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Texas hospital says man, 30, died after attending 'COVID party'

WBZ Afternoon News

00:27 sec | 1 d ago

Texas hospital says man, 30, died after attending 'COVID party'

"Old man from Texas died after contracting Cove in 19 from a party. The man had told his nurse he thought the virus was a hoax, according to a chief medical officer of Methodist Healthcare, Dr Jane Appleby. These parties air held by somebody diagnosed with Corona virus to see If anyone else gets infected to see if the virus is riel just before the patient died, he told his nurse. I think I made a mistake. I thought this was a hoax, but

Dr Jane Appleby Contracting Cove Medical Officer Methodist Healthcare Texas
Number of available beds at metro Atlanta hospitals reaching critical levels

Sean Hannity

00:36 sec | 2 d ago

Number of available beds at metro Atlanta hospitals reaching critical levels

"And and another another part part of of why why Governor Governor Camp Camp has has taken taken this this action action this this afternoon afternoon is is the the story story from from the the hospitals hospitals around around the the Metro. Metro. The The number number of of available available beds beds continues continues to to shrink shrink healthcare healthcare systems across Georgia say they're quickly nearing capacity is more more folks or seeking treatment. In fact, 82% of critical care beds or now in use, leaving a free capacity of just 18%. That increase also means keeping an eye on pp whilst our health Dr Daniel Barr, instead or explains to channel two action news, all areas are going to increase the amount of peop e usage and a demand on the distributors. At Grady, 83% of patient beds are currently in

Governor Governor Camp Camp Dr Daniel Barr Grady Georgia
Texas Hospitals Battle COVID-19

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:30 min | 3 d ago

Texas Hospitals Battle COVID-19

"John Henderson President of the Texas Organization of rural and community hospitals. Thank you so much for talking with us. so tell me what if things been like for you? With covert nineteen, so in the early days of the pandemic are hospitals started telling us they were having a terrible time getting p. mask, and gloves and gowns enhanced sanitizer, and so we kinda became a procurement shop for our rural Texas, hospital and most of those supply chains that we would normally lean on were turned upside down, so we were working with nontraditional vendors and middleman like what were some of the channels that you were reaching out to? Your last. Well. The craziest one was a friend of a friend connected me to a guy he knew that had. Literally smuggled them across the Mexico border in had mask in A. Warehouse in east, Austin, and so. I went down there, and he offered me a Tequila shot and we worked out a deal. And from what I understand like distribution, you say destruction, but that was like you in a car. Well maybe not formal distribution, but twenty or thirty friends of ours that had called our office, saying. Hey, I'd love to help you make deliveries. Kind of created this daisy chain of volunteers across Texas where you know, we could get something to abilene and then a friend in Abilene. Get it on up to Lubbock Grammar out west Texas and the Permian Basin. And, then as we kinda develop and got better at it. We were introduced to people who wanted to help. A A really good example is a lady I met named Camilla all this who I didn't recognize the name, but she's actually married to Matthew mcconaughey. And they were great about getting US donated. Supplies, mcconaughey! Yeah. Hey. Yeah And I didn't realize when she said she had a driver ready that it was matthew with A. Truck full of mask ready to go to. Hospitals. And she said I have a driver. Eddie and it was her husband Matthew mcconaughey, who was like liver masks. If you need me to the threat, it's amazing. Talk to me a little bit about sort of how things have changed since the early days as we talk today, most areas of Texas. Are. Reporting Trans that are a little bit problematic and scary. Right because from what I've read and what I understand like Texas was at a a pretty advanced stage of reopening, and then his actually like walked it back. Early on we were will behind other states especially New York, in thought, we managed it fairly well. Most of that worst case scenario forecast did not materialize in March and April, but it certainly has since the Memorial Day holiday I think that actual coca cases in hospital admissions are like four times higher than they were at the beginning of June and I think for the first time over the weekend. We were reporting more than eight thousand cases a day. So it's it's all headed. Definitely headed the wrong direction, and now we've got a statewide mask. Order Oh so everywhere you go. You have to wear masks outside. Everywhere you go in counties with more than twenty cases, which is almost everybody. We're working to try to secure a stockpile ventilators that we can distribute around Texas you know as we see those flare ups and can help them deal with it. The thing that's actually a little bit scary to me is that the urban areas are at or near capacity which means that the rural hospitals are having to keep patients that are a little bit more acutely, ill or higher level of need than they would normally keep, so we're? They would, they would transfer someone who is really sick to a larger urban hospital, which might have more equipment resources. Things like that. That's exactly right. And they're doing that fairly well, but. In, they've got bed capacity. They're just stretched when it comes to staffing, primarily I think the state of Texas actually has sent twenty three hundred nurses to South Texas to try to help them because the hospitals her. You know bursting at the seams. There's been a lot of coverage about the difficult financial situation that a lot of hospitals are in right now. The things that they traditionally made a lot of money off of elective surgeries and clinic visits have been canceled and they've had to make big investments in equipment and staffing other things to prepare for the pandemic rural hospitals operate on a really thin margin, compared to other hospitals often barely make a profit with this surge coming in Texas. Are you worried that some rural hospitals won't make it? Oh, yes. I was worried in April that we might have a dozen rural hospitals close in, I would get multiple calls every day from rural hospitals. CEO's that were saying. We're on the ropes. You know we didn't have any cash and we were maxed out on credit before this thing started. Now we've got you know. Shutdown orders, clinic, visit, cancellations, and no elective surgeries or procedures in. We aren't going to make the next payroll soccer. We're GONNA close. Thankfully in April. They got some significant federal stimulus money that aimed ten billion dollars nationally that rural hospitals and rural health clinics that single funding alone saved half a dozen rural Texas Hospitals Oh. And so a concern of mine as we look at the whatever the next stimulus package be that if if conditions don't change and that doesn't move, then we could. Have you know more rural hospital closures. You could make an argument that like well we. We should concentrate our resources an urban hospitals and they can have like the very best everything. People can just get transferred. Well, that's that's the argument that urban citizens matter more than rural citizens and I believe every Tex Mex and some of these rural communities are literally. From a larger community, so I think I think Cova has actually been a pretty stark reminder of lots access to healthcare in hospital. Capacity Matters. you know I, I know that we wish we had some of hospitals available that have closed in the last few years. I'm wondering I. Don't know just like what your? Takeaway from this whole thing has been. Well. I think it's probably the most consequential six months in my lifetime, and and maybe the most the next one hundred days. We'll be as important as anything we've been through. A since April,

Texas Texas Organization Of Rural Matthew Mcconaughey John Henderson South Texas United States A. Warehouse Mexico President Trump Abilene Permian Basin A. Truck Austin Soccer Camilla Cova Eddie
Walgreens Shares Get Booted

Balance of Power

01:56 min | 3 d ago

Walgreens Shares Get Booted

"Stock the hour. It's Walgreens Boots Alliance. The stock is falling is announced. It's gonna have to have some layoffs, and he's gonna do some stock buybacks at the same time. Scarlett Fu is here for a full report. Scarlett Yeah, David Walgreens, says the worst performer in the Dow and the NASDAQ 100 losing as much as 10% of its value. Today. The latest earnings report showed a loss for the fiscal third quarter. Net sales were flat and gross margin declined as well. The full year outlook. Came in better or I should say worsen, expected disappointing investors. If you were to look at the vent diagram of where Walgreens fits in. It's basically in the middle between healthcare and retails on the front lines of disruption from Cove it and longer term changes in how consumers behave. So rivals like CVS Health are focusing on health care will has a friend ofthe Amazons pharmacy ambitions. You look at the UK In particular. It contributes the bulk of the pretax profit even though it doesn't come in as much when it comes to revenue and in the UK was where things really fell apart. Traffic plunged 85% April because of the Lock down and that led to a $2 billion charge. David So what about back here in United States? I mean, this was a critical element that we all could go to our drug stores. No matter what, So you think they might have done better here they did to better comparable sales rose 3% as people rushed to stock up on prescriptions. But there's a divergence based on whether it's in the urban market or rule market. We saw urban market sales dropped 18% and in the rule markets sales rose 8% so big big split there. No matter where the stores were located, the Walgreens spent more to clean stores and to pay employees you could see that costs increase and that led to a squeeze in margins for the period. Soto address that, as you mentioned, it's going to suspend stock buy backs. No change was dividend. Walgreens has a pretty juicy dividend yield a 4.9% which is better than CVS. And over in the UK, where foot traffic dropped so much. It's going to cut around 4000 jobs and says retail conditions there will remain pretty depressed. For the rest of the summer.

David Walgreens Walgreens UK Scarlett Fu Scarlett Yeah Amazons United States Soto
"s. healthcare" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

The Voice of Healthcare

03:20 min | 4 d ago

"s. healthcare" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

"It's good to have you with us. We have a show that I've been really Jones in four. I somehow got lucky. and was reading online about really creative folks in the space of Covid. And came across. A group of people that created a skill called the hand wash. And I thought to myself. What is this and it was artists? It was creatives. It was musicians singing in a simple way in order for us to handle a hygienic me during the time of pandemic, which is handwashing something that believe it or not, a lot of people don't do very well at all so I've got three special guest today. Lane Harris Daniel Bremmer and Lucy Cullen Tori. They're gonNA. Talk to us about how they got started why they started it and where it's headed from here so me. Open it up to questions here. I'll start with lean and Daniel. Tell us about how this guy going where you decided to build it. And how did you end up? Incorporating musicians into this tool set that we could argue as a public health benefit more than a musical entertainment sort of enrichment benefit. Well, this this actually start is a shower thought. I had recently seen video that that demonstrated how detergent molecules physically break up the virus behind covid nineteen, and it made it really visceral seeing it <hes> seeing it like that and made me understand the whole twenty second. Recommendation from the CDC. Like okay. We all know we're supposed to wash. Our hands are washing your hands long probably should, but oh, this is probably like a speed limit where it's exaggerated in some some give room, but when I watched this I was like Oh. Wow, this is this is I see how this is important, and and as you know, take a shower with thinking about I'm like it's really hard to make people sit there and do something boring for twenty seconds when it got like twelve other things in their mind, especially during this time <hes>. And what can we do about that? And I had heard about <hes>. Of course, the alphabet saw on the thing. I heard people talking about like their favor taking their choruses, favorite pop songs and <hes> I was thinking what would be something that would be a little bit easier to do. Consistently <hes> and I thought well. We have all these the smart speakers in our homes and a lot of us have our bathrooms. Maybe there's something we can do there <hes> and that's what I started to think lane. The the I thought. I had in my mind before. I reached out to lane was like maybe this? This'll be like an internet variety show. It's a different. You know different things every time you open it like a magic box and we'll be like. Oh, it'll be a joke one day, a weird fact or a story or a song. And so yeah I, give a call <hes> the pretty much straight shower to see if he was interested. And we immediately started batting around ideas <hes> and He felt pretty strongly that it should be one thing and be consistent to provide the user with with <hes>. Only one thing to to to expect, and we very quickly decided that it should be music <hes> and he knew Lucy and <hes> let him go to his side of it, but I think it was about a day and a half that we had a demo.

Lucy Cullen Tori Daniel Daniel Lane Covid grammy Daniel Bremmer Jones CDC Alexa Lucie Westworld Kindi community
The Voice of Healthcare

The Voice of Healthcare

03:20 min | 4 d ago

The Voice of Healthcare

"It's good to have you with us. We have a show that I've been really Jones in four. I somehow got lucky. and was reading online about really creative folks in the space of Covid. And came across. A group of people that created a skill called the hand wash. And I thought to myself. What is this and it was artists? It was creatives. It was musicians singing in a simple way in order for us to handle a hygienic me during the time of pandemic, which is handwashing something that believe it or not, a lot of people don't do very well at all so I've got three special guest today. Lane Harris Daniel Bremmer and Lucy Cullen Tori. They're gonNA. Talk to us about how they got started why they started it and where it's headed from here so me. Open it up to questions here. I'll start with lean and Daniel. Tell us about how this guy going where you decided to build it. And how did you end up? Incorporating musicians into this tool set that we could argue as a public health benefit more than a musical entertainment sort of enrichment benefit. Well, this this actually start is a shower thought. I had recently seen video that that demonstrated how detergent molecules physically break up the virus behind covid nineteen, and it made it really visceral seeing it seeing it like that and made me understand the whole twenty second. Recommendation from the CDC. Like okay. We all know we're supposed to wash. Our hands are washing your hands long probably should, but oh, this is probably like a speed limit where it's exaggerated in some some give room, but when I watched this I was like Oh. Wow, this is this is I see how this is important, and and as you know, take a shower with thinking about I'm like it's really hard to make people sit there and do something boring for twenty seconds when it got like twelve other things in their mind, especially during this time And what can we do about that? And I had heard about Of course, the alphabet saw on the thing. I heard people talking about like their favor taking their choruses, favorite pop songs and I was thinking what would be something that would be a little bit easier to do. Consistently and I thought well. We have all these the smart speakers in our homes and a lot of us have our bathrooms. Maybe there's something we can do there and that's what I started to think lane. The the I thought. I had in my mind before. I reached out to lane was like maybe this? This'll be like an internet variety show. It's a different. You know different things every time you open it like a magic box and we'll be like. Oh, it'll be a joke one day, a weird fact or a story or a song. And so yeah I, give a call the pretty much straight shower to see if he was interested. And we immediately started batting around ideas and He felt pretty strongly that it should be one thing and be consistent to provide the user with with Only one thing to to to expect, and we very quickly decided that it should be music and he knew Lucy and let him go to his side of it, but I think it was about a day and a half that we had a demo.

Lucy Cullen Tori Daniel Bremmer Covid Jones CDC
Gov. DeSantis Sending 100 Nurses To Jackson Health To Help Treat COVID-19 Patients In ICU

Rush Limbaugh

00:37 sec | 4 d ago

Gov. DeSantis Sending 100 Nurses To Jackson Health To Help Treat COVID-19 Patients In ICU

"Nurse is getting some relief at Jackson Memorial Healthcare, the governor announcing he's sending 100 nurses into help as the hospital fills up with covert 19 patients. JMH nurses Union president Martha Baker says Jackson Stopped all elective surgeries and only has 9% of I C u beds available, she says. The hope is welcome, but it will take some time to train everyone evaluate, Orient, educate and make sure they're you know, able to take care of their hue. Nurses take care of I C U patients, etcetera. Jackson's hired more than 80 nurses in the last two weeks who are now going through training and should be ready to start seeing patients in the next 30 days. No word yet on win, the 100 nurses will arrive. When did Horsemen News

Jmh Nurses Union Jackson Jackson Memorial Healthcare Martha Baker Horsemen News Orient President Trump
Supreme Court sides with Trump effort to let more employers out of healthcare law’s no-cost birth control requirement.

WBBM Late Morning News

00:35 sec | 4 d ago

Supreme Court sides with Trump effort to let more employers out of healthcare law’s no-cost birth control requirement.

"The Supreme Court is siding with the Trump administration and a closely watched case Correspondent Soccer Mahogany with the detail. Affordable Care act requires. Most employers provide women with no cost birth control as a preventive service. The administration's been letting Mohr employers who cite a religious or moral objection. Opt out. Low records blocked the rules changes, but the high court has ruled seven to the administration acted properly. Government's estimated the changes would cause about 70,000 women to lose birth control coverage in a year and at most

Supreme Court Mohr
Supreme Court sides with Trump effort to let more employers out of healthcare law’s no-cost birth control requirement.

WBZ Midday News

00:25 sec | 5 d ago

Supreme Court sides with Trump effort to let more employers out of healthcare law’s no-cost birth control requirement.

"Court. In a ruling released moments ago, siding with the Trump Administration in a ruling over contraception and the affordable Care act, this ruling today seven to saying the White House acted properly when it allowed more employers to opt out of covering birth control for religious or moral objections. The law as it stood required most employers to cover contraception as a preventive measure at no charge through insurance. Also

Trump Administration White House
Florida hospitals report ICUs at capacity as virus surges

Glenn Beck

00:45 sec | 5 d ago

Florida hospitals report ICUs at capacity as virus surges

"Florida's Corolla virus outbreak is beginning to push the state's hospitals to the breaking point. We get details from correspondent Erica Hill cases surging in the Sunshine State. More than 7300 reported on Tuesday. 43 hospitals in Florida report there I see you beds are now at capacity. Nearly three dozen Mohr are close, but the governor is pushing forward with plans to open schools next month. Touting his state's efforts to prepare for the long haul. The whole point of the curve. Flattening the curve was to make sure we had enough healthcare capacity weren't away better position today to be able to do that yet 43 hospitals in Florida report their ICU beds are at capacity. Dozens more are

Florida Sunshine State Erica Hill Mohr
Nicole Clowers on Oversight of COVID-19 Relief Funds

Politics and Public Policy Today

05:11 min | 5 d ago

Nicole Clowers on Oversight of COVID-19 Relief Funds

"From Washington Journal recorded on Tuesday morning, focusing on the oversight of covert 19 relief funds. We're going to talk next about the spending of the Copan 19 relief funds approved by Congress over the past couple of months. We're joined by Nicki Clowers Thie Health Care, health care team manager for the Government Accountability Office. Thanks for being with us this morning. Thanks for having me tell us why the G A o did this report The cares act that was passed in in March, require us to provide ongoing oversight of the funding and activities of the federal government. Specifically, it requires us to provide on point oversight of the government's efforts to prepare for respond to And recover from the 19 and it includes US requirement for us to assess the impacts of 19 on public health, as well as the economy as well is tracked the funding and the use of that funding. The act requires us to report every 60 days starting 90 days after Anakin it so Our Joon report was our first report and will be issuing additional reports every other month. So basically almost as soon as this legislation is signed and enacted and signed, the G A. O is monitoring its spending. Absolutely. We're providing real time oversight of the funds. We have experience doing this going back over a decade ago, for example, under the trouble as that released program will provide it. Assistance to the financial sector's After the global financial crisis. We were required to provide ongoing oversight every issue of quarter to 60 days. So we have experience in ways we built on that experience to hit the ground running, provide immediate oversight and help ensure accountability and transparency of how the funds or Viennese let's look at the overall number is 2.57 in Seven trillion in spending and the and the measures passed by Congress here, the figures on each of those packages the PPP, the Paycheck Protection Program, 670 billion. The Treasury Economic Stabilization Fund, 500 billion explain expanded unemployment. Suren insurance, 375 billion economic impact payments. 282 billion public health emergency funding funding, 232 billion and 150 billion from the Exact the relief for state and local governments. Of that 2.57 trillion Nicky Clowers. How much has been spent already about $677 billion. That's what we found in our in our work and collection of data. Unfortunately, Treasury and we have not released overall spending data. Yet under Allenby guidance agencies are to report On on there's care spending starting at the end of June. So we expect the overall spending data to be available starting probably at the end of July in all this time frame. Incident. In the absence of comprehensive data, We undertook our own efforts to collect what was known about spending until we collected spending information on the on the sixth largest areas that you just mentioned. A swell a some other federal agencies and we found about $677 billion has been expended, and about $1.3 billion has been obligated. That means that the government has committed to spending one's. We're talking about the oversight of those covered 19 relief funds. How that money is spent with the hose. Nicky Klauer. She is their healthcare team manager. Welcome your comments to 027 for 8 8000 Eastern and central time zones, too. 27 for 8001 Mountain and Pacific. I have to imagine that keeping track of 2.5 million is hard enough. What were the challenges of tracking $2.57 trillion worth of spending on you? As you mentioned? Not all spent yet and and how much staff does this entail? Well, it is challenging, providing a real time oversight. As you can imagine. A CZ agencies are standing up programs there figuring out how to 1000 programs, how to track their own spending on DH decisions, change programs of all and so that requires us to be Very agile and nimble on Dwork with the agency's Tio Keep up to date on the latest developments, and so in our horses were working around the clock and frankly, too Track the dollars. Make sure we have a good understanding so we can provide that information to policy makers and the public.

Congress United States Government Accountability Offi Nicki Clowers Treasury Economic Stabilizatio Nicky Clowers Washington Journal Copan Nicky Klauer Treasury Joon Dwork Allenby G A. O
California's San Quentin Prison Was Free of the Virus. One Decision Fueled an Outbreak.

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

05:29 min | 5 d ago

California's San Quentin Prison Was Free of the Virus. One Decision Fueled an Outbreak.

"California's one of the large states that has having a large surge in corona virus, cases and hospitalizations right now Arizona of courses in terrible shape right now. Texas is in terrible shape Florida, starting to get really terrible really fast. All three of those states are now having hospitals overrun while their case numbers hospitalization numbers just keep climbing every day scary. but California's having a real problem too, and here's something really specific. That's going on in. California, that was not just like a bad situation that arose from the Meyer of this epidemic in California part of their big problem, right now was a single screw up a bad mistake that has now set off. What is really a disaster? Here's what happened. By mid April one of the largest state prisons in California had run of outbreak. It started as just a handful of cases at the California State Prison in Chino. But it soon became dozens of cases, prisoners and staff alike. At the time there were more than forty two hundred men imprisoned at Chino that's nearly twenty percent more than the capacity. That prison was built to handle and of course. You know by their very nature. Correctional facilities and specifically overcrowded correctional facilities like Chino was just a hot bread for any hotbed for any sort of. Contagious, illness and sort of outbreak. So when they knew that in mid. April it was no wonder that by the following month by May. Corona virus had just run through every dorm, used to house prisoners at Chino. By the end of May there were six hundred and thirty five confirmed cases at Chino. There were nine men dead. Given the crisis, they had on their hands. The State Department of Corrections along with the State Attorney Journal decided that they would transfer all bunch of prisoners out of that prison out of Chino, and they would send them to other prisons in the state. One of those prisons was the infamous prison just north of San Francisco called Quenton now. At the time San Quentin had actually been doing very well and beating back the epidemic so well in fact at the time. San Quentin had no infections saint. Quentin had no corona virus infections in March. In April and it may. But then came this influx of prisoners from China, which had a terrible problem there more than one hundred twenty prisoners were transferred from Chino to that facility at San Quentin and they'd all been tested at some point before transfer. But. It wasn't like they were particularly sticklers timing it right off the bat. They knew problems. Many of the prisoners hadn't been tested for coronavirus for up to a month. Before they got sent from China to this new prison at San Quentin. And so at Saint Quentin within days. They get the sides of their first infections. In the month, or so since those transfers San Quentin has now become the largest corona virus outbreak in California. There have now been more than fifteen. Hundred confirmed cases at San, Quentin alone and at least six deaths. Three of those deaths just came this weekend. And amidst this huge spike in more than fifteen hundred cases at San Quentin. Well now, the top medical officer for California prisons has been fired. And now with the virus, having spread unabated throughout San Clinton. It is I mean there's no wonder that a lot of people are worried a lot of different levels starting of course with prisoners. And with their families recently, we had the chance to speak with the mother of one prisoner at San Clinton and her name is Rita Zavala. And she told us this about her son's cellmate, recently testing positive and how her son is living now. Are Man their lives matter to. Just like everybody else. And they should be treated like. Animals? That so like they are treating them like. Just let him sit there. You know if you make it. Oh, good, if not allow you know. That's not how treated human. Stage they got there, but they're paying for their mistake. You know being in prison. But my son was. But I feel like he is now because I don't know. If he if he is going to get the virus, and not is GonNa make it through the by rich because of their medical is not the greatest. You know. Last point raised by Ms Avella is critical one. It's the it's not just the number of men that are dying at San. Quentin, that is the cost for alarm. It's also the huge number of prisoners who are positive there now who are requiring medical care and they're requiring advanced medical care, which means they're getting not just the prison itself, but within the whole local healthcare system, some hospitals within reaching distance of San Clinton, have become so taxed already by San Quentin prisoners filling up their issues that they're no longer accepting any transfers of California state prisoners to their facilities situations gotten bad enough that one local doctor told our NBC news affiliate and San Francisco. That San Quentin is the Chernobyl of covid.

San Quentin California State Prison California Chino San Clinton SAN Saint Quentin San Francisco China State Department Of Correction Texas Rita Zavala Arizona Ms Avella Florida State Attorney Journal Medical Officer Meyer NBC
The Power of Music for Health

Outcomes Rocket

05:02 min | 6 d ago

The Power of Music for Health

"Welcome back to the outcomes racket Sal Marquez here and thanks so much for tuning in again today I have the privilege of hosting Jamie paps. She is the founder and CEO of spirit to a music based at that utilizes principles of neuroscience and music therapy to re imagine music for health outcomes, such as stress, reduction, emotional, regulation, productivity, and performance the presence of music in health. Health care and health is something that I'm personally very fascinated by, and we've had a lot of guests on the podcast already talking to us about how it could help in normal therapies, digital therapeutics, and so today I'm really excited to have a conversation with Jamie about what she and her team are up to at spirit tune so so such a pleasure to have you. You here with us today, thank saw It's a pleasure to be here and thank you again for having me for having spirit tune, and highlighting some important topics in healthcare. Really appreciate it. Absolutely, it's my pleasure and so Jamie before we dive into the work that you guys are up to. You know looking at feeling better with music. Tell us a little bit about. About you and what inspires your work in healthcare? Yeah, so I really liked telling my personal story because I think it's really important, and it's pretty unique. Um, so my inspiration around by working music sound in its relevance to health really stems from my birth story of believe it or not. My Mom lost her hearing when she was pregnant with me from a rare. It's a rare condition called oughta sclerosis that can be triggered by hormonal imbalance, and so her pregnancy with me. You know really triggered that, and so it resulted in hearing loss, and so as a result of being raised a mother with hearing loss, I gained the steep appreciation for the sense of sound in a way that most people don't get to experience it so in a way that's related to health that understanding the auditory system at a deeper level and quality of life, and then further, became inspired in music, specifically in auditory perception when my sister went off to college and declared her degree in music therapy, so that's when I not only learned about. Auditory perception, but also music, and how it affects brain, neurologic function, and then kind of thirdly I would say it wasn't until I became really stressed and anxious in my own professional career that I felt firsthand kind of music rediscovered. The therapeutic benefits are the therapeutic than music firsthand. Because I felt like at work, it was the only thing I could turn to. That was kind of right then and right there, and so that's really what the third thing that really drove home. This concept of spirit tuna where it was born on. It could help me could help others, and that's when I started doing some deeper dives myself into the science behind the economic dettori stimuli in how it can be a reliable everyday tool for stress, mental health, and so we're really at a time right now. were some great institutions, and some really talented people are devoting their lives and careers to research in space. So while it was my mother, the inspires my work every day. you know all these other components that make spiritual really relevant right now are further inspiring to me. Jamie that's a an amazing story and you know I. Think it is just one of those things that that It's the fire. You know that keeps you going. It's the fire that gets you going, and you certainly have a very strong strong purpose for this. Absolutely so thanks for asking a question and yeah, and well I mean your mom now, so we just. Everything comes full circle It's really a special time for sure luckily. I didn't lose my hearing nervous, or did you know? Yeah, you don't know that it's you're genetically predisposed to it, but until you have a significant change in. It doesn't it isn't express so yeah I was a little nervous for sure. but so far so good and we have a beautiful little girl, and she's one week into life, and it's pretty awesome. That's amazing. I admire your perseverance and your courage, and so the work at spirit tunes is super cool, so tell us a little bit about how you guys are adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Yeah, so I think it's pretty self evident that these are stressful, anxious times right and pretty much. Everyone has experienced the magnitude of stress. Mental Health is Sierra and even prior to the COVID pandemic. Mental health was already called the health epidemic of the twenty first century, and now in this global pandemic. Let's spin. Persisting mental health has been called. You know the second crisis as a fallout rank of in nineteen

Jamie Founder And Ceo Sal Marquez
Britain pays tribute to National Health Service on 72nd Birthday.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:48 min | Last week

Britain pays tribute to National Health Service on 72nd Birthday.

"People across the UK joined in a round of applause on Sunday to mark the seventy second anniversary of the free to use National Health Service one of the country's most cherished institutions, the reverence with which it is held has been bolstered this year during what is being Europe's deadliest corona virus outbreaks though the UK as a whole has a confirmed virus death toll of forty, four, thousand, two, hundred, twenty, the third highest in the world behind the United States and Brazil the chess and everyone who works within it in whatever capacity have been lauded for their work and care. Created by the Labor government after World War Two, in nineteen, forty, eight by bringing together the nation's disparate health institutions, the NHS's founding principles have never changed funded by everyone through the tax system. It provides free healthcare to any UK resident when needed. Prince Charles said the NHS that been through the most testing time in its history, and it was right for the whole country to come together to pay tribute to everyone who works within it after coming down with corona virus himself and spending three nights in intensive care Prime Minister Boris. Johnson credited NHS workers with saving his life, and his insisted it get whatever resources it needs. The main Labour Party opposition said the NHS has been starved of funding for the past decade during the government's austerity drive. Overnight many of the country's major sites, including the houses of parliament and the arch at Wembley, stadium England's National Soccer Stadium lit up in blue to remember all those who died during the pandemic. And before the weekend, soccer matches, players joined in with a round of applause.

NHS UK Labor Government National Soccer Stadium National Health Service Soccer Prince Charles Europe Prime Minister Johnson United States England Labour Party Brazil
Macy's 4th of July finale in New York City to honor health-care heroes, first responders and front-line workers

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | Last week

Macy's 4th of July finale in New York City to honor health-care heroes, first responders and front-line workers

"Week of fireworks is tonight. Of course, the tradition has looked very different. This year, The show has been spread out into small pop up shows to spread out any crowds that might gather and prevent a big, massive crowd that could create dangerous conditions while we're still in a pandemic, and it's the healthcare and essential workers of the pandemic will be honored in the show Tonight. Susan Terceiro was the executive producer. We're highlighting New York. There's a lot that's going on in this country, and we're definitely addressing that. You know, in our broadcasts and in the score, and if you want to see the finale tonight in person, you'll just need a good view of the Empire State Building.

Empire State Building Susan Terceiro Executive Producer New York
Using AI to Improve Drug Companies Regulatory Performance

The Bio Report

04:49 min | Last week

Using AI to Improve Drug Companies Regulatory Performance

"Ronin thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me on. We're GonNa talk about regulatory compliance, which may be an area that's not well understood a outside of the folks who directly are involved with it. I thought that the work I Cuba is. Interesting because it gets at the way, artificial intelligence and machine learning systems have the potential to transform all aspects of the pharmaceutical industry. We we hear a lot about how data silos impede research, but. I. Don't think people tend to think of this problem as it exists within a company on the regulatory side of the business, how big a problem is the creation of data silos in terms of regulatory compliance? Daniels a great question and it's. The one that we have been wrestling with tens of solutions because it, it is a growing problem I think it has always been an issue at. A healthcare and pharmaceutical companies, but I'm with the huge increase in regulatory requirements, changing regulations additional regulations. It is a growing problem and. In. Most companies have set up systems. Very they're very point solution base. The safety group will have their system regulating teams have. This is have multiple systems whether it's a publishing system. Tracking system. Validation systems can be different, and then the quality systems are also independent. It's an one of them and act. And so that? There's a lot of Ju- -plication interns of cross-referencing. Duplicate entry of data. And it makes it very hard and the administration regulation compliance reporting. A lot of work goes into. Trying to ensure that the data is connected and clean so that the submission timely end of good quality. As you think broadly about the the range of challenges. Companies face with regards to compliance and keeping up with changing regulations and. All of the high volume data they touch. What are some of the other challenges? I think the key one really is around into the evolving regulatory requirements. I mean if you think about Marketing of product in one hundred fifty countries, and each country has a different set of requirements when it comes to frequency and data that they require either on safety real of a product or something as simple as manufacturing chain, sure label change and having to do that across multiple products. That are on the market multiple. Those levels is a huge burden on companies I mean. The larger pharmaceutical companies have teens of over two thousand people looking in this space and a lot of what they do is a. Regular operations is collecting information sifting it from various different sources validating that to make sure that is accurate, and then understanding what the requirements are for the submissions that every country. As I think about the types of data that a regulatory department might touch. I think a lot of unstructured data. Things that don't lend themselves to automation. How labor intensive is this area working? And what's the opportunity to use artificial intelligence and machine learning to improve efficiencies and reduced time and cost? So. That's a really good question and I think you know one thing that is quite surprising to many people. Is that even in a clinical trial setting nowadays seventy percent of the data? Doesn't come through the traditional case ripple. Scans. It direct lab feeds. It's connected devices increasingly as we started to use them in clinical studies, so there's a huge amount of unstructured data. And, this is where machine learning and. Becomes really important because. Certainly NLP

Cuba Daniels JU
Global Health and Malaria with Dr. Chandy John

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:03 min | Last week

Global Health and Malaria with Dr. Chandy John

"Today we. We have with US Dr Chandi John He is the Ryan White Professor of Pediatrics and the Director of the Division of Infectious Diseases in global health at Indiana University School of Medicine I should note that this episode was recorded before the pandemic started since then. Dr John's Infectious Disease Expertise helped lay the foundation for to covert related studies tactic, which is looking at how many. People in Indiana Wade. Actually be infected and discover which is looking at how immunity responses occur. After people are infected, we should also note that his research about sickle cell anemia, African children was recently published in the New England, Journal of Medicine and people might want to check that out as well Chandy. Welcome, thank you so you're the Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics. Who Is Ryan White? And what does he have to do? With Indiana Ryan White is in Indiana. Indiana heroes everyone in Indiana and the United States should know about him. Ryan White was really the first child in the United States, who was publicly known to have issued in make a secret and the reason he got into the news was because we lived. They didn't want him attending school with all the kids and he insisted on going to school. This is a very brave individual and kind of push this where a lot of. Of other people just kind of shrunk into themselves and bring it up because it's one of those things where it's like I remember I did live in Indiana at the time, but I remember it being in the news for people old enough. It was a huge huge deal I mean because up until that point. It felt like it was a pretty stigmatized disease were many people were blamed, but he seemed to be the face. If I'm remembering correctly. Correctly like the first quit I'm putting in quotes. Nobody else can see my equity. You're like innocent. Where we sort of public in this child at a big deal that everybody was so public about it. Yeah, it was a huge deal is very brave of him because he got a lot of discrimination and hate mail, and the rest of it, or you know hateful comments right to his face where he lived but he refused to sort. Back away from that and also I. Think very importantly. He also refused to be the quote unquote innocent face of it. He said that everybody who has HIV is say they should be respected. However, it was easier for the public to handle that than maybe to handle gay men who they thought of as other or or something he really did in the United States help to give face HIV that many people could relate to more And I'm the Ryan White Professor, of Pediatrics, and I always mentioned this because our whole division was supported. By an endowment for the Indiana University, Dance Marathon, and that endowment and the Indiana University dance, marathon itself were started by Ryan White's best friend from High Yeah To Stewart I believe her name was, and so she started at more than twenty five years ago and to start, it was started in honor of him, so he was supposed to start at you that fall and died before he could start the started, and she organized a dance marathons, and they've evolved this massive huge. Yeah, and if your local Indiana's a big deal with your kids and these guys are amazing, high school kids in college, kids and they raise funds for Hospital for children, but for the first many years they raised it just for our division, and so that was amazing. It's funny because I knew I knew there is money for Riley but I didn't know it was for that purpose and I. It's funny. One of those I knew Ryan White was, but when I moved here I was like. Why do they have the professorship year? Like didn't know He. INDIANA. No, it's it's amazing, and so now the funds from the Indiana. Brisy dance marathon go to the whole department of beating. US For the first twenty years it was to raise his endowment, and so when people ask me who this rich donor was, who gave the endowment that allowed us to create this amazing or build this amazing division It was It's the college kids, and and I should also very important dimension. The connection there is that writes. Doctor was Marty climate. Who is the? The founder of our division, so that was when they wanted a way to honor Ryan White and and support the things that were important to him. The sought out Dr Climate. He said supporting research in this areas is critical, and that's what they did. Well, that's great and not just completely veer directions, but you know the time what we wanted to talk about. About. Today is global health. So I like to always start by talking to you like. How did you decide? This is the area that what you wanted to be in in studying not just infectious diseases, but how they the impact, the world, not just even the United States. How'd you get here? Yeah, so there are many answers that question, but the beginning always starts with. With my parents so My parents are from India. They came here to do their residency I. always mention because this is a fact that. When they came here, they were paid to come here, so there was a doctor shortage. So when people are talking about all these terrible foreign medical grads and stuff boy. The US has relied on those foreign medical grads and. Show all the time. Yeah, it's it's a big deal and they've added a lot to the country. research wise clinical is an in every aspect of so. They came here for their residencies, and then they went back to India to work at a mission hospital

Ryan White Indiana United States Ryan White Professor Of Pediat Indiana University School Of M Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics Ryan White Professor Dr Chandi John He Indiana University Dr John Journal Of Medicine Director Of The Division Of In New England India Riley Marty Founder Stewart
Major Miami Hospital Limits Surgeries Amid Covid-19 Return

Sean Hannity

00:38 sec | Last week

Major Miami Hospital Limits Surgeries Amid Covid-19 Return

"Scheduled scheduled anytime anytime in in the the near near future, future, you you might might want want to to call call your your doctor doctor with Corona virus cases in I C U usage doubling over the past two weeks. Jackson Healthcare System is trying to free up hospital beds by limiting impatient surgeries and procedures to emergency and urgent cases. Only starting on Monday, CEO Carlos Montoya says they're not alone Memorial is doing the same thing that we are in south Broward. They they are eliminating beekeeping argument emergent. They're also keeping the same day surgery. Jackson workers have seen their infection rates spike from 7 to 12%. Maybe they'd fire rescue, also seeing a dramatic increase in the number of employees being forced into isolation because of the virus. Aircraft.

Ceo Carlos Montoya Jackson Healthcare System Jackson South Broward
A Nurse's Healing Story: Admitting Her Truth about Addiction

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

03:43 min | Last week

A Nurse's Healing Story: Admitting Her Truth about Addiction

"Hello and welcome to let's talk. A series of podcast produced by the Hazel and Betty Ford Foundation on the issues that matter to us the issues that we no matter to you to Substance Abuse Prevention Research Treatment for addiction. Recovery Management Education and Advocacy I'm your host William Warriors and today we have a story of hope. brought to us by Nina Pillow Nina. How are you can cut? How are you great good to see you again I know you've done a number of a public events. If you will or stood up spoken out using your own story to help unmask the stigma of addiction and promote the reality of what we look like in the fact, that treatment works in cover is possible, and we're glad that you're with us today on, let's talk. Tell us a little bit about your first experience with substances Yeah thank you for having me So my first. Experience was really the one that. Ultimately brought me here For my own in my life, my dad was an alcoholic growing up for me I had an injury which ultimately ended up I ended up getting prescribe narcotics, opiates, and I enjoyed them. Well beyond using them for pain. There's about seven years ago so. Seven years yeah. And you know kind of before. I knew it I was. Enjoying them you know Kinda like my whole mind, body, Spirit, everything and It ended up becoming. You know full on addiction which I thought I was immune to for whatever reason I was not and I was physically addicted. It got to the point where I couldn't use them. I couldn't not use them without getting sick. And the irony of this is that you were working in the healthcare field at some point along the course of your diction nurse Yep talked to us about being a nurse who is struggling with substances. Yeah, it was It was really hard. I had I knew all of I knew about addiction. I knew about opiates. I knew I knew all of those things. and I continued using them anyways and. I think I think I. particularly felt a lot of shame because of that and I. Had access to them in my workplace and so Being just didn't want to be the nurse with an addiction and I think that was a huge denial piece for me, Until I ended up diverting narcotics from the hospital I worked at. ultimately ending, getting caught and resigning. That diversion was so that you could sustain your own addiction. Yes, very much. How did that make you feel when you were under the influence? When you knew what you were doing was not only wrong, but was actually illegal and yet you couldn't stop. Just the powerlessness of it, but also in active addiction. It wasn't. It wasn't a matter of right or wrong because for me. My morals and values have always included not stealing, but that wasn't. It was a matter of feeling, normal or not or So it, just it. I don't I don't know that it was ever I know I. Felt Guilt I knew. I knew at the end of the day. It was wrong, but in the moment it was just. What I needed to do and you know. That's what I did.

Nina Pillow Nina Betty Ford Foundation William Warriors Hazel
"s. healthcare" Discussed on Kind World

Kind World

06:23 min | Last month

"s. healthcare" Discussed on Kind World

"Let's start with a two thousand fifteen story about how a doctor. Her young patient and his family created an inspiring connection during the darkest of times. Here's the story sheer members at all. One night. I was giving my son Nick a bath as he turned his head I noticed the lump on them. It kind of fell like swollen glands, but it was big. First thing the next morning we were at the doctor's. He said he has cancer. I remember like falling to the floor crying. You know he's six years old. And I said we need to get him to Boston. We had gotten a call from the ambulance transport that he was coming I laid on the stretcher, and then they put him on top of me unbelted us in I remember pacing the floor before he arrived they open the doors and took the stretcher out I. Mean to me. It felt like there was like one hundred people standing there. And I remember melody being there and I remember her just comforting me as we got off of the ambulance. I didn't realize who she was, but I just remembered thinking all right. I'm glad that she's with me. My name is Rosemary Jensen my name's Melody Cunningham. Malady was Knicks Oncologist Nicholas was he had a hard time adjusting to people and melody he never did. He really didn't talk a whole lot. At first in Q. is just angry and afraid, but he loved practical jokes and I am more than happy to be the recipient of practical jokes, so he would put a whoopie cushion in the chair, and then of course it down and. Neck with chest, roar with laughter over and over and over and just. Swiped the heart. Right out of your chest. Knicks doctor for two and a half years, but at that point she went to a different department. Even though she wasn't his doctor, she was still involved. He loves the. Three and a half years he had twenty three surgeries. When he said to us, you know mom cannot gonNA. Die I didn't say no. I said I don't know. Nick was really sick at that point and melody came to the House. which is like a two hour drive from her house to my house? You don't see doctors doing that. Nicholas was all about the army. She had brought down her dad's purple heart. And Nicholas wishes like in awe of it. I remember bringing the Purple Heart out and talking about what it meant. And it. My father died in a car accident when I was actually Knicks Age. He. Pondered that. After I left. I know rose talk to me about the fact that he seemed. Uplifted and strengthened. And so though he never said the words and asked about dying, think in that moment we had that talk about him dying. One morning his breathing was really heavy. His nurse came in and she said. Is there anybody you want me to call when I said I need to call melody. Rose called me. It's like five thirty in the morning. Absolutely no question in my mind that I was going to be there. Off She didn't have to be there. She wasn't as Dr. But she was there. We were laying in the bed pretty much the whole day and I remember her just like. Hold my ankle. Charlie my husband someone side. I was on the other. She was behind me. She was there the whole she didn't move. I truly believe that when you can't care you. Can always he'll? Or try to heal simply by our presence, and often that presence is a silent present. And then when I felt like they needed, it lightened I would tell stories. We laughed because they were quintessential nick stories, and then of course we cried. For many many many hours. Fifteen or eighteen hours. These breaths were continuous. And then they slowed. And then they stopped. I remember laying in bed with them is holding them. And just waiting for that next breath tocom. But, it didn't come. And then I remember hair melody say he's gone rose. I knew he was gone. I just didn't want it. I didn't want him to be. That reality comes in. I think like a Su- NAMI. The funeral parlor came to get him. And she helped me dress some. She walked out with him. The constant communication with melody helps me remember Nick and brings back all of the joys I had with him. I'VE BEEN LIVING DOWN IN MEMPHIS, for the last nine years, but we still stayed in touch, even after all these years later like I'll be talking to her, and she'll tell me a funny story that I forgot. He's to rollerblade around the hospital all the time. Over the loudspeaker we had to be like Nicholas Johnson get back to your room or you're grounded. She remembers it all. Care for a family. Am there for the duration?

Oncologist Nicholas Nick Knicks Melody Cunningham Boston Rosemary Jensen rose
"s. healthcare" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

The Voice of Healthcare

01:44 min | 2 months ago

"s. healthcare" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

"Hi and welcome to episode twenty eight of the Voice of Healthcare podcast. I'm your host Matt Solesky. Today I'm joined by two special guest. Dr Todd McCarty from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School.

"s. healthcare" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

The Voice of Healthcare

01:38 min | 3 months ago

"s. healthcare" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

"Hi and welcome to the twenty fifth of the voice of Healthcare. Podcast I'm your host maximal ski founder of Ionia Healthcare Consulting where we focus upon voice. First TECHNOLOGIES AND AI applications in healthcare delivery across the US and the globe joined with my co-host read McClellan CEO and founder of a company called Cortina Health..

"s. healthcare" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

08:09 min | 6 months ago

"s. healthcare" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Be able to be part of a big pool and get the same good deal that members of Congress get. That's that's what's going to happen on. A Windy Matthews covers healthcare for us here at the Wall Street Journal on those are some pretty lofty goals. President Obama set out with. Yes that is definitely true. The law was passed with some very lofty goals. And you can tell that by the full name of the law which people don't tend to remember today which was the patient protection and affordable care act. The law was supposed to do everything from expanding coverage and bringing healthcare to many people who hadn't had it to bringing down costs in health care. It was supposed to bring down costs for Medicare recipients for their drugs is supposed to do almost everything you can think of in in healthcare right down to changing our menus. We see in restaurants to give us the calorie counts but doing all of this was incredibly divisive. Not a single. Republican voted in favor of the A. C. A.. And they kept fighting it after it was passed. Here's former Republican vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin speaking on Fox News back in twenty only thirteen using a term that became a rallying cry for critics of the death penalty in there but the important thing to remember is just one aspect of this atrocious unaffordable cumbersome burdensome evil policy of Obama's and that is obamacare on a why was this so polarizing using it was really polarizing right from the very start and you could hear that from Governor Palin comments about quote unquote death panels. That's she was referring ferring to the idea that this law would include a quote unquote death panel where bureaucrats would decide what patients would get care and what patients might not get care. And she referred to her own baby with Down Syndrome in an emotional way and that really resonated with a lot of voters think and became a big rallying cry for Republicans Republicans in the twenty ten campaigns and going forward even today. The fact is that there was not anything the law that I think one could call a death panel. There wasn't isn't any mechanism to deny care to individuals based on their quote level of productivity in society which was her allegation. But what she said. I I think really crystallized concerns. A lot of voters may have had about the idea of government getting more involved in healthcare and it really trans ends. It transformed into a campaign point for the Republicans going forward as they ran on repeal and replace again in two thousand ten and then going forward today now so as we look back ten years later. Hard to believe it's been that long. What about the? ACA has worked. And what hasn't the has increased coverage By as many as twenty million people which was certainly a fundamental goal of the law now that coverage has not expanded as much as had once been projected did and that is partly because in some states have chosen not to expand their medicaid programs. So that is a major accomplishment clearly of the ACA another aspect. That I think is important. Is that people who have preexisting health conditions prior to the ACA could not always buy insurance or they were sometimes charged much more or four coverage than people who were healthy. That is no longer the case the A. C. A. has made that illegal and now people with preexisting health conditions can get coverage and are not charged more due to their health history. One thing that the law had set out to do that you know you might hear different things about is whether it brought down. Healthcare costs costs some advocates. The law argue that it did when I spoke to independent experts. The jury is definitely still out. Some of the really felt that the evidence was not there that the law had brought down health costs and perhaps it had had little or no effect overall one final point would be that in remaking the individual Joel Health market which is the place where people buy their own insurance the ACA did have some effects that were not so great for certain people while people with with preexisting health conditions can now buy coverage people can also get subsidies to help pay for their health insurance if they have incomes below a certain threshold but people people who incomes are above that threshold now sometimes find themselves squeezed because overall premiums have gone up in the individual health insurance market so there are people who really feel that they can no longer afford coverage and that is not a good feeling you just mentioned part of the A. C. That was especially contentious and that's the requirement choir -ment that everyone have health insurance or pay a fine and this is actually one of the aspects. That still being litigated right. Yes it's true. It's just pretty much an ongoing never ending legal battle over the ACA right now. The current big question is a case that was brought by a group of Republican led states. And that has been backed act. By the trump administration that actually aims once again to strike down the entire law. There have been a number of previous ones. The Supreme Court has previously ruled. Perhaps the the biggest one in two thousand twelve to uphold the legality of the charge for the individual mandate that actually was later removed by Congress. But that was perhaps the pre-eminent case but there are other aspects of the that have gotten to the Supreme Court. Obamacare has also now become a divisive issue among Democrats who were running for President in two thousand twenty that is absolutely the case and the parties are evolving which you see among Democrats now is the division between those those who want to build on the A. C. A.. And those who are saying like Senator Warren that the A C doesn't really go far enough and we need to do of something they would call Medicare for all which was sort of government provided health care for everybody. When eighty seven million people uninsured or underinsured when thirty thirty thousand people are dying? Because they don't get to a doctor when they should what a half million people are going bankrupt because of the dysfunctional and cruel system that we currently have you know what are we will pass a medicare for all single payer system and I will introduce legislation in my first week in office others like Joe Biden more want to add a public option to the structure created by the ACA covers everybody buddy. It's realistic and most importantly let you choose what you want here. You have one hundred. Sixty million. People negotiated their healthcare plans or their employer. Like many of you have APP. You may or may not like it. If you don't like it you can move into the public option that I propose my plants but as you like it you shouldn't have while you shouldn't have Washington dictating dictating you. You cannot keep the plan you have then on the Republican side although you still certainly here opposition to the ACA as I interviewed experts for this story. What I heard is that Republicans don't really want to be seen as opposing coverage for people with preexisting conditions that that's really become a political? No no so that may be something that the parties can agree on that people with preexisting conditions should be able to buy coverage so so ANA were certain to be hearing more about healthcare especially as the debates continue and in the New Year. Where does all of this leave us? Well I think it's really worth watching because it's a high stakes issue for a lot of people whatever you believe about the ACA. It has had a widespread effect for a lot of people. I think a lot of people don't understand and it's full ramifications and maybe it might be worth looking at that as as people think about their voting understanding what the law did and what affected this had and how it's affected you is relevant. That's Wall Street Journal reporter ANA will the map US joining me from Los Angeles. Thank you so much on a thank you so so much for having me tomorrow as we continue with our decade in review. Kim Gittleson speaks with David Harari about the challenges facing as the climate changes. And that's what's news from the Wall Street Journal. I'm angry for totally New York. Thanks for listening..

ACA Wall Street Journal Medicare Obama Congress President Sarah Palin Windy Matthews Down Syndrome Joel Health Supreme Court Fox News New York US Los Angeles Joe Biden C. A. Senator Warren
"s. healthcare" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

02:55 min | 7 months ago

"s. healthcare" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

"Well I think it is going to be a term which if we are successful. It's going to be something which we no longer must think about. But I think it comes back to surf client choice and offering the great opportunities whether it be public or private and different clients will have different focuses. Some will want to exclude certain investments because they feel that's appropriate report to their needs but in many cases they want to align themselves with entrepreneurship and the ingenuity of corporations to reinvent themselves and therefore want to have impact to WanNa we've it through their entire portfolio to very much. I think it is something which is science fiction. I think this is something very much but the next decade. And that's wrap things up for this week with mark hastily. I want to ask you before we finish about cancer research. This is an area a related area. I suppose where you're very active and I know there's been some announcements announcements. Haven't there about grants for specific cancer research programs and this is kind of built off the back of the UBS oncology phone which. I which. I do think we've mentioned before just remind. There's a little bit about about that fun until about these grants presumably. It's a moment of great pride and satisfaction to be able to make these kind of announcements absolutely and it is very much. It's related to what we've been talking about. Is Some of the grants do deal with genetic alterations so the UBS on College Fund was launched in two thousand sixteen. It's an an impact fund that means that one of the elements of the fund is to have a demonstrable positive social impact as an outcome of the fund. And and miss these grants are part of that and the fundraise four hundred seventy one million of exclusively out of UBS wealth management clients clients and on the back of that and the success. Now it's the Fund is donated approximately two point eight million dollars in total have half the UBS optimus foundation and half to the American Association for Cancer Research and these grants are on the American Association for Cancer Research Side. And what they are going to fund is right at the lab bench research. Where a lot of the funding at the governmental level has come away eh so that these are for people doing the cutting edge research that may not be able to get funding in other ways? And we're really proud to be able to participate in that and as we've been talking about we're also excited because these things now with the participation of people like him. PM and the more more favorable regulatory environment some of these things can move from the bench to drugs much more quickly today. And that's more carefully bringing us to the end of this. Two hundred and seventy thirty second edition of the bulletin. DB'S CETINJE agenda in the false movie world of finance each week here on monocle. Twenty four listen again and find OUT MORE AT MONACO DOT COM uh-huh catch up by your preferred podcast platform the bulletin with UBS.

UBS College Fund UBS oncology American Association for Cance cancer American Association for Cance WanNa
"s. healthcare" Discussed on Science Vs

Science Vs

09:49 min | 7 months ago

"s. healthcare" Discussed on Science Vs

"And you're listening to science vests from Gimblett. This is the show that pits facts against free healthcare On today show where tackling the big mess that is the US healthcare system. In case you haven't heard politicians have got it EMEC crosshairs. This is a broken system and we must fixit. The current health care system is not only cruel. It is dysfunction make American healthcare great again is pouring money into healthcare and yet more than a third one in three Americans either have no the health insurance all insurance that comes with big medical bills that they can't afford politicians and activists saying this is not good enough. They will just want a chance to get their healthcare without doing broke America. We're focused on because they gotta rest. They're ah one of the big ideas to fix. This is Medicare for all. I wrote the bill. That's right but everyone on the same government plan kind of like what they do in Canada the UK it's one Medicare to rule them all and some police say it's my precious that is it'll fix all our healthcare problems. All out of pocket expenses are gone Medicare for all. Is the gold standard but others say. Wait a SEC. This shall not pass one medicare for all. It's dangerous for the millions of Americans who have good in health insurance. This new thing will be was gonna take away the right of people to choose they wanNA take it away. Give you lousy healthcare. It's pretty incredible and conservative outlet. Skeptical to this thing. Look what's happening in other countries. That do this kind of thing like the UK or Canada. You Want Health Gatt Eh. That waited in the hallways waiting for a kidney transplant. So I want the millennials who think that they love socialism so much to look at what's going on in the UK and see either a future said today on the show The millennials who love socialism so much deluded if they would just put down not talking that Avocado Toast for one second and look around and the healthcare in the UK. What would they say we're going to get past the stump speeches isn't talking heads and look at the data to find out who is to blame for the broken healthcare system in the US? And how do we fix it. He's Medicare for all all the best way to go. Because when it comes to health cam there's lots of O'Neill's who think that. They love socialism so much but then does science. Science says healthcare is coming up after the break. Welcome back. Today we're asking is Medicare for all the dream that will solve America's healthcare woes currently the US spends three point six trillion dollars lives on healthcare trillions with a T. It's about eighteen percent of genie pay. It's huge and when you compare it to other wealthy countries the US is about twice as much per person so tons of money is being poured into the system that doesn't manage to cover everyone. They fix it. The first thing we want to do is to take a close. Look at that big pile of money. Where is it going is very very very clear that we're overpaying states dramatically? That's Professor Harold Pollack Healthcare expert at the University of Chicago and he says Al Price Tags for basically basically everything just too high. That's true for hospital. Care for Pharmaceuticals is true for pretty much everything so for example the exact same in cholesterol lowering drug exact same cost sixty six stole is more in the US per month than in France an MRI. On average costs. Three hundred Dole is more in the US compared to the UK pacemakers cost thousands of dollars more in the US compared to Germany over and over again academics found that things are just more expensive in the US. A famous economist. Ost Why is health care is so expensive in the US. He's ANSA quite. It's the prices stupid okay. So why is America getting shafted on prices. Well if you've got off tic TAC and started reading the economist instead you would know of a little thing called the free market to be more specific in the US. We've got the manufacturers like drug companies. The service providers like doctors and hospitals and the insurance companies are in the middle. The insurance companies negotiate the other to the hospitals and the doctors does that the prices that they're willing to pay and he is. What's been happening? Say Your an insurance company about to go into a pricing battle with the hospital. So you imagine that that I'm Bluecross Blueshield of someplace and I go to the fancy fancy hospital you walk up to that really Nice hospital cutting edge treatment amazing doctors beautiful lobby and you start you negotiation so you ask. How much is your liver? Cancer Treatment Hospital tells you it's seventy two thousand dollars and you say she. You know your Liberte heard cancer. Treatment seems awfully expensive. And you know we really WANNA pay Less the hospital can say back. Well I'm sorry. Seventy two thousand thousands dollars is our price. If if you don't WanNa pay that's fine you can explain to your members that they can go down to the county hospital and get liver cancer care. They'll be a lot cheaper MHM and is very very hard for the private insurers to say okay you know well We're GONNA Walk Away Insurance Company. He isn't a bit of a bind. Either they suck it up and pay the high prices or risk losing business because their plans. Don't cover this treatment and the hospitals can afford to negotiate this way because they are fast becoming the only game in town he's over the last few decades lodge hospitals have been merging. They've been gobbling up mom and pop private practices as well as the hospitals and that means in many places hospitals have become a kind of monopoly monopoly according to a survey from two thousand sixteen more than one hundred million people in the US living places with quote moderate to highly concentrated hospital title markets and that is giving these hospitals a disturbing amount of market power and that allows them to charge awfully high prices. Some of them are essentially the size of a fortune and five hundred company. And we don't think of them as a you know as as a major corporation but in many ways. That's that's what they are and that's the way they behave hospitals already. Eddie tend to be more expensive than private practices and research has found that as hospitals. Gobble up things. They Jack up the prices even more so for example studies. Lisa found that prices generally increase by around ten percent after a merger and hospitals are the only bad guy him if insurance companies do get had a bad deal. Studies have found. They don't suck it up. They often passed the box along to their customers and there are other players to mechanic getting gouged left left right and center. Drug Company Manufacturers Doctors. Everybody who sells a BANDAID so they're many villains to this piece in terms of why the costs Kassir so high and they ease one more villain. That's worth talking about. He and that villain paperwork a big chunk of that not all that but a big chunk of that is stupid annoying stuff that is very wasteful with all these different groups. Haggling with each other and haggling with you. It's a lot of time time and money and dumb lettuce promising to explain your benefits and a study from last year found that all of that crap really adds adds up to more than two hundred billion dollars. That's right eight percent of what we spend on. Healthcare is spent on administration. That is way more than other wealthy countries. Okay so now. We know why. America's health care is so expensive time to talk about how to except and this some politicians say is where Medicare for all comes in when it comes to solving the cost most problem. He's one way that Medicare for all could fix it. If you want to take power away from hospitals and pharmaceutical companies to set the prices you could replace all these insurance companies with one big bat us a government health plan Imagine that scenario you heard before fancy hospital says okay Buck Ru. It's seventy two thousand dollars for liver. Cancer Treatment is hey we you pay fifty. That's what we pay. And that's a fundamentally different position and so you're using the leverage the the tremendous Indus marketing power on the demand side of the federal government all the millions and millions of people. That would be in one plan to really squeeze.

US Medicare America UK Professor Harold Pollack Healt Cancer Treatment Hospital Canada Gimblett Cancer Bluecross Blueshield federal government O'Neill
"s. healthcare" Discussed on Capitalisn't

Capitalisn't

05:05 min | 7 months ago

"s. healthcare" Discussed on Capitalisn't

"Let's have a discussion beat about cost. Bernie Sanders. I have not even try to provide a cost estimate Elizabeth Warren as try. But I think he's a beat put together with a lot out of hope first of all. She decided overnight to dabble the wild stocks. When we add the hour episode about wealth facts? I said the danger of introducing using age and it's not been introduced yet and the demand is going to happen so And I said that there should be caps by the way. Okay okay but caps at like ten percent. I agree that we also need to be realistic about this. Transition period and that costs are a huge component of that I don't think that we can just switch to single payer universal health care Without a private option overnight not only is this just like fantastical from a political perspective but it would mean that the government would be paying for all the rents as you said that the pharmaceuticals and health care service providers are already extracting. So I think that we need like an interim period in which there's a public option for people who don't already have health insurance where they can buy a into like Medicaid programs. That are pretty low price and in the meantime the real focus of the government should be bringing these prices down before we switch over tiny single payer system them so that means restrictions on marketing. It means Limitations on lobbying it means training more doctors and essentially removing all of the administrative burdens. And frictions that give rise to all of these rents that can be expropriated along the way and and I will add to your proposal that should be implemented long way a more rigid system of OTAS. -Ation of new procedures where proving that is marginally better from a medical point of view is not enough. This should be also a cost benefit analysis allosaurus in the sense that if I am an absolute better but enormously more expensive is not obvious that my medicine or my procedure. Ease ease better because you're not factor in the cost. In addition I would be very aggressive against coz matic changes of Madison's Madison's design only to charge higher prices. We know that basically there is no difference between nexium and pilot Zach check. Those are two medicines for reflux and nexium was into use only because product was running out of the patent protection next next was aggressively marketed to all the doctors and to all the FBI orgainzation to try to get into the prescription and be able to charge higher. Hi Process so I think this practice should be eliminated because is pure disability rent-seeking. I agree one final point that I'd like to make is I think one of the hardest issues to address is how to incentivize meaningful innovation in the pharmaceutical industry In the the fact that this burden in large part rests on the US right now And that means that like. US citizens are subsidizing global innovation in healthcare services. I know that this is. I'm not an international policymaker and so this is like sort of pie in the sky but I think that there should be some sort of international national coordination when it comes to the funding of scientific research And I think that the US should send a message that it needs global participation the patient we can't just keep bearing this burden on her own because it's like ruining our politics but what is interesting is to see how much the the debate has changed nine years because when the obamacare was under discussion only the most radical Democrats were supporting the public options. Yeah that was actually taken out of the proposer precisely because it wasn't really a very strong democratic support and now the most conservative Tiv- Democrats are supporting the public option. What I understand is The majority lists the plurality of the Democrats are already way past that that And I think that that's a sign of the discontent that is spreading America about the system. Meanwhile you've been listening to Capitol isn't hosted by Kate Wall docking Wegrzyn Gallus and produced by Matt Hoda capitalism as a podcast university Chicago Stiegler stiegler center in collaboration with Chicago Booth Review. You can find episode transcripts and research links at capitalism dot com also checkout pro-market dot org blog of the stiegler center. And don't forget to subscribe and leave a review wherever you get your podcast.

Chicago Stiegler stiegler cent Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren US Madison FBI Chicago Booth Review Wegrzyn Gallus America Zach Kate Wall Matt Hoda obamacare
"s. healthcare" Discussed on Capitalisn't

Capitalisn't

09:36 min | 7 months ago

"s. healthcare" Discussed on Capitalisn't

"So what can we do about this tomorrow. Bernie Sanders huge quagmire of of a situation. Five hundred thousand Americans are going bankrupt. You know why they're going back up because they suffered a terrible disease cancer so heart disease so at least as of the time of this recording there are tons of Democratic candidates still in the running most far left I would say are Sanders and Warren. They're they are pretty much on the same page. When it comes to healthcare every study done shows that Medicare for all is the most cost effective approach to providing healthcare to every man woman? I'm an trial in this country. I who wrote the dam built if I may say so. They both believe in universal healthcare under a single government end payer system. There are a lot of politicians who say oh. It's just not possible. We just can't do it. It's a lot of political reasons for this. What the really telling you is? They just won't fight for it and they want to do away for the most part with any opportunity for private health insurance providers because they think that that will distort the transition into a single payer system now assuming that that doesn't get passed they do support a public option. Which means that if you can't afford healthcare or if you don't have insurance then you should be able to buy into a state exchange that would normally only be available for low income people and on the price side both Warren and Sanders? Support the idea that the government should produce generic drugs so on the one end Sanderson Warren want to obtain the the benefits of a single payer system where everybody's covered and where you are the maximum amount of polling in order for this to take place you need to ban not necessarily every form of providence but certainly any form of basic visa private insurance so you might go to a country like France where you can have private insurance but his plan insurance is for the stuff on top op not for the basic coverage these move will generate a lot of tumour because on the one end you will have a lot of people who get deprive of the existence of caste system. They have which many people are happy with and they will all be put in the same pool of of insured so tweeting in the same way. The second big issue is of course out to pay for this and the third is how much this is in impacts the supply of care because if you simply subsidized everybody provides insurance to everybody to be sure. But you don't do anything on the supply then. The cost will skyrocket. And so what you need to do is also do some interventional supply apply now the idea of producing generic drugs ease alert beat in that direction. But let's remind listeners that in the United Ninety states the number of doctors is fixed by law. The number of seats in in in medical schools is fixed by laws so the supply lie of doctors does not respond to the market and the vein. Meaning if you expand demand you have to expand supply the same time otherwise we know from economics two one what you will serve is a huge search in medical doctor prices and we know by donation comparison. The doctors are already much much better pay in the United States than in other countries. So I personally am a fan of this proposal. I think that it hurts rich. Rich people certainly the top one percent maybe more than that. Maybe let's say the top ten percent and that's because they don't have or they won't have the option and for private insurance now. I have been on Romney care for a little while I lived in Massachusetts and didn't have any health insurance In so I relied on the state provided universal health insurance within Massachusetts sometimes fondly termed Romney care and the few times and I had to see the doctor. I thought that the experience silence was completely satisfactory. You know the the waiting rooms were sort of dingy and the lines were longer than I had like. Nice school provided insurance insurance But for the most part I was pretty thrilled by by how efficiently it worked So I know that that's just an anecdote but it's not like I think that you you know. People are going to be like waiting in lines around the corner and being deprived of like key resources. Just because this goes to a system that would take care of everybody. But but saw Romney care was a public option was not a medicare for all is not that you eliminate the possibility very private insurance shorts. Oh sure because I think the controversial point is that one any particular is controversial in my view in the Warren's proposal because she she went through how you go pay for it and one way she said she's GonNa pay for it is that she's GonNa basically take away all the money that your company's paying paying for your healthcare and put in the pool to finance everybody else so If I am paid less because I have a very good health of care in the war proposal I find me find that next day that I would be still pay less but I will have the same as everybody else. So it is a form of if you one mile expropriation of the people who currently have chosen to have less compensation and more have care. Yeah I mean to the the extent that it is pegged to the current system of of paying for healthcare than I would call it redistributive rather than expropriative Butcher are people who are opting for for better healthcare now will still be paying similar amounts but would be receiving the public option under this plant. Nobody these it is a beat expropriation because generally taxation is based on some principle of ability to pay. This is randomly chosen depending depending on. Who employs you? So it's not necessarily that you're leads to beating from that. We should pour on average. You're GONNA do that. I agree but in practice these these a lot of distribution takes place depending on who is your employer and what charges of this was done. And I think that that's that's a bit crazy and we'll generate an enormous amount of bedwell so I think people are subject without the Squirrel bias so if you take takeaway today affront this will make their resistance enormous. Well Yeah I mean. I think that that's the reason that the resistance is enormous and that it's unlikely that the sort of healthcare reform will be passed. But I think that it's worth pointing out that. There are a number of countries where this this is the status quo already and they seem to be perfectly fine with it. countries where there's an option for private insurance but not that many people take it up because the universal public calcareous program works quite well So I think it's just a matter of people on the US transitioning poorly. But that doesn't mean that the system itself is a bad one. No no but you. You need to distinguish between. What is the optimal point at the end? And how you go there but are you go there. Transition phase is not auty relevant. I might say that we should have any coal miners in the world because coal is polluting but I cannot say. Fu to all the coal miners nor their pain. Because Tau flack is a transition phase. Or I can say that free trade is better but we. I do know that along. The way hurts a lot of people so the transition phase is very important and should not be ignored. I just think it's like I don't know maybe you could argue that. In this case the transition phase affects more people or would be longer and so it's more painful industries more consideration. I think the transition visas important important. In so far as it's the reason that healthcare legislation isn't being passed but I still think it's important to think about the optimal but food. I I think that the ultimate is a system of universal single provided healthcare for the basic and some option option of getting additional insurance for more sophisticated Thing Obama treatment. But I don't think that going going cold Turkey from one to the other is a good idea and there are a lot of other things need to be done to make this decision because in in other system you either have some major of rationing to avoid the overpayment of Medical Services and you have a lot of restriction restriction in marketing and lobbying now in the United States if you do universal health care we know is tweak Shen free lobbing and free marketing you end up with thirty percent of GDP eat an apple care and quality. That is not much better so we need to be very careful on the transition..

Sanderson Warren Bernie Sanders United States Romney Medicare Massachusetts United Ninety Obama Turkey expropriative Butcher France Tau Shen apple
"s. healthcare" Discussed on Capitalisn't

Capitalisn't

06:06 min | 7 months ago

"s. healthcare" Discussed on Capitalisn't

"Now there are a bunch of economic issues. Who's the also arise In terms of the relationship between insurance companies and pharmaceutical provider. If you are an individual and you're trying to bargain over the price of drug chances are you have no bargaining power whatsoever. But the more concentrated the insurance market becomes becomes An against the ultimate form of concentration is what we call single payer where there's just one government that's negotiating with drug providers the more or power. The insurance companies have to negotiate over the prices of those drugs. Economists call this monopoly. Power usually think about monopolies in the context of Companies having control over wages but in this case monotony can be a good thing for consumers because it means that whoever's providing them with insurance assurance is negotiating with drug providers so that they get drugs or healthcare services at the lowest cost. Agley you said can be good for consumers could definitely be good for government finances. Whether it's good for consumers are now depends on your view of how much of that so plus is necessary. Three to provide the research and development and how much is not because if you were able to extract a one hundred percent of the surplus out of the famous UTICA industry how imagine these days but imagine you could maybe they will stop investing and by stock. If you stop investing you will not get improvement in medicines that that as we observed today we know for example that the price of insulin in Canada is one third of the price of the insulin's in the United States. The reason is that the Canadian in half castes. As bogging hod and we'd use the price of insulin so at the very minimum we can ask. I was south. Why as Americans and we want to subsidize and social development for the rest of the world and if you think about we subsidizing research development for Africa? That's fine because the poor and that maybe he's our do so but subsidizing our defoe Canada or Japan or Germany. That seems to be a bit crazy. Yeah Dan Lewis. You mentioned extracting surplus and also takes place directly whenever drug manufacturers or healthcare service providers interact with with consumers. Who Don't have insurance so if you've been in these sticky situation of not having insurance insurance having to go to the doctor or the hospital? You've probably been stuck doc with a crazy bill. I mean on the order of tens of thousands of dollars and sometimes you look at that bill. And you're like wait. Why is the bill for me higher than then the total amount that would have been paid for myself as well as the health insurance provider if I had health insurance and this goes back to the idea that health insurance companies things have been operating power and so they're able to bargain over the prices of the services that are provided but individuals don't which is why individuals without insurance are in some sort of perverse contradictory way stuck with an even higher total bill? And what happens is that they usually don't don't end up paying that full amount right so if you don't have insurance and you get one hundred thousand dollar bill. Chances Are you're not going to have to pay that full hundred thousand dollars. There's ways that you can negotiate with the hospital or the doctor but without effectively is is a way for service providers to price discriminate against individuals. Who Don't have the health insurance? They can extract the full surplus from these individuals and so they start with the highest price possible and then they cut that down to the maximum amount that each person can pay so one last thing has to do with taxes. There's perverse incentives that are created by the tax system. As well this this might not necessarily lead to higher costs but it does lead to higher administrative burden so as Luigi mentioned in the beginning of the show when he had to go to the doctor for for his wife's early pregnancy he got hit with bill after bill. After bill from different types of doctors and this is because for very highly paid individuals else physicians and specialists included the tax code incentivizes them to be independent contractors rather than hospital employees. So of the best paid doctors that you might come across in your lifetime. Chances are they will all be individual independent contractors sort of like they run their own little consulting nothing businesses and provide consulting services to the hospital so this creates this administrative mess and make things pretty stressful and complicated for the consumer. Because you you don't really know how much you're going to be charged because they're working with like a slew like twelve different entities rather than one hospital so the bottom online is that the healthcare market is Feel with frictions and market failures and problems you like listening to capitol. Isn't there's a good chance. You're interested in pioneering research and groundbreaking discoveries big brains. Another podcast from the University of Chicago brings the work and ideas of the world's smartest thinkers straight ear buds with guests. Like David axelrod. If you know people if you understand something about them it's harder to dehumanize him. It's harder to hate them even if you disagree with him. Richard Thaler those two words systematic bias that that was the big Aha if there's systematic biases. Then you can make better predictions addictions. And he's doing we. Now in the past couple of decades have started thinking about schools. Not as things that we have rights to Barack. There's there's something that we are to consume choose. You'll hear the stories behind the research. Reshaping Our world. Listen and subscribe to big brains. Wherever you get.

Canada Africa Barack UTICA David axelrod Richard Thaler University of Chicago Dan Lewis United States Luigi early pregnancy Germany Japan
"s. healthcare" Discussed on Capitalisn't

Capitalisn't

10:57 min | 7 months ago

"s. healthcare" Discussed on Capitalisn't

"You don't need to tell you that the US has a problem with its healthcare system. Why does American medicine costs so much? And if we're going to pay so much for why don't we get better results. We have a huge competitive disadvantage in American businesses far more than any tax change in terms of our healthcare costs and the dysfunction of the US system as they can says the stage in the Democratic primary becoming for many the central issue of the election every every family in America would receive comprehensive coverage as we move to a publicly funded program. Healthcare care is a basic human right and I will fight for everyone who has ever had to go to hospital in the United States as filed a fear of of getting stuck with an outrageous bill that you insurance cover or even worse. Don't have insurance at all. Have you ever gotten an outrageous. Bill Luigi Eh yes actually. I remember when I was a student. My wife add a pregnancy and to rush the hospital. Get Surgery and After that I started to receive bills there was one there was a second third and I never wanted to summon all up because was was Tool sort of shocking. But it was a lot of money especially at the time especially given my finance at the time was a lot of money so in terms of the actual numbers. Here's another another way of thinking how expensive things are in the United States the US spends about seventeen percent of its GDP on healthcare. And that's pretty high. Compared to most other rich countries for example in France that number is eleven percent and Turkey. It's only four percent on today's episode. We're going to take the capitalist Elise view on health care in the United States. What's the problem? What does it come from and most importantly how can we fix it? This is Louise's and Gal from the University of Chicago and this is Kate Waldoch from Georgetown University. You're listening to capitol isn't a podcast about what's working in capitalism today and most importantly with the current system is not working and it is the thing that doesn't seem to work Oakland. Well is actually Alf outcomes if you compare In the United States to other countries you are shocked. By how poorly Hooley. The United States does life expectancy is almost eighty. Three Years in Japan eighty-one Nita Leonardo Seventy eight in the United States. Now you may attribute that to the fact that in the United States people eat too many candies and they eat butter not good olive oil and they don't drink the good red wine and the shoot each other but I think that sounds like you really have Italy in mind. That's the basis of Japan. But but if you look at death that should not occur in the presence of timely ineffectively medical care in France. You have roughly fifty of of these amenable deaths per one hundred thousand immediately sixty five in the United States a hundred and three and even in infant mortality Taliban United States doesn't do that well six point two thousand vast Susa the three point three of France the five zero five of Italy and the five point eight eight of Cuba so we are below Cuba an infant mortality. Let me leave you with one. Last Que statistic the top one percent of the income distribution and as a life expectancy fifteen years longer the bottom one percent now. What's so puzzling about healthcare in the United States it's it's approach to healthcare is radically different than other countries in the rest of the developed world? In fact it's the only rich country that doesn't have universal reversal. Healthcare and universal. Healthcare itself is hard concept to define but it refers broadly to some form of government action. That's aimed at making insure. All citizens have access to healthcare that. Meet a minimum standard so no country days. A pure healthcare market kitto a free healthcare market is always impacted by the government in one way or another now. The question is why the United States is doing so much worse than all the other developed countries without scaring our listeners. Too Much I think the problem is fairly simple. It is difficult to have a completely voluntary insurance system because young people who are unlikely to have problems prefer not to ensure themself and seek people one. Insure the Salat so that you you don't obtain a good sharing of risk if you own force people to get an insurance. This is all the debate that we had about the mandate or non mandate top Republicans like Finance chairman. Orrin Hatch now have woven a repeal of the individual mandate or the requirement to buy insurance into the Senate tax cut bill by eliminating the individual mandate thirteen million people mostly healthy are expected to choose to go without insurance driving the premiums by at least ten percent for obamacare customers who don't get government subsidy many people feel that it's very coercive to have a go going Monday. Twelve health insurance but the reality is that the only way not to other Golan mandate is to be tweaked and let people die if it gets sick and they don't have health insurance now. Nobody's willing to do that. This ex-boss problem makes it very difficult. Go to have a system walking without a mandate so I think this question was well answered by Healthcare Economists Gaber and skinner. This is from a paper that was ten years old. But I think that it's main lesson still apply today so I'm going to quote from this paper. They say that the fundamental cause of healthcare healthcare costs is a combination of high prices for inputs poorly restrained incentives for over utilization and a tendency to adopt expensive medical cool innovations rapidly. Even when evidence of effectiveness is weak or absent so translated means that people with a healthcare insurance tend to consume too much healthcare and probably paying too much for what they're getting that adds up and not only that but there are perverse incentives in even the administration of healthcare because these intense lobbying that brings to us more all procedure. More drags even when these procedures and drugs are non necessarily demonstrated to be superior just to give you a sense during the the last Decade Alpher Billion dollar will spend in lobbying every year by the industry. In addition doing the two thousand thousand eighteen election cycle members of the industry gave roughly two hundred twenty five million to federal candidates in outside money groups and parties. This is not to mention the problem of revolving doors. There are two hundred sixty seven former aides who walk for four congressional committees. The media's in reforming healthcare the now walk in alka industry but the most unserious way my view in which this lobbying takes place place is in sponsoring research. That surprise surprise finds that the product is extremely useful and needs to be adopted for example these now medical recommendation that after c-section women should be tweeted with blood fina to prevent can't fatal blood clots. Many doctors claim that he's not really any evidence to support the such widespread Latino us. We really really improve Africa outcomes. Now what is disturbing is that the recommendation was developer and the species of Kupa a prominent finishes called the National Partnership for Maternal Safety Whose Party organization we cease funding from make us about fairness us also notes as anti Cagas and marketing of drugs in the United States is another area that I consider also insidious Luigi you quoted the statistic about half a million dollars is spent on healthcare lobbying per year. Will that numbers. On the order of about four billion dollars when it comes to the money that's spent on the marketing of pharmaceuticals as well as medical devices by their manufacturers. And what's also disturbing or more disturbing is that whereas in other countries as well as the United States before the nineties marketing is okay. But it's usually done to professionals To doctors and healthcare service providers who have a good sense of what drugs are Fulton drugs aren't or which drugs are effective in which drugs aren't but now in the united it states. A huge amount of money spent on direct to consumer marketing ability symbolic tight with adver common side effects are dizziness sleepiness sleepiness waking and swelling of pancakes feet serious sometimes fatal events such as infections lymphoma or other types of cancer have happened so I can join the fun at my family barbecue acute. This started in the nineties and by two thousand to eighty one percent of consumers reported having seen a direct drug advertisement. Just anecdotally whenever talk to my friends who moved to the. US from other countries one of the things that shocks than the most is how many drug commercials they see when they're watching TV As opposed to where or they come from where. It's almost unheard of plastic tent to all be drags for elderly people both because the people need more drugs but also because they are the only one left watching TV so I think that they should start the ones that are marketed to you what it may be. Those are just the ads that you're saying. No He's any. TV Go from CNN. To whatever program. I I watch. I only watch news news on TV by medicines for all people and now you may say that. Now I belong to the category. But that's a different story.

United States France Bill Luigi Eh Italy alka industry Japan CNN Orrin Hatch Turkey America Cuba Hooley Oakland Georgetown University
"s. healthcare" Discussed on The Economist Intelligence Unit: Digital Economy

The Economist Intelligence Unit: Digital Economy

13:32 min | 8 months ago

"s. healthcare" Discussed on The Economist Intelligence Unit: Digital Economy

"Professor and Blandford Deputy Director for digital health the UCLA Institute of Healthcare Engineering by Jackie Hunter Chief Executive for clinical programs and strategic relationships that AI powered drug development firm Benevolent Ai. And by my colleague Elizabeth Super Managing Editor and global editorial lead for healthcare. I started by asking professor. Blandford what are the frontiers tears of digital innovation in healthcare. Well there are many different frontiers because digital health is such a broad field breath. There are three main audiences for digital health technologies analogies. The first is the individual the citizen and third for them there are lots of new APPs. wearables even implantable that are emerging urging on the mall. Kit help us to manage our own health and health professionals to work with us in managing our health. They may so help asleep. Better quit smoking. Whatever the frontiers I think are more APPS and other technologies that are clinically validated? And that actually have been proven to have a significant effect at least for a segment or sector of the population and also APPs APPs that integrate with other clinical technologies such as Glue commenters to ensure that the data is transferred from medical devices through into the big data for health. Professionals are a whole bunch of digital tools that support diagnosis decision making treatment. They include traffic health records and variety of medical devices with digilent- faces current frontiers include artificial intelligence is receiving a lot of press right now and it seems ridiculous to say it but I think unimportant frontier is actually getting the different medical devices healthcare systems to actually talk to each other effectively effectively safely securely and said the patients are treated as whole human beings not as a series of different clinical conditions in silos and and then the last group of users for digital technologies are in public health bringing together lots of sources of data across thousands or millions of patients to spot trends and to plan and prioritize and to think strategically about the future of healthcare and then the final frontier is actually joining up all those perspectives so that the individual visual health data is actually used for clinical care and use as part of the Public Health Initiative. That's great so so you've been covering digital technology in the healthcare context for for a while. Do you when you think back to. Maybe ten or twenty years ago do you think it is come. As far as you expected by why then has the integration of digital technology happened as fast as you would have expected I have to say no. I think I was quite naive. Fifteen years ago and thought that by now we would have a lot more health technologies in our daily lives particularly for people who are managing long term chronic conditions but more generally for for all of us in managing our wellbeing more generally. And I think it's taken a lot longer to see that change enjoy. I mean I think it's still in a daze now because health care and people are so complex and actually you can't just plug things in and and expect them to work first time. We have to adapt society and adapt all social structures and adapt to accommodate the the expectations of technology's Great Elizabeth. What do you think are the biggest challenges integrating digital technologies into healthcare systems as and said? They're such complex systems that provision of healthcare. So is that why. Perhaps progress hasn't been as fast as expected. You're absolutely right. He Tom. Such complex systems you. Are you going to need champions to help embedded at a local level and you need to also train our healthcare professionals so they can understand what this technology is all about and Said said the needs to be as Coccia of continuous learning and innovation. That takes time and we know there are budgets a stretch and so there's going to be very hard to achieve so one of the most important things is to show who digital literacy and to what extent do our healthcare professionals have this this such an age range that there's such an educational range in our healthcare professionals. And so we need to really think about that long term also As you said and I agree with you. We don't have enough long-term evidence around these healthcare technologies apps and as as healthcare professionals professionals. You kind of need to know whether it works and and so you can better advise patients and also interpret that data. It's generating another really big challenge and I think think round trust so who owns the data. How will it be used how comfortable people feel about data on their wearable going into electronic medical record? Who's going to look at what's what's going to happen to her? As you probably heard recently Google was keen to buy fitbit. Now there's tons millions of data on health on healthcare in those and it's worrying what will will happen. That data going forward another area is I don't feel regulators are up to speed with the science here. The FDA has the digital health care unit. That's right right. So they're going to need to hire the experts okay. These dates who data engineers these infamous these genomics experts to keep up to pace for the speed in the science. That's moving so quickly And also they need to be on top of they need to create the standards in terms of where what standard we apply here. Do you look at APPS APPS and products. That have a real therapeutic claim. What about those others? That are not so therapeutic might have long term consequences for our half. I think kind of ads as as well as half professionals being very variable of course patients. The public are even more diverse. Because most of us don't have any kind of medical training training at all and we come from many different walks of life. We have many different value systems so as well as the health professionals. It's also thinking about the population more broadly in terms of the variability we're lucky in Europe and the US. I mean the population does have a degree of health literacy if you go look. Globally emerging economies. A half literacy is very poor so that's going to be important to develop and I would say even though there is a certain amount of health literacy actually. The adoption of the technology is hugely hugely variable across different healthcare systems across different patients. I have heard professing. Pathology say there's no away a machine can tell me what is a normal image and until we overcome some of this distrust and the technology and Dan says tap into people's values systems. Then it's not going to be effectively taken up but I think also requires us not to make any big speak mistakes so take very few big mistakes to really undermine trust cad data for those of you who remember it was such a big mistake can you recap head. Data was an initiative to make our care records available. Both research also potentially sensually for private organizations and the concern about these issues of privacy that Liz mentioned was so large that cad data quite quickly got shelved because they threatened all sense of trust in who curate tting and taking responsibility for our Health data I was GONNA say say planning hugely important. I mean if you look at the The tie up between Google deep mind and the London royal free. It sounds like a great idea. I'm the pharmacist by training. I'd like to pick up acute medical Renal injuring hospital early before the patient suffers and has renewed dysfunction and so it was a great idea to start off with but it went not so great in the end. Because you know the Information Commissioner got involved in twenty percent was the data properly shared so we need a good governance structure around they so we can benefit both sides the companies that we know. The private sector's good at developing these things but also we as citizens is healthcare professionals as to how this data's being used so Jackie Jackie L.. I like to bring you in there so benevolent. Ai Or company applies artificial intelligence to to drug development. And I'm sure patient data it is part of that we ourselves don't hold patient data apart from the clinical studies when we run but clearly we access patient data data for example. We've done in extensive analysis of the data from airless from motor neurone disease studies that held in the product database. She's publicly available We also look at basic bioscience because we go all the way from early drug discovery right the way through to clinical development and so it's really important for us to be able to access high-quality data. But were very clear about the need for transparency. And how we're using that data to you characterizes finding the right balance are there any jurisdictions any healthcare systems soon found the right balance. We still finding our way. I mean I think the most important thing I think it's this transparency. So people are very clear. I mean the example dot dot news highlighted in terms of Google de mind and the Royal Free Hospital. One of the issues there I think he wasn't transparent neon exactly what was going to be transferred bird. And I'm going to be done with that data. I think if you got that right and you engaged with the patients. It's very important for us to work with with patient groups so that they understand what we're trying to do for example with the Airlines Society in America so there are health care systems and organizations where I think they have got it right you K- bio bank. I think is a very powerful resource for researching touching the in the UK. Going do you think is particularly effective. And I think the way that the data's collected the process for being able to access the ability and ease of access once the clear ethical. I'm regulatory guidelines are passed. It's harder for a small company. Lie Mike how to be able to access some of these data sources because we don't have some of the financial resources of the of the larger companies. But I I think as things move forward. There's GonNa be an increase in interoperability an increase in data sharing and transparency. When it becomes clear by doing that for example you you can identify patients that are much more likely to respond to a drug than those that are not one of the biggest issues for the patients nations and the pharmaceutical industry is that we're still seeing fifty percent failure rates in phase three trial? So you've been working on a drug for many many years you take it to a stage where you've already spent several hundred million pounds on that drug and you still sing a high failure rate and most at the time. It's because we don't understand disease well enough to know exactly how that drug is going to work in a whole range of patients when you go into a broader a group of patients so if we can actually find those patients who will respond best at treatment. It's going to facilitate eight more rapid drunk development. It's going to mean that patients who will not respond to that drug won't be exposed to it and therefore I think it's going to make the whole system more officiant ineffective research looks at impart in the development of digital systems that are safe to use in a Medical environments can you talk about some of the ways of the methods of digital of technology development that aid with the integration the digital technology and healthcare system yet so as the human factor specialist. I advocate iterative design because we can never get it right first time because people pull are at the center of the use of technology and interacting with it unfortunately in healthcare it's much more challenging to use some some of the Agile and very iterative approach is to use for games and entertainment technologies because in those areas you can deploy technologies see how people engage with it how they interact with it and then keep it's relatively changing it whereas in healthcare. You really need to make sure that you've got something that is safe and fit for purpose before you launch it at any scale so we are trying to deal with this mismatch between trying to get people involved really early early stage because that's the way you develop technologies that are actually fit for purpose but also ensuring that they're safe before they go very far and so I think that involves a whole pile of techniques to do with engaging with users early understanding people's lifestyle. Not just asking them what they need because actually most of us are pretty in articulate about. What's possible and what we really want in the future? That's different from what we've got at the moment but also observing people's lives jobs. I'm an academic so I'd also talk about developing theory that is relevant in this space to understand how we can get people engaged in behavior..

Google UCLA Institute of Healthcare E Europe Blandford Elizabeth Super Public Health Initiative Benevolent Ai Jackie Hunter AI FDA Jackie Jackie L
"s. healthcare" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

The Voice of Healthcare

03:40 min | 8 months ago

"s. healthcare" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

"Hi and welcome to episode twenty three of the Voice of Healthcare podcast. I'm your.

"s. healthcare" Discussed on Our Life In Transition

Our Life In Transition

07:31 min | 10 months ago

"s. healthcare" Discussed on Our Life In Transition

"It's it's just it's frustrating that we live in a system that is designed in order to maximize the prophets of these private companies at the expense of people's health and wellbeing. I will say we're grateful to even have insurance coverage because I have a pre. Existing condition has preexisting conditions several you know like so we could just not be covered all so there's that but they shouldn't be able to do that either so it sucks the long and short of it is health. Insurance Sucks private health with insurance sucks so yes so during this delightful election cycle when people are saying oh well a public option would be terrible because you'll lose your health insurance. Please him fucking. Take it away. I don't want it. I would like to have health insurance. That would cover my actual help well. Here's the other thing about health insurance health insurance. It's not health insurance. I think I'm probably quoting Elizabeth Warren. It's not meant went to endorse Elizabeth Warren all but it's not health insurance. It's sickness insurance because they don't cover a lot of things. That would actually make you healthier. that would actually help you maintain your health so that you don't get sick and need major care. The only cover the once the should has hit the fan basically and then once. I should hit the fan then they go will Geez. You should take care of this before now. We've got you know what are we. GonNa pay out some money or something you know if only thought ahead yeah right so I mean okay. I was going to say not to get political but we do that a lot well. Where does that leave us. I mean I mean the current situation that we are in is that there's we live with this. Janke half ask insurance system and and I mean what can you do in order to to fix that system. besides vote vote vote I think we're just going to show that into every episode of the podcast whether it's streaming toward talking about we're not until yes ask until not until until forever more F. Four at birth because even if there's a major election there's a local election. There's a the Arab. There's electrodes all the time about vote to keep in mind too as far as especially. Ashley Talking About Trans Care and LGBT care actually honestly not allowing sex discrimination in general okay this is about any any of non white male care yeah that so non white male Christian care so there's this case coming up on to the Supreme Court that is argued on the eighth throws it being ruled upon argued on the eighth probably won't have a rolling until next next June or something 'cause it takes them forever to actually think hang in there are Bj uh but so the case has been brought before the Supreme Court is actually the first case that explicitly about Trans Discrimination but it's actually a a group group of cases about several gay persons and also a trans person who came out. I'm their employers and were fired explicitly for that reason so the case is being brought before the court is that what is them suing because of that but the administration and the Justice Department is just Komo flying in the face of the previous positions were under the last administration and saying not only is that legal but any gender-based gender basis is fine so this wouldn't just effect lgbt people but everybody and different things fire you for whatever reason they want and extends to not just you know your your employment that opens up the door for a whole yawn discrimination everywhere about everything because I mean if you you have that president then okay well. Why can't you discriminate if you are insurance company slippery slope. If you have a job and you come out in your trans. Even if you have insurance you I guess what they can fire you and now you have no insurance so I mean there's that is something to be aware of that something to to keep following and it's an I think maybe we might talk a little bit more. Get closer to that but I mean also I mean we talked about the fact that you know vote that there is the election going on and thankfully for the first time they're actually campaign the campaign. The election isn't going on the campaign. It is an important distinction. The election is about long feels like a anyway but so there actually are cuts. We're allowed to have primaries undemocratic side there are actually a couple of forums and town halls that actually bothering to talk about LGBT Q. I A. Plus class issues. which is I mean for me personally personally? I finally figured figured out that there's a voting block here except perversion and we're Bernie went but so glad did one last week and they had a forum that some candidates went to due to talk explicitly.

Elizabeth Warren Supreme Court Ashley Talking Bernie Komo president Justice Department
"s. healthcare" Discussed on Our Life In Transition

Our Life In Transition

08:45 min | 10 months ago

"s. healthcare" Discussed on Our Life In Transition

"Don't cover like there's a lot of stuff is still considered cosmetic. Even it's really not cosmetic for a Trans Person. I know a lot of these are like related like life changing life affirming saving. Yes yes lifesaving saving because I mean gender dysphoric. It's not a joke no and talks with people badly and and I mean there's a multitude of reasons why the suicide rate in our community is so high but that's part of it but usually they don't cover Professor Facial Feminization Surgery they don't cover hair removal which it is just bullshit and that's like the number one thing ever move for surgery yeah to which he's just like delightful. It's like okay so I went to do the console. 'cause you know about doing bottom surgery and they're like okay. You need to have electrolysis or laser hair removal. Okay Fine Yep but you gotta pay for that a pocket because nobody's going to cover that which makes no sense. It's a prerequisite part of the surgery but no it's it's cosmetic have electrolysis that in some cases says you also have to have like an EKG in a checkup with a cardiologist to make sure you could undergo surgery and like all these other like the a prep step surgical prep and if you don't get hair removal especially down there I mean you. You can have medical complications later. Get them not wanting to cover hair removal elsewhere. Where like on your face things like that. I think it's stupid. I think it really flies in the face of wide other trans care is covered to begin with right but it shows that they're doing the minimum that they absolutely here's the thing I don't understand how this is the thing especially with for locating some places like transparent still completely excluded. My one friend who lives in South Carolina like the only place you can is planned parenthood her hormones because they won't cover them was that all of South Carolina or is that that she's a teacher right yeah so is that the school's policy that excludes it. I don't know but my understanding is her insurance that she has which is probably which. I assume school doesn't cover it. It's it's trans. CARE is one hundred percent explicitly excluded in her healthcare policy which which which private employers can do yeah marketplace plans can exclude it but if you get it through an employer the employer can choose whether whether you can have any kind of coverage at all they can exclude bariatric surgeries they can exclude any elective surgery injury they can exclude. Trans Care They can exclude Birth Control Reproductive Care Lake because sure why not which in this instance too. She works for Public School so that's extra special that you know if that is the case they're like Oh. Well you know it South Carolina. I know it's South Carolina whole she's moving well then she'll be able to go somewhere other planned parenthood if she wants to yeah but I mean it's it's and it's not just something with Trans Care. They do that all the time with lots of different things than I when my mom had cancelled their she had to fight to get to get head scans she had cancer do another like the extra cats game like that doesn't detect what the hell they're looking for. What are you talking about a and e. People shouldn't have to go through hoops to get the medical care that they need right now. I'm supposed to go to physical therapy for my shoulder. I just went through physical therapy for my back back supposed to go for my shoulder now because basically the only thing that they can do for people people with eds is hope to somehow strengthened the connective tissue. That's falling apart around my trains. continually so this is going to be an ongoing cycle of physical therapy which is fine. I have problem going to physical therapy Arab except that physical therapy three times a week with my insurance costs SME- a an hour out of my work day because that's when I go in the middle of my workday because that's because that's when they're open open and be forty dollars per visit for my copay only top of which I then get charged a co-insurance fee so I ended up going for my back. I didn't go for the the whole time that they wanted me to go but I ended up basically spending one hundred eighty dollars a week one hundred eighty dollars a week doc and so now they're saying will they can't do anything about my shoulder except physical therapy and I'm like well. How bad do I want my shoulder fixed. Because how am I gonNA come up with two hundred dollars a week to just exercise my shoulder and isn't there girls like a limit of how long you can go thirty visits yeah which is nothing half of them. Yeah which is nothing so you know if you're only going to cover it part of the time like that does that completely negates the point of going to physical therapy but it's not. I mean I mean it's covered but it's not really covered right kind of cover. It's covered in name only thanks again for listening to this show. If you like what you hear so far subscribe so you never miss an episode also be be short share with your friends and family so they can enjoy as well. This podcast is made possible by listeners like you. Thank you for your support Hey Shannon Hey Rachel. Have you been having fun making the podcast. Have I while that's so so these are exactly you've been handling. All the production has been hard to do not at all. Do you know why yes well great. I'm glad we're on the same page me to. Maybe you should tell listeners. Now okay fine. I just use anchor. That's right you. Do you really do know what I'm doing. I do I do you do it all the time. Well let me tell you. Anchor is the easiest way to make a podcast. It is yes. That's it has awesome creation tools to help record and edit your podcast so that it sounds great. I hope ourselves great everything you need in one place in you can use anchor right it from your computer or even on your phone on your own. Yes on your phone. Anchor will also distribute your podcast for you so that it can be heard everywhere that people want to listen to spotify got it apple podcasts also google absolutely and the best part is it's free. Which is why we use it. It's crazy if you've been the he'll starting a podcast. This is the best way to begin. Anchor will get you all set up. Help you get your podcast off the ground out into the world and you could start making money from your podcast lasted with no minimum listenership precisely what people are waiting for this obviously so download the anchor up now or go to anchor dot. FM Get started..

South Carolina Trans Care Professor Public School Care Lake spotify SME dot google apple one hundred eighty dollars one hundred percent two hundred dollars forty dollars
"s. healthcare" Discussed on Our Life In Transition

Our Life In Transition

01:35 min | 10 months ago

"s. healthcare" Discussed on Our Life In Transition

"This podcast deals with issues about LGBT families and transpacific specific topics. We would love to hear from you and welcome your questions and comments however we will not tolerate any discriminatory language or hate speech so please. I just don't do it. Enjoy the show caveat you you know because we're talking about these side effects in kind of scary shit about. HR is I mean it's it's something that definitely be aware of but not like terrified of I mean I had somebody comment when I posted my video about being in the hospital that you know this. This is one of the reasons I'm scared about starting t m like listen. It's talk to your doctor. Be On the same page about it understand what potential complications into be aware of but it's not something to be scared of when we were kids. We met at Camp After College. We got married ten years later. We finally had to be that same ear. I came out as trans. This is the story of our journey through marriage parenting gender and all the changes that life I phrase this. Is Our in transition.

"s. healthcare" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

The Voice of Healthcare

06:15 min | 1 year ago

"s. healthcare" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

Bradley Matt Bixby Google Alexa Michael Patrick Life Potters Siri engineer Boston Tennessee Stuart Patterson Chattanooga Samsung Amazon CEO billion dollar