36 Burst results for "SARS"

U.S. government begins two trials testing Eli Lilly's coronavirus antibody drug

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:29 sec | 8 hrs ago

U.S. government begins two trials testing Eli Lilly's coronavirus antibody drug

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Kobe Khun California Cove White House Donald Trump Director ELI Undercount President Trump Collins.
Fresh update on "sars" discussed on Garret Lewis

Garret Lewis

00:42 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "sars" discussed on Garret Lewis

"E N S t E A. M 7 92 sons, Most stimulating talk. Thank you so much for hanging out. Three things I think you need to know. Roger by strong bill, plumbing, air and solar. Number one. State super tender Kathy Hoffman. Has said that Ah She doesn't think schools can open. In person living by August 17. She wrote that yesterday afternoon. She's already putting it out there. They're never going to change their mind. They're never going to open up by the way before the election. I'm just letting you know Unless you pressure the hell out of him and again, we have literally no support from Republicans. In the state Legislature that always asked you and me for money, right? And so what? What are they doing to fight for us? What are they doing? Nothing. Nothing. So she says, It's indicators show that we have We have some major spread, right made majors. Oh, yeah. Major spread. Give me a break. Second thing I think you need to know Trump is up again in Rasmussen up to 51% approval seven points higher than where Obama was at the same point in his election. That is why that why is that dad might notice the media only talks about him losing in these fake polls by 12 points? They never talk about Rasmussen, which was one of the two poles. I got it right. About Trump winning in 2016. Um, that that's what I mean. It's incredible, and 76% of Trump supporters were enthusiastic to vote for him, as opposed to Biden's 53%. It's a big deal. Third thing I think you need to know the Republicans are wiping the floor with Democrats when it comes to getting new Republicans registered to vote, closing the gaps Bigley in the swing states they have now overtaking here in Arizona. We were down until April since April, we have overtaken them. Over 100,000 new Republicans registered to vote. In this election cycle, double more than double what they had in 2016. More than double three things. I think you need to know just watching some of these videos by the way of these these crazy people again wearing masks and freaking out on people, not in masks. The gateway pundit has one about some lady in a in a walmart in Idaho, and she goes off on teenage boys. She's some overweight woman. You know, if you if you say so she's high risk, right? Must severely overweight, but she's overweight. If you're that scared Stay away from them. Oh, my God. You're going to kill me. You're gonna do this. You're going to that. So I have to suffer because you are a freaking unhealthy fool. You know, that's where it really pisses me off. Like so listen. I am not the most in shape, but I'm okay. I watch what I eat as it goes in my mouth. I wish I could be more work. You know, terrible things. Thank you. Thank you very much. I was in agony. Worse things. I'd love to eat chicken Parmesan every day and going to happen. So if I take care of myself and I take vitamins, and I try to be as healthy as I can I walk I run. I tried to push ups. Jim's air closed. What do you want to dio? So I do the responsible thing. And yet I have to suffer because you're an ad risk fat slob. Like no offense to Jerry Nadler. But like why do I have to suffer? Because you didn't take responsibility. And why does my kid have to suffer and not be able to sit in a class with his friends and a teacher? Because you as a parent, I freaked out. Or even you as a teacher or clueless. It's not my problem. If my kid's teacher wants to be there, let it happen, right shouldn't be that way. I don't like this. I don't like it at all. No, you understand. You're You're protecting all of us. No. You know what if you are, if you are at risk, stay the hell home. I'm not at risk. Right? You don't know. I love that. You have no idea if you have any, you don't. Yeah, I'm walking around the past five months. Just fine. I have to sit back and change my life for you. This. It's the kind of thing that bugs me. You know what out of me on that level by the way? Gateway pundit has this. A study was published. The common Cold Viruses may protect against Cove in 19. Wait, What? And I'm sure you've seen this. It's got around its on the CDC website. They say you might test positive for covert ID if you have different versions of the Corona virus. Which is a cold Corona viruses. So you don't even know these tests are accurately on positive Corona virus. You don't know if it's this strand of covert 19 or a different strand. A different strain. Scientists in positions later are learning more and more study finds dot com reported, and this was published in nature. That and this is crazy. A new studies found more than 1/3 of people who have never had the Chinese virus. Have immune cells capable of recognizing The Chinese virus. Scientist suggest these cells could be the result of prior infection with other common cold viruses. Thus. The other common colds that you've had in your life. You may have built up immunity and that protects you from this one. What a freaking concept right more than 1/3 of people that I've never had SARS Cove it too. Apparently have immune cells that recognize Stars Cove. It too. Guys. It's not a big deal like white. Why is this? Not everywhere? They lead.

Donald Trump Rasmussen Scientist Kathy Hoffman Colds Roger Sars Cove Jerry Nadler Stars Cove Arizona Walmart Barack Obama Idaho Biden CDC JIM
Suspended Los Angeles Councilman Pleads Not Guilty to Federal Charges

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

01:02 min | 1 d ago

Suspended Los Angeles Councilman Pleads Not Guilty to Federal Charges

"Plea entered by suspended L. A City Councilman Jose We SAR. The multiple charges related to a pay for play corruption scandal at City Hall next 10 seventies Pete Demetriou working this story, he's life Force of the Roybal Federal Courthouse in a hearing that took a little over three minutes was our agreed to the withdrawal of his private attorney. He'll not be represented by federal public defenders when asked what the magistrate how he would plead to the charges against him. These are speaking to resume conference Window said Not guilty. Matter will now be sent to a federal judge John Walters, Quarterman Wednesday morning for a trial setting conference. Given the fact he's ours just changed counsel. It's more than likely his defense will ask for a delay and setting a trial date. On the grounds they haven't had a chance to go through all of the evidence, and the exhibits listed in the 113 page indictment specifies 30 for criminal counts against the councilman, ranging from bribery on the services, fraud and money laundering. Four other defendants in the corruption scandal, including former city Councilman Mitch Englander, have already pled guilty to charges of, or Judge Walter and are awaiting sentencing between December and February of next year. At the

Pete Demetriou Roybal Federal Courthouse City Hall Mitch Englander Judge Walter John Walters Bribery Attorney Fraud
AstraZeneca Rivals Moderna in Race to Successful SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine with ChAdOx1 nCov-19!

Breaking Biotech

04:28 min | 2 d ago

AstraZeneca Rivals Moderna in Race to Successful SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine with ChAdOx1 nCov-19!

"So I'm glad to be back and I have a pretty exciting show for everyone today the main. Main Serb we're going to talk about is the latest publication by AstraZeneca in the Journal. The. Lancet of their source to vaccine, and we're going to take a look at the data, look safety and contrast that to what I talked about with regards to earn his maxine last week. So definitely check out that show first and then watch this if you're interested by. That's going to be the main story, and then we're also gonNA touch on a few other biotech companies that invested in that updated their earnings, the last little wild for Q. Two. So that's going to do for the show. And really that's not much going on in the biotech space unfortunately lately, we seem quite a sell off in the X., p. I and I think that's largely due to the executive orders announced by the trump administration when I looked at them though it didn't seem to affect the company's I'm invested in which are mostly small and mid cap. Biotech. These executive orders had more of an impact on drugs that actually price right now in the market and the one in particular, that's concerning for large-cap Pharma is the one that forces companies to maintain pricing through the US and ex us. A lot of companies are able to charge a premium in the US compared to ex us, and now there's going to have to be normalized in what that means is that often these left lower their price for Americans which they didn't need to do before this so. That's kind of what's going on in biotech space excitement in the market otherwise has to do more with the tech companies that just destroyed their earnings on Friday. So we saw a huge increases in facebook, apple Amazon Google. So the sciences to be flowing more towards those companies than the XP. Even though the FBI did recently hit all-time highs. Personally I managed to get on a road trip in the last week or so and I checked out SEDONA Arizona for those who've not been there. It's definitely worth checking out if you live in the US, it's it's pretty gorgeous place except for the heat, the heat is pretty insane and somebody lives in San Diego, it's shocking to see the numbers go up to one hundred and fourteen degrees, Fahrenheit, but it was nice to get away for a bit and one other piece of business I. GotTa Get through is to give a shoutout to a friend of mine named Dave Coggin. And the reason for this that we had a friendly bet over a ping pong tournament yesterday that I would give him a shout-out if I lost all the games against him and he ended up beating me in every one of them. So with that, let's actually get into the meat of the show. And again, thanks everybody. All support all the emails in tweets in the comments on my channel are very, very much appreciated. It does go far with in terms of spreading the word and getting the podcast out there. So thank you for that. Now, the first company I WANNA talk about is trillium therapeutics, and they're sitting around fifty, five, hundred and fifty, million dollar market CAP, and we're talking about them today because they had a press release announcing a delay in data and people were expecting a clinical update on their six to one and sixty two product in the middle of twenty twenty, and that's around this time now, and instead what we're hearing is that they're going to. To this update at the American Society for Hematology Meeting in December of twenty twenty. So it's about a six month delay, not the end of the world, but there was really no relevant update provided in this press release. They mentioned that can relax refractory C. T. cell patients have been enrolled in the first four cohorts, and they were treated with the sixty. One monotherapy at does doses up to one point, four milligrams per kilogram. They also mentioned that they completed dose limiting top evaluation of cohort four, which is that one point, four milligrams per kilogram does and they're now moving onto the two point zero milligram per kilogram dose. So not really much to report the stock sold off from the sevens to around the fives and then was bought back into the sixes. So I think my average position is around the fives end. I decided not take an additional position into it because I am pretty heavy in the stock. And yet, it's unfortunate delay, but I don't think the fundamentals of the company at all are in jeopardy and some other things to know if you WANNA take a position in sort of CD, forty, seven molecule, which is what Chile him is commercializing They did announce a solid tumor study, which is going to be starting pretty soon, and we're GONNA see data in that in twenty twenty one. So if they see good data in solid tumors I think the stock could Garner maybe a five x valuation from where it is. Now, let's kind where I see trillium eventually, and I plan on holding well into twenty. Twenty one.

Google United States Twenty Twenty Dave Coggin Executive Astrazeneca Lancet Solid Tumors Maxine Arizona FBI Chile San Diego Facebook American Society For Hematolog Garner Amazon Apple
Dogs Can Sniff Out Coronavirus Infections, German Study Shows

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

02:48 min | Last week

Dogs Can Sniff Out Coronavirus Infections, German Study Shows

"Kicking off today with some potentially positive covid nineteen news from our canine friends. Dogs being trained, to sniff out. Drugs, weapons, and diseases like malaria, and even cancer is nothing new, but a new study shows that when trained dogs are able to sniff out code in Nineteen infections, quoting CNBC a new study, which was piloted by the University of Veterinary Medicine Hanover the handover medical school in the German armed. Forces found that if properly trained dogs were able to discriminate between human saliva samples infected with SARS COV to and non infected samples with a ninety four percent success rate overall, the hope is this method of detection could be one day used in public. Such, as airports, sporting events and other mass gatherings in addition to laboratory testing to help prevent future covid, nineteen outbreaks, according to researchers and quotes. The study was conducted using eight dogs from Germany's armed forces. They were trained for a week, using thousand samples of both infected and uninfected saliva, also neither of the researchers, nor the dog handlers new, which was which. Marin because black widow, who conducted the study says the dogs can probably detect folic change which occurs when a person is infected the one issue, the dogs apparently can't differentiate Kovic nineteen from other diseases like influenza yet, but the research team says that is the next step and the Hannover Medical School in Germany aren't the only ones conducting trials on trained dogs. Researchers at the London School of Hygiene and tropical medicine are also training and studying dogs to see if they could detect covid nineteen from person's body odor, which they say is altered by respiratory disease, and as for the canines welfare quoting CNN. Dogs are known to be. Be Able to contract cove nineteen, but there is no evidence that the virus can spread from dogs to humans, the team, medical detection, dogs or sure CNN that the dogs are well looked after and will be kept safe from infection, our dogs we trained on a dead virus, and then have no contact with the individuals. They're screening, but will sniff the air around. The person says representative Jimmy Butler and the dogs will only be permitted to be touched by the handler, which therefore means there will be very low risk of spread of the virus from the dog to their handler or to the people they live with and quotes. While this might not replace the uncomfortable diagnostic tests it could, certainly as the article said be a boon for public spaces where you need to test large numbers of people instantaneously and where fever scanners would only catch symptomatic. Assuming that is that the dogs could sniff out positive infections in a symptomatic. So, we'll have to see how accurately the dogs can be trained, but sounds like a promising solution so

CNN Germany Hannover Medical School University Of Veterinary Medic London School Of Hygiene Malaria Jimmy Butler Cnbc Fever Representative Marin Kovic Cancer
The tech behind the search for a COVID-19 vaccine

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

02:59 min | Last week

The tech behind the search for a COVID-19 vaccine

"This week on marketplace tech, we're reporting on the innovations that will help us transition to a post pandemic feature, a lot of hopes are pinned on a vaccine for covid nineteen, and there are in fact, a lot of efforts on that front. Some combined the old ways of making vaccines with new techniques, suppose instead of manufacturing all these viruses are protein, fragments or dead viruses and using that as a vaccine. Suppose we skip that step. Safi call is a biotech investor and author. He's describing technique for vaccine development that was invented a decade ago and just take the code for making that fragment. And give it to the body's cells. So instead of having a giant lab and a warehouse, cranking out these proteins that we then put into lots of vials and deliver billions of doses around the world. Your own cells will be the manufacturing plant while this technique is super promising, it hasn't yet lead to a successful vaccine any disease mainly because there's a huge shortage of funding, the problem is there hasn't been enough incentive to work in infectious disease. SARS cove one which came out eighteen years ago. The first sort of version of the SARS virus, eighty percent genetically identical to the current SARS Cov virus. We had started some promising work in promising drugs and promising vaccines against that first SARS. Virus. Some of which may have been enormously helpful these days there is plenty of incentive to both cure and treat covid nineteen, because says even by the time we get a vaccine, we might have much better success at preventing deaths from the virus like HIV. There's no vaccine, but drug development has turned the virus from a fatal condition to a chronic one. Every month we get more data wet drug works, and it's not just the exciting stuff of Heya scientists in the lab came up with this awesome new molecule that nobody ever saw before and radicals the virus on first contact. That's not how it works. Sometimes it's like well a pretty boring old drug. That none of us thought mattered very much. Actually works or the right combination by itself. It's okay, but if you combine a and B, it's really amazing. Those are kind of the they. They don't make sexy headlines. But they're really important. So despite all the very bad headlines, because said he's feeling positive is just the number of shots on goal that we have and for most diseases. Maybe. You develop five drugs or ten drugs in clinical trials. Today we have over three hundred treatments in development for covert of US working in

Sars United States Safi
Researchers Throw Cold Water on the Panic Around COVID-19’s Alleged Short-Lived Immunity

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

04:56 min | 2 weeks ago

Researchers Throw Cold Water on the Panic Around COVID-19’s Alleged Short-Lived Immunity

"There was a study put out by King's College in London a few weeks ago, which found that covid nineteen antibodies in people who had been infected largely disappeared after two months. The headlines about covid nineteen immunity being temporary were all over the place with more than a few implying that this means will never have a truly effective vaccine and never truly defeat the coronavirus. It's all terrifying so I wanted to share some insight from Derek. Thompson over at the Atlantic spoke with a number of experts to get a deeper understanding of the study and inject some good news into all of the headline fearmongering. Now I'm not going to tell you that. The study was totally wrong and that we're all going to be completely fine nothing about covid nineteen is completely good news, but as Shane Crotty of urologist at the La Hoya Institute for -Nology told the Atlantic actually looking at the data. I feel okay about it. Quoting further from the Atlantic acquired immunity is. Memory when our bodies fight off infection, we want our immune systems to remember how to defeat it again like a person who, after solving a big jigsaw puzzle recognizes and remembers how to set the pieces the next time. The whole point of vaccination is to teach the immune system those same puzzle solving lessons without exposing it to the full virus. This is why Casey L. study initially seemed so dreadful it. It found that the number of certain active antibodies called neutralizing antibodies declined significantly between tests especially in patients with mild or no symptoms. Antibody levels are one proxy for the Immune System's memory. If they plunged quickly, that might mean that our immune system can't remember how to solve covid nineteen for more than a few months at a time do minus to start from square one with each new exposure end quotes. Now while those findings from the King's college study are definitely concerning, there are three main reasons to be skeptical about the study and therefore hopeful for futures. I, the study only looked at one part of our immune system, our vast mysterious immune system about which there remain many unknowns quoting again when a new pathogen enters, the body are adaptive immune system calls up a team of BCL's with produce antibodies and t cells to over simplify the B. Cells antibodies intercept and bind to invading molecules and the killer t cells seek and destroy infected cells, Evaluating Immune Response Without A. T cells is like inventory, national air force, but leaving out the bomber jets, and in the case of covid nineteen, those bomber jets could make the biggest difference. A growing collection of evidence suggests that t cells provide the strongest and longest lasting immunity cove in nineteen, but this study didn't measure them at all end quote, further study and a Francis Strasbourg university hospital found that patients recovering from covid nineteen had strong t cell responses, despite not having any detectable antibodies. Now second decline in antibodies that unusual Shane Crotty the Varela gist from the Loy. Institute for Immunology. said quote it unusual to have feeding antibody response after several months the off. Isn't that surprising when you look at something like the smallpox vaccine easy the antibody responses down about seventy five percent after six months, but that's a vaccine that works for decades. We need a study like this to look at Cova patients six months after infection to really know what we're dealing with and quote. And third, and finally it's possible that even these low levels of antibodies could trigger a larger immune response in the future like if the individual is exposed to SARS Cov to again, this goes back to the immunological memory. It's like the memories and that strong when it's not confronted, but win the trigger of the virus returns, so does the memory. Even beyond the critiques of this one study that caused so much panic in the news, there remain many other reasons to be hopeful. Vaccine Research continues to steamroll along at an unprecedented pace. Several studies on monkeys have shown strong long lasting immune response and a new study shows that patients who recovered from SARS East Asia indeed have long lasting t cell immunity. Plus Journalists Noah. Smith shared on twitter, pointing to research from immunologist professor. Akiko, it was sake. This news about antibodies doesn't necessarily mean the vaccine would be ineffective because quoting Sake, vaccines can elicit stronger immune response than natural. Those covid nineteen vaccines can and should induce more robust and durable protection than natural infection end quote. As no Smith sums it all up quote. One antimony bunnies aren't the only thing that can give you. Immunity to your body can probably remember how to make new antibodies and three vaccines can potentially give you longer lasting immunity than you'd get from actually getting covid end quote.

Covid Atlantic Shane Crotty King Derek Thompson Smith London Francis Strasbourg University East Asia La Hoya Institute Casey L. Cova Akiko Institute For Immunology. Twitter BCL LOY
‘Don’t Hesitate’: Mayor Walsh Urges ‘Everyone’ In Boston To Get A Coronavirus Test

WBZ Afternoon News

00:55 sec | 2 weeks ago

‘Don’t Hesitate’: Mayor Walsh Urges ‘Everyone’ In Boston To Get A Coronavirus Test

"Boston City Hall Mayor Marty Walsh, speaking at a news conference. They're talking about Cove in 19 saying the spread in the Commonwealth all comes down to testing. It remains one of our most essential weapons in this fight. It's how we get our data. It's how we convey SAR decisions on reopening. It's how we also work on getting access to treatment. It's how we contain potential outbreaks before we see those spreads happening. We have extend expanded testing to this point is widely available all across our city is in more than 20 locations and mobile testing sites, and I just want to urge everyone today the please go get a test on hesitate. The mayor says Those tests are covered by insurance. If you have symptoms or confirmed exposure, and he says, even if you haven't experienced symptoms, go get a test for free at any of the the locations up in the Commonwealth. Full list available at mass Dock of We have it on our website as well. W b c news radio dot com Unemployment

Commonwealth Boston City Hall Marty Walsh Mass Dock Cove
The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Life Sciences

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

21:30 min | 3 weeks ago

The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Life Sciences

"Live. Let's kick it off as Glenn with Meta data. You're on the and business podcast. So Glenn Are we're GonNa talk a bit about the future. And we're in this wild time in your industry with the corona virus, but I wanted ground us in the now. When when you look even in the space for twenty years you look at where data are starting to transform processes in life sciences. How do you like to frame it? What's the state of affairs today? So I think if you. If you look at what happens in life sciences outside of data, we just look. People, the big trend that we're seeing is it's good trend. That's the world I. WanNa live in as a patient. Therapies are getting more. Effective therapies are getting safer, and it's because they're being designed very different. Way used to be that you try to create a therapy that worked for as many people as you possibly could, and you would maybe high fiving in the hallways. If you right for Outta ten patients, you know this. This was the world of the blockbuster drugs, and it was about as imprecise as possible like a patient has a blood pressure over this. Give him this drug. Patients got cholesterol over that. Give them this other drug, and now as you start to get into these more effective therapies because they're more precise. Actually start to create an interesting data problem, and that is you start to have smaller and smaller denominators. If I'm starting to in well, this drug isn't district people who have a blood pressure over this. They also need to have this gene. They also need to have or not have this pre existing condition. ETC, acceptance every time I come up with more criteria. The pool of patients who are going to bed. And remember. We're making things that people take. They put in their bodies, and we've to make sure that they're safe. Not just effective, and there's a good way regulatory bodies who are protecting that safety and efficacy. So now as these patient pools, who will benefit therapies get smaller. We also have smaller smaller pool of people who we can use from a research perspective would be volunteering. Stoke the specificity, which is great means that we have a scarcity of patients that we've got to deal with a new way and I think that's been driving at least I have a very kind of drug development centric view of the world. About a drug discovery. Can I find a new molecule I really focus on the will what do I? Do if I think I've got something that's going to cure this kind of cancer. Think about making more evidence, but with fewer people line. Smaller denominators I think that's a big piece of what's driving the data landscape in life sciences. The other thing that I'll tell you which is kind of interesting, is that the life sciences industry has not been really good about data, standardization and a guy. He was a big influence in the way I think about data medi data chief data officer starting from about five years ago, his name's David, Lee and He came out of the insurance industry. Any any taught me that data standardization. Doesn't sound sexy, but until you do that, you can't benchmark until you do that. You create a predictive model and the life. Sciences Industry hasn't been great about data standardization because everybody was doing stuff for this one drug in this one area, and so I see people outside of Medi data as well, but certainly the kind of stuff that we do is we try to use AI to climb that data value curve. How do we a figure out how to standardize data in different ways data from different sources about different things? Let me just give you one quick tangent example. I got asked very kindly to speak at a conference about Ab-. Stroke and I do not know anything about cardiology like I did cancer research before we started medi data I'm comfortable talking about oncology, so I figured I better. Get ahead of it if they're asked me to. Present and I got up on stage and I said listen I. Don't know anything about stroke. But if I was speaking to a bunch of oncologists, and they were trying to build a predictive model around cancer diagnosis, and they were only looking at cancer research. They're not going to be very successful because everybody already has cancer in those research studies, but if you were to be able to go and look at large-scale cardiology studies, stroke studies studies about hard tax. If I were to go, pull data from studies research about diabetes. Then I'm going to know what those patients looked like before their cancer diagnosis, and then I can start to use. Use that to build that model so when you put that Lens on things, you realize I need to standardize data across a lot of different kinds of patients and a lot of different kinds of research patients who are in research. I have to stack the deck. I don't mean that in a various way create to create the biggest possible denominator to create the most evidence generating. Data set that I can, and even just generating that data set requires ai tool sometimes, and then once you got that data set. I think probably inherently obviously you. You've got more traditional statistical tools and methods with frankly work great and a lot of the shared also can start to apply things like machine learning neural that works and look for look for signal that you might have missed or enhanced signal. That wasn't there traditionally so I. I do think that's happening I. Feel Pretty Good. There's a lot more we. We can do, but we're. We've started as an industry getting that right. Yeah, until there's couple of things to poke into here I. Like the landscape paint I'm going to dive into a couple of things. You mentioned one of which was around standardization, so yeah, I mean what a tough problem! I think everybody. We've interviewed in healthcare. You guys are in Pharma. If I was ever GONNA be selling a product, probably said the six time on the podcast never be selling artificial intelligence solutions to hospitals like a break one. One of the Pharma companies, but in healthcare, broadly whether they be life, sciences, or or diagnostics, or whatever the case may be just data, being goofy, and like in silos and locked up and not uniform sort of this big ubiquitous issue is this when you talk about the standardization, clearly from what I understand of our look into companies like the MERCS and the bears of the world. They're beginning to try to do this with their own big corpus's of historical information, whatever being able to streamline things so that it's. It's findable, maybe not machine readable yet. They don't necessarily know where that's going to add value just yet in most cases, but but at least make it more uniform. Is this something that the industry is GonNa have to get to the same page from kind of a regulatory or kind of soft law level, or is this just per company? We're GONNA have to come up with data governance policies within our firm and just be really steady about those across silos. Like how do you see this rolling out? Yeah, so? Well I. DO think that individual companies are working on that, but I also think that there's industry organizations. There's commercial entities. My own included who are trying to do that beyond the walls of an individual company and I think we're GONNA have to I. Don't think the data that one company has is going to be sufficient. Across all the use cases that we'd not just a good idea commercially, but we have a medical ethical obligation to create the best care possible when data sets and I do think that the data quality is a really important thing to think about if if it's a a regulatory prescriptive method of doing it or the way regulation works today, which is demonstrate to people that you've done a responsible set of work to standardize things and prove it, but a lot of people will point a finger at regulators and say they're slowing down innovation, sometimes particularly and Pharma and I do not believe. believe that at all regulators. Job Isn't to be like Glen, you're a great guy, so you know I believe what all your data and Algorithms put out. No job is to protect the public health and say Glenn proved to me on paper that you did something that was scientifically ethically responsible to jobs. Is So so i? Think if that requirement is there? What you'll see is individual companies trying to solve this on their own, and I've seen this before in life, science space with other technology things, even just the management data used to be every company tried to do it their way. Out of their basement, and then twenty years later, this medi data do Thanh, research and again we're not the only company doing it, but you see platform providers that are doing it at a larger scale so when I see everybody trying to do it individually get excited because that means that there's actually a market demand for that. And you're creating a marketplace where the best technologies, the best rhythms, the best data sources will create something that more and more people will come onto, and that's how that's everybody clearly. I think we could extrapolate that for those of you. Listening into almost any industry right I think people say this. Even about I'm just GONNA throw some random stuff at ya like automotives. Hey, if we're GONNA make safe self driving cars. Do we want Ford my develop something about some certain snowy driving circumstance like there's GonNa. Be Some things that are going to have to be transferable so that everybody's safer on the dam road and with drugs. Maybe it's the same way. Business Opportunities Hey if we can be the ones who even through kind of soft news. Can Be. The folks that people rely on to develop a system instruct sure that's going to build a really sticky market position in clearly from a business perspective. That's that's an appeal as well part of the challenge see in life, sciences and I know you've obviously you guys have dealt with this and found ways around or whatever there's there's a way to frame it, but you know I. Look at companies like we just did a piece on Johnson and Johnson for example looking at some of their current innovations and investments today I. Frankly we. We don't see a tremendous amount, but they're involved in a consortium called Melody Out in Europe somewhere from not mistaken where Santa a bunch of other big players are from what I understand exposing a certain amount of data is being trained on in some aggregate sense in everybody's GonNa get a little bit of the benefit from it. How do we do this? Hey, we all have the same uniform stuff. Hey, we're able to kind of like mould things across companies. How do we do that without giving away the secret sauce, because of course? Clearly as a drug development firm that there's a humanitarian side, and then clearly we have to make payroll in in. That would mean that we've got to keep some of the things that are secret. So how do we uniform things and maybe cross pollinate without the risk of US losing her crowned jewels yet? So that is not an easy thing to do I'm I'm super appreciative of it. The way we've at least tried to tackle that problem is by creating like a give to get dynamic. There are definitely companies out there that sell data. And I think there's a great place for them in the world. Probably doing and we'll do some awesome stuff I. think there's there's a great place in the world for not for profit groups who say hey just throw your data. Here will create naturally yet. For sure, that's all all good, but I also think there's a place for a model where you say look if you put your data into this, what is effectively proprietary bucket, but with a third party that you trust and let that third party that make sure that everybody who's putting their data into that pool is protected in terms of not showing the specifics of your individual data points, so in your example. You know Sanofi doesn't see Johnson and Johnson's data. But you've got enough people in there that you can do things in aggregate and let people compare their own specific data to the more generalized bigger denominator that Medi date, or whoever it is or you and it's done at the standardization is done for you in a way that this transparent and you can believe in the results I think that's a really interesting commercial model, and then must exist in other industries I just not an expert. Well, it's. The way you're talking about it makes it sound like it's kind of a Nathan idea, even for you guys where it's like well. We think that there could be a space for this like it's something that could have all right. It's like an I believe you're right I, think actually it absolutely. Could I just think you Mr Glanton? Whoever your your absolute best partnership guys, you know you'd better be drinking beers or some of these people because there's a lot of trust that goes into those kind of relationships. So. There's a lot of trust that goes along in life sciences anywhere for sure yet. You're dealing with data about patients in some way. Holly anybody in medicine right has a person's life in their hands, but if if we're working on a vaccine for SARS, come to I, mean literally billions of people are going to get it like you've got billions of lives in. In your hands, so he's already. A lot of trust is important in our industry and I. do think that what will see by the way. There's posters at scientific sessions that we've done. There's clients right now are taking some of these aggregated data sets to regulators, and they're using them to demonstrate exactly what I was saying before. Their drugs are safe and effective. But with different kind of aggregated denominator, we call it a synthetic control arm, and it's not that is android senator anything synthesis out of the people it, synthesizing people who are in lots of different research studies into a cohort they can be used as. As a valid competitor to the patients who you treated with your new drought, Nisa solving that problem, you're saying of the narrowness if you have some super niche allergy medication for people with a certain kind of whatever then yeah, maybe you really need to extrapolate in that kind of uniform data, way and and kind of square that circle that you. And I actually think that not only by I know this is happening. See it happening, but this is a harbinger of things to come because. I gave. Let's take it to its most extreme, so in all US oncology, because it's happening there I and cancer, but I think it's going to happen in almost every therapeutic area, probably even like analgesics, and what the next tylenol is, but we are all so interestingly I mean at biologically individual and people talk about cancer therapy, and almost every patient really is like an end of one problem. There is nobody who has your. Your exact same tumor right in your tumor has probably different kinds of cells that have different mutations even within this one problem in your body. So when you start to think about that, we have to use these techniques to extrapolate what the best therapy is for every single person at the right time down to individual. We're going to need as an industry and I'm not just talking about now. Life Sciences although I think by scientists. Imprint part of the for sure. It's GonNa. Pay For a lot of this Oh. Yeah, sure I sure, but but these mathematical models that we used to figure out what to do for individuals there being born right now using these techniques stacking up all this data and figuring out how to use as a group. We're GONNA use that against individuals, so this stacking I'm just going to clarify this point will move into the next question, but I wanNA nutshell this for the audience the stacking is it sounded almost like a combination of two things one if we can have some. Unification, around the data, we can combine it in certain ways where nobody's giving away their secret sauce, but maybe we were able to get bigger cluster of people who have a specific genetic condition, or whatever, and then use that for for our clinical trials. That's one side of it. You also mentioned Kinda the synthetic sort of element. was that kind of like you know what immediately came to my mind? was you know we're we're? We're training an algorithm to read handwriting. You know we'll come up with a bunch of programmatic generated handwriting. That might be slight variations of things like using that I. Don't think that's what you. You meant there, but what? What did you mean by synthetic again? No, so you got that stack. We've got stack of every patient and I'm coming to see you I say all right well. What am I going to treat Glenn while I got to figure out because Glenn's unique. WHO's similar to Glen and so what you do? Is You build these kind of like Matrix views, patients and you start to use algorithms to compare Glenn with everybody in the stack. Yeah Okay Okay you, you pull those people out of the stack, and you then synthesize them into a group of smaller stack, but that is purpose built. To make a guess about what to do best for Glenn Don or all them. You synthesize one of these smaller stacks from the big one to use as a competitor the same way if I had a group of patients who I gave my new drug to and I'll give another group of patients a placebo sugar pill right I, compare them with like. Well, should I be giving people sugar pills if we have tons of people who are in research, who already gotten the standard of care? Can I reset the CISE? Those people into a comparative instead of exposing a whole bunch of volunteer patience to something that. Does, not effective, and that's the synthesis of the group. Yeah, it's not robots. You're not talking about programmatic degenerate I wasn't suspecting were so. It is it is quite interesting. Because the direct analogy, some of our listeners are avid readers that emerged dot com, always covering use cases in different industries. We think about how a net flicks or Amazon does recommendations you know. You're stripping, you know. In their case, it's purchase behavior. Geo Location whatever else for you. It's genetic stuff in health history, whatever and yeah, you just find in those similar clusters and being able to extrapolate a little bit. You know the movie Gatica. People haven't seen it like the ideas like your DNA decides whether or not you're going to be an astronaut or somebody who's cleaning, toilets or something, cleaning toilets, and of course, of course, that's patently ludicrous, because your genes interestingly don't change that much there. In instances where mutations and things, but actually I I can't tell you much more about your health today than I could have told you about your health the day you. You were born because it's a static data. Set Your Connecticut Right. That is a very simple view of it. There's a lot more elaborate stuff, but if you think about all the stuff that is changing about you overtime, Gina Type, and then all of your phenotype, and you start to measure that stuff and you start to think about it. It really is a problem of finding not one needle, but the right ten. Ten needles in the haystack that allow us to make the best comparison between Glen or a group of patients and patients like them, and that's another place where these artificial intelligence tools are used, so we use them to create stacks, but we also use them to select the right needles out of those haystacks to create these comparative groups Yup I. See those reasonable applications I would be you know. BE FRANK WITH YOU IF If that struck me as not possible based on precedents and other industries, but that clustering strikes me as quite possible, particularly solve that data harmonisation issue. I mean that's a Lotta. The crux of it I know we're just about to wrap up I know you have seen a lot of things change with covid nineteen. Thinking about what that means for the future of your industry. Any closing thoughts before we wrap on. What this means for now in the near future in life sciences. Yes so at the risk of making Not Look that good? Because, I'm definitely including myself in this criticism wouldn't have been nice if we had all that patient data stacked up. And I mean they're. They're few million patients around the world who are in studies on the Medi Data Platform. It's all different companies doing the research with their data, but can you imagine if we had that stack? And we were paying attention to in the hundred fifty countries that we do research knowing some of these patients, genetics, and all of their pheno types in a better way than we normally do in medicine, because we see them consistently wouldn't have been great for layer on like who seems to be coming down with cove nineteen I mean no, no, no, no doubt, no young. And I think that that that's an interesting. You put like an exclamation point on why we need to do this. It's like there's an ethical imperative, not just a commercial driver to think about data in different ways. Yeah, yeah, well. To some degree you know my thought is like what you're articulating makes a tremendous amount of sense. Given Your Business Model. It makes slightly less if I work at Bayer. However like despite the biased tilt, I do understand the value prop and I do think that it is compelling and I think it does feel like it'll have to be the future. People are not going to keep distance silos forever. I do think it make sense. Air Because, if you if pharmaceutical a pharmaceutical company B. comes out with the same effectively drug, and and they're competing for the same group of patients, and neither of them knows that you might be better off taking drug Abe before drug be or drug be is better in a certain kind of of patient than drug. As than actually, you are not serving your customer and you're. You're not generating the revenue that you could be generating, and so you should be motivated with other companies to lineup tightly. In terms of what is the best way to treat patients I actually think it's in your best interest. i. e Clayton clearly is I mean there's a little bit more potentially to lose while in your firm, it's it's almost explicitly to game but I. I think he'd do things like you see things like melody you see companies like yours have been tremendously successful. You guys were acquired recently. You know massive congratulations for that and yes I think long term it's not against their interests by any means, and hopefully I think Glenn. It'll be part of the future. I know these are things you've thought about for. People are interested. Interested in some Glenn stocks is a book coming out in August called the patient equation by Wiley. It's about precision medicine in the age of Covid nineteen and beyond Glenn. If people are interested in in stay in touch following your thoughts, we live sciences I. Know We have a lot of people that follow that space. Where should they go on the web to find you? Cou. You could find me on twitter, etc, at captain, clinical a fictitious superhero for good science. And meditated accomplish our website for anybody interested. There's all kinds of papers and men links to publications. We do academic stuff, too, so it's not all commercial awesome, all right,

Glenn Cancer Glen Johnson Diabetes Europe Bayer United States Twitter Sars AI Covid Pharma Glenn Don
University of Houston researchers unveil air filter designed to ‘catch and kill’ COVID-19

Money Matters with Ken Moraif

00:27 sec | 3 weeks ago

University of Houston researchers unveil air filter designed to ‘catch and kill’ COVID-19

"Of Houston researchers designed to catch and kill their filter that contract Covad 19 killing it almost instantly. This is, according to a release from the University of Houston Researchers reported that the virus tests at the gallows to national laboratory found 99.8% of the noble SARS Cove T O V, to which causes Cove in 19 were killed. In a single pass through the filter

University Of Houston Research Cove Houston Covad
Fauci: There is not "a lot of definitive evidence" that coronavirus can transmit through airborne spread, but it should not be ruled out

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

05:11 min | 3 weeks ago

Fauci: There is not "a lot of definitive evidence" that coronavirus can transmit through airborne spread, but it should not be ruled out

"CROWBARS cases are increasing and at least thirty six states this week Texas set a new record high for the number of new cases in a single day today, topping ten thousand cases for the first time at ten, thousand and twenty eight Arizona set a new grim record high for the number of coronavirus deaths in a single day today at one hundred seventeen. Some states reversing their policy. On allowing indoor dining in restaurants today, Dr, Anthony Fauci said this. When you talk about heiress, ill or airborne? There have been demonstrations viruses. That can actually stay in the air for much longer enhance. Get caught up in the circulation system of given room. There isn't a lot of definitive evidence about what the impact of the Aristotle Ization is on covert expression. However, we have some good examples back with SARS which is a similar virus where they were clear cut examples of spread by Aerosol. Juror discussion now is Dr. Peter says. He is the dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine and the CO director of the Texas Children's Hospital Center for Vaccine Development Doctor. Thank you very much for joining us tonight, and just in reaction to what Dr Fauci was just saying in the whole question of indoor dining in restaurants, one of the simple messages is being outside is better than being inside. Yeah that's right now. We know that droplet contact is a major out of transmission meaning that somebody has this virus and what we know about this viruses, that's it's president. High amounts in the Upper Airways speaking, or you cough. You released a lot of virus, and then gets on surfaces or land on people's face. We've known about that for a long time, but a lot of us have suspected that it does something more which is lingers in the atmosphere as well. Well and it turns out not allowed to respiratory viruses. Actually do this easels, does it chicken pox? Virus does and this one almost certainly does this as well, and that's one of the reasons why this is so highly transmissible that high amount of virus, the upper airway and the fact that those particles are released, and so many of those people are without symptoms. So this is what makes it so hard to do. The contact tracing into really manage these epidemics. I? WanNa. Get your view of something. We discussed last night on this program. And that is the the possibility that the real range of possible symptoms is almost unlimited because of the fact that the. Although we think of it as a respiratory of problem, there's also a vascular problem because of the way it seems to get into the bloodstream and those New York Times. Reporter indicating that you could walk into a doctor with just symptoms of feeling, generally bad, and and that could be worthy of Corona virus testing. That's right. There's a huge number of different presentations gastrointestinal presentations prison, presenting coughing and early on in this epidemic we were always told about cough and fever, and that certainly does occur, but the big worrisome one now is the fact that we know this virus binds to certain receptors on the cells, lining blood vessels, and this is causing blood clots warm, so you're seeing pulmonary embolism. You're seeing strokes. You're seeing heart attacks, and that's happening because this virus induces blood clots in the coronary artery, and so one of the big concerns now is, we're people with sudden deaths at. At home people maybe in the early stages of this illness, and this is one of the reasons why so terrifying when the President says ninety nine percent of the cases are harmless, is just not true, and we need to step up our game in the US in terms of interrupting community transmission, the number of cases is going up and up and up forty thousand last week than fifty thousand. Now it's going to be over sixty thousand towards the end of this week with no end in sight so with this epidemic tragically a spiraling out of control right now. and Dr, who does the way you described that? Possibility of sudden death at home would also be a one of the reasons why the death count is, so it is understated in our statistical analysis of it so far. Yeah absolutely, and we're trying to tease out exactly. All of the ramifications we know for instance uncertain about a sudden deaths from covid nineteen. The other thing that happens is when covert night team strikes that community. The people don't take care of themselves. They're reluctant to go to the doctor with symptoms because they're worried of our contracting Cova Nineteen, so we think that may be a component of it as well l., but it's a lethal combination in so many undiagnosed cases, so we're. We're going to get her better handle lot in the coming months, but for now this is a serious and deadly infection.

Texas Children Anthony Fauci President Trump Dr. Peter Texas Arizona New York Times Aristotle Ization Cova Vaccine Development Doctor Cough Pulmonary Embolism Wanna Baylor College Of Medicine United States Reporter Hospital Center National School Of Tropical Me Director
Russia referendum: All you need to know on the vote that could see Putin stay in power until 2036

Inside Europe

02:49 min | Last month

Russia referendum: All you need to know on the vote that could see Putin stay in power until 2036

"Make great backing singer from Miley SARS, but anyway I my name is. Is Keith Walker at to Russia next where polling stations opened on Thursday for voting on a constitutional referendum. It's on whether to less President Vladimir Putin run for re-election twice more and potentially remain in the post for the next sixteen years Dwi's <hes> at correspondent. Emily. Sherwin is on the line from Moscow Emily. I. Tell us a little bit more about the referendum. What's at stake here? Well this referendum is actually more of a vote because it doesn't have the legal status of a referendum, but the vote on amendments it covers really a whole range of measures. It's a big mix, so there's one amendment for example that states that marriage can only be between a man and a woman. Politicians can't have dual citizenship. There's an amendment guaranteeing accessible medical care. Environmental protection is on that <hes> on the bill as well. And there are banners all over Moscow advertising these rather some of these rather populist measures I would say, but one amendment, of course the seen as particularly important, and that is the amendment that will reset the clock on Nevada. Mir Putin's presidential term, so what it means is that he isn't actually abolishing term limits for future politicians, but he is abolishing his term limit, so he can run again in twenty twenty four and that would mean he could be in power. Power for two more terms if he runs again if people vote for him, is this referendum likely to go and Putin's favor? Well, it's a bit of a strange one. Because the constant constitutional amendments have already actually passed in the Duma, so the lawmakers here in Russia have already voted in favor of it <hes> but the president this week as well has emphasized again that it will only pass if people vote for these amendments that these amendments will only pass. Pass if people vote for them, essentially, this vote is seen as kind of almost referendum on Putin himself and trust in the president has been falling for months. It's clear now that the the authorities though will try to make sure that the turnout is high and they're trying to really set the mood. They have been trying to really set the mood ahead of the vote. They've made it really easy to vote. People can even vote in Moscow. They can vote. Vote Online <hes> they've had the victory day parade this week to kind of set a patriotic mood and this week as well <hes> Putin announced some <hes> additional economic support measures for people in the corona virus crisis, but people that I spoke to. I mean admittedly in Moscow which is traditionally kind of more <hes>, more critical of the authorities than the rest of the country, but people were surprisingly negative <hes>. They said you know why vote, it's all been decided. Anyway and the authorities should really spend this

President Vladimir Putin Moscow Miley Sars Keith Walker Russia Emily President Trump Sherwin Nevada
The 'ludicrous' coronavirus certificate your boss wants

Coronacast

04:52 min | Last month

The 'ludicrous' coronavirus certificate your boss wants

"We're hearing about this trend that seems to be starting with. Employers or schools or day care centers are requiring a carbon nineteen clearance. What people have to guard the pay and get basically a medical certificate? Saying that they're not sick and the Royal College of General Practitioners has put out a statement saying please don't do that. For number of reasons, chiefly, because it's kind of impossible, that's absolutely right. Employer should not be asking employees for that sort of proof, because the proof doesn't exist as we've said before you've never negative test, let's say you are infected with Covid nineteen and you get the test done on day one. It's a high likelihood of negative and hopefully more positive as days go on, so you could have a negative tested means absolutely nothing, and even if you're not infected the day after you do the test, you could be infected and the day before test doesn't matter, so you're going to have the test every day before you get to work. It's completely ludicrous. Ludicrous and really not the way to go, and what really should happen is that people with symptoms should not go to work and be tested to make sure they're not positive, and then even people symptoms shouldn't go to work, even if it's the common cold, or it might even be the flu and you gotta wait interval symptoms settled. We don't have to be isolated for two weeks. If you don't have covid nineteen, the difficulty with this is that GPA's at the moment especially more. I've alerted than ever. The last thing we need is more people trying to vie for that really valuable time. Jupiter are probably not that busy at the moment actually. Doing a lot of telehealth consultations, the surgery's going back into action, but the reality here is that you're asking for tests really meaningless in in the absence of the likelihood that you might be infected I think it's fair enough. If you're maybe a little bit of symptoms, you into a protest, you want to get tested. That's fair enough, but to ask this on a one off basis for a line to say the you're covered negative on one occasion. When in fact you might well be positive is ludicrous. So what should you do if your boss does ask you? You for one of these medical clearance certificates well I. Think should show them the release from the Sterling College of General Practitioners and we'll put that up on our website and you can find. They're pretty often. Take it in one of the things that they do say in their release from the pay is that there's not an unlimited number of tests which is of course true. What do you think about this? Perhaps discouraging people from getting tested because they don't want to be wasting them. There are plenty of tests. People need to test. They should get it done. But the would I mean would put an unnecessary extra burden on testing, and there is a cost attached to that, but we've got plenty of tests. I wouldn't worry too much about that. So question from Perry about why people is symptomatic. She's asking to raise such as why some people is symptomatic. Is the viruses only mall in these people? Can it be savvy and they still show no symptoms I think she's talking about viral. Load here, so let's be clear what we're talking about here. So this is somebody without symptoms who is covered nineteen positive call positive for the SARS covey to virus. That could be two situations one. Is that your? Throughout the course of your infection and the other. Is that your committee that you're having any symptoms yet? But in five to fourteen days you will develop symptoms, and so the reason why you could be asymmetric. Right through the course of your disease is that you got a very small doors of the virus? It's likely that the doors you get an. Organism, is related to the severity of disease. One reason why healthcare professionals can get very severe disease, so if you get a walloping doors of the viruses likely, you're gonNA. Get A walloping case of the disease. It's not true in everybody, but that's one reason so. That, you could be symptomatic. Probably the biggest reason why people symptomatic is their age and children beyond one year of age through too young I don't who'd through to fifty sixty years old, the likelihood of getting symptomatic disease increases, and it's almost certainly do in that case to the response of your immune system, because essentially symptoms like coughing sneezing feeling fatigued, are all symptoms not so much of the virus, but of your body's reaction to the virus, so it's like getting an immunization in your. Your arm it goes red and inflamed that your immune system responding to the immunization, and it's a good thing because it shows that you're reacting to it and similarly with your body, so your body is reacting strongly immunologically. Then you're more likely to get symptoms, and of course this severe covid nineteen disease is actually a disease of the immune system. It's an overreaction of the immune system doesn't mean to say if you get a few symptoms like fatigue or Or loss of taste, and so on that you're heading for severe disease, but it's a sign that your immune system is reacting quite strongly to the virus, so those are the two reasons those of the virus and your immune response related to your age in particular,

Royal College Of General Pract Covid FLU Sterling College Of General Pr Perry
Can blood plasma of recovered COVID-19 patients help prevent infection in others?

All Things Considered

03:10 min | Last month

Can blood plasma of recovered COVID-19 patients help prevent infection in others?

"There is still no cure for code nineteen but there is one drug that helps a bit the researchers are hunting for better ones and now they're testing some of those in people and pure science correspondent Joe Palca spoke with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly about where we are with covert nineteen treatments right now the minute you start with the one drug that I've mentioned to that shown to help a little bit yeah it's called ram doesn't fear it does show it they have shown that it's shortens a stay in the hospital from fifteen days to eleven days but it doesn't reduce mortality and I know that scientists and and eight patients for that matter would like to have something better this is good but it's it's still not not not what you call it you are so they're looking for better things so in terms of things that are actually far enough along that they might actually show up at the hospital soon what are we looking at well actually some of these are in hospitals some as being tested there and some under what's called the compassionate use our emergency use one is called convalescent plasma this is plasma that's taken from patients who have gotten sick with covert nineteen and then recovered and their blood or their plasma is fall of the antibodies that help them recover from the disease and so if you take their plasma and give it to somebody who's sick the hope is that that will help them get better and and this is actually being used in other infectious diseases and it and it does work to some degree and then I mentioned there are other things that are being tested maybe aren't actually being used in hospitals yet what else is actually comprised mainly not routinely used in hospitals well one is an anti viral so ren disappears is a drug that blocks the ability of the virus replicates so is this drug with the terrific name of he I. D. D. two eight oh one it was developed at Emory University and it's now being marketed by a bridge back bio therapeutics and marked the big pharmaceutical company has joined in and the and that says to me at least that they see great promise there it's being tested in clinical trials in the U. K. and it seems to be showing great promise it's also shown to work at least in animal studies previously with the sars which was also a corona virus caused illness and so there's hope that it might work there right it means that the question on all of our minds this is for treatment that might be ready and ready soon what else you keeping your eye on well actually there is something called a monoclonal antibody which is a synthetic version of the antibodies that our bodies make and there is one monoclonal antibody that's already begun testing in humans there are others that are coming along very soon there are more than a dozen others that are coming in these are drugs that have been used to treat other human diseases and they actually do look quite promising in animal studies and they're anxious to try the more eager to try them in humans as

Returning to Work on the New York Subway? Here’s What You Need to Know

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:59 sec | Last month

Returning to Work on the New York Subway? Here’s What You Need to Know

"As the city of New York gets back to work starts to and people start to get back on subway cars the MTA is taking extra steps up cleaning the trains down to a science at several yards like this one in corona queens dreams go through what looks like a giant car wash now a pilot program is looking at the logistics of using UV C. light to kill viruses and germs inside a train and a New York City transit chief mechanical officer John Santa Maria says the services would get wiped down and then the lights would go on to pile it will help us determine how to best set up the fleet on a shot by shot basis to figure out the most efficient way to go through this process on a nightly basis so far they've figured out how to use it on a whole train in thirty minutes the plan is to make that happen system wide as soon as possible a Columbia University study determined the light is effective at killing the sars COB to virus infected so intense people need to clear out of the car while it's in use you can't see the light but a separate flashing light indicates that it's on Sonia Rincon ten ten wins in corona queens

New York MTA John Santa Maria Sonia Rincon Corona Queens Officer Columbia University
Coronavirus May Be a Blood Vessel Disease, Which Explains Everything

Cyber Talk Radio

03:16 min | 2 months ago

Coronavirus May Be a Blood Vessel Disease, Which Explains Everything

"Story the corona virus pandemic is still with us and we'll cover it nineteen was initially thought to be a respiratory disease many of the symptoms have another thing in common poor blood circulation and blood vessel damage forty percent of deaths from corona virus related to cardiovascular complications for more on how this disease is starting to look like a vascular infection instead of a purely respiratory one we'll speak to Dana Smith senior writer at elemental I mean it's a really bizarre infection and I want to be clear you know it's definitely still in fact in the long people do still have pneumonia like we initially thought they did but like you said there's a lot of really bizarre other symptoms that have emerged things like strokes and blood clots a lot of cardiovascular complications that you don't typically see with a normal respiratory disease fell if I merge and I laugh mother Jill that it could be that the virus is not only affecting fell in the longer the respiratory tract but also infecting blood vessel cells and that's really unique not many buyers to do that and we don't think there's any other respiratory viruses apparently know that did it all felt felt the original hardwired influenza viruses don't infected blood vessel cells so it's really unique for Kobe to the novel coronavirus in particular and it could explain a lot of these really strange and really deadly complications that we're seeing so let's talk a little bit about how it progresses through the body sars Kobe to go through the body and connects to these AC E. two receptors that are usually in the nose and throat and from there what happens it can start destroying some lung tissue and it can break open some blood vessels and then it started catching to all these other cells that have to do with the blood vessels are called endothelial cells and and then it creates this immune response and then everything starts going haywire but it seems that all these other side effects seem to be kind of coming from the blood vessel problems we know that it could be to get them out of Iraq have to latch on to these these two receptors and there a few weeks after the all through your nose in your respiratory tract in your long thank you all for your body there the company and have been there some even in the brain and they're also on the bloodbath well we think that just like we've always thought about the virus gets into the body through the nose and throat which is why you still need to wash your hands don't touch your face the boy being around people who are coughing all the standard recommendations are critical it's still the same with this new development but we still get infected through the respiratory tract and then the virus travels down into the long wait is still causing damage and and ammonia but then the unique part is the final step where it does actually get into the blood vessel felt still activating on the H. two receptors on the bloodbath without editor there it can travel everywhere in the body and for that but you start being these really bizarre things that would like to call the toes that people are talking about that could be a problem with circulation all the way to you're good at your fingers and toes it's why you start being of the blood clot it's why risk being potentially damaging the intestines and the liver and the kidneys really furious diseases because a lot of information and can cause organ has shut down to the part of the body's overactive immune response which is what we thought was happening with Kobe nineteen to begin with and that still could be the case but the evidence is mounting that there's this kind of other route that the virus is using two is fast and caused damages other organs that

Coronavirus: WHO Warns Against Complacency

Markley and Van Camp

00:45 sec | 2 months ago

Coronavirus: WHO Warns Against Complacency

"World Health Organization warns against complacency is coronavirus restrictions are being lifted more from correspondent Jim Roope sars kovi to the virus that causes covert nineteen is an opportunity when the virus has an opportunity it can transmit readily the WHO's coronavirus technically Dr Maria ventricle says a hallmark of corona virus is its ability to amplify health officials warn of a second to spike of the outbreak if people don't comply with physical distancing and face coverings guide the virus will take that opportunity scenes of crowds gather to close no face coverings she says this is the opportunity the virus needs to make another run adding as restrictions are lifted it is imperative we continue to practice the measures that have made it possible to have restrictions lifted

World Health Organization Dr Maria Ventricle Jim Roope
Hong Kong leader says security law not a threat to freedoms

America's Morning News

02:21 min | 2 months ago

Hong Kong leader says security law not a threat to freedoms

"Hong Kong's leader says national security legislation proposed by China's legislature won't threaten the semi autonomous territory civil rights despite widespread criticism of the move as encroachment on freedom of speech and assembly chief executive Carrie lam telling reporters Tuesday that there's no need to worry over the move due for approval by the ceremonial national people's Congress a lot of questions about protests in Hong Kong sar vibrancy and the coal values in terms of the rule of law the independence of the judiciary various rights and freedoms enjoyed by people will continue to be that because when you supposed to the ICCPR off all these international confidence do also contrasts and I meet the need for national security civil rights and freedoms are not absolute if we want to protect the majority of the people down if a minority of the people indeed a very small minority of people are going to breach the mall to organize and participate in terrorist activities to subvert the state power then of course they have to be by the need to registration Hong Kong has over ten thousand public folder he rants every year when a figure that I quoted whenever I go out to meet with international business community that that is the proof of Hong Kong's vibrancy and respect for rights and freedoms protest itself is an expression of freedoms and rights and opinions if it is done in a legal way okay you must observe the law everybody has a right to observe for little so it is it is just not reasonable for you to ask me to guarantee that a certain type of protest will be would be allowed another type will not be allowed us to depend on the circumstances and whether it has been done in the legal action I could not comment when the little is yet to be dropped China's move to pass the legislation signals the government's determination to take greater control after months of pro democracy protests

Hong Kong China Carrie Lam Congress Chief Executive
Moderna Presents LAUGHABLE Interim Vaccine Data. Verastem Shows Mixed Success in Solid Tumors

Breaking Biotech

05:30 min | 2 months ago

Moderna Presents LAUGHABLE Interim Vaccine Data. Verastem Shows Mixed Success in Solid Tumors

"So God pretty exciting show for everybody and glad be back. I know I'm doing back to back week episodes but I wanted to talk about this before. Lasko comes which is going to be next week. So we're going to touch on bare. Stem Oncology is the main company and also GonNa Touch on the major news that we heard the interim phase one data that came earlier this week because it is definitely interesting stuff so with that. I do want to thank everybody for joining me today and I wanted to give a shout out from a donor adviser ready to check out the Biotech plays I appreciate all the support that everybody's giving me there and they're actually pretty engaged. I know there's a few. Biotech focused separates out there. But I think biotech plays actually has the most amount of people who are engaged in willing to to talk about different companies so checkout biotech plays and Yana appreciate everybody who shares my videos on there so with that. Let's get right into it and the first thing I want to talk about today is modern. So what we heard on Monday. Believe rate at the bell was that they announced positive interim phase one data for its Rene Vaccine Twelve seventy three against the novel corona buyers. I know this is a big wall tax but the details are very important here so going to read a couple of paragraphs we'll break it down. But they said that immunogenetics data are currently available for the twenty five microgram and Hundred. Microgram dose level after two doses. Day Forty three and at the two hundred and fifty microgram level after one dose day. Twenty nine dose dependent increases in immunogenetics. Where seen across all three dose levels and between prime and boost within the twenty five microgram and hundred microgram dose levels all participants aged eighteen fifty five fifteen per cohort across all three doses. Ciro converted by date fifteen a single dose so just to keep everyone up to speed here across all these three dose levels are saying that between baseline and after a single dose patients went from antibody negative to antibody positive. Now we don't know what the sensitivity is of the essay or anything like that our saying is that all of these patients became positive for certain antibodies. Now they go on at day forty-three two weeks following second does at the twenty five microgram dose level levels of binding. Antibodies were at the level seen in convalescence Sarah which are blood samples taken from people who've recovered from covid nineteen tested in the same essay at day. Forty three at the hundred microgram dose level levels of binding Antibi- significantly exceeded levels seen in convalescence Sarah. So I put three stars here just to make a call out to the actual clinical trials dot Gov page which showed that the secondary objective in this trial was to evaluate the immunogenetics city as measured by Immunoglobulin g enzyme late immunised orbin assay or the long version of Liza to the spurs co two s spike protein following a two dose vaccination schedule of Amarnath twelve. Seventy three a day fifty seven. So this is what they're referring to is the levels of IGIEA that are specifically in response to the SARS cove to spike protein. Now a couple issues with this study in and of itself to the first thing that stands out is we're only given descriptive character of what's going on in these patients were not being shown actual data and you know just from the outset. That's pretty pretty sketchy. And they're also comparing the levels that they signed their study to level seen convalescent Sarah but as we know convalescent Sarah varies widely in the levels of IGGI and the timing also matters quite a lot too so they omitted all of that stuff. And it would have been great to actually see how it compares to convalesce and Sarah is the timing similar from which the code infection stopped a lot of those details just completely omitted from this. The other thing is that the nature of the elisas against the G. For the SARS COKE TO SPIKE PROTEIN. The specificity and sensitivity varies quite a bit between these different asses. And we also don't really know how cross reactive their ass a was two different serves cove spike proteins. So as we all know there's a variety of different krona viruses out there and we all might have some antibodies that could be cross reacted in these assets. And we just don't know if that happens to be the case here. The fact that they compared baseline to after the injections. Kinda suggests to me that there is some increase in antibodies. Here but it would have been nice to see more details which were completely omitted in this. And the other thing is just because you ciro converted. That doesn't necessarily mean you have protection against the coronavirus. So that's what they looked at in the second part when they talk about neutralizing antibody so to touch on that they say at this time. Neutralizing antibody data are available. Only for the first four participants in each of the twenty five microgram and Hundred Milligram Dose Level. Cohorts they go on consistent with the binding antibody. Data emanate twelve seventy three vaccination elicited neutralizing antibodies in all eight of these participants as measured by Placard Action Neutralization Assays Against Live. Sars coke to the levels of neutralizing antibodies today. Forty-three were at or above levels. Generally seen in convalescent Sarah

Sarah Ciro Lasko Stem Oncology Yana Corona Spurs
"sars" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

13:59 min | 2 months ago

"sars" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office Public Health Preparedness and Response and he was Deputy Act and acting director of the National Center for Zoonotic vector-borne and Enteric Diseases many positions he held at the CDC for quite some time. Dr Cohn has been around the world chasing viruses and trying to tamp out outbreaks and we WANNA learn from his experience about why we took the missteps in this country that we did with the COVID. The novel Cova Corona Virus outbreak. Now Dr Con- you were telling us about your experience in two thousand three in Singapore and how the detail with which the Singaporean government decided to basically do you were effectively talking about contact tracing down to looking at receipts from taxi drivers seats from taxi drivers looking at their credit card statements and then once they quarantine people how they updated it again for the twenty first century they would put cameras in people's homes and randomly call them in the morning and the evenings to and then that would give them a certain time window to connect to the. Webcam and make sure that they were there. So they They updated everything for the twenty first century while I guess at that point was the twentieth century at to make sure that the quarantine these quarantine in isolation measures and their affective. They were very effective And they got their outbreak under control but the bigger point. Besides updating isolation quarantine was that they stuck to their strategy despite the setbacks they had during the course of that outbreak with these unexpected unexpected cases occurring in markets and and taxicabs and other places. Okay so As with so many of of the conversations that I've had in the past couple of months we have the luxury of looking back on history But I'm wondering if you could actually put us squarely in terms of what you were thinking and feeling in that moment in early in two thousand and three when you were in Singapore. Was there ever a time where you were wondering if the efforts that you were helping with? Would they work? Wouldn't they work? Were there moments of uncertainty or absolutely. There were numerous moments of uncertainty. So when I got there at the moment of uncertainty resolved around. How do you identify who infected whom within hospitals a so Sars coronavirus one. A you become more infectious. Has You became As you progressed in your illness so that disease was mainly transmitted within healthcare settings so there was a challenge to try to understand who you are infecting within the hospital so there was uncertainty there that we could capture everybody who was sick because then you had to go. Look for all the visitors into the hospital than if you'd left the hospital and went to another hospital so eventually Singapore Jab tracking that down. Then the next big point of uncertain became when we saw this large Number of cases that occurred in a market that was completely unexpected with no link backed with digital cases. Bats what we would call community transmission Would be the term that people would recognize And that was very disheartening. But again the a Singaporean. Public health authorities just worked right through it instead. Okay we're GONNA take each. And every one of these cases find their contacts and keep going about our business And they did. And despite the uncertainty and And I remember that day was very disheartening for everybody but Couple of weeks later they got all of those under control again and I can i. You know those days when I thought about you know now. In retrospect I think about that day in Singapore would all those cases. I'm sure that's my in South Korea Felt when they opened up South Korea couple of weeks ago and then they had one individual who caused about two hundred cases around five nightclubs. So I'm sure they felt the exact same way when all of a sudden they thought they were on the right track and they had this you know blossoming of cases around a single individual. Wow so there are so many details about this SARS experience that you had that we could dive into but I am constrained by time Dr Console. So let's fast forward a tiny bit you you you you you help the Singaporean government in the midst of that SARS outbreak. You saw the successes that they had in two thousand three you come back to the United States. You're you're at the CDC AT THIS TIME. Did you come back and say wow? I Willard a whole lot. And here's what we need to do in the United States. What what do you think the most important lessons that you learned that you wanted the? Us to to vigorously incorporate in terms of its public health responses to emerging diseases so one of the main lessons we learnt at during the SARS outbreak. A couple let me go through some of them So the SARS outbreak was one of the best reminders. We ever had was about how air travel can rapidly move disease worldwide. And this all has to do with this wonderful thing called an incubation period and the incubation period which almost every movie ignores is the time you get infected to the time you manifest disease and this incubation period always protected us when you needed to get on a boat go from Point A. Point B. Because by the time you got to wherever you were going you knew you were infected. That doesn't work with airplanes because the time it takes to fly from London to New York is less than the time it takes for you to sort of incubate that disease so you can show up in New York City from Milan and then three days later manifest your disease so the SARS outbreak made that very clear and taught us a lot about what it means to screen people at Borders Because you'RE NOT GONNA pick up everybody of this incubation period. It also taught us something about super spreading events. Which is the sort of even though we talk about this covid nineteen causing maybe two to three additional cases for each individual. There are some individuals where you can see fifteen twenty fifty one hundred cases around that individuals. These are called super spreading events. A those are very problematic in this disease and needs to be considered as you think about mass gathering and other events on what the implications of those are and it told us we need to be careful about thinking about these diseases generally because there wasn't just SARS there's also another related disease called Moore's In the Arabian Peninsula. That proved that has proved problematic for them. And they've and they've had cases in South Korea of Mars so and then the other piece is this robust public health response that's required by countries and globally right. Those are the lessons that we took away from that outbreak that we try to bake into our system so when my last jobs at CDC was ensuring that the US was prepared for all public health threats whether they were natural or man-made and we tried incorporate that into our planning processes but going back to the ax in the display case We have always funded public health than preparedness with sense on the dollar compared to our healthcare and we see that playing out now which is that we have failed to fully support and fund. Cdc In state and local public health departments. Yeah well so Dr. Khan I keep thinking about The book that you wrote the next pandemic in two thousand sixteen And you go into a lot of detail about Not just what you learn for example regarding SARS but you have a basically what amounts to list of things that we needed to do or must continuously do not just not just occasionally but continuously due to be ready for these kinds of global disasters and the reason. I don't mean to laugh because this is not funny but it just does it almost. Maybe that's just like my my kind of reaction of disbelief. When I read the list of things that you were writing about years ago right the monetary of actually viruses in the field in the wild if we can systems to produce diagnostic tests very fast and in huge numbers surge capacity in our healthcare system. Smarter supply chains for P. P. Ventilators et Cetera et coordination from local state federal international level. I mean it's like a list of all of the things you could check them off of the things that did not happen in two thousand twenty so you talk about a failure of imagination. I mean is it more. That almost seems a little generous is more that we had A. We went through a deliberate act of ignorance from our own experience. We clearly have despite a long history of emerging infectious diseases and pandemic so know. Two thousand seven Two thousand nine at the h one n one pandemic so we've had experiences with emerging infectious diseases in and a and a mild to moderate influenza pandemic in the US we have failed to take those lessons too hard to make sure we built robust public health systems and the comment about healthcare systems is on a one of the things that I had the honour of helping put together while I was at. Cdc with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation was a numeric metric of how prepared the United States was and one the lowest indicators in that was healthcare system there nece and the thing that got us in trouble with. This outbreak was healthcare system preparedness. So it's not like we didn't know where the is worth that needed to be fixed That would have helped during this outbreak. Well so I was just digging through Some older Actually through the war Robert where Web Robert Wood Johnson website. Because of the work that you had done with them and it's really really interesting because I think back in twenty thirteen In the summer of twenty thirteen you you they had sponsored a congressional briefing that you attended and at that time You had said by every measure. Our nation is dramatically better prepared for public health threats than they were. And you outlawed outlines some things that were going on. Cdc that the showed that that stronger public health preparedness. What changed between then and now. I don't think anything changed. I mean every year our preparedness has improved in the US. The problem is the level of preparedness has never gotten to attend so Okay our current preparedness in the. Us is like a six point. Seven on the numerical scale we developed so we had gone up. I think from six point three to six point four to six point five over the years I was there. So we were making incremental baby step changes And improving our systems. But we still have a long way to go. Does that make sense? Yes it does. And thank you for that clarification. Because it it's I suppose the reason why why I asked you that Dr is for someone like you and your colleagues former your current colleagues Nebraska former colleagues at the CDC colleagues worldwide who studied who are in the World of epidemiology and infectious diseases. This do you feel a sense of frustration heartbreak? Now about how We were. We still had a ways to go in preparedness and even though we knew how to get there as a nation this nation. We didn't do it. It's it's impossible not to feel a sense. Sense of frustration. Does ninety thousand Americans have died so far so you have to feel a sense of frustration and heartbreak at at what's happened. I mean each and every one of those is the tragic death than it's not you know you don't know what could have happened especially given hindsight but Yes of there is a sense of frustration and I know even during my time at CDC that while there was a lots of support for preparedness activities following nine eleven some additional support when there was concern about avian influenza potential avian influenza outbreak in two thousand five six and seven you know when there's not this looming threat directly there. You know dollars fall off to supply to support preparedness activities in state and local health departments and also state and local officials have responsibility to support their own state and local health departments. So I hope if nothing else people realize that they need to do this. And not just for the next endemic even for this current pandemic. We need to strengthen our public health departments to help us get these cases down into the teens. Yeah.

CDC United States SARS Disease Control and Prevention South Korea Singaporean government Singapore Dr Cohn Dr Con COVID acting director National Center for Zoonotic v Dr Console Arabian Peninsula Nebraska P. P. Ventilators
"sars" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

03:00 min | 3 months ago

"sars" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Cases in the state the team identified a sars co viewed mutation that's never been found before work eighty one of the letters have vanished permanently deleted from the genome one of the reasons why this mutation is one of interest is because it kind of mirrors what happened in two thousand three with the severe acute respiratory syndrome the first sars outbreak remember that that would just kinda went away the article published on Tuesday said researchers noted that during the middle in late phases of the sars epidemic mutations scientists believe that a weakened virus that causes less severe disease that may have a selective advantage if it's able to spread through populations by people who are unknowingly infected which it seems like a lot of that's happening now anyway yeah we know without question viruses mutate sometimes they mutate rapidly sometimes they mutate slowly he refers to the process as the physical phenomenon now we've seen innumerable epidemics sars in two thousand two and three swine flu in two thousand nine what we know what happens and sometimes they just fizzle out despite people running around saying the sky is falling the sky is falling and it doesn't happen explaining the two things happen the virus does mutate such that the very Dylan's decreases one is good it's not going to be as lethal it's not going to be as severe as the thing that's bad is you might have more commonly a community transmission and what you end up is exactly what we saw with sars three four years after the crisis we saw that people had if you will antibodies to them and yeah the epidemic just fizzled now we have studies showing five six seven years later that people still had antibodies against the sars that's actually good news well okay we can only hope right about eleven before the hour and we'll get back to your calls just ahead then some other industry headlines coming up would you believe that there are actually industry headlines involving the coveted how could that be yeah we'll get to those coming.

sars Dylan
"sars" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

15:29 min | 3 months ago

"sars" Discussed on Ideas

"And Sirius Xm with the enwright files. I'm NOLA I. Few Infectious Diseases Inspires much fear and dread as Ebola in twenty fourteen. An Ebola outbreak killed thousands in the west African nations of Liberia. Sierra Leone and Guinea those countries were in turmoil. Their healthcare systems were pushed beyond the breaking point and their economies were in tatters. Fear drove the response and much of the affluent world. Political leaders called for Western countries to shut their borders to west Africa. Something experts said would likely worsen an already dangerous and destabilizing public health crisis in globalized world. One thing that would have kept the world safer from terrifying public health. Crises like Ebola would have been investing in the public healthcare systems in the developing world. Dr James Are. Bensky is one of the world's top experts in global public health. He was the international president of doctors. Without Borders when it won the Nobel Peace Prize in nineteen ninety nine. He is an officer of the order of Canada when I interviewed him in November twenty fourteen. He was a professor of medicine at the Dalla. Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto. Here is that conversation. How do you contend with the argument driven? Perhaps by fear that Ebola is only an airplane right away from Texas or auto or Winnipeg. We've seen in the last few weeks There is some truth to that But there's also truth to the fact that epidemics have very particular dynamics and it's absolutely vital to understand the dynamic of a particular epidemic and to respond appropriately to achieve containment a control and mitigation of the epidemic. If you don't do that Then the natural course of an epidemic spread and so the reality is that two of the dynamics that are really important. Our fear and panic one must understand the nature of fear understand the nature of panic and respond appropriately and that's not simply fear and panic outside of West Africa. It's also in panic inside West Africa. But how how did Nigeria examined Senegal? They've managed to contain right and even end their their bricks. Yeah so Nigeria. I think is a very good example of what is necessary And what is sorely lacking in much of the developing world and particularly in this particular case and in the three countries. Liberia Sierra Leone and Guinea when the epidemic emerged in Nigeria. It first of all was in two separate. Travelers who were essentially members of the elite class of society. One was a diplomat was a businessman very quickly. The infrastructure of formal and informal of Nigeria was mobilized to first of all identify a problem secondly respond appropriately with containment an isolation and thirdly to engage in what's called an active case finding so they have the infrastructure that well they had an infrastructure and most importantly they had strong leadership capacity and the exercise that leadership they also had expertise so the WHO was already in Nigeria and had been present for a number of years working on polio eradication and on Guinea worm that capacity was in country and was just shifted to deal with the Abo- la outbreak and so those essential principles are the vital elements of a viable Public Health Response. Whether that's local or whether it's global but you said in that explanation that Nigeria specifically had the wherewithal to deal with one read you a quote from one of your colleagues former colleagues. I think in mid says some frontier doctor from Windsor who's been treating Ebola in Liberia and he told Maclean's magazine the following we are overwhelmed. Our resources are stretched to the limit. We need to double our staff right here right now. That doesn't seem to me that you can get any worse. Don't resource. What what it illustrates is the the limits of a charitable response to a major public health crisis as opposed to a government as as opposed to a government and multilateral government response you cannot rely simply on goodwill goodwill is a necessary starting point but it also requires appropriate resources appropriate infrastructure appropriate personnel. And to be clear. I'm not speaking for MS up here server. Msf is a charitable organization with enormous capacity. Enormous skill. Developed in fact the protocols around Containment control mitigation of a bowl. But it's a charity. It's a group of people who freely come together to focus on humanitarian. It is not a state it does not have legal mandate and responsibility to pursue protect promote the public health. And so in the face of an epidemic of this kind of this scale it must be state based responsibility and response that deals with the reality of the epidemic but isn't the real the also that the international community has been relying at initially anyway on NGOs like MSF to deal with the crisis if it is a global threat. Why doesn't that Paradigm Change? Why doesn't read governments in countries and UN? And everybody involved. Well when it shows us is that this is a major governance deficit a black hole if you will in our global governance architecture and system. It's a crisis that can become an opportunity in the sense that if we carefully analyze the causes and conditions of the particular crisis carefully analyzed the deficits that led to the crisis. We can actually begin to imagine And then to construct a proper global public health architecture. You've worked all over Africa. Can you give me a sense? Like a survey sense of what kind of medical infrastructure there are in these countries much of the developing world. I would characterize in terms of health as policy rich in that capacity poor So there's lots of good thinking. There's lots of good analysis. There's lots of good understanding of the nature of both clinical need and of public health Needs now that generalization made there's a great degree of variability across the developing world. So there are certain pockets. For example South Africa has a highly developed clinical and public health system there are deficits of course but relative to other developing world Middle Income Countries South Africa is extremely well developed The same could be said for Ghana for Indonesia for Thailand for example but the low income countries have in fact the lowest capacity for the forty eight low income countries. They spend on average between eleven and fifteen dollars per year per person on health care in Ontario. We spend somewhere between thirty five hundred and forty three hundred per person per year. Now that should tell you everything about what kind of capacity you get for eleven bucks. What we're seeing in west Africa is that that public health infrastructure is simply not there. It's not there insufficient form to deal with this particular issue. And then the failure to recognize the gravity of of the epidemic has led to a kind of a cascade effect throughout the system so that the health systems are on. The verge of collapse or have already collapsed. And so you're seeing now for example massive increases in malaria quite apart from a bowl because people can't get treatment many of the hospitals and clinics are abandoned. Healthcare workers. Aren't going to work. Because they're afraid like everybody else. And there isn't an appropriate support system for them. Basic surgical needs Are Not you know? Cases being met and so on and so on and so on but when you read stories Jim how they they don't have the right kind of gloves or the right kind of masks or things. That are so elementary to us. We throw away. I don't know how thing a situation that could arise unless the world just doesn't give a damn well. I think it's a good question. We come to a point here with this particular epidemic and it really calls into question The very nature of our relationship to others and the degree to which we care or don't care and also calls into stark focus the interdependence within which we exist and the real kind of necessary caring the wise self interest if you will that lies at route to a future viable global public health system can't separate needs over there from Needs over here or needs over there that that become potential threats over over here to Bricusse is a disease that we've human beings have lived with for Millennia every year. There are nine million new cases of tuberculosis around the world and now tuberculosis is completely treatable and infectious disease. One point nine million people still die of TB every year now because as a human society we have failed to actually treat those people with tuberculosis. And because there's such high morbidity and mortality associated with it there's now emergence of multiple drug resistant tuberculosis these emerge because of poorly or partially treated Tiburcio service. And so now. We have a five hundred thousand cases every every year of multiple drug resistant to work. If you get 'em dart as it's called eighty percent of the people who who get MDR TB aren't even detected and don't get treatment of the twenty percent who do get treatment only half will live and treatment itself is extremely difficult. It's like chemotherapy for cancer. And it's a twenty four month period and leaves people with hearing loss with kidney failure with with all sorts of other potential side effects to the treatment. Now that is a direct consequence of failing to treat to Bricusse that the cost of treatment for MD. Rtp is about four thousand dollars for the full treatment course the cost of treatment for regular TB is forty to sixty dollars a couple of weeks ago. We had on the program a doctor working with the Gates Foundation and she works in the area. Ntd neglected tropical diseases and there are thirty or forty of them or something rather than she was explaining them and then she said of course you know. We could cure these diseases for fifty cents a year per person. In many cases we actually have the treatments. We actually have the technologies what was lacking is the health system and the public health system to actually properly identify treat and support people through the course of therapy when a health care system is stretched beyond capacity to deal with crisis. What does that do to our country in terms of the economy? The government's social unrest. Have you seen countries almost brought to their knees because of well in in the early part of the twenty first century there were several African countries wearing their leaders had declared that their nations are on the verge of collapse because of HIV now with a massive international movement to gain access to treatment for HIV that situation for those countries and for many others around the world has radically changed. There's no question that there are highly significant threats to national stability and as being a good example of that And the reverberations of that effect through the public sector through the private sector through the military orders and then potentially beyond borders in my view. It self evident that if if you don't deal with with the bushfire then it's going to spread. It's that simple again. A public health issue like Turkey losses or Bulla is a call to action a call to see the nature of the problem and to deal with it effectively. How you view responding to that call. We still don't yet have in my opinion appropriate. Strong clear political leadership on this epidemic. We still at a point where we're using in my view. A kind of charitable mindset but among nation states which who wants to give or to donate a certain amount of money or send a certain treatment clinic or support a certain region. There isn't a clear political imperative that has been acted upon to appropriately. Engage the measures that are necessary to to contain and control the mitigate the epidemic. Even though there's been a Security Council resolution on this well why don't we have that we have the World Health Organization under its number? Don't we have nation states saying here's what we're doing and we're going to give this amount of money this number of resources we do. We certainly do and we also have the usual practice that follows the grand and glorious declarations. You know that so much is pledged to not quite enough is delivered. We live With a series of post World War Two United Nations Institutions Bretton Woods institutions that have adopted very particular norms of practice in terms of dealing with crisis and those norms are practice are no longer appropriate in situations of this kind one of the provisions of the Charter that was never actually exercised was the creation of a standing force to deal with threats to International Security. And so at this point they're still a kind of a donation mentality among nation states Toward issues of this kind. But what is the ACLU DHS those pathways of getting the resources and material in the money to the People? Who Need it? It's just that there isn't an appropriate pipeline to deal with problems of this kind. It's akin now what we have to instead of a pipeline bringing the the resources there. We have a bunch of people running around feeling buckets running along the road to bring the water to the necessary people who are trying to put out the fire. That's no longer appropriate. We need to build. Those pipelines is the World Health Organization up to the task. Well you know. The World Health Organization does great things. The World Health Organization however like so many multilateral institutions has been functionally limited. Its budget is four billion dollars. A year of that four billion one billion mandatory and is made by contributions by member states..

World Health Organization epidemic Nigeria Liberia west Africa Guinea Lana School of Public Health Sierra Leone Msf Ebola Sirius West Africa tuberculosis Africa Bricusse international president Bensky
"sars" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:20 min | 3 months ago

"sars" Discussed on KCRW

"And the original sars virus the trump administration recently cut funding for research project into possible natural origins of the virus Geoff Brumfiel NPR news Washington the US army's top leaders are defending their choice to hold a graduation ceremony for west point graduates they were sent home because of the pandemic as NPR's David welna reports the June thirteenth graduation was announced after president trump said he would be the commencement speaker even though a west point instructor was recorded telling prospective graduates that as many as sixty percent of the may test positive for corona virus army secretary Ryan McCarthy says their graduation is still on will conduct the ceremony much like the Air Force Academy did on April eighteenth in honoring completion of their forty seven month journey to enter the army ranks including at this unprecedented time for our country and west point superintendent lieutenant general Darryl Williams says all the returning cadets will first be tested for covert nineteen we'll do it safely and for all the parents and threats that are out there watching right now we're gonna take care of them Williams would not say whether any cadets who don't return will be disciplined David welna NPR news the presumptive democratic presidential nominee former vice president Joe Biden is scheduled to respond this morning to a sexual assault allegation he is accused by a former Senate staffer terror Reid of assault in nineteen ninety three by his campaign has denied the allegations reed's brother a former neighbor and a friend have told NPR that she told them the story in the nineteen nineties this is NPR president trump has declared that may is older Americans month he's signed a proclamation and the White House has listed steps the administration is taking to protect senior citizens against the corona virus but this comes about as half of US states are starting to re open their economies Johns Hopkins University says that well over one million people have been diagnosed here with the virus the code nineteen death toll has increased to more than sixty three thousand people in Lebanon protesters are gathering for Labor Day demonstrations after a week of tension and fear as Alice Fordham reports many people's anger is directed against banks across the country banks have been targeted with Molotov cocktails and rocks in the post week some branches have been destroyed dozens of people injured and one young man killed Lebanon is in a dire financial crisis which stems from a collapse of the banking sector on Thursday the prime minister has India announced the country would seek ten billion dollars in assistance from the International Monetary Fund he promised a structural reforms but the value of the Lebanese Lehrer has already more than hard against the dollar and many people are suffering Alice Fordham and peonies Beirut officials in stock car racing say that NASCAR will return from its corona virus shut down NASCAR will run seven races this month but no fans will be allowed to attend events all of the races will be held at Darlington Raceway in South Carolina or Charlotte motor speedway in North Carolina where many of NASCAR's teams have a base there will be social distancing rules I'm korva Coleman NPR news support for NPR comes from NPR.

"sars" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

Mayo Clinic Talks

10:50 min | 3 months ago

"sars" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

"Welcome to Mayo Clinic Cumin. I Dr Halima Gesellschaft up a new serology test for covert nineteen has been developed and is now in use by clinic laboratories. We're willing to discuss that today. Serology testing can identify those who have had an immune response to the saw ours. Covy chew virus meaning that they have been infected with cove in nineteen and have now recovered and are producing. Antibodies in their system. Here to discuss this with us. Today is the director of Male Clinics Infectious Disease Serology Laboratory. Dr Eliot feel. Welcome Dr Phil. Thank you happy to be here while. It's wonderful to have you here with us today. We're learning so much by doing these interviews and I am certainly enjoying them. I'm wondering if you can tell us here so much about testing in the news but not really. What kind could you tell our listeners? With the differences between molecular testing and serology testing. Sure so it's A. It's a significant difference the molecular tests which are typically done off of a swab of the nose or the throat detect genetic material of the virus and that indicates that the viruses actually bear and is likely causing the patient's symptoms on the other hand Sheer logic testing detects a patient's immune response to the virus vice specifically looking for antibodies which attach and essentially inactivate or kill the virus in their a major component of how we fight off really any infectious disease These antibodies take time to develop and become detectable by these antibody tests. And timing really depends on the type of antibody were detecting whether it's an eye. Gm or an I G A G type. Antibody can take anywhere from days to weeks for that response to develop. Why is it so important for us to know who has had the virus recovered from well? So who's developed an immune response to the virus is really an important component of our public health response to this and make allowing us to better understand the transmission characteristics knowing how many individuals have actually been infected versus Who maybe didn't develop symptoms and how this percentage of individuals changes over time and then on a more a patient by patient basis and important component of this year logic tests is identifying individuals. Who HAVE ANTIBODIES TO STARS KOBE? To would make them eligible to donate plasma which can then be administered to sick individuals to help fight off the infection so there's a few Utilization Perspectives that. We can consider when thinking about your logic. Testing looks great. And they also discuss it in reference to reopening the country and allowing stay at home orders to be lifted. Can you describe how serologic testing might help those efforts? So that's a great question as there's really been a lot of interest at the local in state level and the national level for using SIR logic testing to guide. Return to work activities on initiatives and. I think it's a really intriguing idea but nonetheless. We need to exercise some caution with how he used this testing so while. I think it's likely true that these individuals that are positive for antibodies to stars. Covy to or or to Kobe. Nineteen while I think they're likely at lower risk for reinfection compared to an antibody negative individual. We still really don't understand or know the level or the duration of protective immunity That these antibodies give us so I think antibody tests will ultimately be another tool for risk management and risk assessment as we develop plans to get everyone back to work But right now given what we know I would be cautious against relying solely on a sheer logic test result to guide these decisions And these recommendations. All of us have watched the news. And seeing these testing centers in the big swabs that are being put in the back of people's noses to test and even president trump has talked about his own testing in that it was unpleasant. How IS SEROLOGY TESTING? Done? And is it similar to the other testing? It's quite different sociologic. Testing is typically done off a blood sample. Most of the tests require a routine Vena puncture be done on some of the tests out there do say that it can be done off of finger stick whole blood so it depends on the test here at Mayo Clinic. our tests that we're using all require serum to be collected and then the serum is tested using what we call or what are called enzyme-linked immunosorbent essays or or Lila's these tests. Take about three to four hours to complete but they can process about ninety samples At a time and that can be done entirely on an automated instrument or platform Which makes this sort of testing really attractive for high throughput Type Laboratory. While there's something amazing so how many tests can he Laboratory like what we have at the Mayo Clinic. Perform on a daily basis So right now we actually have a testing capacity of approximately ten thousand antibody tests per day Between our internal Mayo Clinic practice and the External Mayoclinic Reference Laboratory. So that's quite a lot In really I think as the need evolves in or increases. We do plan to be able to meet that. Need an increase our testing capacity as appropriate. But just sounds amazing. That's really sounds like a lot of tests. It's a lot more than we usually do. So yes how is Mayoclinic being to work with other medical centres. I'm an assistant with access to serologic testing so great question. So you know there is a few things that we've been doing over the last month. First and foremost were really trying to provide education And ordering guidance as much as possible for these antibody tests you know this is a new virus antibody testing. It's a new type of test and to a certain extent we really had this test available before we knew how best to use it. So providing that educational component I think has been really beneficial to both external medical centers but also for us. Because there's been a lot of Idea exchanges between us and and other clinicians so that's been really beneficial and then also we are physically offering on our test to be order -able by Other medical centers across the across the country. And I think that's really beneficial because it allows those hospitals to focus on providing molecular testing. Which is a much more crucial and essential. Need at the moment cinch does Actually diagnose active infection compared to see your logic testing which tells you yes. This individual has been infected at some point in the past. But it's not really to be used as a diagnostic so that urgency and need for a result is not as great as it is for molecular test. When I was a child I remember hearing guy now knows an old wives tale have going to medical school. But if you've had a virus once you can never get it again. In fact I use this example before but my parents sent me to a girlfriend's house when she had the chicken pox hoping that I would get the chicken pox so that I'd never get it again now. I know the chicken pox in covert nineteen are very distinctly different viruses. But I'm wondering what is known about immunity after someone has been infected with covert nineteen. Yet you know that is really one of the key questions right now. After recovery does an individual have complete or partial immunity to Kobe nineteen eighteen. And so how long does that last to be honest because we really only been dealing with this virus for four or five months? We don't have a good sense of the duration of that protective immunity. That you're talking about I think we can say that based on prior studies during the SARS outbreak in the early two thousands we know that protective immunity against that virus which is closely related to SARS Kobe to that protective immunity seemed to be detectable for about two years after infection. And then there's been some preliminary studies in In monkeys suggesting that they have at least short term immunity one month after recovery of from Kobe. Nineteen as we see more and more information I think there will probably be at least some short term and immunity But we really need more studies in this area before we can make any conclusive comments on the duration of that protection from reinfection. I just have one last question for you because this brought it to mind for me. I saw on the news yesterday. I believe it was that some patients were becoming a according to the news that reinfected with cove in nineteen soon after having a suffered from it is that reinfection or is it just persistence or do we know that yet. Yeah I think I think that's a really important thing that we all need to consider whether this is truly reinfection versus whether we're still detecting residual nucleic acid from these individuals Is is something that we're really learning more about so I think only time will tell to be honest at this point. Thank you very much touch with the owns very informative visiting with Dr led. Today she's the director of our Infectious Disease Serology Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester Minnesota. Thanks so much for being with us today. Thank you Mayo Clinic. Cuna is a production of the Mayo Clinic News Network and is available. Wherever you get and subscribe to your favorite podcasts. To see a list of all male clinic podcasts visit news network DOT Mayoclinic Dot. Org then the PODCASTS. Thanks for listening and be well. We hope you'll offer review of this and other episodes when the option is available comments and questions can also be sent to Mayo Clinic News Network at Mayo Dot Edu..

Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic News Network Male Clinics Infectious Diseas Kobe director Dr Halima Gesellschaft Dr Eliot Dr Phil Infectious Disease Serology La External Mayoclinic Reference SARS Mayoclinic Gm Rochester Minnesota Cuna president
"sars" Discussed on Limitless Mindset

Limitless Mindset

06:53 min | 4 months ago

"sars" Discussed on Limitless Mindset

"Here's why I fear that. Subsequent coming waves of the pandemic may be worse. The Rush Job vaccine that big Pharma rolls out will not be safety or placebo tested. There will be a huge global. Push TO GET ALMOST. Everyone vaccinated many places. The state will totally disregard informed consent. And we'll just force the population to be vaccinated and vaccines tend to Cause Immuno suppression. I linked to some sources on this. This is why you always hear people say I got my yearly flu shot and then I got the flu anyway. I expect that the coming vaccine will work more or less the current flu shots that we have. The evidence indicates that they only work about half the time. But I think that it will work more or less for the current cove nineteen strain but the virus will mutate and the vaccine will render multitudes more vulnerable to the life threatening pulmonary effects of the virus a paper published in the esteemed journal plus one warned that previous SARS coronavirus vaccines resulted in pulmonary. Immuno pathology quote these SARS cove. Vaccines all induced antibody and protection against infection with SARS cove however challenge of mice given any of the vaccines led to occurrence of the T. H. Two type Immuno Path Oji suggesting hyper sensitivity to the SARS. Cove components was induced caution in proceeding to application of a SARS cove vaccine in humans is indicated. And perhaps you're thinking Jonathan don't be a silly conspiratorial Anti Vaccine. Scientists on television are always telling us that vaccines are safe and effective. You have the right to your own opinions but not to your own science. I believe in science. Well I also believe in science but I've read enough to understand that there's a lot of bad science out. There do your best to research science and evaluate the evidence instead of just listening to make up embellished experts on television. But there's a tremendous signal to noise problem in science. We may not all be qualified to understand complicated science but we have the rational capacity to ask Kit Bono who benefits from the science that we are being told to believe and I will quote from Bill Sardi who is an author and researcher. Who's done some great analyses of the effects of vaccines? Here's what he had to say about a coveted nineteen vaccine. Everyone on the planet is expected to hold their breath. Metaphorically speaking and wait for a future vaccine that will buy my predictions end up hospitalizing. Many and leading to hundreds of thousands of high risk individuals like diabetic smokers drinkers and the frail elderly. Lead them to their early demise because these are the people who do not develop sufficient. Antibodies following vaccinations. I penned a prior report EXTRAPOL- extrapolating from published flu studies which predicts that six hence to one point three percent serious side effects after mandated corona virus vaccination. Among the nation's seventy two point six million senior dolt would hospitalize between four hundred and thirty five thousand nine hundred and forty-three thousand and a subsequent one point four mortality rate would then result in fifty four thousand two hundred eleven thousand deaths approximately so. He's looking at the data. That's out there about the incidents of serious side effects and yes mortality that occurs as a result of vaccination we know from the data that the government collects on vaccines because they have a big database. That is actually publicly available. We know that Among infants among children's the vaccinations result in something like four to five hundred deaths every year. So there are more. There is mortality verified mortality that does occur and when they are gonNA force or strongly strongly encourage large large amounts of people that death toll given the proportion of people that are gonNA be mandated or required to receive a vaccine. It's going to be very very high. It's going to be a a death toll. That may totally eclipse what we are seeing with. Cova nineteen so a lot of people are talking also about chloroquine and I expect chloroquine to be demonized in the coming weeks and months because it seems to be a highly effective solution for more serious corona virus cases. And here's the thing. Get this even in the United States where we have higher drug drug costs. It only costs five dollars and thirty cents quite affordable right. Big Pharma will make unprecedented prophets tens if not hundreds of billions of dollars off a corona virus vaccine this year or perhaps next year when they come out with it and every subsequent year as the virus mutates.

Big Pharma SARS flu Bill Sardi chloroquine United States Cova Jonathan Kit Bono T. H. researcher
"sars" Discussed on Limitless Mindset

Limitless Mindset

06:27 min | 4 months ago

"sars" Discussed on Limitless Mindset

"I have not taken these and I hope not too as I have been an implementing all of the natural nutraceutical herbal type bio hacks and they have kept me from getting sick during the Chili Eastern European winter. Here and they've kept my wife very very healthy during this during this chilly time of the year when people tend to get sick however I like to have things like this on hand as a last resort. Just in case me or someone close to me came down with a really nasty case of the flu or was God forbid struggling with Cova nineteen and these are both sold by roof on DOT com. They are both still in stock. But frankly I don't know how long they will be check it out. We've got a rather timely unbought saying this is a package from Rue Pharma in Moscow. And they've sent me river impressive supply. Okay this is a corona virus care package and Vinyl Alexi. Thank you thank you. Thank you Alexi. Placebo choice. Seba does we've got anti SAR. This arbitral Arbil anti SARS medication. And if you're really worried about the current virus especially like if you have to go to hospital in time soon these sorts of items would be in a really smart idea and you can get them from Rue Pharma Dot Com. We've got a third of ice in my. Which is Greek for your eyes. If your if your eyes are strained from binge watching the the scaremongering media about the coming apocalypse one of than we have what these this is reba. Verron remove Aaron. Okay so this is actually HIV AIDS medication and luckily we don't have AIDS. Don't worry guys don't worry. This is in our age story video blog but the revolt there really is what they are using to treat the corona virus cases. So I don't I really don't anticipate that we will contract it so this US orbital which is a potent anti-influenza and anti SARS drug. And as you can see. I've got both the one hundred and two hundred milligram examples of it here and break down a little bit of the science and some of what I was able to dig up on so it was developed in Russia in the nineteen eighties and it can cure and prevent acute respiratory diseases. Including pneumonia and bronchitis is treats chronic bronchitis and pneumonia. Something I found interesting about. Arbitral is according to the researchers that have done the. Meta analyses on this it is effective even against mutated viruses. The mutations are the big concern with for example cove in nineteen people are saying well. They're developing treatments. Maybe they're going to develop a vaccine for the current strain of the virus but what about next year when it when it mutates into something else and what the scientists are saying about it that I find really interesting is that it is universally effective against Aren a viruses because it binds to and inhibits a protein? That is in all our Rene viruses. Apparently it's given to young children pregnant women and even the elderly and it's more effective than Tamiflu. As far as dosage and usage the prevention protocol is two hundred milligrams daily with a treatment duration of ten to fourteen days. And then if you actually had flu the treatment protocol is two hundred milligrams four times a day. So that's once every six hours and you would do that for six days. I looked up the side effects. And to quote from wikipedia no known overdose cases have been reported and allergic reactions are limited to people with hypersensitivity the LD fifty is more than four grams per kilogram and l. d. fifty is a measurement of how much of give drug they need to give to a rat to kill it. You can find on pubmed one hundred and thirty scientific papers on arbitral and also found four recent clinical studies on Arbil as a treatment for corona virus. Here's what I found. From clinical features of sixty nine cases with Corona virus disease and twenty one thousand nine hundred in Wuhan China quote orbital treatment showed tendency to improve the discharging rate and decrease the mortality rate. There are over sixty scientific papers. On orbital's anti influenza effect to quote the most recent farber doll abroad and potent antiviral molecule incorporates rapidly into membranes. These data suggest that the potent antiviral effects of Arbil are mediated at least in part through its membrane oh tropic effects likely giving place to the formation of perturbed membrane.

Vinyl Alexi Rue Pharma Dot Com Arbil AIDS pneumonia Rue Pharma bronchitis Cova Seba US Wuhan China farber Aaron Moscow Russia wikipedia
"sars" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

07:28 min | 4 months ago

"sars" Discussed on The Science Show

"This is the science show. What if we in two thousand sixteen of a lost generation to see magnificent beasts like elephants and Rhinos? Out in the wild. What if there was something we could have done to stop the industrial slaughter? But we didn't bother yes such how we started the sun show for years ago with a special from the triple. As on the International Criminal Trade in wildlife it's huge and may also have given us that virus yes bats but also possibly pangolins and even snakes. There was a superb expose in sixty minutes on channel nine two weeks ago back to twenty sixteen and how we could have avoided the pandemic wildlife crime is currently the fourth largest transnational organized crime in the world it is just under the weapons trade drug trade and human trafficking trade. It's worth about twenty billion dollars a year annually and the ivory trade is about three billion dollars that twenty billion dollars. So it's a big problem. There about fifty thousand elephants a year being killed right now with only about four hundred fifty thousand left in Africa and one of the complexities of this problem is dealing with this transnational organized. Crime where you have these sophisticated networks of criminal entities that are experts at moving contraband from one place to another without being detected in one of the consequences of that is that as you get further away from the source. The potential places the contraband could fall gets more diffuse. It gets more expensive to trace and the salaries of the agents go up so it becomes more and more problem Michigan further away. What we have done is we've tried to focus our attention using genetics to determine the source of the actual poaching into figure out how many major source populations are there. Because in doing that you can potentially vote this law enforcement on those areas for the contraband from getting into this transit. Where these complex? Networks makes it so difficult to attack and it also allows us when we focus law enforcement at the same time to make. These countries held accountable so that they are not denying the magnitude of the problem in their own country. Now the way that we focus on this work because we use DNA from large issues a seizure. That is a minimum of half a tonne worth minimum. The million dollars and the reason that we focus on those seizures is because that's seventy percent of all seized ivory that bear the signature of large organized. Crime Syndicates. These are people that can afford to lose a million dollars at a single encounter with law enforcement. The work we published in science showed that virtually one hundred percent of all large ivory seizures that we analyzed in the last decade came from really just two locations. Twenty two percent of the ivory was made up of forced elephant ivory and that came from an area with the northeast corner of Gabon in northwest corner of Congo and seventy eight percent of the ivory was savannah ivory and that all came from Tanzania so Tanzania clearly is the biggest hotspot that we have encountered in this trade and was surprising to all of us. One of the things that this suggests that the number of kingpins driving this trade are relatively few because so much of this. Big Trade is focused in one area. It also suggests that these hot spots are very slow to change so when we analyze the recent seizure. It's very actionable. Information allows us to get right to the source. Our work has already brought down one of the largest ivy dealers in west Africa. We are now hot on the trail of probably the largest ivory dealer and one of the things that we are now moving towards is trying to apply this technology to other species in need and one species that we are focusing on most heavily is the Pangolin which looks like an Armadillo and it's hairs modified into scales. It is currently among the most if not the most post animal in the world. And it's the size of a cocker Spaniel and with that. I'm going to turn it over to my graduate student. H J who is focusing her PhD on applying this technology to help address the penguin problem so many of these Hanjiang Kim and I'm currently a graduate student at the University of Washington. Sam just mentioned pangolins are just like an theaters and that they feed primarily on termites and ants and instead of having long hair to protect themselves their hair has been turned into scales and hence there's still made up Cheriton and these animals are currently being poached both for meat for delicacy and their skills for medicinal purposes around the world and during the last decade. We've seen many many seizures of pangolins and these are larger than the largest ivory. Caesar we've ever seen just last year. We saw an eleven point. Five ton of Pangolin meat being seized in China which is about over two thousand six hundred animals and because penguins are small and they're also ternal and incredibly elusive species. And this is the problem because currently we don't know how many animals are left in the wild we have no population estimates for any of the species for the majority of populations out there and this basic question. Where are they coming from? And how quickly are they being decimated around the world? I joined doctor's lab about a year and a half ago and I started working in the illegal ivory trade and the more. I learned about this technique. I realized that this is perfect. To apply to the penguins because pangolins are very widely distributed animal their pound in both Asia and Africa. We four species in Asia ENFORC- piece Africa and not only are they in both continents. They range about around forty eight different countries around the world and it becomes urgent that we find that word approaching is happening so that we can direct law enforcement and protective measures and the populations that are being currently being targeted using the experience and expertise. That's currently in this lab. As well as the lessons that Tamas learned over the years during the ivory trade we hope to be able to transfer this method onto the pangolins in a much faster pace in much for transferable manner so I will be collecting data to create a genetic reference Mafuta penguins around the world and we hope to complete this within the year. Using Conservation canines second. We also can develop genetic markers. That's not only compatible across all species but can be more easily transferred to other labs so that we can share this technology once it's fully developed and finally. I think the most important piece to all this is cooperation between the researchers currently working on the Pangolin trade. And this is one of the biggest lessons I learned in this lab and currently there is many wonderful researchers around the world and we all share the same goal enough effort to try to the penguins. And we'll be working cooperatively with all these different groups to build a system for the penguins that we can save them before. It's too late in the playoffs. In Twenty Sixteen and one of those teams assisting in the hunt is at Taronga Zoo as we broadcast on the side show on August. The twenty four th last year pangolins may have been the vector in those wet markets carrying corona viruses. Perhaps from bats next. The world is in lockdown a twenty billion dollar criminal industry..

Africa International Criminal Trade Big Trade Asia graduate student Taronga Zoo Tanzania Gabon Michigan west Africa Caesar Sam China Tamas Congo Kim
"sars" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

Mayo Clinic Talks

11:58 min | 5 months ago

"sars" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

"Very good insight I would say that This is an example of what the new biology has done for medicine and science. I mean within a week or two. This virus was sequence. The sequence information put into A genomic database so that other investigators could have access to that well. The reason that's important is multifold number one by knowing that sequence you can design primers that are the basis for the. Rt PC. Are Ask say number two. You can look at those genetic sequences and over time understand the molecular evolution so Are the viruses that cause such severity in Wuhan China Different Than The viruses? Here you can literally trace the course of an epidemic The other thing is by knowing those sequences we can take advantage of that information design novel vaccines particularly when we get to the point of 'em are a DNA based faxing this. This allows us to do that in an formed way. So there's there's a lot of advantages to having that that sequence as soon as possible and to sequencing many a isolates it is many geographic areas as we can and you you started to drift towards this conversation. I definitely want to build towards that That dialogue about some vaccine genomics but start with talking about the degree of public attention right. Now there's press conferences. There snooze stories updated minute by minute. And we're seeing a congressional hearing much of this discussion is. When can we have a vaccine ready? What you talked a bit about. You know. Those aren't even very well known for Physicians so let me. Just take a minute to describe this. But this is what I've seen development in the US starts with an idea usually from biotech startup or accademia. From the time they come up with the idea until the time of vaccine is the license takes seven to ten years usually and about one billion dollars U K. One of the fastest was the vaccine. Just licensed in December for a bullet that took six years in spite of the public health emergencies that he bowl a percentage. So what will happen is an ideal become up with and then you go into animal testing. You find an appropriate animal model. And you're looking to see. Is it safe? And is it a -ffective so you're going to see if there's immuno-genetic this actually raise protective immune response we don't know in this case because there's no Corlett of protection so you will challenge those animals with the live virus to see if it protect if it does then you apply to the FDA go into phase one studies with their permission. These are called first in man trial. They involve ten of people so this week and I h in the Derna started the first trial of a stars. Covy to vaccine it's an MRI rene based vaccine. We talk about that later if you'd like. And they will test forty six people looking for evidence of any toxicity safety issues and trying to figure out. What's the right dose? What's the right route of administration? How many doses? How far apart that sort of thing if they if it passes phase one it goes into space to where you now enroll hundreds of people with the same. I is it immunogenetics. Is it safe then you you give those data to the FDA they look at it and if they agree that it seems to be safe than they have some benefit you go into phase three now. You're you're enrolling thousands to tens of thousands that that gap between face to face. Three is called the valley of death because the vast majority of vaccine candidates antivirals other medications will not make it past the values de that cost hundreds of millions of dollars to do. And when you think about it when you're looking at an epidemic let's just take Zico was a good example. Ebola turned out to be a good example. Ideally you WANNA do a randomized controlled clinical trial so Roughly half might get the vaccine candidate. Half an irrelevant vaccine or placebo. You wait and see what happened. Well sometimes the epidemic doesn't allow us to do that. We have to test it out if they face three results or positive. Fda looks at it they make the decision to license that and then they usually request phase four studies that we know about the hundreds of thousands of people. So long winded. Answer to say. We're not GONNA have a vaccine for this epidemic. Maybe the next one Lots of vaccine candidates were developed for Stars. Not One of them got past phase one. The only exception to this is the president. Hold the powers of emergency use authorization. He could decide that at some point in the future. The risk is so great that the benefits and unknown risks of less or unknown or untested vaccine would be worth it otherwise by law regulatory pathway has to be followed. Kinda fascinating I was. GonNa ask about SARS. And Moore's where at what point vaccine development stuttered for them really right at phase one Some some folks who are listening to this. We'll know that I was providing direct care to the patients in West Africa and when I get got back was exposed to all the data about the evolving genetics for it and also got to hold a vial of the now approved vaccine in my hand. But I didn't get to put it in my body I would. I would not hesitate when there's hesitation about vaccines is a whole other discussion. But in the settings of outbreaks do you find and this is this is purely editorializing. I'm giving you this opportunity. That people are more receptive to vaccines. There is some public skepticism in debate about rape regular seasonal or childhood vaccines. When there's heightened attention and heightened concern you feel that people are more receptive to vaccines in general. You're right the higher. The perceived risk of disease the lower the perceived risk of the vaccine and that can be helpful of course in the context of an epidemic. Where you're trying to test a vaccine I've been in vaccine development of vaccine testing for about what thirty three years now and it always used to be that when we ran a vaccine trial. I was the first to enroll into the study. I felt strongly that I couldn't ask other people to enroll in a study. I was unwilling to roll it now. Of course you can't do that. Irbe's don't don't allow you to do that or say that but Just to make the point that these are the. It's really important that the public have some sense of trust. Which is why we have the regulatory pathway. We we do. It is designed to be sometimes lower than we want but it is to liberate. It is data informed. It's time proven it's reflective and it's transparent giving lots of I the opportunity to see the data and make reason decision. I respect both. The premise of is saying. I'm willing to take this myself. And also the importance of this process and the hair and transparency and safety that it ensures. Do you WanNa talk. A little bit introduced the topic of Immunex. I'm sorry the topic of Immune Amax. Oh Yeah So we actually developed a field in taking off of that in vaccines that we call backs a nomex and also the inverse of that adverse dome but it takes it takes advantage of what's called systems biology so as all of our listeners will know much of ion is reductionist so we will look at a pathway or eight drug with one outcome and of course. That's not biologically how we were created So we we are a distant we are as it turns out. A very complex system with elegant redundancy built in. And what we attempt to do when we're looking at vaccines and how The body reacts to it is to look across as many systems as we can. So it's not only the immunologic with the genetic the proteome the Lipid Olmec the glide comic Everything that we can conceivably measure it. It's been said this way and I think it's a pretty good way of saying it. You know in the past. We did science by doing a couple of ass as on thousands of patients in the new biology in the Baxter illness in systems. Biology way of doing things we do. Thousands of tests one tens of subjects so some of the experiments that we do in my lab will generate a terabyte of data. I literally cannot even visualize my own data. We have to send it to buy a win from the Titian to have a and other programs. They developed to help us make sense of our data. We'll we'll give vaccine in that define time point. Look at. How every single gene in the body reacts to that is suppressed as it activated. What pathways are activated? You suppressed so it's really in an unprecedented look into how the body responds to vaccines than we've ever had before the and then the implications for this how does how does that speed the development of a back scene for SARS Kofi too. Yeah so so it does and an upbeat person generally and then we can apply it to ours. Kobe too but the benefit is primarily understanding. What is actually happening? If we know that certain genes are required for a protective immune response. Well that's helpful particularly when we know perhaps concomitant medications that somebody would be taking that would suppress the very genes. We want activated interested develop immunity. The other side of it is to develop molecular signatures of Potential harm in somebody for example My one really terrible experience I had the position as we got transferred.

FDA Wuhan US epidemic Derna Zico president Ebola rape West Africa Kobe Irbe Moore Titian Immunex
"sars" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

Mayo Clinic Talks

09:33 min | 5 months ago

"sars" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

"We get the opportunity to dig further into Cova nineteen as the outbreak evolves and gets much much more public attention today. We're joined over the phone by Dr Greg Poland mayoclinic internist research specialist. He's the editor for vaccine. He's widely recognized as an international expert. In Vaccine Development has worked with the military and on public policy and is distinguished investigator here mayoclinic. Thanks for joining us today. Greg my closer I think that right now everybody who's GonNa be listening to. This is following the situation reports in it's inundated with the rapid expansion of Krahn virus in our country. The situation coming from China and it has a pretty good background of that. Are there details that you would like our audience to know to start with? I think A number of things one is some very preliminary they stay at cautiously because it needs to be confirmed with some very preliminary information suggesting a reason for why we're seeing very different severity and mortality rate as this virus has moved from country to country the way I sort of explained it. If you've ever seen those pixelated pictures you know the first pixel that show up. You can't tell what you're looking at when you get to maybe fifty percents of the Pixel you get the sense. It's a space and when you get to eighty percent or more you can say. Oh it's a picture of George Washington. We're somewhere in between that. We've got enough pixel to begin developing antivirals to know how to handle the virus to to have a pathway toward vaccine development but not enough pixels to say is what happened in China going to be reflective of what will happen here so far very early too few pixels but very early Impression would be no. It's different here than there. One reason is differential cultural. Spur example About fifty percent or more of Chinese men smoke. Well that's the that's a dangerous thing for any Respiratory virus illness for another thing. There has been some preliminary information suggesting that the virus is mutating. An are nate virus like this particular kind pens to gather a mutation that that allows for genetic fitness. So I'm talking about that level of mutation Maybe on the order of One a week one every other week something like that. So we're getting into three plus week Three plus months in this outbreak and there are some preliminary evidence. It's only one investigative team at indeed mutations have occurred that appear to be making the virus somewhat less virulent that's a great analogy and and some encouraging news there and I think that one of the things that causes public fear in any outbreak is that that initial picture isn't clear we're looking at something new and as the data is gathered as we see enough cases to truly understand the clinical picture. We we developed the subtleties of this. Yeah I've actually Somewhat jokingly that we need a new icy icy ID code called Corona virus. Things diety but quality information helps combat to and I think helps people be more comfortable. That efforts are being made and understanding is coming for what this is. Could I ask you kind of more basic question first of all? We've seen corona viruses. This is the third novel Corona Virus But most Corona viruses. Give us the common cold. Do you think that most all of us have had a corona virus in the past almost certainly There are four seasonal corona viruses that have been identified it caused upward each year of thirty percent of sort of the upper respiratory cold and quote or respiratory illnesses that we see and the reason. I say almost certainly all of us have and repeatedly. Is that oddly enough? Immunity to those seasonal corona viruses doesn't seem to last very long in terms of protection. Maybe only less than a handful of years some suggest Really only two or three years. So yes we've been inspected. What's different about these as you mentioned? Is that this. Is the third recognized corona virus that in the last eighteen years that has Jumped the species barrier so this is inherently do a no sweat it is jumped the species barrier to infect human with burying level but nonetheless higher than most respiratory viruses in terms of severity and case fatality. Would you be willing to make some comparisons to this and are two prior novel Corona Virus Events? Of course so you know when you think back to Stars in two thousand started in November two thousand two and finished in June or July of two thousand and three there were about eight thousand known infection and a case fatality rate of ten percent so slightly under eight hundred people died and involved. Thirty seven countries not eighty one by the way ours was declared a pandemic. And that's one point I would make is despite what we hear. This is a pandemic by any criterion. Just a matter of time. Well we had merged and in that case. We had about twenty five hundred known cases in the first outbreak And it was about a thirty five percent. A Taliban rate now stars spontaneously stopped merced hasn't immersed continues to circulate just a few cases now and then primarily in the Middle East but two very different although there are some similarities very different Beta Corona viruses as is this one Beta corona virus. One of the interesting things that we saw with SARS and is true of a star's Koby to That's the name of the virus diseases. Copay nineteen is thinking propensity to caused Diarrhea and in the case of Star Stars Covy to it's only about three to five percent or so but virus has been isolated out of those stool specimens suggesting as we saw with SARS. That oral fecal route not just respiratory route could be a method for transmission and there's a famous apartment complex during SARS that had disrupted plumbing and became a native for an or an outbreak center. Interesting that you say that. Because there's there was a similar outbreak in an apartment building with SARS copay to where they were able to isolate a multi plumbing issue that they think accounted for white people above and below got infected. Is there any sense? And I think you've already answered this. That exposure prior krona viruses is going to convey any immunologic protection against this one. Yeah good question. Colin none none that we know of another words would would immunity to a seasonal corona virus in some way less than the impact of infection was stars. Kobe to We don't think so haven't seen any evidence of that Rather what we seen and in fact. Let me just backtrack a bit at one level and argue mint or This not being true is that we're seeing the highest rates of severity and case fatality in older people now true immunised national they have co morbidity. But you would have expected sort of build up if that were the case of someone. Unity season after season after when they're exposed to circulating seasonal corona viruses and that does not appear to be the case that makes that makes absolute sense. Now one of the things that seems different to me. Your impression of this is Yup. We're getting very rapid global transport of this illness and that's to be expected go. Transit is something that we have to contend with. What seems different to me. Historically with this is how rapidly we're getting high quality data particularly particularly genetic information about this when it's what are the implications.

virus diseases China Dr Greg Poland Cova investigator editor nate Diarrhea George Washington Middle East merced Kobe Koby Colin
"sars" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

03:46 min | 6 months ago

"sars" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Than the sars epidemic of two thousand two and two thousand three fox's John sincerity more than forty three thousand people infected Americans was named the fox news now here's your storm team ten forecast here it's of rain throughout the day on Tuesday steadiest along the coastline as temperatures holding the low and mid forties clearing overnight with a low down near thirty degrees Wednesday morning a mix of clouds and sun on Wednesday high again the lower forties a brief wintry mix early on Thursday turning to reign as temperatures rise back into the mid forties our storm team ten we are all just mark Searles on newsradio nine twenty and one oh four seven FM newsradio nine twenty and one oh four seven FM first came season right let's say the vehicle is registered so yeah which I in order to mention in the entry fee continues order continues please the first one protected but like right about but I project recording with a fireman office for him and all project with only located throughout North America nine other okay they have been very it'll be a very not only the game forever the breakdown of all religions and it'll hold everything right now we look up they are they're going to do I'm glad Lewis you're listening to ground zero Everest called at eight seven seven seven three three one zero one one that's eight seven seven seven three three one zero one one but a lot of feelings with us right about this free Spence three friends was originally the brainchild of the.

North America Lewis sars John fox mark Searles Spence
"sars" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

03:46 min | 6 months ago

"sars" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Than the sars epidemic of two thousand two and two thousand three fox's John sincerity more than forty three thousand people infected Americans was named the fox news now here's your storm team ten forecasts of rain throughout the day on Tuesday steadiest along the coastline as temperatures holding the low and mid forties clearing overnight with a low down near thirty degrees Wednesday morning a mix of clouds and sun on Wednesday high again the lower forties a brief wintry mix early on Thursday turning to reign as temperatures rise back into the mid forties our storm team ten we are all just mark Searles on newsradio nine twenty and one oh four seven FM newsradio nine twenty and one oh four seven FM she came season right let's say that the yeah so yeah which I and in the entry fee continues these older continues please the first one protected by hand right about but I've worked many projects our government recording with early retirement all before him and all project with only located throughout North America nine here's another okay they have been very it'll be a very not only whatever the breakdown of all religions and everything right now we look up they are or what they're going to do I'm glad Lewis you're listening to ground zero Everest called at eight seven seven seven three three one zero one one that's eight seven seven seven three three one zero one one but a lot of feelings with this right about this free Spence three friends was originally the brainchild of the.

North America Lewis sars John fox mark Searles Spence
"sars" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

10:43 min | 6 months ago

"sars" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"That was seventeen years ago. Thomas was talking thing about SARS. Another corona virus now SARS eventually reached thirty seven countries and killed over seven hundred people now that the world is facing facing a new corona virus. What are the most important lessons to be learned from the SARS outbreak? Can those lessons be applied. And should they be applied to containment aiman efforts around Wuhan Corona Virus. This hour on point what it will take to stop corona virus. And you can join us. We'll be talking with several infectious disease specialists today today. What do you want to know? What do you need to know about this? New Corona virus while we're going to begin in Bethesda Maryland. Dr Anthony FAUCI joins us. He's director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of health. Dr Phil she welcome to on point. Thank you good to be with you. So first of all we do have at least a five confirmed cases of Wuhan Corona virus in the United States. I was wondering if you might give us your your evaluation of the current risk of the virus spreading in the US at the moment sure well there are five individuals that are all travel cases directly from Wuhan. which is the epicenter in China of the outbreak of these individuals have been identified Hanafin? They've been isolated and what we're doing right now is we're doing what's called contact. Tracing on at least one hundred individuals that came into contact act with these individuals At the time that they were infected right now there have been no indications but we're still investigating at the CDC. He is doing that that. There is a secondary transmission in other words. There have been no human-to-human transmissions that have been recognized at this point in the United States which is good news because these people have been around for a while and as each day goes by we get more and more reports from the CDC about what the status that is of the contexts are so right now. The risk is low but as you know from what's going on in China. This is a very seriously evolving situation nation in China but for the United States at this particular time with the five individuals and no secondary transmissions. Things seem to be at a low risk. But we've got to keep an eye on it. Of course that can change and so tell us what you make of the current response so far. Because I'm thinking if those five cases in the US were travel vol- cases. We still have hundreds if not thousands of flights coming in and out of the United States. Perhaps fewer now from China but from other places where we know corona virus it has been found. Yeah but But I it's a very good question Ignorant it's very important to distinguish if you look at what's going on. In China versus the relatively few cases in the countries in which there are a travel related even though there has been some secondary transmission such as in in Germany the burden of disease in those other countries that have travel related. Cases is at this point so low that the odds of there being any import tation from France or Germany or Japan of one of those countries is exceedingly low at this point point. So the thing you need to concentrate on from a containment standpoint is taking the kind of surveillance of an testing of you've attention to people coming in from China now. The important thing that the Chinese did that in many respects is very helpful is that they've essentially cut off flights out of Wuhan which is overwhelmingly the EPI center but the rest of China starting to have the acceleration of cases. So that's the reason why as you probably heard correctly that we started off with five airports in which there was the kind of of screening as people came came in a syndrome screening as well as questioning screening now. They've enhanced broad general screening of fifteen additional airports reports now for a total of twenty for people who are coming from China. So right now the real surveillance of what you WANNA do about people coming into the country is clearly focused on China and not focused on other countries in which there's one or two or three travel related cases right so so help me understand something. Dr Vouch e We have seen a ballooning very quickly of the number of cases over the past several days. Right I mean I think it was just yesterday in China it was roughly forty five hundred then this morning at jumped around six thousand. That's a twenty five percent increase overnight. Can you explain why that is the disease actually spreading faster we catching. We've finding more cases you know it's a combination of both. I mean what it is clearly. It is spreading fast. What what what we're seeing now is that we're into what we call the generations of infection? So if I if I get infected I'm first generation Phai infect check you that second pick somebody else that's third you know we're well into six seven eight and long so when you have a number of people who are infected. They're infecting a few people. Then you're going to have a major I wouldn't say explosion but certainly an acceleration of cases. There's there's a terminology called our ought which is means that how many infected people will get infected from one index case and so if by in fact two people then the Arrow at for me is too but are autism population base thing so it's really an average Of How many people get infected from people who are already infected right now. That's about one point. Five to three point five. Three point. Six When you look at really rapidly spreading diseases like measles is up there and eleven twelve thirteen fourteen eighteen? It's really very high but it's high enough enough now that it is it is accounting for this type of spread. The real question is is the measures that the Chinese have have done. A really rather draconian in the sense of shutting down forty five million people Whether or not that's going to have a positive effect on my backfire and have some deleterious effects like causing panic or interfering with supplies in and out. We don't know and the reason we don't know is because this has been unprecedented. There's been restrictions in other outbreaks. But never to this magnitude so if this helps we're going to be obviously looking very very closely over the next weeks to months whether that acceleration that we're seeing is going to continue view. which would be quite ominous or whether it's going to slow down based on not only what the Chinese are doing within their own country but the recognition recognition of other countries of travel cases and having them handle it properly the way we were fortunate enough to do in the United States and Ainley that those five cases were recognized early they were isolated and they have their contacts traced? If that happens broadly. We're in relatively better shape right. If you have spillover into other countries and lack of control then we'd have a problem okay. There's so many questions here Dr Chee Let me just ask you do we yet know confidently where this corona virus has come from. You know we don't you know what the price with the precise jump was from an animal to a human but I can say with some considerable confidence that knowing corona viruses and what their animal reservoirs. It almost certainly started off with an animal human interface because the reservoir of he's Infections Corona virus or an animal an animal particularly bats are very important in the reservoir aspect of this infection. So you know if it acted like well let me give you some examples quickly with SARS. We finally found out it was a bat that gave it to a palm civic cat which then interact with the human species with mayors. It was a bathroom gave it to a camel and Campbell gave it to people so I would not be surprised even though I don't know precisely that it was something similar to what we've seen with SARS and with mayor's so this zoonotic transmission of disease. I mean. Are we just going to see more. And more of this as time goes by well you know as as long as we continue to do. Two things encroach upon the environment where animals animals are that we usually don't have human-animal interface. The more you do that. Encroaching on rainforests encroaching on pristine areas of the environment. You'll see see it. But also it's the proximity between the human species and animal types that actually hall viruses and we we know we see that in China a lot. And that's the reason why when you talk about flu a lot even though it is an exclusive often you see flu coming out from China China and the reason is that flu is fundamentally a wildfowl bird type infection that has reservoirs in birds and chickens uh-huh and in pigs and when you talk about the agricultural situation in a country like China which traditionally has people very much intermingling with ducks folks and with birds and with chickens and pigs. That's how you have the jumping of species that's what we're seeing with the h five and one that had gone on years ago in the seven and nine flu. That is now still a little bit of an issue with some infections occurring right. Well Dr. We've just got you for another thirty seconds or so. So do you think that Examining the global response to SARS is a good way to draw lessons about the best way to contain this corona virus in some respects. Yes yes I mean obviously good public health practices with SARS namely identification isolation that contact tracing successfully put an end to SARS so that would be an important element of what we're doing here with the corona virus. Well Dr Anthony FAUCI Director of the National Institute of Allergy and infectious just diseases at the National Institutes of health. Dr Raji thank you so much for joining us today. Great to be with you but when we come back we'll talk with two more infectious disease. Specialists about how.

China Wuhan Corona Virus United States Dr Anthony FAUCI China China National Institute of Allergy National Institutes of health flu Dr Phil director Wuhan Thomas Dr Raji Bethesda Maryland CDC Dr Chee EPI France National Institute of Allergy
"sars" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

Relevant Podcast

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"sars" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

"Restaurants, and there's rural class restaurants. There's like, you know, Morimoto and like, I mean, there's all the best of the best celebrity chefs opened all these new restaurants, and then there is for years. It's been a Planet Hollywood there as they reimagined it. They redid it, kinda bring it more upscale. So it's in this new era, right? And the way they re in invented Planet Hollywood, the Planet, Hollywood experience is a broadened guy Fieri to do a new menu. It's like you ought to buy on these high end restaurants and all these high end shopping, and then you walk by the the new Planet Hollywood, and there's this big old guy Fieri sign like on, and you know, like just real probably does more business than. A lot of. He's appealing to to the mainstream. You know, someone has to be the CBS sitcom of cooking. Chilies on drugs and a laugh track, and that's what you get with the guy. Feary menu. It's not high brow, but it's what the people want. He's giving it to them, right. Hey, speaking of the reading wildfires, you know, obviously we cover, we've been covering it on our site and stuff, and we haven't mentioned here in the podcast. It's been a crisis. We've been watching, you know, in covering in keep you keep that in your prayers. I mean, obviously, Bethel music is based in Bethel church and all their huge ministry, and a lot of the people in that ministry have been affected, you know, and it's it's a tough situation. I mean, there's yeah so many people display. Yeah, yeah. I, I would say to death church now has been doing a drive in the partner. I'd leave with Salvation Army to to help the community there so you can check out them on social media tiller out more about those efforts. One of my sisters lives there and her husband. I know you had sisters have sisters and one of them lives in reading and has a husband and Basit pictures yesterday that they, everyone has to wear face masks all the time right now because the air quality is so unhealthy. Been SARS Tulsa SARS a unit. My favorite. And I've said this before SNL skit of all time is and it's very underrated in no one would ever have this on the list for good reason because it's one joke, but they just play it to the death. His. Bennetts very minor hosts, it was Peter SARS guard the actor and they did a whole bit where he has rented the late night TV time to try to sell off a warehouse of Peter SARS guard SARS Gars. Splaine's. He's invested all his out. During the SARS scared his agent, talked him into Peter SARS guard SARS guards. Well. Outlet. Reading California for the air quality. She's somebody get Peter SARS on the phone. I would just love to be in the SNL writer or like you hear about the infamous pitch meetings where they pitched the idea like war, Michaels, and all the cast. Pierce Sargus this week. So I was singing. The skit would be he. He selling Peter SARS guard SARS guards the skit there like. Not. I mean, that's it. They're called. Is perfectly a year after the SARS. I in case you missed it this week, John gray and Don lemon got into a heated debate about passers role roles in politics. So actually, this is interesting was happening while I was on New York last week, and he was one of the speakers as he was here in New York, and then when over was on Don lemons show and all this kind of happened during conference. It was it was crazy, but John gray was among several black faith leaders recently invited to the White House to discuss prison reform measures. So CNN's Don lemon invited the pastor. He's passed relentless church in South Carolina onto the show to discuss the meeting, but admonished, gray claiming the meaning sent mixed messages about some of the president's more polarizing comments about race. John gray, however, explained with everything that I could have lost and could still lose..

Peter SARS SARS Planet Hollywood John gray Don lemon Pierce Sargus SNL Fieri Hollywood Splaine New York Morimoto Salvation Army Bethel church CNN CBS South Carolina California partner Bennetts
"sars" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"sars" Discussed on Ologies

"It's so real, like it's so that is how it has happened for for SARS, I think was very similar series of events in terms of like wildlife to an outdoor market to the domestic animal to then humans. And so this like SARS actually was a pretty good shot at it for a while. And then. It for various reasons. It didn't become like a full fledged pandemic, thank goodness because we controlled it or because it just out this is so fun. Okay. The reason that I get really excited about this stars one, but one of the main reasons why stars didn't become as big of a pandemic as it could have been as people were afraid that it would is because we were able to catch it early and they did a lot of really intense quarantines at airports, but the reason you could Corentin at an airport is because SARS with when you get infected with SARS, you actually begin to show symptoms before you're infectious. Oh, so if you're coughing on a plane during two thousand six SARS outbreak. If you were on a plane from any of the areas where SARS had been a problem and you were coughing, they were going to quarantine you, oh, that worked as a quarantine method because people were not yet infectious with something like influenza, you're infectious for several days before you show symptoms. So Corentin is much less effective. And what about equal. The reason that it became as big as it did was in part because of miscommunication between like World Health Organization and CDC and like people on the ground. It was in part because it made it into a larger city that it didn't usually usually outbreaks happen at sort of more rural areas because that is a disease that tends to happen as what we call spillover. So from animal populations billing over into human populations. Bats, right? That's in this case. Yeah, they are pretty sure in the big twenty, fourteen Abol outbreak. They traced it back to a kid playing in a tree with a bat. This is sad for humans and also for the bats, and I hate that because bats are like just getting on the up and up. Don't worry about bats guys. They're good. They're cool. The got. We should save them. They're really important. Yeah, and they are, but they also are great diseases, so many diseases, right? That's I have no idea. I think it's part of it is because they're mammals and they can disperse long distances. Also the. The for a lot of bats. There's this communal living like Salata that's in one population. Yeah, and so you have the opportunity for something to spread very rapidly and so with with the bullet, what's the latest on like a vaccine for that? How are we? Let's check in on. Let's knock on Ebola's door and do a little visit from what I know there is a vaccine that they tested right towards the end of that outbreak in two thousand fourteen and it is effective. And so I think now they have been using it in current outbreaks that are happening. Okay. So so that's a little easier. Yeah. And the thing is that here in the US there really was never a reason to not sleep easy because since the way that he bullet is transmitted is is through close physical contact with blood or other bodily fluids you living in Chicago or LA you're not at risk, right? That's not the disease that's going to become the next pandemic just because mostly because of the mode of transmission. Okay. So what is the medical. Community stance on illnesses that some would argue our behavioral or lifestyle influenced smoking related lung cancer or obesity heart disease. Do those fall under the same epidemiological protocol in terms of response to them? Yes. So I know the CDC I think just a couple of years ago actually classified obesity as a disease. So it's officially classified. I have personal feelings about that, but yeah, because I feel like it's not. We say, we say that certain behaviors are a choice, but I feel like they're so we're, we're marketed to in a way that is that is pathology in and of itself xactly..

SARS Corentin influenza CDC World Health Organization US Chicago LA
"sars" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"sars" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Thing well they're the scars guards witches like stellan skarsgard is the dad okay and then the son was the dude on uh drew blood the vampire show and then recently on that uh pretty little liars i think oh no one with nicole kidman okay uh that's alexander skarsgard i think that might be him is sars guard the one whose fargo sucked no who is that that sars got yeah that's another dude what is up with all these guys so are you sure you're not just dropping the chaos of peter scars guard all right here's the deal again the guy in fargo uh huh man this is such a bedside trek already it's pretty best the guy in fargo was peter storm air uk incident so he's not even in the equation then no but a definitely know that there is peter sars guard okay because he either was or is married to maggie jilin hall oh yeah i guess i knew that peter sars guard okay and then they're stolen in alexandra scars guard and i don't know who at the clown was as bill scars guard and is he related to the scars guards i guess so yeah i believe he's the youngest of them okay i'm sorry i was wrong is tim curry of suck now actually a uh we'd never look stuff up at it and look that up yeah because the headline here says alexander scars guards reaction to his brother bills mmhmm uh clown costume yeah he's it it it's good his acting it goes way beyond the costume they did go with the costume but it was who could a yeah was.

stellan skarsgard sars the deal fargo peter sars tim curry nicole kidman uk maggie jilin hall
"sars" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"sars" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Brazelle september 23rd which is this saturday numerology fists uh and and and others who watch for signs and they have and say that this is a very important date because these signs are happening in heaven do you have a couple of pieces from the documentary yes uh so we have what i just described a whole lot better which has the whole september 23rd theory area here it is on september 23rd of 2017 there is an alignment that is happening warranties on moon stars in consulations which looks like something that john wrote about in chapter twelve of the book of revelation in the first two verses is talking about this on the moon stars the wandering stars which we call planets constellation which is virgoe john says that he sees a great sign in heaven there is a woman she's closed in the sun with the moon under her feet she has a crown of twelve sars but she's also pregnant and notches pregnant she's in labour an amount to give purse lino them virgoe beat the woman will actually be at her feet at this hour traversed by her shoulders clothing herbs on and in her head will be twelve stars nine of those will be the constellation of what makes of leo they're always there but the three other ones that are not there are this is the alignment of atlanta's mercury will line have venus that is there and also mars making that the twelve stars are we conceive of.

consulations john sars leo atlanta