22 Burst results for "S._M._e"

Hector Barreto - Entrepreneurship and Immigrants

The Strategerist

05:45 min | 2 weeks ago

Hector Barreto - Entrepreneurship and Immigrants

"Welcomed or guest today, Hector Baretto Hector form headed up the United States. Small Business Administration today. He's the chairman of the Latino Coalition. Thanks for waking up early with us. Do this actor thank you in our Co host Laura Collins, once again. Welcome back, Laura. She's the director in the Bush. Institute smu Economic Growth Initiative thank you. Thank Santa I. Only wake up early for this I know we. To Peel back the curtain we're here at about seven thirty in the morning in Dallas and Lauren I were comparing notes and turns out that one of us are morning. People so hector. We're looking. We're looking at you. Demand on. West Coast time. It's like five thirty in your body clock Oh. That's rough. Hector's here for our SME Economic Growth Advisory Council where he is one of them. Is that help guide the policy work that we do at the Bush Institute, because both of his expertise is the forty first administrator, the small business, and because his work with the Latino Coalition. Let's start with the former when you were with the small business administration. What was the goal of that department? What were you? You, all working on the small business. Administration was actually started in one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, three by President Eisenhower and there were some small business programs before that, but they unified those all into one agency, and it's really the agency that supports and advocates for America's small businesses, and that role has become even more important over the years when they formed the SBA. There probably weren't thinking that was going to be over thirty million small businesses in the united. United States and I like to say nothing small about small business. They really are the engine of America, the engine that fuels the economy of America not only are there a lot of them, but they represent over fifty two percent of the gross output of the economy. It's the place that two-thirds the net new jobs of our economy comes from, and it's also the place that a lot of our innovation comes from. That makes us the envy of the world. World in terms of our economy so very very important agency. A lot of people have heard of it, but they oftentimes don't know everything it does. Where does your passion for Small Business? Come from a well? That's easy. I was fortunate to be born into an entrepreneurial family, so the first business owners I ever met where my mother and father and my father was especially a serial entrepreneur. He loved business. He loves starting businesses. I'm not saying he loved running. My mother ran the business ideas, man yeah, but I learned a lot about a small business I used to joke that everything I learned about business. I learned in a Mexican restaurant because that's why I worked when I was a little kid. What jobs is you? Hold with your parents Oh, a lot of them, you know we were an immigrant family and. There was five children. My mother had five children six years. I have four younger sisters, and so we were all recruited to my father's executive training program very early on, so we all had to work I remember waiting tables when I was nine years old. So And then I. as I got older, I got more responsibility and help run some of those businesses and start some of those businesses, and my father had a number of different businesses. We started off with the restaurant business, because that's an easy business to access, but then later on at a little import export business, a little construction business, none of those businesses wherever really large, but they were very important to our family helps support us. They helped educate, and we learned a lot about being in business and working with the community and customers, and so your father came to America start these businesses. He actually didn't. My father was an immigrant to the United States in the late nineteen fifties. I don't think he was planning on staying that long. But he met my mother. My mother is also from immigrant parents from Mexico they've shown love, and and of all places they started their journey in Kansas City Missouri that's where I was born. I grew up in Kansas City Missouri and my father. He had a lot of different jobs as a lot of immigrants do when they first get here. His first jobs were picking. Picking potatoes for fifty cents an hour in rural Missouri and later on, he worked at a railroad, a literally pounding the spikes into the ground, but in the winter it got too cold, so he moved into He started working in the livestock business, and it was very difficult. dirty work. He was cleaning out stalls, but at least it was warmer than being outside. When he was working at the railroad later on he, he was a janitor at the school that I would eventually go to, but my father used to always say that he was a business owner, and I would say dad. You have these jobs. You're not a business owners. They know what I have to do right now, but eventually alone my own business, so he was very passionate about that. He always wanted to work for himself, so he starts so then he starts these businesses and his career trajectory starts trending too so far up that start happening. Yeah, my father was a very visionary leader very. Very charismatic you know he when he's grown up used to say know. I came here with nothing I didn't know anybody. I didn't speak the language. I had no money I had no power, but I believed in myself I was willing to work hard, and this is such a great country that affords us the opportunity to go as far as we WANNA go. We're only limited by our own imagination our own commitment, so he he's. We started these businesses, but later on my father was kind of an organizer as well, and he wanted to belong to the Chamber of Commerce. This is in Kansas City. Number of others spanning businesses. There were there at the time, and my father started asking. Where's the Hispanic Chamber? And they said well. There isn't an Hispanic Chamber. My Dad said well there should be, and if nobody else is going to start it, I will so my father was one of the founders of the Kansas City Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, that was in the mid seventies,

Small Business Small Business Administration Hector Baretto Hector United States America Business Owner Latino Coalition Kansas City Kansas City Hispanic Chamber O Missouri Hispanic Chamber Laura Collins Smu Economic Growth Initiative Kansas City Missouri Chamber Of Commerce Chairman Director Bush Institute President Eisenhower Dallas
Accelerating Innovation

Healthy Thinking

07:14 min | 4 months ago

Accelerating Innovation

"Simple question. Why do we need a program? Accelerate and how pioneering is it Shawn? Okay thanks Keith Unwelcome everybody accelerate to think is Is Important to the the Welsh economy. The WHO he thought of it was kind of speed up the development of innovation within the life science sector but also the sport Deanna Jess and charitable organizations. That they're trying to do things to better health care and to improve wellbeing and in the principality so I think accelerate in that sense is really essential to the future. Wales okay. So let's imagine you'd Entrepreneur I with innovation that you think could benefit the health service and ultimately patients and you're very excited about it but Bit Slack about where to go next for example with get access to clinicians patients. If I wanted to test that perhaps perhaps you can tell us about the options there. Yeah so for Cardiff University. We've got that link between Cardiff unveil health boards answer the clinical innovation partnership where we often hold an MD tea. Which is a multidisciplinary team meeting every Monday? Where people can come along and present such projects so in front of this project board. We've seen people such as clinicians porters nurses academics medical students come present their ideas to us. We've had a number of industries. Come in as well with some project ideas who are required that link our understanding that clinicians and academics can support and provide through this forum. So that's the important part for for us within Cardiff University. As well as that's wash economic development is linked to patients clinicians and academia to see that health economic benefit as well as patient benefit strikes. Me As being really interesting areas. It's not just about established businesses. But you're taking soundings ideas and suggestions frahm individuals students clinicians and even patient troops in some cases. That's the your Europe she based in Swansea in your research. Experience includes things like in vitro bench test in what way through to support clinical investigation the medical devices launching products evaluation etc. I mean how how in your experience how difficult is product onto the market and how can accelerate or htc help in that respect. Y- apparently being based with an SME who went from basic patent on a piece of paper through to launch products. It's not easy. It is difficult. Lots of different challenges for me I think is about having the right expertise around you and expertise early on so that informs all our D. That you do away thought. H D C can help have technology centre and Swansea. University is that we have a team of sixteen people. They're all multi skilled. They've got Fast Array of expertise talk that we also can tap into the the academic staff within the school of Medicine as well on the wider university. So we've got a lot of expertise that to try and help them get. Get people that knowledge on those people around them to help them early on. I think one of the more challenging things is the regulatory pathway. Potentially making sure you've got the right people around you to support you show. Attic is particularly interested in assistive technologies. That's right isn't it? Yeah I mean that's the that's kind of the core of The the attic offering but to be honest We we're finding it working across a wide spectrum of Different sectors so A NASCAR exciting. I mean it could be you know digital products and services through to physical products and so it's I think is important to kind of understand. The science sector is is quite broad. Which means that you know Attic and got involved in You know in terms use a testing and analysis of sort of medical products or things which are a little bit more cutting edge like the Internet of things type sensors that people can then use to monitor elderly people in home for example so so it is quite broad in that sense but also I think Moscow exciting is starting to recognize that there are companies out there. On the periphery of the license actor. That may be astonished to consider moving into it So we can also help them as well with product development and an Kenneth Challenges that they might have in terms of innovation process. And you know it's so it's It's it's beyond just what we can initially considered to be the life science sectors much broader opportunity in an ns be clear. The collaboration element is is clever across the partners but we also collaborate in between the partners and the and the company's not providing direct funding. Were not doing stuff for them exactly. This is kind of a shared activity. Bus Right isn't it absolutely? Yes so everything we do. We we aim to go. We aim for effective. Rnd collaboration so we put in fifty percent. The company's fifty cents on a very much a joy joint venture Anna's Shawn's already mentioned in some of the benefits of that is we can transfer knowledge between the university so the company from the company to the university. So you know. We're all in rural from the experience is really important. And Sean fifty percent is not is not necessarily about money is it. This is about time this is about expertise is about facilities and equipment as well. Yeah it definitely I think One of the crucial things is that the the program allows companies to get access to stuff that they would normally be able to access And they might have a law plans for commercial development But they just simply don't have the capacity so the the accelerate program unlocks the potential by providing additional staff time resources and an inability to research particular challenges and problems that the company needs to overcome. But because they don't have the capacity you know they maybe go so far but then they they hit war base. At Lisa's is the accelerate program is unlocking opportunity than for them. So and another important aspect of this is well is the you know we can. We can do quite small pieces of work with a company that then provide them with inhabitants. Base that can they can then look for additional funding and draw down money from other sources than actual money to develop the product and take it take it to market a bit quicker than so so we kind of You know we provide in a kind of like for like service really if they if they want to develop within in the commitment to do that we can weaken our commitment to that to make sure that it actually can become a tangible output. At the end of the

Cardiff University Swansea Shawn Wales Bit Slack Cardiff Deanna Jess Keith Europe HTC Product Development Lisa Nascar School Of Medicine Moscow Sean Kenneth Anna
"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"I can see my plumber in pimlico or wherever <hes> all of a sudden now being overwhelmed with the auctions that have got so how do you actually give them back control to make informed decisions and we had a managed. I'm really worried <hes>. I'm going to share my my data david who shared it with somebody else and somebody else really loss. Even though i said yeah i want that loan or something there was one person or two person band then go to find the time to sift through all the different offerings and that could be going through quickbooks sage zero zero and actually know which one is right for me or going through which bank account or a finding the time to do that so that's some of these additional services income as well at recommendation engines actually taylor genuinely tailored to you and your business. We've bungled products. Jim means so it's it's going to be a tricky. One that i think is the richer the the product offerings becoming the better the services. We've got to be aware of that now as me as as david plummer register. That is the plumber all of a sudden. I've got so many things going on which one i how do i manage it how to manage that. I thought take complexity away and we've got to rest and you know intuitive services that are easy to use. I think this isn't something that hasn't been seen in other industries. This is bound taking best practice ratchet understanding the i mean the fundamental jobs that consumers you're really wrigley trying to do and then meeting them with good service. You know the if you think about the complexities now of all of the different things that sits in most people's mobile phones today actually there abstracted distracted by good customer experience and that fundamentally is probably the thing. That's been most missing from a from the s._m._e. Market really we. We've been in a situation where despite like the fact that s._m._e.'s materially shift g._d._p. In this country that they've just been underserved for such a long period of time say i honestly think this is bizarrely the beginning any of this story the you know go back to this will happen in the first place with you know i'll be asked problems and williams england and everything that happens. It's tough out to be a pretty damn good ending ending you know for for the s._m._e.'s in this space for june twenty five million pound coming into this area is pretty impressive but the end of the beginning yes. He kicks this. This is the star of something rather than the well. I think we'll probably what we'll do is. We'll finish actually if we bring you guys back in maybe against time. Let's get back together a okay from now. Let's go back everybody in the room and see where we're at because i think it's going to be a pretty amazing space all right that wraps up today's discussion. Thank you all for joining us so i'm not sure where can people find out a little bit more about you and kodak alex yes so kodak donohoe the websites and we're going to be money twenty vegas in october so if you'll come on that's where the money's got dan you regrets right to making that point immediately and working people. Are you including yes. It's andrew clay bank on twitter cleared. Bank is the orally we some people still get wrongly and lincoln there gets. Some people find out more about you and atom yeah. That's social media outlets than me. Mainly linked very good rob. How about you a nationwide so nationwide foreigners. Is you know in branches in nature cut at u._k. And for nearly two and and we'll be coming with people position to back into this year very exciting sarah you can find me on twitter zakrzewski wonderful and ask for me. You can find me on at eh over on twitter. Don't forget to subscribe so you never miss one of these episodes followers on all with good social media platforms and leave a review over on. I tunes. We do love reading those reviews. James sarah has also written local missed topic which you can find on the insights page run eleven fest dot com check out love to hear what you think. Thanks very much goodbye..

twitter david plummer pimlico kodak dan Jim s._m._e. James sarah wrigley andrew clay williams england lincoln twenty five million pound
"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"Of the foam which is the incentivize switching fund and that <hes> the the first round of banks were eligible for that was announced earlier this year and that was nine existing banks that were basically given money to encourage ridge customers s._m._s. customers to switch their offerings but it was very specific types of somme well. I think there was a lot of caveats which has a means could be eligible for it and my understanding is that there's still some money left in that pool so that once you guys will get going more banks can be eligible for that pool as well once fundament running. Yeah i mean i mean nationwide. We submitted an application were accepted in the initial ru but on the basis that what we're bringing to market was dependent on us success and we did we resubmitted in june in got reentered right will only go obviously your business current account is not ready for market yet and we're working with partners to do that when we're ready will come in and join the scheme depending on how much of the dowries which is the money which is given to the and is dependent on the size of the business big business to bigger incentive to switch which away from rb s.'s provided and then we'll join the scheme with whatever switching off of that we decided time wants our business current account is fit and ready for the for the market but today has made think you have seen. It's made a difference not quite the difference that you hope and there's still work to do. I think anchors andy referred to try and get the confidence for customers because cast has been out there for the actually gasworks and businesses do jews and it takes some some of the stress out of switching sorry. Is this where the two funds sort of interactive like. I know full well y and moved from lloyds to monzo underpass right so you so you need an alternative capability in innovation from that. That's the thing that lights at least some alternatives go and all the data asymmetry through the guns of the alex is doing a completely eroded in us so that this idea that i stay with my bank because they've known me for years and that must give me an advantage i i think that's the nuance as well because even if you look at the retail side of you say to people all did you know you can switch your bank in seven days not do for you and why would i do that so there's still an amount of that on the assamese hops even more so like x. as david said elliot. It's just a red balloon or a metal guard rub plastic card but that's not enough. I don't know one of those accounts. I think i'll probably make for that. I think that's that's the point around. I keep saying to bio competition or choice. I think people have had choice for a long time which is like red won't they won't but actually creating competition a market where services are actually the thing that differentiates in which organization you're actually choose from that feels like it's a you know that's when organizations nations are working to help s._m._e.'s rather than working to maybe extract with funds from the estimates. Get the point around service..

alex monzo underpass andy s._m._e. elliot david seven days
"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"That's that's more of what we want because all of us probably had a lot of these things on the road map we had everything they're retired already kind of lined up and it was all about how do we actually make this quick. How do we bring it to market. How do we actually raise awareness of what we're doing. It is a little bit of a tokyo so everybody's got the same sort of thing so i think all those people who didn't actually i think we're still seeing a lot of innovation into the marketplace from those guys as well. Yeah i was going to say i would think think that whether unit whether you put together the bid and you didn't win. You still got that you've put the time and effort into that now so you might as well go ahead with off your back if you've got the funds all aw if somebody who didn't put in a bid and does currently have an s._m._e. Offering who's sitting there looking around yoga. Oh my god we're going to have to pay for these guys. It's got to be a win win win. From all parts of the competition aspect. I guess the question will be how how quickly people start delivering slightly more new sunni for atom is slightly anymore nuance which is because of this money we can do it differently not just faster so there's a reason why people launch products like they do because they have have to make money to be able to launch suppose with this we're able to actually build something of genuine utility to s._m._e.'s which around which we can build products us and we can make money quite transparently and happily and the customers quite happy with that because the game genuine utility from a tool that we're delivering into the market so more big sightings once once servery started to deliver on all of these commitment is to then see. How do they hook together. So you mentioned funding options for example those is when as i is there a place were they start hooking up to other propositions to enrich those propositions after that delivered their v._c._r. Commitment and you can kind of start seeing that you can kind of see a map kind of forming above. You've actually if you saw the medium size enterprises what they use cases with with business banking is very different micro microbusiness right so what does that actually actually look line can actually some of these winners team up together in two fintech style at some plumbing annalisa new now on real medium sized enterprise side proposition that maybe the fund initially wasn't targeted but i think actually you'll have an outcome the looks like that and then just to different aspects you can look at it as one this much quota choice for s._m._s. in terms of the bank in which was your new was needed from. The people that were win for poor. Lane is real choice. They're banking services plus. The response sponsored incumbents will have to do and we'll we'll do..

Lane tokyo s._m._e.
"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"By the cash flow and focused oh cast goes anywhere from sort of overdraft working capital facility all the way through its to secure lending falange development purchase and we want to tap into sort of almost half of u._k. S._m._e.'s her these permanent number borrowers who have one hundred seventeen billion i think of deposits languishing not making any interest so in put some smarts savings into the product as well into into the experience and then provide meaningful and actionable insights and scenario planning and that kind of things around package and then we also committed to reading now partnering with ten innovative at least u._k. Fintech assamese and creating seventy jobs in the northeast where we're based in durham and the whole not transparent reporting and governance which i think everyone's also committed to the table is anybody else committed to matching all going <music> at in their own funds to this as well and we are on the table. Yes guess from nationwide does yeah yeah yeah and yes. We hear that okay so everybody it has. I think it will. I'm not sure what i think. It was set the scene in the parade. It's yeah the it said. If you wanted to be in a game you needed to to match the yeah sometimes mark for some of the maps of over and above so if you're one of the very small intex matching watching five million is is quite hucker to go over and above that is probably going to even harder but how about you how how will nationwide to be spending spending the money so we'll be ready to help us boost style turbocharger entry into the banking market. It's not a market currently in new to the the market which is what was to do. We'll we'll take our mutual and members of focused approach into the banking mark and look to disrupt the major banks with we have a combination of digital banking offering from business current camps moving out to savings and unsecured lending and credit cards connect with a great digital journey coupled with support from.

durham S._m._e.
"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"Effectively pay a bunch of startups and challenges to to compete with amazon effectively and perhaps part with those banks down the line and get a piece of that pie is a different way to come at this competition. Otherwise amazon will probably is one of the whole s._m._e. Market given enough time a really interesting point that i hadn't considered because i was coming a mole from the s._m._e. Market in the u._k. Had been historically quite fixed. It was it was wet. Banks made net interest margin right if you compare that <hes> that that sort of market to the retail market which had quote unquote free banking in the in the s._m._e. Banking those people holding a lot of deposits and effectively. You have something where the role fees involved. It was a lot more profitable but the s._m._e. Experience just just wasn't great and the problems being solved. I think it was an interesting as well. They've gone for things both both providers that are you provide a service providers. People are actually delivering to the market but for me. I think what's interesting is they've also gone for people living kind and the fabric of the market price so the currency cows modulars the code out and you know you've got people that delivering things i would say friction out of the market overall by by improving data transfer or payments transfer. I think it's quite an interesting approach. Hopefully we'll ask you to multiplies average structure. Isn't that yells. Oh so you're not just doing that front end. You're not just giving banks a million pounds to do it to a fancy new end bill which which may not work given that they're relying on the assistance. If we update the systems as well at the same time then then hopefully it has a double impact yeah they come for kind of multiplier effect on the money but also in the in the marketplace germany as melissa competition. I think it seems like a good mix. So what do we think this is going to leave as an three five years time do think s._m._e.'s call coming back to your point. Is it going to be <hes> <hes> mostly amazon still doing the lending and now they've got a lot of new suppliers all or actually going to see a material more confrontation. I think competitions ultimately going to be a good thing. Ah this relatively early stage if you compare it to other industries but at the same time with with as much love and respect to the people in the room here i wouldn't against amazon having a massive passive chunk of all parts of the democrat. I'm not sure i agree with that. I think i can see a scenario where amazon quite quite dominant in the online marketplace marketplace participants so e sella's but are they going to participate. Are they going to win market share with other unrelated so k. manufacturing companies companies on jay. I'll give you an example of why in three three years maybe not in five. Maybe in the u._s. probably in july. Maybe they announced that. They're working talking with realty their real estate platform you can once you basically find a house. Go through amazon to finish it to get get a bunch of staff and there's some sort of discount punishable tie up there the details but all of a sudden amazon's now attached to a bunch of home improvement vendors small businesses that maybe even your plumber whatever else and so all it takes is one or two partnerships and then they're in an industry that you never thought they'd be in. It's an interesting concept stephen. I wonder if the point was more. Is it sort of a a bit more of a patchwork of suppliers on a bit more competitive than you might. Let's see where with a with an financial weather marketplace's being. They're they're more dominant. The market is quite different in the west but possibly does what what makes it intriguing if nothing else i think two main trends one is the kind of close ation of fintech so you down by sectors whether that is in real estate or an amazon retail payments and credit going into the country into the workflow but i thought we'll have a big effect on lending but i think the other pieces gemini particular s._m._e. It's been a market. It were decision on finance. Particular hasn't been very data driven..

amazon Banks germany melissa competition s._m._e. three three years three five years million pounds
"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"Number two is to kind of bring new use cases to the market for integrations with accounting software so that's really in the in the startup and the guys who are doing the kind of really out there stuff and then three it's to link one hundred thousand small businesses businesses through all platform very cool and in terms of the <unk> a space that you guys rain right now who was the i guess the in the competitive landscape escape that sort of work with you guys so you mean the competitive landscape on all sides in terms of on your side also so i mean we're we're kind of still out there and at the forefront of this the main thing we come up against is people building integrations themselves directly with each one of the batches the that's sage age quickbooks zero these players and what we see is that really it's the maturing of the ecosystem so people saying hold on. I've got to build a whole a load of different integrations. Don't wanna do this myself. I want to outsource to a third party makes it a standard process forever. Actually if you look at the winners from your pu you could actually sleep foreman. Is this little group yourself so you're you're playing in similar but slightly different spaces soon the other winners and pool d were fluidly which does of cash flow management front end stuff. I'm funding options which is sort of a lending marketplace really i suppose and sweep from three he will be back end again so you could actually you could actually work together as both yes yes oh interesting the prochet exactly who but several of those down back in very good what about you what's what's it's the the impact atom atom ecstatic to one ten million pounds announced last tuesday so it's about bringing lending payments polcy so from commitments perspective. We're going to get another fifteen of our own money. So i twenty five million pounds deliver something go back home and followed jobs to be done process to to to do some genuinely estimates central research and an all says that it's it's a lonely places and as a small business owner and this is a very personal journey. You spend a lot of time not knowing if you're doing the right things at the right time to develop l. Let your business and concentrate on doing your business rather than administering any other teams kept coming out very little thoughts about product and so you know s._m._e.'s he's one help not product push and so what what we're going to build should address some of that and so <hes> the public commitments we made an and driven digital tools allowing customers to an monitor their finances cashflow anticipate shortfalls and.

s._m._e. foreman business owner twenty five million pounds one ten million pounds
"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"K. or international payments estimate in the u._k. That was polcy representative. We have from from that group is atom and to facilitate the commercialization of financial technology that is relevant to s._m._e.'s that was pulled confusingly announced before poilcy was which tied in knots for awhile. I'm not quite sure they did that but the representative from that group that we have in the room is kodak so hopefully that is a brief summary. There is also a blog. I've written if you want to back and read that in more detail but it should be enough. I think to get us going today. So sort of lovely referred to as cruel and unusual punishment series you you refer to is is that very often as you can just feel it was such a strange to go from with setting williams and glyn we're building this thing to. We're now going to forcibly give a bunch of money to other players in the market. I you know it's the most amazing thing and the weed is i always come back to. They missed the opportunity not televising the whole thing the pitch process like we could go like well. I am done macy. Would it be way more interesting than the the voice for show but all right well. Let's kickoff with. I say congratulations to all of the winners in the room like it's an amazing <hes> achievement for you guys to go through this process and and get to the point where you now i guess trying to figure out precisely what it is that you'll be doing with the money and the fund particularly. I think he's done amazing job of really sort of shouting about the the public commitments and maybe if we start there with a kind of a bit of a view of what it is that you guys are going to be doing so maybe andy stars with a bit of a view of what the public commitments are for some reason yeah so it's quite interesting because a lot of people think that clipping shouldn't have had an award star aw simply because we don't have a public offering speak and our slightly different because it's a joint they between ourselves and tired. I think a lot of people for that. We'd been working retired tied for for some time beforehand. I think actually original compensations of back at the end of twenty sixteen weeks of level so we've made a commitment with tires zoo have this joint bid and a lot of that. I'm not gonna go into too much because some of that's quite secretive innovation that we're trying to bring to the marketplace but essentially the top line on was between us and tired. We went to kind of take control about eight percent of the market and we're looking to do that with a number of initiatives around cash flow big data rule time incentives real time payments the use of our infrastructure which funny enough is a play. There are other people using as well so we're we're looking at leverage. Ah quite considerably an entire propositions kind of sits on top of that so is a joint partnership say too much sitting inquiries some good stuff with cash.

representative macy kodak poilcy s._m._e. williams andy twenty sixteen weeks eight percent
"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"<music> hello and welcome to fintech insider insights. I'm david and i'm joined by my colleague and co-host sarka ski. Has it's going well. It's the sun's finally out it is. I know it's been a misty sort of weird london week. Isn't it very english. Some of us for it is well. Hopefully this is going to break to the mood someone if not sound side but definitely in the rim we aren't going to be talking today about the obvious remedies fund who are the winners of pools a._b._c._d. And see because that's how it was was announced widely. We're here to talk about the road to winning those grants the that's gonna have on the industry and what is actually going to deal with all that money so we're joined today by some special guests just happened to be big winners of the different pools so at least you just totaled up. Actually we've got about one hundred twenty five million of the fund. That's been awarded wooded in <hes> in this room which is pretty go in itself so i we have andy smith. Who is the c._t._o. Over clay has gone not bad david not bad. Thanks very get. We have alex cardona. Who is the co founder at kodak's. How's it going good thing. We have robe angus. Who is the chief propositions and finance officer officer over at nationwide for business. Thank you very good and we have some brown. Who is the head of business over at atom bank. How's it going along relax than a week ago. We'll come to that full shadowing indeed okay. Let's get started with the show so i up sarah before we probably get into this. I guess the twenty five million pound question is widely is the obvious remedies fund so i'm gonna keep this fairly brief because we have touched on this quiet a lot recently but in summary and also please jump in if i get any of this wrong people around the appropriate of the paperwork and find details benefit but long long story short obvious was bailed out by the u._k. Government after two thousand eight crisis by proxy or the u._k. Taxpayers to the tune of around forty five billion pounds <hes> <hes> in pretend that you could give him a pissing shares post crisis. The bank agreed to a number of conditions one of which was spent a part of the business to encourage competition so the plan and was to resurrect to brand called williams and glyn which had been absorbed into our bs and the plan was split it back out again and have that as a bank that would serve small more medium sized enterprises in the u._k. It didn't quite go to plan there. Were there were numerous. Numerous things is went wrong and long story short. We had to come up with an alternative so plan b was the remedies package which was a lump sum funding to be handed. I an independent body known as the banking competition remedies body or be which was going to hand that money back out again to <hes> eligible companies basically it was actually split into two the bit way hits talk about today's the capability an innovation fund there was also the incentivized centralized switching fund which we will come to no doubt toledo cost the capability and innovation fund was divided into four pools those david mentioned earlier elia so was to facilitate the development of more advanced business current account offerings and cillari products s._m._e.'s in the u._k. <hes> so the winner from that pool that we have is clipping pool b was to facilitate the modernization of existing business current account offerings or the development development of new business current accounts or ancillary product propositions estimates in the u._k. The winner we have from that group is to visit the expansion of business this offerings to include lending all payment services to estimates in the u..

david atom bank officer andy smith alex cardona toledo elia kodak co founder sarah s._m._e. glyn williams forty five billion pounds twenty five million pound
"s._m._e" Discussed on The Bitcoin Podcast

The Bitcoin Podcast

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"s._m._e" Discussed on The Bitcoin Podcast

"Let's say four hundred subjects so after that it can spend the third day in whatever you can find feet <hes> <hes> n._c._a._a. Viewers ending what <hes> or <hes> echoed <hes> based on the commitment i mentioned earlier. <hes> us is credit line and these were things really really gets interesting. Because the moment the then feast please <hes> buys. Let's say goes grocery shopping and spend fifty bucks is account goes from zero to negative negative. It goes to minus fifty. The grocer account goes plus fifty at that very moment the dentist as being creating tarred next credit and the moment e goes from minus fifty be back to zero or over zero is basically repaying is that to the community not a single member but the whole community so it's basically a currency. It does not a true interest. There is no interest in the system at all <hes> it functions mostly as a means of exchange <hes> it. It's very not common kalman that is used as star value also because sard next are not meant to be converted back and forth into do you rose started next are meant to be created and destroyed through trade among s._m._e.'s among small companies or or even medium companies and for the purpose of keeping the local economy alive <hes> the only objective ear is two key to to keep trading among <hes> <hes> companies that are in proximity <hes> even <hes> <hes> when <hes> the official <hes> economy traditional economy <hes> where all these companies also operate <hes> <hes> gets into trouble nice so a good way l. u. <hes> to american listeners would it be accurate to to say that it's a local currency of sort. Yes yeah i would say so <hes> our local mutual credit system if we want to be very very precise who is the principal. Your is mutual credit. Okay all community credit yorker and a local currency is is <hes> the sex unit of account <hes> transferable from one member to another oh yes oh yes i mean the <hes> the members can credit and debit each other as as as a normal <hes> normal transactions they just use our own up as opposed to <hes> whatever the visa network or <hes> a bank payment and often <hes> we also have companies who use and do <hes> blended payments as we call them <hes> so <hes> where <hes> <hes> you know part of the <hes> invoice is settled in you rose through normal channels and another part these settled inside the through <hes> the up are the the web up yep <hes> so <hes> when you say hey that is valued at one euro and it's stable <hes> how is there any kind of mechanism that guarantees the the stability <hes> or is it simply the fact that members in the union <hes> accept it like a dollar so therefore it's exchange it's exchanges value is essentially a dollar what keeps it from shading or depreciating relative <hes> <hes> yeah the teen year is is that <hes> since there is no convertibility so <hes> there is no secondary market. There is no price discovery in classical trip. If the currency <hes> juggle right <hes> air <hes> saturday is to the euro <hes> <hes> unit of account by <hes> by the members <hes> because for <hes> simplicity reasons mostly <hes> because they don't need to think even bother about both <hes> hoping that <hes> the balance the today we will not be worth a will be worth more tomorrow <hes> in in in in terms of stability <hes>. I mean i could talk hours. There's about the euro and it's people's and then these problems but as being a fairly stable <hes> so far fairly stable currency princi- and so it's it's purely voluntary and and <hes> it's purely <hes> <hes> an agreement <hes> to treat units <hes> as such because there is no <hes> <hes> deposits in a bank. Thank all or collateral <hes> in terms of i don't know <hes> whatever acids it's a convention invention yeah and it's also easier yep and it's also because the people who offer services in return for starbucks artifacts for example <hes> are themselves pricing the services the same in euros and sardonic as well so the way that the currency he is minted to use cryptocurrency parlance yeah similar to <hes> someone essentially providing these goods or services <hes> but it you simply change how the payment is settled instead if you offer payments for goods.

starbucks kalman principal official s._m._e.
"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"Though so you mentioned <hes> voice recognition technology earlier and this data that shows that women struggle with voice recognition technology because typically it's designed by men for men so it doesn't recognize women's voices for Aberdeen was thinking it was my accent women? The population in the plates Emplo for the last time you met was the university where we're looking squarely into these things and working with Newcastle on the Fin Trust Program so that is specifically looking at bias in May I buy some chat bots and and trying to find solutions to to drive out the the unconscious elements of those a lot comes back to the point you to sang in around trust. I mean if you can't trust the people and you can't trust the algorithms rhythms that actually you get to a bad place very quickly with to your point around the communication back to people I mean you know bringing it back to banking a little bit is like people have been used to banks talking to them not like human beings you know you all and and for some good reasons in some of that you know I was Kinda. Safe like you receive a message from Your Bank and you take it and you text it to your mom. Your mom would be like would've I don't like how did you <hes> so you know the idea that essentially you can start talking to humans and like humans but that the trust is in the brands ends that actually you have so if you do say no then actually you're on a good footing to actually push back because you have that trust. You have that relationship with your customers. That actually allows you to to do that. You know the place where I mean. The regulators been very scared about anybody saying anything really so you know now you can actually start having much more doyle organ explaining to people why and doing it like a human. I think people will start getting a little better response. Even even if it's not telling them the reason why you've declined them telling them things that could help them mm to improve their financial health. WHO's GonNa make a difference yeah all these people that are trying to get their foot on the housing ladder in the WHO are in the early to mid thirties? You know what forty years ago no one would have believed that it was such a struggle to get on the housing ladder but if you can educate those people on how to improve their credit score so go away and do a bit of this and doom if that and actually there are ways that you can get your payment of your rent taken into account in assessing you credit score but for us in the banking industry I think there is an obligation and a responsibility do that for us to help people understand that also for us to make it easy for them to do that. I mean S._M._e.'s is a space exactly like that. You know so I mean you've been doing of things in the space from a lending perspective because when you're a you know an entrepreneur governor running a business and you're looking for thank support at like say empathy in that intensity comes is a huge thing right yeah exactly exactly the same challenge and it's a the U._K.. S._M._E. population woefully under served group of people and <hes> you know the theft falling between the gap of the accountants and the bank and no one's giving them that level of advice that says here are some things you can do to get yourself lending ready for and so borrowing ready from a customer perspective and you know when you have excess cash how you earning.

Fin Trust Program S._M._e. Newcastle Aberdeen theft forty years
"s._m._e" Discussed on The Ready State

The Ready State

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"s._m._e" Discussed on The Ready State

"<hes> that's a you know a converted barn that we can burn office space and then I built the building on top of Hill on the other side of our property which is about square feet which has a gym and a full place for you know seminars whatever we want to do so it's been really it's been good for Nali us but also great for my family and my kids to Kinda see that this happens I think they'll grow cope with an interesting perspective of this stuff. Yeah it's all happening right at their house so so it is interesting to think about you and Kelly and the other cross with S._M._e.'s teaching so many people sign signed worked for John and his course before I even use initial right what happened is <hes> we need you wanted to you needed to get your own course and I think the only way they were going to give your course was if they saw that you were gonNA come working kick ass on my course the need to me this much lightning in one place so we're going to give Kelly his own. Course I WANNA get in because this whole season is sort of aware they now of cross people and I do want to get into how you I learned about cross. I feel that before that <hes> I'd like you to tell us a little bit about your pre croff it athletic background yeah so I grew up in southern California youngest. Three brothers went to high school in Palos Verdes played sports their a high school football. <hes> you know fighting stops basketball. You know normal things kids do and I ended up being pretty decent. Listen some weights and playing football and then ended up getting a scholarship goes to U._C.. Berkeley or a wind up in the northern California <hes> was there five years was able to get a undergraduate degree in rhetoric like English philosophy degree whilst by football and then to my master's in education my fifth year around that time I got drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles as the a second pick in the fourth round came in and started as a rookie for.

California football Kelly Nali Palos Verdes Philadelphia Eagles Berkeley basketball John S._M._e. five years
"s._m._e" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

Data Engineering Podcast

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"s._m._e" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

"Downstream downstream to other teams and other organizations either for direct integration or for being able to provide secondary data products from that in a reusable and repeatable manner yes definitely they're they're parallels and I think we can learn from those lessons. You know we have gone through the Dave and op separation and we you know we devops we brought them together and as a side effect of that we generated a we created a wonderful generation of engineers call this series. I think absolutely the same the same parallels can be applied in those learnings can be applied to the world of data one thing I would say though <hes> going into the you know distributed model with distributed ownership ship around data domains with different you know infrastructure folks supporting that bringing products thanking platform thinking on all of that together to it. It's a hard journey N._S.. counterculture to to a large degree to what we have today in organizations it today data platform data lake is a separate organization all the way to the side really not embedded into the operational systems. What I like to hope to say is that data becomes the fabric of the organization to they we do not argue about having A._p._I.'s serving capabilities to the rest of the organization from services that are owned by different people but for some reason we argue that that's not a good model for sharing data which I'm still puzzled by so data right now is separated? People are still thinking you know. There's a separate team. Deal with data data is like the operational systems folks are not really incentivized to own or even provide you know I'm kind of trustworthy data so thing we still have a long way to go for organizations to reshape themselves and there is so much challenge there is a lot of friction and challenge between operational systems and data that needs to be unlocked and the consumption of that in a meaningful fool way <hes> I definitely I am working with and also have seen pockets of these being implemented but for people who get started and aware I'm starting also with a lot of our clients is not big is not day one. It doesn't look like a distributed ownership and distributed team so on day one we in fact do start with maybe one physical team that brings people from those operational domains as S._M._e.'s into the team it brings infrastructure folks into the team but though it's one physical team Unin linked take us like the repose for Code that generate data for different data domains are separate repose their separate pipeline's the infrastructure has a separate backlog for itself so virtually internally have separate teams but they're still working on day one. They're still working under one programme of work and hopefully as we go through the maturity already of building this in a distributed fashion those internal virtual teams that are there have been working on their separate repo-. They have a very explicit domain that they're looking after then they can kind of once we have enough of the infrastructure in in place to support those domains to become autonomous completely autonomous than they can go out and be turned into long standing teams that are responsible for that data for that domain so that's though that's a target state. I do WanNa just mentioned that there is a maturity and there is a journey that we have to go through and probably make mistakes along the way in land and correct <hes> to get to get to that point at scale but I'm very hopeful because I have seen this happen weapon power as you mentioned parallel in the operational world and I think we have a few missing pieces for it to happen in the data world but I'm hopeful based on the conversations that I had with with companies since this has started <hes> I've heard I heard a lot of horror stories failures stories in the need for change so the need is there of also been talking to <hes> many companies that have come forward and say we are actually doing this. Let's let's talk so they haven't may be publicly published. Published and talked about their approach their internally during the kind of leading front of changing the way and challenging the status coal around data management one of the issues with data lakes is at the face value the the benefit that they provide is that.

Dave A._p._I. S._M._e. Unin
"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"They're few hours has gone beyond London either way around and if he's I think maybe it will say bristow so I have to confess so the way it stung right the offline the risk of important right the way you measure the offline is to uptick on your nine right and so we do the same thing so we had Manchester and other than what we basically do is we see maxing out the digital side than we do a test of process and so on and we attribute the uplift to the offline campaign right and so we actually have been doing this Bradley. How did we didn't catch up? They wear that the way way in Edinburgh but we did Manchester Bristol and a few other cities and we're definitely going through its through through that and the interesting thing is if you look at matured Monza what you said Moms who is like if you look at tight aid distribution of of of of member so S._M._e.'s is actually very much the U._k.. Renzo London Greater London unfortunately is thirty thirty five percent depending on which K._p._i.. You're looking at however. The is just regional spread and we have the same issue all over the place which is essentially prompted awareness of the relevant target group is just too low and it's difference between actually so regional differences one but also it's income age demographic as well so if if you put a television ad on a Saturday night at nine o'clock you're going to reach a very different demographic to the Tech Savvy Andrew etc so it's not just as where you are the people used it might have been the same age bracket and income people in London moms and dads you start using them but he was quite interesting as N.. twenty-six is cheap ads have changed over time so I'm one of these sad people who for purposes of having like photos to put on my website I take photos under the not we can be sad together with this approach a very much like W- issue cool very cool bank and that message obviously hasn't worked in the bullshit wasn't and they also have this like dude with like his hair. Hey I like playing back like he's been blown by head. Dryers sifted obstacle about their walls around yeah exactly nobody wants to go find. It was a fantastic sifted. Article on twenty six is admission that that failed to Brown correctly in the U._k.. In France but it's given they didn't hear so let me just so I'm not sure within twenty six or we you could Hughes title. I mean we don't fundamentally changed the brand proposition we'd try different creatives right so the first thing we go in and we tried to set the lift and then we actually tried to say different types of messages use to optimize things and I think this is partly where actually within tied where thing will be don't call. There's certain things that we fail and certain things. They're learning so we always say if you test something that we would never ever tell the team team. This is a failure because we defined certain amount of budget and we say look you know we've tried to best and the key things we call defy the learning so it's called a learning a failure is if it's outside test and learn ride. You haven't judged right the risk taking that's a failing and that's what I think very very important from the risk taking of Phoenix where we'd take risks all the time to people feel comfortable that they are not exposed to being called a face works is like boring but factor or is it funny. Is it pawns four for the for the for the what I can tell you. I don't know the consumers I think that's one of the things that I keep battling with this that people confuse very much business sector with the personal sector so business sectors always about being very serious. S._M._E.'s in general don't have multiple banking in relationships unlike consumers where they have the the opened the twentieth account small business don't do that. They don't want to spread the liquidity. They don't want to account for Multiple Council. It's all about being very serious and right and as far as tie disconcerting things messages messages. We want to know that we iterating around either. Do we actually promote a business current account or the value added services around right because that's really differentiated..

London Manchester Bristol Renzo London Manchester Andrew Multiple Council bristow Edinburgh Bradley France S._M._e. Brown Phoenix Hughes S._M._E. thirty thirty five percent
"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"s._m._e" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"To verify that credit worthiness more efficiently than traditional bricks and mortar banks and so I think the application of the. The fintech phenomena to the person AW society providing real solutions to allow them to budget veteran to access you know financial products more easily is where I think that's great opportunity and and <hes> I wanna see that facilitated an extended and and be too yeah. It feels like as you say there's there's potential to focus really into small groups doesn't whether it some bank to I mean the remedies funds that have been unlock yeah. It feels like you're GONNA get amazing amount of focus there as well wealth as well to your point. It's actually being in a situation went. Digital can just facilitate well. If a few weeks ago I went to visit funding options who the sensually provide a an online marketplace funding for S._M._e.'s giving them more appropriate tailored match to the needs of different small businesses and I think that principle is obviously mostly applicable to the person society with different profiles and different needs and that sort of work excites me because I think it means a step change in terms of the better than you know people in unauthorized hike high high-cost lending or exploitative actors who really don't care about what's happened to individuals involved yeah. It's it's interesting isn't it. It's a relentless focus on the end-consumer. Isn't it and I find the the matching their really interesting because we've oh really big organizations learning again sort of rekindling of that fire for customers intensity. You've got fintech players coming in who are born into the digital age. You are by nature very sort of consumer centric so it's an interesting sort of battlefield. That's really sort of shaping enough and it's happened so quickly. Just thinking as you will ask as you were talking that I left university in one thousand nine hundred six and I remember friend in the states telling me to contact her by email and I was like at a book assault New Room now you know we we do virtually everything on the device that we carry in our pockets from our banking or scheduling a shopping delivering a food and we've seen a transformation in the generation says exciting to think about perspective Fintech where we will be in twenty years time because I think the air that's quite interesting to is to anticipate needs and year of open banking you know. How can you say well actually you? This is your behavior of the last three months. Can we suggest these interventions to make your life function better. This is where it gets very exciting and transformational. Yeah sites completely agree we we took a lot about the different stream products and services and actually that move as as you say to a service where you can avoid people going into overdraft soul of weed people defaulting on loans. I mean anything that's preventive rather than <hes> sort of restoration posters absolutely nothing syntax the heart to that and say we're seeing lots of work going on in small firms getting up to grits some these ideas and the flight working that is obviously exciting for the country and you know I think is an enormously strong sector employing lots of people.

assault S._M._e. three months twenty years
"s._m._e" Discussed on The Ready State

The Ready State

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"s._m._e" Discussed on The Ready State

"Have been used to accelerate and raise both mental and physical performance in world-class Olympic and professional athletes top executives and operators as well as to improve the health for people suffering from various chronic illnesses. Everyday people have used Brian's tools to reduce pathologic stress into vastly heighten their mental and physical wellbeing in performance Brian himself. Health is a bad ass athlete. He completed the Ironman Canada and both the Western states one hundred and the Angeles Crest one hundred using adopted training protocols he developed to avoid injury and fatigue. We are super stoked to have Brian on this season of the podcast podcast because he is one of our best friends and because he was in the crossword world from the very beginning as an S._M._e.. Of Cross it endurance for those outside the Cross Bit Universe will let Brian Explain what that means Brian Mackenzie welcome to the ready State podcast postulate star at thank you for having me. I'll just jump right in here. You were not one of the first fifty Crawford affiliates but you were part of a special group of people known as cross fit S._M._e.'s so can you tell us what Vanessa is <hes>. What what what it is you were doing for Crawford as an S._M._e.? In the early days yes Ma'am so I think we're like round two fifty or something as an affiliate but <hes> the S._M._e.. Program was my highway in to cross fit because I anyway it's Sesa S._M._e.. Is a subject matter expert and I got involved with cross fit for the reason of endurance training we I figured out a new paradigm in how train sports specific with regards to endurance training and part of that equation was running mechanics and my entrance into cross awesome it came because I actually emailed Greg. I was like I really love what you're doing and you're so focused on movement but everybody run like Shit and I might by the way we've we've done a few to heavy duty endurance events and I just finished a my second hundred mile and we use this program and we used it in conjunction with cross fit to actually do something it. He instantly like he responded. I think that day to me was like hey can you come to Santa Cruz and talk about this and that was kind of the kickoff of what I did and that was when level ones actually had guests that would show up on Sundays and they had like an hour to I believe to actually present and information and if the community liked it then you would get an invite to another one and if they continued to like it then Greg. I would invite you to put invite you to be an S._M._e.. I had a fighter guy at my level one. Do you remember what his name was. John how common yes I had John Holloman at my my level one so yes so you are I remember when I first became aware of you. You are so well known because you could take a traditional like let's say marathon running program where people normally would do this period is thing and at the end they would end up running like twenty three miles before the marathon or something and you're able to say no. You'd actually don't need to do that much. Volume you can do way less volume and be successful and probably really prevents him. Injuries and be more awesome you tells do we call that. The cats and dogs program exactly where people were like what what you can start at how are you. Hey just that you don't have to run a marathon to be able to run a marathon. You you can do a lot less than run a marathon and be awesome totally that that was pretty much what we did and I you know I mean really really really smart. People would be like no you can't but you know when we talk about about training for an an endurance event. The limiting factor and endurance events are not what people actually equate them to typically be <hes> and so..

Brian Mackenzie Greg John Holloman Ironman Canada Crawford Angeles Crest Vanessa Santa Cruz S._M._e.
"s._m._e" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"s._m._e" Discussed on Probably Science

"It. Guys Talk to Kaitlin nurturing rather make it a lot of choices eyebrows work into Deniro impression tighten me up and you got to give me puppy dog I am I was the best bringing eyebrows together a little bit and bringing them up or something together and up lifting some other emotions back this right. Oh yeah good is for all the middle the test about who sociopath and I think failed it because I can't. I thought all of you were looking at me like can you get your eyebrows together this yeah I think there's a couple of examples. Where maybe this is gone too far? <hes> like Pomeranians I think are their schools are ninety percent eyeball Shitzu. Just looks like they're about to pop pugs same way. Maybe we've gone what do far don't French. bulldogs sometimes get a condition where there I like is top out of there yeah. Oh Sherrie wash your hand. Is it called Cherry I or something things in a dog definitely cute dog with this thing prolapse the third eyelid of dogs than Cherry which is that one of the shuckers that's literally discussing Eagle Eye Cherry so so the finding shows like you said like wolves don't have this so it was something that developed at some point inbetween wolf sunny into Doug Yeah and previous research has shown that dokes more likely to use this puppy is expression when human is looking at them suggesting it as a deliberate behavior and intended for human consumption not to each other these genetic exactly each other and anatomist and Co report author professor and boroughs of Duke University Duquesne like defraigne how that ends in the university. That's G. U.. Q. U. E. S._M._e.. Duquesne Yeah like Frisbee Pretty Basketball team well. They have a good professor and have your school start with the word do and they just get worse from. I played basketball team at Duke. Just graduated from Harvard Tuten Turn Pale so in and Barra says in evolutionary terms the changes that dokes facial muscles was remarkably fast ost and could be directly linked to dogs in social interaction with humans. The findings says Professor Bridget Waller of university polls miss show how important faces can be and capture attention and how powerful facial expressions can be in social interaction is interesting..

professor Professor Bridget Waller Duke University Duquesne Kaitlin Deniro Duke Duquesne Barra Basketball U. E. S._M._e Co ninety percent
"s._m._e" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"s._m._e" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"You know not a true Scotsman as I say not true Hugh X. I think you'd hear someone say I'd run a design sprint. You know this whole design sprint design thinking. Is that made it over to your part of the world interesting. I set it like I could see someone saying it's basically like an internal workshop over multiple days with multiple cross functional teammates so like an engineer a product person a stakeholder some. S._M._e.'s and we're all going to brainstorm solutions instead of expensive. Jeff breaking off of my shoulders to I'm supposedly the authority. It's it's expect it takes it off of my shoulders. When it shouldn't yeah my thought is if you have a problem or question with relating to product or you exit your company? Why don't you just bringing it to you X.? Yes we have good ways to collaborate. Yes you have good ways to collect ideas and brainstorm with other people but to go into a room and have everyone sketching solutions seems a little bit off the track when when we should spend more time understanding the problem right but you think this is an extinct aspect of yeah I can see you being involved in the crowds gathering phase and putting together prototypes so forth that get us on our path but when they step back in as we're building things and we are having conflicts with the way that they that design is laid out or are not haven't followed it whilst we didn't understand it in the first half yeah so I tell people that I tell the U.. X. People that we need to start as soon as we get those requirements. We need to talk to engineering immediately and we need to learn what are technical limitations. Is there something that we might already be starting to dream of that. We can't build and these are the types of things I heard when I worked at macy's Allot Oh. We don't really have that in the architecture or oh. We don't really have a service for that well. Are you going to do that by the time I designed this more design around something that doesn't exist so we have to be collaborating really early to understand stand where there are limitations where I can't design something you can't build and then I like to show engineering my work in progress roughly every week and that way not for your approval not for your ideas not insight as to where you not because I need you to thing but just we don't get surprised later and I disappeared for weeks or months design something and then threw it over the fence at you in a non collaborative way and you're like holy cats. We can't build this where the heck have you been and so I do believe that we have to be collaborating often but then I also tell engineers start inviting you to all of the meetings. We want to be in release planning sprint planning retro showcases especially if it showcase is going to talk about the U. X.. I should be answering questions about my work. Please don't answer questions about my work but I mean they've worked on the implementation. You've worked on the the flow like what this should be so I would hope before I showed that I checked in with us like this what you were thinking intent but sometimes it's an outside person who asked the question you know these showcases it could be somebody else who has a question about it but <hes> but yeah it's great for us to continue working together like that and I tell people I tell the engineers engineers. If you're using Jira get us into Jira. Whatever is your system? We're on the team now. You're not an outside S._M._e.. Were not an outside consultant. That's part of what's been keeping US apart and keeping US Silo D- imagine us on the team with you. We're doing different pipeline we are. We're creating look if we fall apart. You don't have a backlog so so hypothetically we should be brought into your system. Don't send me to a TRELLO board. Don't send me an excel spreadsheet. Get me in your system. If you have a question of ambiguity maybe I missed something then tag me in a ticket assign a ticket to me and that is great for collaboration called it you X. and devops because nothing to do with devops but devops is like it means on marching the overarching developer operations was how I was looking at..

engineer US Hugh macy TRELLO Jeff S._M._e. developer consultant
Richard Nixon, Novak Djokovic And Facebook discussed on 24 Hour News

24 Hour News

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Richard Nixon, Novak Djokovic And Facebook discussed on 24 Hour News

"Seventy four four? I shall resign. The presidency of bacteria that noon tomorrow. Are. Free. Richard nixon. The game is coming forward. Close enemies close. The note was a cassette tape with the voice of hers. For the past fifty years. Thanks for making ten ten wins the place where more people get their news than any other station in the nation. Ten ten wins. All news all the time. If you love us on the radio like us on Facebook. News all the time. This is Dan wins. You give us twenty two minutes. We'll give you the world. Good afternoon. Twenty nine degrees. It is three forty on this Tuesday. January twenty second. I'm Susan, Richard. And here's what's happening. Already drama in the courtroom in the trial of Manhattan, man, accused of murdering his wife for money are Juliet Papa we'll have the story supreme court weighs in on the transgender military ban and DACA. The White House moves forward with plans for the president to give a state of the union speech on Capitol Hill despite a request from the house speaker that he delays governor Cuomo announced his big plans for four new metro north train stations in the east Bronx ten ten wins. Accuweather cloudy tonight down to twenty-six is Marco belletti can Marian Rivera get one or two percent of the vote will find out tonight for the baseball hall of fame. Islanders Roper Chicago. And Serena Williams and Novak Djokovic both in action tonight. But replacing the SME's at the Australian Open. This is Joan Doniger at Bloomberg. How high drug crisis, go pharmaceutical companies aren't optimistic and trade hit stocks. The dow. Down three hundred thirty seven the NASDAQ one hundred thirty eight wins news time three forty one transit years. Greg rice full ride at this hour on the Long Island expressway

Richard Nixon Novak Djokovic Facebook Governor Cuomo Juliet Papa Serena Williams Joan Doniger Accuweather Greg Rice Marian Rivera Long Island White House Australian Open Manhattan Bloomberg DAN Susan
Identity: Who Am I Anyway?

The Road Home To You

05:12 min | 2 years ago

Identity: Who Am I Anyway?

"Else. Hi, welcome to the road to you. I'm Brad to Gable joined by my husband. We'd like to invite you to join us is we have real conversations about truth, grace and living out our Christian faith. If you have a messy past struggle with the idea of being the perfect Christian or simply curious about just what Christianity is your the right place within, we don't claim to have all the answers, but we're excited to have real conversations that deal with topics that matter. So grab a drink buckle up, and let's head on down that long road home. Good morning. Brandy. Good morning, Matt. And how are you doing this morning? I'm over. Right. I didn't sleep. Great. Yeah, me neither. And as a result, I'm maybe doing less than great. You know, I dreamt about skunks. Oh, that's nice. It wasn't because I could actually smell them. Oh, well, it was weird. I don't know that I've ever had a drain where I could actually smell something in it. Right, but I was smelling skunks. Yes, I was talking to my brother awhile back and talking about how well now that marijuana is legal, it's hard to know if you're smelling a skunk or you're smelling somebody's recreational marijuana. It's possible that it was there was a little bit of real life intruding upon your dream. They hurt you. Wanna come on in and smelling like skunk it was. It was. It was a weird dream. Yeah, very gunky things to consider. Anyway, not why we're here. Right? So this morning we're gonna. We're gonna talk about identity, but I, I wanted to share some stuff with you because I mean, the name of our show kind of suggests that we dig road trips. We'd need a whole summer series on road trips from the bible. Right? I took a road trip this summer. Yeah, which we've already talked about, but we didn't talk about one of my favorite places that we stopped on this road trip. You hear about it, it's a place you've been to. Actually I haven't. We have driven past driven past it. I've gone. Wow. I'd like to stop their aunt, but I'd like to when we drop our daughter off, I've already decided this when we draw our Nodar off to watch him in a couple of years. That's a soothing. She wants to go to the base in Montana SME that right. We on our way back. We are going to stop and we're going to linger in Wallace, Idaho. That sounds good because this is a funny little town and I love it so so much. Okay. Well, as Idaho, that's we're gonna talk about really, really quick. We'll get onto a real subject. Okay. Wallace was founded in eighteen eighty four. It is according to Wikipedia, they principal town of the quarterlane silver mining district it produced more silver than any other mining district in the US. Wow, that's all it does. Is they mind for silver and there's. A lot of shops that would let you know that they mine for silver. Every single building in Wallis is on the national register, historic places. You're kidding? No, because it's I ninety kind of passes right? Right? And the way that they wanted to make the highway go. It was going to essentially decimate all of Wallace back in the seventies, they were able to get it on the national historic register, and so every building must be preserved, it's fabulous. I'm thinking what better way to salvage your town then? Say it's a historical place which it is. I mean, it's an all of these buildings are pretty much from the turn of the century in two thousand and four on September twenty. Fifth, there Mayor, Ron, Garrett, tone proclaimed Wallace to be the center of the universe. Precisely it is a sewer access cover on one of their streets that is the exact okay center of the universe. They've got like a manhole cover that says center of the universe

Wallace Idaho Matt Marijuana Brad Montana Gable United States Wallis Wikipedia RON Principal Garrett
'Acts of genocide' suspected against Rohingya in Myanmar

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

02:24 min | 2 years ago

'Acts of genocide' suspected against Rohingya in Myanmar

"The us on board south korea can really move forward unless it has the trump administration on aboard as well is this just you know south creative saying the north told them everything that trump wanted to hear that remains to me saying i mean the white house has pretty sceptical eve no trump was taking credit the un human rights office says the widespread and systematic violence against roe hinges in me and ma is continuing high commissioner for human rights rupert colville says even genocide call to be ruled out officials in cox's bazar provided credible accounts of continued killings rape torture and abductions as well as fourstar ovation britain's foreign secretary says he will mount a robust response if moscow had anything to do with a suspected poisoning all the former russian spy and his daughter the russian embassy in london has accused boris johnson of speaking as if russia has already been found responsible britain's home secretary amber rodwell cherry cobra security meeting on the matter later today and the leader of italy's fivestar movement luigi demayo is vying to become the country's next prime minister that's off to the populist party gained in sunday's election winning nearly a third of the vote we have one great goal in this moment that is to take the support you have shown us and go with it to the prime minister's office and coal the first cabinet meeting and suppress parliament's members life annuities cut down parliament member salaries and recovered 30 billion euros wasted in public budget and we return them to you the fi saw movement was boosted by voters in the south of italy wet former prime minister silvio right bagless kony has long held sway his forza italia party may also talked to form a government through its alliance with the anti immigrant league which outpolled parties in the north global news 24 hours a day powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries i'm alkas kalsan this is due back on marcus thanking now with the morning sport here's jay townsend to radley wiggins form a couch says he could have made things a lot easier for himself after the 2012 told of france when a claim people are trying to maliciously sme at his reputation and pays it alleged in a report that the cycling legend and team sky use drugs within antidoping rules book crossed an ethical line liverpool are into the champions league quarterfinals a goalless draw with porto gave them a five milligrams win.

Silvio Radley Wiggins Luigi Demayo Italy Amber Rodwell London Rape Porto France Jay Townsend South Korea Prime Minister Russia Boris Johnson Moscow Secretary Britain COX Rupert Colville