter ads I think it's definitely worth taking a look at number six is a bonus. If you're in SAS. Software or agency YOU COULD USE G to to promote your business capterra is another option that. These review sites basically give you an option to promote what you have going on or. Promoting content, but you're promoting your business, so that's a bonus that doesn't really fit at number seven. Another bonus doesn't fit for all of you. Is Start collecting phone numbers on your website like you know how you collect email? Start collecting phone numbers. We're starting to test out texting people whenever released new content and the click rates are through the roof, the unsubscribe rates and people saying stop the taxi also through the roof and. And early high, but after the first one that you said, the unsubscribe rate is drastically slowing down, so it gets better after the second third for tax and people like it, but sending him text messages every time you have new content we're finding that works really well. What are you using the tax because I know a Gary V's community? What do you use Tokyo Api integration I've devs. And how do you see the open? Open, rates and the UNSUBSCRIBE 's so whenever we ended up texting the open rates I. Don't know we twit. UTM codes in the links were able to e the click rates, but if I send out a hundred text messages were getting like sixteen, Seventeen Eighteen,

Eric Su Twitter Marketing School Gary V CNN Patel Pinterest Andrew Wilkinson Boone Z. E. S. Houston
How Modsy Brought Consumer Interior Design Online

The Small Business Radio Show

04:54 min | 2 months ago

How Modsy Brought Consumer Interior Design Online

"In one of the biggest shifts in consumer behavior we have ever seen. Companies are rushing to bring their traditional offline businesses online. My next guest has done exactly this many years ago. She speaks on topics ranging from game development to women in Technology Organizations Shawna. Tiller is the founder and CEO of. She was previously at Google ventures where she focused on the future of retail experience three year experience and SAS platforms. She also marcy new. Google ventures to connect fortune five hundred companies with relevant startups sean welcome to the show. Thank you very much. So how are you doing sheltering in place with your family? Adventure. What has been the one thing that will stand out when you look back in this time being the most adventurous. Honestly not Super Adventures, but just special. My son is just about to turn to and to be able to spend this much time with him. And watching his brain really developed like all the words that he learned on a daily basis has just amazing and one hundred years ago. They'll GRANDPA. What was it like? During the pandemic twenty twenty, he'll say I was only two years old I. Don't remember exactly and he will. Bullets Vally. I think that's time. So want to go back to your college days because I saw that you majored in entertainment technology I don't even know there was a major like that. What made you interested in that subject? It's a good question. I didn't know that either I was an Undergrad fine arts, and I liked science, and I could never figure out where they combined, but I took this class doting virtual worlds when I was a senior allege it was It was talked by Randy. Powell shoes a famous professor a. he wrote the last lecture. The course was amazing. It was early virtual reality. It combined like everything. I loved technology and art and design and storytelling. Working in teams, and at the end of the semester with like a week to go, I was like I have to do this. For the rest of my life and I applied to the graduate school. There, we are world history. So, where did this idea come from to take an? Taken offline business like consumer, interior design and dimmer online, offer tools, and also independent Zayn resources. You Know I. Think like a lot of ideas. From my own experience and it didn't really start as like I wanNA. Take this professional online. It started as me as a consumer, I was trying to design my own home with my husband. Pick out furniture. Imagine how everything would look and I just felt that there was a gap in the world like that. There was a missing place where I as a consumer could do that. All in the comfort of my home I wasn't planning to hire like interior designer to come to my house. Tell me how to do it I thought that was more both expensive in kind. kind of elite, but also it was It was outsourcing more of the control that I wanted I imagined instead solution where I would basically like upload pictures of my room, and what would come back? We would be visualizations like a catalog, but beautiful visualizations of how my room really could be that I could fully shop, and that really was kind of the cropped to end up starting Wasi, but you didn't just use of the technology. You also have personal resources that people can get a hold of now connecting the folks that the service to someone that can provide it right. Correct yes, it's beautiful. Of, services, so we have designers that you work with and technology where the product that we deliver it to. You is a virtual product that shows you how things would look in your space, and both have to go together in order to make the whole thing work. Here's the key question. What role did game development play and how this whole service and website turned out? It's a good question. I in turn. Graduate School on the surface to had I will say that that has been a big astray. Shake for what we're doing. And also I spent most of my career using game technologies in tools for the things that I've dealt and you know I believe that. There is like it's amazing. Combination of what already exists so that gains obviously gives you sandboxes things to play around with and a certain amount of control, but they also put you on rails so that it's not. Not so much control that you can't get your end destination. You can't can't play the game and we try to do the same thing in balanced that that right ability of the tool and the process of the product guide you at the designer to guide you, but also giving you the flexibility to make a lot of your indices within experience.

Tiller Google Graduate School Founder And Ceo SAS Powell Randy Marcy Professor
7 Tools That Will Help Push Through Tough Times

Marketing School

03:14 min | 3 months ago

7 Tools That Will Help Push Through Tough Times

"Super committed to your success online. We've worked with them. To a special offer just remarking school listeners. All you have to do is go to dream. Host DOT COM slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome onto a another episode of marketing. School I'm Eric. Su and I'm tell- and today we are going to talk about seven tools that will help push you through the tough times so these tools specifically because we talked about a lot of different tools but we wanted to give you a couple options that we think will actually be helpful specific to right now so the first one is APP sumo so this is from our mutual friend Noah Kagan an APP sumo is. Let's say it's groupon for deal? It can be deals on courses. It could be deals on software but especially right. Now if you're looking to get started or you're looking to cut costs on your software APP. Sumo's a really good place because they're looking out for the small business entrepreneurs another one is Eric's click flow in his click voto. He has a content decay feature right now in marketing. You probably have less resources. So look at the pages that are decaying the most in focus on them. I with your Seo. Because if you folks on him I recover your traffic. The quickest which will hopefully impact your sales and help you generate some extra revenue. You can keep more employees all right number. Three is profit well profit while this is from Patrick Campbell and he had a subscription type business. It's a free tool that will allow you to see how your business is doing in terms of revenue growth churn rates and all that good stuff around SAS absolutely free to use probably dot com. Another one is said Fox so send Fox is a Email marketing tool. It's not one hundred percent free but it's quite a bit generous compared to some other tools out there check it out. It's up and coming. It's funny enough by the guys who also created APP Simao. It's worth checking out because it will help you reduce your email. Marketing costs in the short run. All right number HIVE IS UBER SUGGESTS SO LUBERS. I mean obviously free. Seo toll from Neil. He's been working on for years and years. We talk about it a lot on this podcast and I think Neil you've offered a free deal the people right now as wall right yeah. I'm giving away more for free. So a less people have to pay just so it helps them out during these hard times number six rescue time. You probably don't have all the time and energy in the world to get stuff done especially now with less resources. Rescue time helps you optimize each and every single minute of your day so that you can get more out of it. You'll need less staff to get similar results. Check it out. It's a really good product for individuals or teams to figure out how to get the most out of Helps you with your time management without really having to do much all right number seven last but not least so actually I was gonNA say Zoom but a lot of people are already using zoom so I think they went from ten million daily active users to two hundred billion something like that or I think the release something yesterday which is crazy right but instead of things zoom. I'm going to say loom. That's Elo and loom allows you to basically create screen casts really quickly so I want to explain something to my team. I just make loom real quickly and it just makes things move a lot faster right communications. Great obviously you combining

Sumo Neil Eric FOX Patrick Campbell Groupon Noah Kagan ELO SU
Who's Right About The Economy? Wall Street Or Silicon Valley?

Techmeme Ride Home

09:07 min | 3 months ago

Who's Right About The Economy? Wall Street Or Silicon Valley?

"Who's right about the economy right now. Silicon Valley or Wall Street. Let me start by saying that. We're going to hopefully have really speculative high level discussion about the global economy here. And I'm pretty. I know for a fact. I'm not qualified to have that kind of a discussion. And maybe you aren't at the level that I M- aspiring to here either. So I think we're GONNA caveat that guys at the top but Alex look the reason we're is because on twitter. I saw a piece the gist of which was You know everyone that I talked to in tech and Silicon Valley and investing and venture venture side of investing. They're all sort of battening down for a nuclear winter and then meanwhile the stock market while not back to where it was you know is sort of roaring back and so. I've been asking people all the time like who's right here Wall Street or Silicon Valley and so let's start with your piece and let's start with the tech side. Which is I guess. You've been hearing the same things that I've been hearing from venture folk and stuff like that. Yeah it seems like we're on the same page going back to your very generous intro. I want to say that. Not only are you and I not qualified. Has I don't think there's a person alive who is because no one's really seen this. Before the the scale of unemployment the rapid rise of unemployment the complete destruction to travel. I mean this is. I hate the term unprecedented. Because it's so kind of lazy to catch all for like. Oh Gosh but I mean this is unprecedented. We do not know what's GonNa Happen and so I I think speculation is the right game here. We'll do our best to be as as coach unreasonable began. But like we're going to be you know a off of our offer shoulder here we're GONNA be. Maybe like I said to you over. Tm We're going to be in our dorm room getting a little high kind of the we're going to be on that level a little bit but that's the goal so You go first. Give me just. You don't have to name names but give me a broad sense of what you're hearing because you cover SAS a lot and enterprise a lot but also investing in those areas too. Yeah yeah so I part of my job as a as a reporter in the technology in kind financial world is that I talked to a lot of venture capitalists a lot of folks he put the money into the startups that you hear and read about in the media and usually speaking for the last forever years. They've been upbeat. They've been positive their complaints have been you know. My portfolio companies can't hire fast enough. Or You know. Everyone's watching the same channel with ads and now the tone is different than the tone is is much more negative and downbeat and people are generally pretty okay about this like look. This happens every ten years. No big deal. But certainly companies in our portfolio are struggling. And what I'm hearing from them is ruined for a tough patch. People are going to be going through layoffs. The economy is going to go through recession. This is gonNA take some time. It's not gonNA be a v-shaped recovery. As talking point loves point out it's going to be a U. shape recovery at best and and and then I turn around and I look at the stock market and any small news item that could be construed as positive sends the dial by five hundred thousand points. And I'm just sitting here going. What in the hell's going on because you know to me both these people both these groups of people can't be right at the same time and the piece was an attempt to begin to kind of poke it then toured part. Yeah and I WANNA come back a little bit too. We'll say the stock market speculation such as we can do for the second half but The the folks that I know in the venture world are basically. We're we're still at the stage where they're telling their companies like stop hiring hoard cash like batten down the hatches. The people that I know that are the entrepreneurs are like you know basically everyone that I'm talking to in in that world is like What's what's what's the quote from. Last of the Mohicans stay alive whatever occurs. I will find you like so first of all in the SAS space. Like in your we're talking about like like startups in the space or are seeing things. Like fifty and eighty percent drops in new bookings like Gimme some of those anecdotes. Yeah so if you covered this offer base at all or even just really any start about their. That sells a product that recurs that you pay for more than once what? They really care about his churn and they want to keep sure. Absolute minimum turned his. When someone who was paying you no longer is. It's like the worst thing And enterprise software companies tend to have very good churn which they have very little churn and that's why they're so attractive to investors and that's why they've become a huge part of the venture capital world so when we talk about the health of enterprise SAS. We're talking about really the health of a big chunk of the world of venture capital and investors. I've put tons of money into this group of companies and really believe in the business model and the sector focus. Bigger companies are saying that churn is going up and that's impacting. Everyone's ability to grow on the other hand. There are also seeing new bookings new business coming in the door. Go down there seeing. Churn go up. And there's a new book go down which is double effect on growth. He brings growth down very sharply. Because you're losing stock your bucks leaky and is less new stuff coming into the bucket So it's kind of a double whammy and that's why I think a lot of people are doing kind of what you said. They are slamming the door and hiring. They are hoarding cash. And ironically their pullback in spend is going to hurt other companies that are selling stuff to companies like them so there's a there's a a circular firing squad effect to some degree to get really Dorky if listeners want the kind of insider stopped we're seeing stuff like ACV's go down SEV's average annual contract values. You want those to be as high as you can't. It means that when you land a customer they're worth more People are being forced to sell for lower prices and trying to get more discounts. Acb's are also slipping and it's hard to find a positive Positive talking point inside this knicks of stuff. It's a mess in other words. So let's let's do devil's advocate for a second again. You're talking about largely enterprise software. So what if everybody just collectively over the last six weeks or so? Did the thing where they're like all right. Everyone freeze in place and then Well okay maybe it's not so bad which again we'll get to that with the stock market. Maybe that's what's happening. Maybe it's not as bad as we thought and so then things will start to creep back are are we seeing any sort of signs that that might be the case right now or is it. Is it too soon to tell that sorta stuff? I think it's important to note that we're still on the downward slope of I would say the broader Economy End Looking Valley The state of fear is getting worse as opposed to better still and people are talking about Q. Two being pretty terrible so that may happen that kind of sit back and go okay. Maybe things are opening back up. Maybe about to get better again. But I think it's a Q. Three discussion and I'm not predicting that on just my gut instinct and kind of my thoughts dots based on what people are telling me about what to expect for Q. Two And just add context to that. I spoke to a number of these these with partner. Natasha crunch and we're looking at the Boston market a market. That we love and those are saying Q. One won't be as bad as you thought because January February pretty good for these startups choosing to be a hot mess so the people that are putting the money into the firms. Expect the next quarter to be terrible. Maybe you're holds up in Q. Three but those green shoots are more like you know late summer as opposed to early spring. Well speaking of your podcast m correct me. If I'm wrong but at least and again this could be again acute versus q versus q three thing at least as far as I know we haven't seen like actual numbers of investments that. Vc's have been making sees up terribly right like it's it might be down. You would think it would be down but it's not like horribly down yet. A very similar point to what we just went over because V C as you know and everyone listening to the show knows is very laggy. You'll hear about it on a market was closed in December totally standard. So the Q- want numbers are just the rounds that were announced in q? One effectively? And here's the thing even inside those metrics you can see some deterioration in March and I'm just beginning to parse through all the reports are coming out from CBS sites in pitchbook. And everyone else. So I don't have the the firmest view yet I will in about a week and a half but marches bad. The numbers weren't as good as they could have been and people are expecting once again cue to be worse. Vc's are not contrarians they are. They are momentum investors and they don't like to say they don't to be called that but they are and they're they're all listening to other and listen to the The prior carnage stock market somewhat. And I think they're pulling back. Dramatically valuations are going down and new deal getting harder and harder to land because feces are focused more of their portfolio. The new bets. So I think it's it's again acute you. Problem MADE ECONOMY COMEBACK IN Q. Three may get better.

Silicon Valley VC Twitter Alex ACB Reporter Batten ACV CBS Boston Natasha Crunch Pitchbook Partner
Resume Hacking - Amanda Peer

Daily Sales Tips

04:28 min | 4 months ago

Resume Hacking - Amanda Peer

"You're listening to the daily sales tips. Podcast I'm your host Scott Ingram. Today's tip comes from Manda. Peer a field sales rep from SAS as we continue to bring tips to serve those who find themselves in need of a new sales role. Here she is. I heard one many demanded here. I am a software. Sales Rep precise. I've been selling software for a little bit over six or seven years now and have worked at both early stage. Startups and enterprise companies like Oracle. The sales to focus on today is basically had a hack your resume to get interviews so the entire concept is have you maximize your chance of being selected in a pool of resumes to get a door and interview for the companies you want to work for. There's a few different areas I'm gonNA focus on but the first point I need to make is you're not being. Henry picked early cherry picked by a recruiter. Technology is picking you so when you think about the evolution of attack across various business operations recruitment is one of them that has of all to have not only more sophisticated applicant tracking systems but each are As a whole so when you think about the application process actually applying for a job whether it is on limiting or a third party recruitment site or directly on their website through their applicant tracking system. There's a variety of different things to consider when it comes to evaluating that Resumes so you need to build your resume for a robot because robots skin. The resumes not recruiters. A human is not going to sit there and go through two thousand applicants. They're gonNa go through the applicants that the scoring techniques recommended that they do and depending on the platform that's GonNa differ from Lincoln to Angeles or whatever else you're gonNA use but it's also going to differ from company to company and what they're specifically looking for in hiring for that role so in building your resume for a robot in not a human it's all about keywords. It's all about four matting and it's all about making it easy for a robot to read so resumes that are one page usually sexy for that scanning technology resumes with the right key words so anything that you could add your skill section that is relevant to the job. You're applying to so if it is an engineering job you probably WanNa list the languages you could program for sales jobs. You WanNa put that. You have experience with salesforce dot com. You WanNA put outbound sales. You WanNa put prospecting you WANNA put any certifications youth Gotten mothers sales training with Sandler sales training. All of those things are key words. That are super important. Actually serve your resume a little bit like it's a lot more important than people think it is and you have to treat it like. Seo for a resume just like on Google when you're searching for editor of sneakers on that first page of results you're GonNa see a Dita's you're gonna see Nike and the reason that they're on those pages because there was a match with the keyword research to end. They did a really good job at making sure that they got to the top of the results with an SEO strategy. So I will be talking to you all about an SEO strategy for your resume and different tips and tricks to make sure that you can increase the odds and get in the door at any company. You wish to work

Sales Training Scott Ingram SAS Google Nike Oracle Lincoln Henry Editor Sandler
Security When the Workforce Goes Remote

a16z

09:47 min | 4 months ago

Security When the Workforce Goes Remote

"With so many people going remote the same way that we are. What's top of mind for you? As a security expert there is a concept and information security. Which is the belief in defense in depth and that means that you don't rely on any one thing to protect you you have a series of things that you use and you stack them on top of each other and you use those series of things to offer multiple layers of protection. You don't just put a moat around the castle. You also put walls and you have archers and you have hot oil ready to pour on people that try to storm it so insecurity. We have those same sorts of controls. The challenge for security teams. Is that a lot of those controls for a lot of companies only live in their office and only live in their corporate network and so in users take the machines home with them. Mirtha remotely accessing. They don't necessarily have the same controls in the office as they do at home. And if you look at some of the large breaches over the last. Let's say five years you'd see that. There are a number of instances where a remote employees using a home computer. That's perhaps shared with someone in the House that doesn't have protections on it is used to access internal corporate information by an attacker. That's acted are the things that we're dealing with new things or just things that were underway happening a lot faster. We've had multiple scenarios in the corporate and Enterprise World where we've had to make employees work from home and work remotely. You know the first real encounter in at least my adult life with this sort of a scenario. Was these nine eleven. When we had fundamentally city that became unavailable in the workforce there being mostly unavailable or having to move to disaster recovery sites and I think nine eleven really taught a lot of large corporations about the importance of building really resilient business continuity programs the actual new thing about this is just the scale is just the entirety of a workforce for a company being forced to work remote as well as their suppliers as well as their customers. We had the advent of things like SASS and salesforce inbox. And all these tools that were basically derived so that people could access their work materials anywhere that it sort of became expected that some percentage usually sales people because they're in the field but some percentage of your workforce would be remote and so we've been building infrastructure to support that workforce for some time. Now this is less of like. Oh it's a new way to work and we have to change everything this is more like. We have to reengineer everything to handle the capacity and just the sheer number. How are the best security teams? You know properly preparing their organizations with this really rapid shift to remote work. You know I think the right way to think about it is to just build a matrix in your mind and sort of numerous all the different security controls you have available to you in the workplace in the office and have some understanding of how they translate to the different scenarios. All of your employees will find themselves in now so I think there's two things that really good security teams are fundamentally doing. The first is getting. Their people stood up online outside of the office. Because security teams don't necessarily always have a great disaster recovery and business continuity plans and then second making sure that what they're doing is actually safe and secure if you're an organization right now and say you were gone from twenty percent to now ninety percent workforce's remote breakdown from very specifically how you would do a risk assessment over the last couple of years. Most things have left. The building and so most services are provided by third parties most of the infrastructure. That you run isn't running on your premise. And so for the last three or four years most SEASO's or chief information security officer has spent a tremendous amount of time thinking about their third party risk who are there. Vendors are their counterparties who are the people that they transact with. And you have to think about them. Not just from a security perspective. Because that's a little bit narrow in terms of impact the business but you need to be more comprehensive and terms of like confidentiality so is shifting. All of your voice traffic to this third party does that provide you with the confidentiality. You need to run your business while it may be okay to have a sales call with a customer where you don't discuss anything confidential over video conferencing system now. You're having your board meetings over this video conferencing system. Does it need their requirements that you have and then you have to think in terms of integrity the systems that you're relying on now that you've moved everybody onto them have the controls in place to ensure the integrity of the operations of Your Business. Are they going to lose your data? Is there going to be some sort of disruption to the quality of the output are the systems of record truly capable of being systems of record? And then finally you have to think in terms of availability. Not just you. As a company are moving your entire workforce to the service provider the entire planet is will the service provider? Be Up and running in the face of this kind of demand or will they just follow over because of the excess utilization. I liked the way that you broke that down so it sounded like the first bucket there was really around confidentiality and what transactions were happening in person providing measure security now happening virtually. So let's focus on that for a second. How would you go about assessing that? It really depends on the vertical and it depends on the industry. There's a very very rich tapestry of regulations that you have to really understand. And it's very specific to the business that you're in specifically if you're regulated and you have to make sure that the tools that you're using can support those industry specific regulations if you are for example in the healthcare industry and let's say you're a hospital network and hospitals right now are rushing to provide telemedicine and to remotely treat potentially sick people. The issue with that is that there are these regulations called hip and high-tech that mean that you actually have to work to maintain the confidentiality of your patient information. So then I guess looking at a second bucket that you talked about which was really selecting these new tools and introducing these new third party vendors that you maybe weren't using before so for instance you and I are using a totally new tool for a sixteen Z. That we rolled out as soon as we went remote that we could keep running our podcast. Power you or security professionals thinking about these third party tools in how do you go about assessing them? Well it's always about the data for example where recording a podcast. This is public information. Eventually it's going to be released and so the sensitivity of our discussion that we're recording right now is slow. It's fundamentally public data whereas if we were talking about a portfolio company this might not be an appropriate tool because it might not adequately protect those discussions and so we really have to understand I the sensitivity of the data and then matched that data sensitivity to the security features and capabilities of the tool generally marketing teams. You're kind of free to experiment with tools that are maybe not industrial grade security but the moment that you start talking about transferring customer records transferring personal information that your customers or any actual property. Then you really need to understand the tools and a very quick adoption and migration path to potentially get you into a not so great place was interesting. You mentioned quick adoption because that is absolutely what we're seeing right now when you suddenly have in our case all of the sixteen ego in remote. We suddenly needed all these new communication tools that we didn't use before so we are rolling them out relatively quickly. How our it insecurity teams keeping up with the fact that people are rapidly adapting to this things are changing daily. How do they balance that with security at a sixteen year? We've been fortunate in the we've probably spent the last two years really focusing on eliminating any kind of custom solutions not having servers under people's desks not having servers at all focusing on using cloud infrastructure and SAS and so when this event happened and we had to pivot credit to our. It team. They did some wonderful work but we were really well positioned. There wasn't a whole lot of stuff other than adding a few new services. That were disruptive. I think the way the modern enterprise has built their data stores is somewhat similar so that a lot of the data that a company has that could very easily flow out of the organization are generally pretty well controlled often. Were used to these. Large enterprise roll outs of new tools. They take a long time. But now you have a workforce going remote and you may need to roll tools out faster. What steps are you seeing? People caught or needing to add to get the tools out into the hands of workers to do virtual work. Usually one of the longest polls on any of these kinds of tools. Deployments is the legal and contract negotiations. It's the kind of thing where the length of your proof of concept is probably half the length of the debate. You're going to have with the vendor about limits of Liability. It's like people complain about it. But if you really want to prolong something bring a couple of lawyers and especially when you have to have. It people technical people work with lawyers at compounds it. So I think where I've seen things getting quicker is just on the procurement side on the contracting side. We've gone through a three year. Process of large enterprises telling employees. Don't use your credit card to buy a SAS services. That window seems to have opened up a little bit. And so you're seeing people paying for things with personal or corporate cards to get services deployed and unrolled and I think. It legal. They're going to be flexible. They're to keep the business moving. There's probably going to be a lot of contract review and a lot of heath gnashing over the next couple of months since they figure out what they've allowed into the

Chief Information Security Off Seaso Heath
Filling the gaps

Dots, Lines & Destinations

09:11 min | 4 months ago

Filling the gaps

"I'm Steven Seagraves. Joined by Seth Miller and Fayza Mood Gentlemen. How are you doing? Well Yeah are you. I'm feeling a little better. Not One hundred percent. But I'm getting there. Just good this. This episode is being recorded solely with your right year. Yes yes so. I have no since of Stereo should we? Should we record him on? Then that's what it feels like the spoiler alert. They're all mono gotta time production and that's where they always end. We should edit this so stevens voice only comes. I left to come out of the right now. The problem is I can't do that. You can do that man. Let's let's think that'd be mean to our listeners. Think it'd be really peel off for sure A. Let's just start off by talking about what we're doing to fill our time. I'm working from home Seth I'm guessing you are as well and I got a call at work call today and so I was like. Oh so you know how you adjusting us in that. You're going to work. I always work from home did I. And I actually don't even go out on a normal day anyways this really has to say it hasn't affected me because it definitely has but on a day-to-day basis. My experience is very very similar. To what normally as I don't go to the gym I was GonNa say how can affect you in your navy reporter. Well right I mean mentally. I'm a disaster but physically. I'm sitting in the same place. I would have been anyways this weekend though normally would be on my way to Hamburg Aircraft Interiors Expo that has postponed slash canceled. I think it will actually cancelled but they admitted that That was supposedly Friday. Actually somewhat pleasantly surprised. I was able to D M American Airlines and British Airways cancelled. The flight was booked on the American and American process. The refund. They. I want me to go. Do it myself And the American process for getting a refund on their website is crap but when I went click the button is. We're sorry you can't cancel this ticket online. Ibm's him back and last night. That took care of it for me and this morning got back in touch with me told me is getting one hundred thirty two euros refunded calls. That make you feel Stephen. That's the opposite experience of united. Yes I mean at this point. I think I'm just going to file a charge. Back in right at the OT complaint wasn't what our friends at the exact same issue five tickets United Future Refunds Fry Open disputes and FAU DOT complaint if they even had chesser columbine. But if I have issues. I do the exact same thing. So here's a question for you guys. Because I believe it or not. In a similar scenario scenario my ticket home from Hamburg was an SAS operated reward issued by united and again. That's flights aren't operating. So they're gonNA is. This is just an award ticket. At worst I pay seventy five dollar redeposit. Fina get my points back. But they've canceled the flights in theory in any other scenario the the points would just get refunded for free. I can obviously issue a charge back for the taxes which were not insignificantly than Europe. But do you think stand a chance of getting my points for free or just assume? I'M GONNA pay the five dollars and have not combined until dollars you'll be able to do without the Without the thing is they're dragging their feet on refund simply because they don't want they want to hold onto the cash right so their latest policy is they will. Your ticket will stay OPEN FOR YEAR. And then they will process a refund for you right. Which assuming they're in business assuming they're in business. I mean I would hope that. If the government doesn't give these airlines a lifeline that part of those stipulations they can play stupid games. This is just ridiculous. I had a a friend asking me. His parents were supposed to go. This pet last Wednesday supposed to be on the united nonstop to Cape Town and then from there to Singapore on Swiss and then home if you or whatever and then back to the states and was asking me you know how to get out of it. Essentially we've been going back and forth like a month trying to help him out on that and Donna Mile. Just wait. Just wait. Just wait as the rules as more and more cancels things will get better for you and he eventually got to the point where they took a voucher because I think the united out athletes still operated even though this we're canceled at that point but he said his his parents. His parents were concerned that the vouchers would be nullified in a bankruptcy. I would be too I. It's a fairly assumption is it? I've thinking back of other airline bankruptcy. I don't remember that being something that they went after as far as assets they haven't but there's nothing asserted that they won't. I mean this might be more dire than anything else. They've had to go through in the past we. We are certainly unprecedented in unprecedented Era The industry. But I feel like I feel like I get I get. Why United's trying to do it. I think that they're doing it in the wrong way. Like you know. If American like American said to us they cancelled your flight. They're going to refund the. There's no reason. United should be like. Oh well we're GONNA keep your money and you're gonNA get a certificate for that case like Eve. In my case I would say my cases the like the extreme in maybe so mine is they delayed thirty two hours and basically making me leave a day early to to make connections. Chicago incidents Thirty two hours. And I like that may be a scenario where it's inconvenient for me. I could see cancelling it and keeping a credit. I don't like it. I think it's wrong but I think cancellation of a flight is more important than than my scenario. You know what I mean like. Think it's more. It's more useful for that person to get a refund in comparison to me so I don't know I just. It's disappointing that united to doing it. This way You know just actually has a flight scheduled for Wednesday that she's supposed to Austin she's not going to take the trip but I mean there's four people on the plane and amazed. I'm amazed Alaskan cancelled. It was actually talking to someone earlier today. Alaska of all the US carriers. Alaska Airlines has reduced. Its schedule. The least yeah which is really strange to me If you WANNA put on your foil hat and go for a fun ride. One of the arguments was. Maybe they want bankruptcy to undo the mess they made with the Virgin America by how might be a little bit extreme. But yeah it's really interesting how little they've adjusted their schedules Compared to obviously the big the biggest airlines Delta American united have cut massive chunks. But a lot of that international and international that Alaska never did anyways but domestic loads crater. Like jetblue is doing whether calling rolling cancellations where a day or two before the flight. If the loads are too low. They're just canceling. The trips. Reminded one hundred one hundred fifty of the eight hundred flights a day. They're doing that too now because they literally I mean. These aren't flights with single. Digit numbers of passengers. And I've pilot friend of mine. They're posted on Instagram of thirteen souls. Onboard for crew was ninety four crew nine passengers. Which is you have to cancel it. I would think a one off whatever maybe not but this is not a one off. This is the new regular. Yeah and like. That's the thing with justice flights. Like if they really wanted to they could cancel her flights and re Booker via Seattle or San Jose City And maybe put more people in planes but from what I've seen is just been masking insulations on her plate where Whitley were full. 'cause it's break here and no one's traveling now so these are all regional flights This is Portland Austin. Non-south is one seventy five thousand guys. No no it's it's not to Airbus seven seven. Three nine on the way back doesn't do anything at the regional contracts. It's it's the hipster expresses usually full. Well you know what's funny? Obsessed mention keep to honor their nose. Looking Newer Capetown is going out empty. Capetown Newark is coming back full. Everybody's evacuating Africa. Yeah it's crazy. Well that would cause I was wondering why they're running that play all the way through the end of the schedule and they cancelled everything else. I started looking at the loads mccaw. That makes more sense. Yeah there's a lot of very symmetrical loads right now Someone was saying the China Southern puts three eighties back on L. A. X. Three times a week now for those you worry that the eighties never fly again. At least for the very short period of time China Southern brought back by apparently the the SCUTTLEBUTT is empty coming into L. A. And full gone out with three Patriots Knees China as well so take with a grain of salt. It was shared by someone who is a Chinese national by suggesting that the Chinese of the United States are fearful especially in Los Angeles area. If you're full of the medical system WANNA get back to China where they think they'll be treated better. I think at this point China's probably the safest China or South Korea Safest PLACES TO BE. Certainly the most skilled incompetent in dealing with the situation. Exactly I I did find it interesting. That Singapore has now banned even transit passengers. I mean that's kind. I mean that's a. That's a new one for me now. There's a lot of countries doing now Part of that is they're they're not allowing entry of non residence and as flights are being canceled and operations are going to how they don't want to get stuck with someone who is now living in the airport

China Seth Miller United States Alaska Singapore United Austin Steven Seagraves Alaska Airlines Stevens Stephen Hamburg Aircraft Interiors Exp M American Airlines Reporter Chicago Fina Hamburg Europe
"sas" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

05:56 min | 5 months ago

"sas" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

"You know it's time to make that comeback and when it's time for that comeback I'll guarantee you're not gonNa hit me three times with running clothesline here in my office. You're going to beat the Fuck Outta me with you. Would you balled up fish? Houston crowd macgyver. Kicked the Fuck Outta me. My point is it's GonNa enlisted him an emotion out of you. Which is it's fight or flight. I doubt very seriously that you can run through my sliding doors. Run DOWN THE FUCKING BLOCK. Holler and I would imagine that when you open up on me. You're going to bring everything you got because it's time to end this bullshit. Am I correct in? You know the point I do. I'm kind of a bitch. I'd probably just take and start the story that offended you this. I wouldn't fight back. Come on go at work where I work now. I'm trying to point about fire. Well fire look at look at the. Nhl You've worked enough for a face off and you look at me that's it. We're going right so you punch. You got three or four five times of course going to fire back. It doesn't take that much right. You Ain't gonNA standpoint. You've got to go. That's one thing that it is To me is a lost art in the business only lost emotion. Because you're talking about selling we'RE TALKING ABOUT LOGIC. It only logical aluminum and turn the tables. Fuck you come over and you slept fuck out of me a couple of times after today in. Why don't you come over to my crib? But do a podcast. I'll tell you right now. Django get too many of those mother fuckers because we're going and got there and whether I beat your ass you'd be mine we're going that's the point. I'm trying to make logic in a match. Yeah that's real life due to the fight. Yeah if you want to do something here you GonNa pay for it and if you do something. My Ring on the baby-faced I've got a gut fully antics. I got to come back on. Yeah so what? I'm talking about engaging the audience but I'm talking about I mean when you if you WANNA grab it audience by the guts like Tom. Cruise in mission impossible or any your favorite action star. Whoever the fuck it might be when it's pay back time it's payback time. Yeah and so when you're talking about selling logic we're talking about doing all these things in a match for it to be believable to work on the character development so that I can love this person or I hate that person or whatever the case as I bought into their characters and fire is so simple but you see it this these days so manufactured. Yeah that its seat through and it's the same old same old three clothesline bullshit. Come back and I can call the comeback. Because I've seen it to me in times but you know the worst part of it. I don't feel it because there's no anger there. And if a person has fucking held me down by cheating or it's just my time to get my shit back in I'm pissed off and I'm coming for your ass and you've got to send that message out as a baby face or reverse it a mean streak as a heel if you're fucking dastardly pieces yet. Cowardly whatever or just a bully when it comes down to get heat on baby face if you ain't stopping his guts in with malice and intent to hurt. You're doing your job wrong. You Ain't got to do it. Go about doing it in a row and fire fashion. You can pace yourself. I'm not saying rush which another Mistakes that you often see today rushing so much shit today because I think Well we're not. We're not gonNA think of the crab because we're not doing things fast enough. No you're doing things too. Goddamn fast slowed down. I take you back to a match. The one the best matches I've seen in a long time. Was you in fucking Pentagon junior season. One she's one dude away all that out you ain't been in a ring and fucking along. What eight years yeah? I'm sitting here thinking all right house going to pull this off. Dude you sold you generated offense. Then he got back on top and you had to size advantage to clear size advantage but it he operated and worked on you in a fashion. That was logical and sensible bought into it hook line of secret. Angels saying that. Because you're right here. I talked about it last year. On the podcast you did and it makes first of all for the fans. It's been a long time since anybody. Steve also cut a promo. And I'm right here. A fired up face covering nick. Rolling your sleeves up when you buy stuff fugger ready to go back up and I'm your homie weather but I think the biggest thing that the kids are making kids when I say kids. The younger people are making boys and girls men and women by. You're going too fast. You're too quick. You Punch a guy six times before the fans can even say that digest that violence you've already kicked kicked and you didn't move salt you've kicked out. You don't sell the chair shots and you're back everything you just did junk-food man fucking in and you just wasted all that talent. He didn't tell a fucking story and I think that's the point telling stories. I'm GonNa tell you a story about to lose one of them's bald and other guys. He got that I'm ball number. Two number one zero zero so you got to to thirsty. Azer angry. They're sitting across the table. Goddamn calm you down. Come over and kick me stopped me in the corner better. Jesus Christ Employment Myself. I'm getting my blood pressure. Medication and Shit. Y'All Jackson throw with you but you know what but doesn't like when you talk about the business you get excited about it and it's like I get so fired up about the business because that's my love for it and so I just get ramped up so I didn't mean to go fucking crazy I forget other commoner. I was probably like seventy five hundred RPM almost red line. No you redline Liga motherfucker. I was watching. What's the red line? We'll go take a policy because Sponsors come in here and do you think I'm taking a break to have a beard in Hodgkinson Van. Piero here Steve. Show.

Steve Houston Holler Nhl Django Hodgkinson Van Tom Jackson Pentagon Piero nick
"sas" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

05:35 min | 7 months ago

"sas" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"Make sure that as marketers were thinking through because technology can be fun and some of these. His parents can be exciting. Make sure you've got that use case really defined use case of what you're trying to solve for and that it's solving a problem for the customer not that you want to throw some technology at it right right right well if you were in front of a bunch of marketers which you will be when this airs. What should marketers be doing? Or considering when they're trying to understand how to improve their customer experience where would you tell them the starter or think about and I think customer experience is going to change much over the next ten years in. How at a if you if you dream about like Gosh you know when when when you're sick are going to be delivering your medicines and when you go to a grocery store you're going to gauge the human or a machine and you know the world's going to change a the ten year so that's equal parts exciting sometimes overwhelming and so when I talk about with with marketers is there's five things you can do to future proof yourself and future-proof the the business right now and that first one is focused on on customer experience him make sure they're you're you're on the customer data so the first thing I would advise mortars orders to do is really understand your analytic maturity and I say that as a as a marketer at SAS and we provide industry-leading analytics? I'm constantly looking at my. I my teams analytic maturity. Do we have all the data first party third party data that we need. Do we know her. Data is that we broken down those data silos and then is the team empowered and trained. I'm to be able to really gain insights from data and apply it so really look at Jane Olympic maturity. The second recommendation I would have is is start small and find some wins and really celebrate. Those wins wins because this is the road to customer experience success. It's a journey. Until you gotta find those those short-term wins and and talked about the Chapada example we actually ended up that started as a pilot. That's now business as usual and our CEO highlighted that on main stage at one of our flagship conferences just last month and so what celebration really got to enjoy that success us. The third thing I'd say is be a customer experience champion within your organization and I do believe that customer experience is a whole company sport but marketers have a really uniquely positioned to move this forward and so be that champion but really think through champion of the customer experience the Voice of the customer and and as a marketer you have access to that data And if your moral compasses pointed towards what's right for the customer you're in a good place right. The fourth thing I would say is. Bill does cross divisional bridges. You can't do this alone. You need to have those partners just just like with GDP are. I made better friends with the legal and it team but all of us in an organization needs to be working on customer experience so team up with sales with with I certainly once again legal finance hr every group has their own view of customer experience. And if you can go at it as a group you're going to be more successful and then the last thing I'd say a Cliche we talk about embracing change. I think you need to instigate change when it comes to customer experience because if you're not if you're not disrupting yourself you're not disrupting your company. Your customers will and so. They have a different expectation. And if you're not you're not changing to meet that. Then then they're going to choose to do business elsewhere. I Love I love the instigate gate changed. Not just driving. Make it happen Last question for you. What do you think the future customer experience looks like? I know we talked about ten. Years is hard to predict anything. So I'm asking you potentially the thing. This hardest thing to do but where do you think it's going to end up. I mentioned we did this. Research study with Daniel Newman of future research. And we did that because we wanted to charter our own course but also help our customers and so the research really came up with Some bold predictions along the way on topics like how wearables are going to be much more embedded into our our day to day. Even envisions a world. Where you can buy with your is is because of the way wearables can be so imagine how much that changes for for those of us on the retail marketing side? Right I think something. We really didn't talk about it. All was blockchain and the impact blockchain is going to have even more broadly. The research imagined a future where maybe we can end fake news. Because we've got blockchain looking at where does the source of data coming from so. I think that par or is is really fascinating. I do believe that we are going to see augmented reality. And virtual reality be much more part of our day to day lives and and we see that with our kids with folkman go right but but I think retailers are in front of this this trend. You think of Laurie Al.. WHO's got APPs to help you? Choose the right lipstick and that struggles real meaningful in Utah has something where you're able to see what the close look like on you. I Kee- can bring the store to your home. I think we as marketers need to find ways to help our customers experience experience our technology in a more immersive way a little bit. Well Jen thank you for coming on the show today thank you. It's been a pleasure talking with you. It's Alan again. Marketing today was created created produced by me. If you're new to marketing today please feel free to write us a review on Itunes or your favorite listening platform. Don't forget to subscribe. Tell all your friends and colleagues about the show. I love to hear from listeners. And you can contact me marketing today. PODCASTS DOT COM. There you also find complete leaks show notes links to anything we talk about any episode. You can also search archives. I'm Alan Heart and this is marketing. I'm getting today. Today's podcast is brought to you by audible. You can get a free audio download and Thirty Day free trial at audible trial dot com slash. Alan and Alan Spelled A. L. A. N. for those that don't know again audible trial dot com slash Allen..

Alan SAS Alan Heart Daniel Newman CEO Bill Laurie Al Alan Spelled A. L. A. N. Utah Kee Jen Allen
"sas" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

04:57 min | 8 months ago

"sas" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

"Could never stop. He had to keep chopping and competence often topping. Luckily he was the only one doing so he was okay so it didn't seem what if there was another couple of is doing the same thing that he was then all of a sudden you would. He's a flaws in it because he never gave you a chance to sell. It never gets with you. Don't and get a chance to sheldon. How am I going to commit the act of drama? And then he would never have like. I think he's self conscious 'cause you know whenever ever. He would have time earliest further back in his career. You know he would do the things that I was just talking about. And not that. He wasn't an amazing athlete. Leave and not the The mazing Japan and not that he wasn't a double murder. They began to accounts too. But the whole thing is that to me I hate eight is the fact that he would never let me because he was too self conscious to gloat to the crowd. You know to play what he did to the crowd you know so I would have then. He shot me in the corner. And Stop Me. I just have to drop to my knees and powder and then figure I'd get a breeder but not there. He wasn't right behind me spin me round chop chop chop so I mean I made the most wants to this But to me and I know from what I've read the Like you know I know you expand a working with and so I'm sure your feedback feedback. That's one kind of filibuster. No you just got to know. But but that's First of all I love Christmas Wa and I was a huge fan especially I. I thought his work really translated a probably better in Japan than in the states wall. I thought I thought he kinda outworked himself and he worked too fast fast and working too fast and normally as a sign of someone that has really green in the business but Chris was a hell of a hand it could work anywhere in the world he just. I liked to work fast. But when you do something to try to elicit a response when you get that response he respond accordingly so if you knock somebody down. Let that register that you've knock somebody down because they've gone down for you and then you know you can pay surround you know. There's there's times to hit the gas paddle. There's times to pull off but you gotta let people breathe in and grab hold of the fact that hey this guy's in trouble every just if you never stop shopping would you don't have the chance for the audience to get emotionally involved. They want to so. I'm not going to sit here. And pick apart his work because he was premier here but I would have been even better than he was had. He slowed down and let those moments breath at again. A AH. He's not here with US anymore. But I'm just saying now it'd be my only critique of slow down and let the other guy to your point sell assuming now that I've put the down yes if for as as Japan Style and and frankly because he was such a UH believable apart it was okay because it will work in the sense that you have to have different things on the card. You always always have to have different things in the car so you know. That's why I say they could only him and I tried to tell guys work like him afterwards. I don't be like Kim go on. I want to be like Ben. Wilder only been was going to be been Wa- because he was missing a tooth he had the had the ability he just. He was like a machine soon and you lose him. He wasn't machine hoovering. But but you know the thing about it is when you. I was over in Japan for three weeks. Has Me Arn Anderson. Ron Simmons him and his name Lingo at a Gro- Chris Wa a couple of other guys and me an arm about go crazy because we were stateside guys so we're drinking tons of beer and all of a sudden you go out there and you watch. It's Chris at work with the Russian Thunder Liger or Malinga were Eddie and they would just rip the place apart for like twenty solid minutes. It's a bad ass wrestling an action high spots. And you're sitting there thinking dude this knowing my second tour Japan. How do you follow that and you know how you follow it? You just go out there and you you do your own thing. Because that's what they do and you can't beat them at it so you don't try to up your game to imagine them because you can't so you stick to your same game blanding you do the same stone cold stuff or stunning Steve. One whatever I was back in you do your same stuff off but I'll tell you what when you first go over. There was intimidating because you think I gotta do it. These guys are doing no you. Don't you do what you brought to the dance. And what brought you there. Two first place he russell your their own game and I think the reason he kept getting faster and faster word because he got more and more self conscious and he couldn't stop because he didn't know how to to stop because once you stop all eyes are on.

murder The mazing Japan Wilder Chris US Japan Style Gro- Chris Wa sheldon Japan Steve Ron Simmons Wa Kim Arn Anderson Malinga Eddie
"sas" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

12:35 min | 8 months ago

"sas" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

"That's the same day we're here ear started same time so you know there's there's nothing to really front on and we both want to make an impact and even if there is jealousy or ego it's for the benefit we both type steam on our characters at all time so it was both is beneficial for both of us which is also hard to tell sometimes it might be beneficial for you but not so much for the other person. There's just GonNa be that that a little bit of I don't want to help this person. So you know or or whatever the elements might be involved but yeah we start at the same time and we because we always had steam on our character. It was always going to be a benefit for us to work together. Whether it's same team. He'll whatever the divas division in has. Everything's changed everything. Moves a little bit faster than it used to seemingly The crop up superstars is a little that greener these days and it was back and they have some very bright have some heavy duty catch. I think on the Raza going to be big superstars it has taken a while for from ww to cultivate that begun to the divas specifically does a lot more divas now than there used to be. Yeah and do they going to TV. Time as you're too many of them formed to get enough. TV Damn Right. I mean it seems like you don't steal them until it's a big free for all because it's a free for all your like I can't I don't even know cluster mucks. I mean let's face it you know they they can really turn out to not be so great and tough to work and it is what it is sir. I mean we were when I was in the locker room was fortunate that the characters were kind of being developed one by one and it might mean you hung back for a minute but then you had had a better developed character to go work against her work with I think we've kind of gotten away from that. Both male and female remember. There was a time way back in the day sometime the late nineties and well probably not an two thousand give or take us about to go get an ex surgeon you you just come into the company when you come in. That's higher than ninety nine. Okay but it's about Dan or maybe WANNA came back but you're meeting with a little frustration and I guess office work kind of giving you all the push and they stop y'all we were talking a little bit back in a day. So what was your relationship with the office. You know some people go in there and they start talking events. I love God death but hey man I've been knock down drag after that you know. He's a jet. I mind mattress assumed guys walking there all pissed off and you know they got to get things straight. They're working too hard to push strong enough and they're not making enough money and all of a sudden they walk walkout and everything's Hunky Dory and it's fine and they realized that they didn't get anything accomplished. How was your dealings with the higher ups? And who would you go to person as far as you know you have in your communication education with the with the office and the powers that be in your direction and being able to convey How you wanted your care to be taken care to be presented and your store Lynch man and that's a really tough question Lash about fifty things in and five shaggy chair but all the reason it's tough is because I'll be honest you're probably one of the main people. I whose opinion I trusted and then I felt comfortable going to and I never felt like I had someone in my corner office. Honestly and that was Was Annoying you know I. It was annoying because I love and I loved the business so much. I'd I wanted to like. They had trouble right before I was there with with with with divas going off and doing other than building them up and then going off so I kinda got a little bit of the brunt of that like like like. You're not jealous but you get the brunt of the past march launched leave us. I'm like do you know what I did to get here like. I want nothing more than to just be here like let there are being defensive like thinking I was going to. I don't know I. It was a bummer. I felt like dude. I love it here. I'm trying really hard no-one's but everyone's on the defensive and I never felt like I really had somebody rooting for me. I felt like I got over despite them wanting you to well. She's already here and the chanting her name. I guess we gotta do something. That's there to your point. Wait I mean that almost seemed like that's the way it happened. I mean I thought y'all were such a cool act altogether and it's like he's one of those things that you couldn't deny it was like we gotta do something they're getting over without now. You know a heavy duty green light not any kind of like really right. It was just. It was just a great package and great performances and an interesting look that no one was doing at the time. Yeah and so you've got this we would just go with it. I mean and that was some interesting. I've talked about this. We were hired at the same time but she was she was was there their money. You know she's this Canadian fitness model. And she has this killer look and they're going to do these packages and they send down to the Bahamas to take these shots and they're like you do dark match. Maybe Jack. If you're lucky you know but then you. So it's like my thing kind of took off inadvertently whereas Hers Hers was cultivated typifies our whole Yin and Yang. Kind of way to to your same way as you want to talk to you about your neck injury. A you're filming Dark Angel Yeah and so you were doing to deal with the stuntwoman and crash landing. What in your neck? Three Vertebrae are correct. Yeah what was stolen and it was your first TV Gig. Young that was that was my first TV Gig. My La Mosque. TV and that was that was when you talked about going out there and doing all these moves and just feel like I can be wide open in the ring is I just ahead kid power. I was invincible until then amion and it really took the my invincibility out of me and that is what you know. Screw the pain. Screw the tee time on the shelf but taken my my invincibility away was like the biggest. Bummer that in the fact that I like to for a long time like I wanted I wanted the girl dropped me. I want her to be broken and I didn't like carrying that around like I'm like if I see here like I want to attack her and I don't like I'm feeling like that. Like user harbor feelings I don't now just 'cause I'm like whatever I it's like it's not just something that I think about. It took a long time for me to even shake. Ah I was like I I hate her and I don't even like that. I hate her and I wish I didn't and I felt like a jerk but you know talk about other talk to draws and I I was like how can you forgive your. I'm walking and I'm GONNA get better. I feel like a jerk for even bringing this up. You know let's talk about you. Know he's fine we're friends But and after talking to him about it and he you know I was like all right. If if he can do this I can to not today and not just GonNa go okay today. You said so and I'm going to do it too but I was like I'm talking to draws who's never gonNA walk again. I'm going to walk again Anna Russell again I need to just chill out an figure out how to reflect and grow so from this and not focus my energy on mega. Yeah Finding Nemo let me give me give me yourself to be negative from minute you know. Get it out. Yeah you got to do that so so. You're doing the thing the deal happens. You get smoked so what bring amulets they put you in a collar. Oh Oh hill. Her next broke in your surgery. Because you made a couple rounds at new. Yeah we're only a week into shooting and I was there here. WWE Protocol. Here's the trainers doctor. This is this is how we do things there. So I'm laying there after the move went wrong and they said Oh just go ahead go ahead and we'll just take a break and I'm laid out on the on the wrestling mat like yeah. I mean 'cause I can't I'm on a break right now I can't move and they said we'll just a few minutes. We'll just let me. He said if we need to. We'll just walk through the rest of it. We don't need to be physical with it and I'm laying there. They said are you okay. I said well I can move my fingers players and toes. But I can't get up this. Oh you just gotTa Stinger. You'll be fine and a movie set Tony Stanger and I'm thinking I hope I hope I I've got a Stinger I didn't but I hope you know. And so after about five minutes of just laying there just laying there. Is this weird helpless feelings. I don't know who any of these people are. Who to ask for what to do and you know from being there? It's normally them them being the officer or medical going you. You took a really bad fall. We need to look at that. And you're like none on On on OP. Don't worry I'm a is it and they're like no no we'll just to be safe. Let's look at it. Well I'm going. I think we should hurt worse. You're fine no no no no I need to be looked at right and then I mean we're just say used to be in tough and so the last thing I was like wait if I I mean I think I'm pretty tough but I think I'm hurt your so but they don't think I'm hurt so I guess I'm not will ensue. After five minutes. They said all right. Can you get up and I was like well. I think if you push me to a seated position I could stand up from there. Are we supposed to move me though just like this. Isn't there like something with head. Injuries neck injuries. That you're supposed to just leave it there and they're like okay okay. So they literally came under to hand under my shoulders and just pushed me up to a seated position. My left arm didn't work. I thought maybe on my shoulder or something so I just took my right arm and held my left arm and just like got myself to stand and just kind of stood there my my traps and shoulders Jack to my ears trying to support my neck. That's broken in my other arm is like a potent and just kind of stayed like that and then they just kind of just walked through the rest of the thing I'm like okay and I mean I was hoping I'm like I'm GonNa go home and take a bath and this is apparently going to go away because nobody else seems to. They ever really seems to think it's way you know and I just couldn't take my clothes off couldn't move. I couldn't Georgia Ugali. Go to the doctor when I said okay so I think hopefully after take a shower everything will be fine. If it's not someone I should call. And they're like I don't know I mean maybe just ask at your hotel if they have a doctorate because they didn't want it on their in Los Angeles wrote wrote in Vancouver Gruber and they think they don't WanNa associated with their guess. If you call the hotel they can refer you to a doctor and I was like our aunt. Call the next day to hotel. WHO's like somebody like if you have allergies or something when you're on vacation it's not and so he comes in my room he's like okay? Move your head up down left after Right of course. I'm like okay. I can't I can't I can't i. Can't he's like all right. Well here's some prescription and I guess you can't do the show. I'm like I mean are like who's making these calls like I just don't know. Echoes just so uncomfortably out of my element and I remember having this with other major injuries. That by the time I finally found my neck was broken. I was kind of like see told told you. Like part of me was like part of me was like now I gotTa have surgery and now I'm like nick screwed up but like I didn't WanNa have like caused all that like commotion and then be like it's fine like would you just fine. Here's stupid extra see told you. Everything's thanks find gone. Shut up but so same thing when my knee I tore everything in my knee and I couldn't finish the match the only time I've never been able to fish in that and I was I think it out there as we're switching to finish and I'm trying to get through just to and I might better be something wrong with my name because I don't Wanna I don't WanNa cause the stink and then they'll be like just a little sprain near like okay ballistic to the next so you get your neck. Thanks what did they do to your next. Today fused three three levels to levels when they do five seven so just to level what now I think I was like in the last wave of the bone out of the hip so I have nothing thing else to compare it to Which of course that was the bitch to heal the bone out of your hip walking the ball middle not now do you feel it? David still got chopped line up with a beer out of my hip style. Yeah because you had your neck done my young blood and when when youngblood. When I woke up he goes up? took a big thick bone. Out of your Hippie Chris he goes so used to be six maybe be six to now. Help me on my basketball game so you. We're down for what fifteen seventeen months fifteen months. So then you come back and you're ready to get back into action. Yeah and they'd sit a year initially and I remember coming up on a year and I was like I. I WANNA be ahead of the curve but I'm not I don't feel.

Jack neck injuries Raza Bahamas WWE basketball Anna Russell Tony Stanger Dark Angel Dan Lynch La Mosque youngblood nick Lash David Los Angeles Georgia Ugali
"sas" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

Inside Intercom Podcast

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"sas" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

"The SAS dot conference in Dublin recently. Let's listen. Got to take a hypothetical example. Let's say you're launching a brand new product tomorrow. What of the first steps you're you're taking to understand how to position right? So most companies start with an idea to make an existing thing better. So they'll say I'm going to build a better Email system or I'm going to build a better CRM or faster database, and they interest on the product. They get it out in the customers hands the customer say I love these features. I hate these features. So after they go through this period of monkeying around with the product, they have something that customers love and they start selling it often. They never revisit that positioning. So they say, you know, we we started out to build a database. This thing is obviously database where it's obviously a serum. But quite often if you were to customer coming at that thing having no prior experience with it. You might look at it and say, well, no, that's not CRM. That's chat. Bad. No, that's not Email that's team collaboration. And so what startups need to do in particular is to be able to sort of back up and say if I put my customer hat on. What is the best context I could weave around this product. So that it makes sense to people when they first encounter cold. I was a consultant at the moment. I mean is there particular mistakes or challenges that people are coming to you with when it comes to positioning. Yeah. So most of the time we positioning manifest itself in a bunch of ways. So the most common symptom of week positioning is people just don't understand what we do or you get compared to competitors that the company says these are not our competitors at all. And yet customers keep thinking, we're just like them. So you'll see this kind of weakness in the funnel in different ways. So often it'll be difficult to get a lead into the funnel. Because people don't understand what it is. And then sometimes what you'll get is a lot of essentially friction in the mid funnel where you can see customers wrestling with is this really what I need is really what going to solve my problem. And then you'll get a lot of turn on the back end where they think you do one thing. And then when they actually get their hands on it and use it. They're like whoops known. This is something else, and they'll turn out on you. So you tend to see those. Dmz quite a bit. When features products we replicate is so easily position becomes so much more important. So is there any sort of advice, you'd give them to sort of stunned and this particularly credit marketplace. I think the best thing that BB SAS benders can do is stay really focused on their differentiator because there are things about your solution that your customers your best customers really really love about you and the rest of kind of doesn't matter. And I know we wanna talk about all the things, but the best thing to do is to just hone in on. This is our secret sauce. This is the thing we do better than anybody else. If you don't care about this stuff. We're not the solution for you and most vendors where they get in trouble B to B SAS vendors is when they start trying to tell me about every single little thing, they do and some of it's their secret sauce and some of his men, it's just like everybody else's thing. But they're trying to sell me too, much stuff. And what happens is. You end up looking like everyone else. And so I think it's important for SAS companies in particular to be says to lead with your best stuff and get your best stuff out front. Your secret sauce stuff out front? And then you got lots of time later to tell you do the check box of the mind million other features you've got we'll worry about that later. But if people understand your core value and your core differentiator 's then you'll stand out on your own from all these other folks that are like, hey, we're everything for everybody. We just heard April talk about the importance of telling people about your product of French eaters your secret sauce..

BB SAS Dublin consultant
"sas" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sas" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Pipeline i've got these different environments i've got a test environment or staging environment and i have a pipeline i if i'm deploying new software i first deployed to my test environment i run some tests on it okay it's looking good i click you know move along the pipeline to the staging environment and then i have automated tests that run the staging environment maybe i've got some manual people who are doing some tests in the staging environment as well if it works then i push it to production and then we have my sas company has been updated in it's in production and that's great with lightning network we're talking about deploying software that has a wider reach perhaps is is quite difficult to roll back if you roll it out how does the deployment process of something like lightning network compared to the deployment process of conventional software well so you do you do start out pretty similarly of you know you'll you'll write your code you'll write your unit tests you'll have peer review on the code itself which is hopefully very rigorous and then there are both local tests networks in a re register networks that you can set up and then there's the actual tests net the most people are using and and you know hopefully any issues get caught while it's still in the testing phase but this is one of the reasons why life cycle for changes to these crypto asset networks tends to be a lot longer because you you want it to be baking in adversarial test environments for as long as possible because like you said once you get to the production ready phase even then it's not it's not that you just deploy it because you don't have the ability to deploy it it's the you know you make the software available to deploy and then you're going to see.

sas
"sas" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sas" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Pipeline i've got these different environments i've got a test environment or staging environment and i have a pipeline i if i'm deploying new software i first deployed to my test environment i run some tests on it okay it's looking good i click you know move along the pipeline to the staging environment and then i have automated tests that run the staging environment maybe i've got some manual people who are doing some tests in the staging environment as well if it works then i push it to production and then we have my sas company has been updated in it's in production and that's great with lightning network we're talking about deploying software that has a wider reach perhaps is is quite difficult to roll back if you roll it out how does the deployment process of something like lightning network compared to the deployment process of conventional software well so you do you do start out pretty similarly of you know you'll you'll write your code you'll write your unit tests you'll have peer review on the code itself which is hopefully very rigorous and then there are both local tests networks in a re register networks that you can set up and then there's the actual tests net the most people are using and and you know hopefully any issues get caught while it's still in the testing phase but this is one of the reasons why life cycle for changes to these crypto asset networks tends to be a lot longer because you you want it to be baking in adversarial test environments for as long as possible because like you said once you get to the production ready phase even then it's not it's not that you just deploy it because you don't have the ability to deploy it it's the you know you make the software available to deploy and then you're going to see.

sas
"sas" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"sas" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"This of software engineering daily is sponsored by data dog a cloud monitoring platform built by engineers for engineers data dog enables full stack observability for modern applications see across all of your servers your containers your apps in your services in one place to monitor performance and make a data driven decisions data dog integrates seamlessly together metrics and events for more than two hundred technologies including cloud providers databases and web servers with built in dashboards algorithm mic alerts an end to end request racing data dog helps teams monitor every layer of their stack in one place but don't take our word for it start a free trial today and data dog will send you a free t shirt go to software engineering daily dot com slash data dog to get started and get that free data dog fluffy t shirt anything surprised you in the data that all these people that are plugging in their their stacks into shifter what surprises have you seen in the data about how people are buying and using sas products the data is very much dimension we don't tend to analyze data to the extent where we are making data business would we do have customers trying to understand daddy better we digging at times and understand what's going on a lot of things that have surprised us in terms of how people are there certain segments of the industry which very reliant on certain other types of self for for example on these ecommerce companies you could dick stitch fakes all other companies they're very reliant shipping software.

sas
"sas" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"sas" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"This of software engineering daily is sponsored by data dog a cloud monitoring platform built by engineers for engineers data dog enables full stack observability for modern applications see across all of your servers your containers your apps in your services in one place to monitor performance and make a data driven decisions data dog integrates seamlessly together metrics and events for more than two hundred technologies including cloud providers databases and web servers with built in dashboards algorithm mic alerts an end to end request racing data dog helps teams monitor every layer of their stack in one place but don't take our word for it start a free trial today and data dog will send you a free t shirt go to software engineering daily dot com slash data dog to get started and get that free data dog fluffy t shirt anything surprised you in the data that all these people that are plugging in their their stacks into shifter what surprises have you seen in the data about how people are buying and using sas products the data is very much dimension we don't tend to analyze data to the extent where we are making data business would we do have customers trying to understand daddy better we digging at times and understand what's going on a lot of things that have surprised us in terms of how people are there certain segments of the industry which very reliant on certain other types of self for for example on these ecommerce companies you could dick stitch fakes all other companies they're very reliant shipping software.

sas
"sas" Discussed on 1075 KZL

1075 KZL

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"sas" Discussed on 1075 KZL

"From the sas alabama news no way dan fifteen the song justice fans pigaso no catch fifteen breezing the birds tangled up melissa song her on mind.

sas alabama news melissa
"sas" Discussed on Book Marketing Mentors

Book Marketing Mentors

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sas" Discussed on Book Marketing Mentors

"B with what forget it if you're not others always rooms optimize right opposition is ongoing process that never ends so what else can you to go on he can listen to your prospects slight what they say used as your copy so the research that you do could happen in any number of ways it could be that i write a book for technical cofounder of a sas business if i sit down for coffee with the tactical cofounder of sas business then that's a form of israel by if i were to record that in that habit transcribed to can go through that and identifies of the problems of challenges that that person told me about so interviews are replaced cattle conversations are great place to do that researched doing formal surveys another great way to do the research all sorts of things my favorite way to do research without question because it's fast and it's relatively reliable what you're looking for leader the research is not a consensus for what you should say or what the problem is that your prospects are feeling so you don't need a lot of quantity you're looking for messages it might be that one person in six billion people one person says one thing that becomes your headlines 'cause you not looking for the message that is most likely to please everybody that's usually going to be a deluded sadness says at least a nobody what you're wanna look for when you're doing you research is you wanna listen for messages that sound raw that made you pause that means go at what do you mean by that i like to think of it as you're walking along or your brawling along and you hit elk grove you hit the thing that's like sticky suddenly yet can appeal yourself back from it and that's a look at it that's what we're looking for when we're listening or our message so because we're just looking for these statements these raises that are out there that are prospects as reser saying.

israel elk grove sas
"sas" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"sas" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Sas moved through his statue the ship stone try it just to show received a fracture give their back pay to speak to the george solace for you can do two did you.

"sas" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

Full Stack Radio

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"sas" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

"Custom rules basically we provide and how to use those and their style she'd so they just have to worry about things like at responsive from stuffing rise in there or at tail wind utilities to nowhere to generate those in their style she okay so this is this is what a just helped me out because what i think of i think of an last lesson sas is that everyone needs to learn their syntax and you can only do what they're syntex offers right and so that's you know the you've got to find a balance in the middle where it's easy enough to understand that for example sas has on designers and part of that is because it's syntax is easier than lessons but like we've talked about it's a little bit less powerful times so it's got to be approachable um but then it's also got to be powerful and you gotta figure out like well what what amount of power customisation my willing to lose for the sake of approachability or or vice versa so this one you act you have to completely different not a p eyes but whatever like two different ways of approaching it where um the end consumer needs learn only what is necessary for the plug in authors kinda desires to be a doable in that the plug mothers one who's defined that's in tax but when you kept saying it's got to be vowed css what i was imagining is somehow you have to write css in your plug in that defines how to do text dash dark verses text dark death softer and it's like no and that's what i just which that once you the css definition is at tailwind plugins the moment you get in your plug in you have full rein of jobs script you're not using css rules in the blood the restrictions of css rules and see us as variables to build tailwinds utilities yet you're using job skip doing whatever the heck you want to add didn't only goes back into css world once you pass it back to post the assess.

sas
"sas" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

Full Stack Radio

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"sas" Discussed on Full Stack Radio

"Custom rules basically we provide and how to use those and their style she'd so they just have to worry about things like at responsive from stuffing rise in there or at tail wind utilities to nowhere to generate those in their style she okay so this is this is what a just helped me out because what i think of i think of an last lesson sas is that everyone needs to learn their syntax and you can only do what they're syntex offers right and so that's you know the you've got to find a balance in the middle where it's easy enough to understand that for example sas has big on designers and part of that is because it's syntax is easier than lessons but like we've talked about it's a little bit less powerful times so it's got to be approachable but then it's also got to be powerful and you gotta figure out like well what what amount of power customisation my willing to lose for the sake of approachability or or vice versa so this one you act you have to completely different not a p eyes but whatever like two different ways of approaching it where the end consumer needs learn only what is necessary for the plug in authors kinda desires to be a doable and that the plug others one who's defined that's in tax but when you kept saying it's got to be vowed css whereas imagining is somehow you have to write css in your plug that defines how to do text dash dark verses text dark death softer and it's like no and that's what i this which that once you the css definition is at the tail wind dash plugins the moment you get in your plug in you have full rein of jobs script you're not using css rules in the lead the restrictions of css ruins yes as variables to build tailwinds utilities yet you're using job skip doing whatever the heck you want to add in only goes back in see css world once you pass it back to possess.

sas
"sas" Discussed on WNVZ Z104

WNVZ Z104

04:54 min | 3 years ago

"sas" Discussed on WNVZ Z104

"From the sas first eddie no way good correct two no justice logan no so those no sza no two this is king in the bird jiang who live so owner howard that is the only a ma bad baggio two this is oh fast as is bruno mars hey this is taylor swift this is shawn mendes number one 104 unlike donors can remember start for us this must two no it was just my sex lorde work is good two two a timer dealers want two.

sas logan eddie howard taylor shawn mendes
"sas" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"sas" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"That's super i saw the sas prints that you have up on their really do really well yeah revolution ups gold me in the middle with no gloves on with my famous painting commissioned and knives the print tobin and that's doing really well that's cool i want one myself now on have to go on there were rusty thanks for taking a few are on our out of your night i know it's nighttime over there in the uk on thanks for coming on software radio with us today and i hope we talk again soon yeah no i don't know if you've gone greying great pressure today this is this is the this is special operations history i love this stuff i'm sure you do yeah yeah absolutely brilliant thanks for that kenny kenny just let me know when wendy when when they're going to go on your website or to the podcast shallow say story we'll have it on soccer rep dot com tomorrow for members and then a week from today we'll have it up on apple podcast also known as i too am sandbag when i hear it week's time i mean we could email it you but we bulletin around that'd be yeah we put it up for the public um a week later on on i too yeah we we can get rusty subscription to sci he's gasol that's your we'll how if you do that then let me know them i can go up and up a look at what went we'll send all will settle that up rusty.

sas tobin uk kenny kenny wendy gasol soccer apple