35 Burst results for "S. Amanda"

"s. amanda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

07:12 min | 2 d ago

"s. amanda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Highest courts in the land that some of these things right now in these cases are resting on. I think the difference with the United States is that the people are crying out to the lord right now in a way they didn't do in Nazi Germany, meaning like there's way more resistance. There's way more resistance than opening their standing up and saying no more. And they're doing what they should have done in Nazi Germany to stop happening. I agree with you. I think that's right. And that's why I have hope because I really I see that there are enough people praying and resisting. I mean, clearly, most are not, but enough are. And I think there are plenty of people kind of watching from the sidelines trying to see what's going on. And they are coming at certain conclusions. I mean, when you see things as insane as they have been, I think a lot of people, they simply didn't think it could get this bad that gas prices would rock it up that the economy would go crazy that we would be perceived as weak by all our enemies around the world that transgender madness would pollute every part of culture and on and on and on. And that racism would be a thing, right? That you have critical race theory, introducing racism in effect pushing division between the races that wasn't there before. I mean, it's amazing. And I think your average American looks at it and says, yeah, this is nuts. I was not prepared for this. And I believe a lot of those people are going to suddenly open themselves up to what my friend Steven meier calls the God hypothesis. Like, yeah, maybe things are so crazy that I will turn to God. I wasn't really planning on that. But I don't see any other realistic solution. And the only people who seem to have sanity are people who believe in the God of the Bible and take him seriously. So I'm hopeful. Just a few seconds left in this segment I'll give you the last word as they say. You know, we keep our sanity because we know Jesus is in the boat with us. So the wind and the storm may be raging right now, but we have an advantage because we have Jesus in the boat with us. It doesn't mean the store won't cover. It means we have the one in the boat with us that can rebuke it. We're gonna be right back talking to Amanda grace, miracle Monday on the aircraft axis show. Folks I'm talking to Amanda grace, Amanda, I want to get really crazy. You recently was a recently. Heard an audible voice, God speaking to you. When was that? This was a few days ago, actually. Hold on, I can tell you the exact date of it right here. I think a lot of people is just safe to put you in the category to put this in the category of witchcraft and turn the channel. But I don't because I know you. This is real. So you at some point recently, you heard an audible God's voice speaking to you audibly. Yes, so basically I was in prayer and I had for a moment shut my eyes. You know what I mean? And you're not asleep. But you're almost there. And loud. I heard ObamaCare flew up on the couch when I heard this. And I thought, okay. I'm up lord, I'm up. So it's kind of like, I'm wondering now, why am I hearing this? Because normally when I hear, when I'm told this, when the audible voices the lord speaks normally it's shortened to the point. You know? In this manner. And so I started to do some research about ObamaCare and jabs after I heard this because really the battle in the courts right now is like ObamaCare two in a way, revved up. And so when I did some research, now this is interesting. When I looked it up, ObamaCare in these jabs, there is a document that was produced in 2013. I believe it was February of 2013. From a HIP, which is America's health insurance plans, okay? When you go and find this document, the first three pages I have it up right now. Is the Affordable Care Act immunizations, okay? And they talk about this for three pages at the beginning of this document and it says health plans commitment to vaccinating all populations. This is what it says. On their document, that was released in 2013. So they had intentions back then, and that's why ObamaCare went to the courts. And that's why a certain justice tipped it in a certain direction who shall remain nameless. And this is why they had plans way sooner to do this than they did. And ObamaCare was a part of it. It was a part of this is I mean, again, it gets to government control folks. If you understand anything about freedom on the American model, you understand that centralized government control is evil. It is the enemy of your freedom. And that's it's basically, you know, it's introduced. It's the Trojan horse. Hey, we're going to free healthcare. Come on, sign up. Hey, we're going to help you. And you're giving away your rights slowly, but surely. And obviously one of the big reasons so many people were opposed to ObamaCare was because of that. I mean the idea of centralizing power in that way, it's bad, no matter how you look at it. But when you look at it with regard to the vaccines and vaccine mandates, you start realizing this is a way to control people. This is a way to rob people of their God given freedoms. But it's interesting to me that you heard an audible voice because I know that doesn't happen even to you very often. No, and surprisingly enough after I write that down. Can I go back into prayer? And I'm just about again. I relaxed. And I hear another word and it was meta X. I have no clue minorities. I thought I was losing my mind. 20 seconds. What is it? It is a patient health, software system, sharing system of patient information in Ontario, Canada. Watch this company in the middle of all. And wait, you heard this as an audible voice from God? What the word was? I heard met erectile. Oh my gosh. Amanda, you are so much fun to talk to. You're not just informative,.

Amanda grace Steven meier Germany United States Amanda Ontario Canada
Amanda Grace on Her Prophetic Dream

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:08 min | 2 d ago

Amanda Grace on Her Prophetic Dream

"I'm talking to Amanda great to meet I got to ask you like the tough question. There are people listening that they don't buy any of this stuff. They just think you're somebody with an active imagination. And they would say, okay, so you're having some weird dreams. So what? I have weird dreams. Like, what does it matter? Why are you talking about Eric show? Why is there a having you on his show? Talk about that because this is your life. You know, this is important. It is, you know, this is going on been going on with me since I'm a little girl. So you know what I mean? This has been going on for like 35 plus years since about the age of 6. So people when they don't live it in a way, it's hard to understand it. But these are dreams and visions and things. The lord has given me over and over again for years and years that have come to pass. In fact, with me, what's going on with me was prophesied when I was 26 years old, 13 years before it ever happened. So this is interesting too. So I'll say this really quick because it'll help prove my point. There's a woman named brigid who is one of the most prophetic people I've ever met and she went to the church. We were going to at the time. And it was an assembly of God church when I was in my mid 20s. And I was really sick at that point. And I was very thin, I was getting white blood cell transfusions. I mean, I was really ill. And so she came over to pray for me. And when she started to pray for me, she stopped and she looked at me and she goes Amanda, the lord is going to raise you up into a prophetic ministry. And it is going to be a driving force in the world. And it is going to be a different kind of ministry because the lord is going to build a brick by brick himself and you're going to let him. And it's going to have a healing aspect to it. Little does she know, and this will prove my point, what you asked, I had had a dream. She didn't know I had this dream. And I was standing in the front of an enormous room that I couldn't even see to the back of. And there were so many tables and at each table was a different nation. And I was preaching to the nations. So I had this dream and then she comes over and not knowing this prophesied this from the lord.

Amanda Assembly Of God Church Eric Brigid
Amanda Grace of Ark of Grace Ministries Looks Into Dreams and Prophesies

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:37 min | 2 d ago

Amanda Grace of Ark of Grace Ministries Looks Into Dreams and Prophesies

"Talking to Amanda grace, okay, manda, so you said you're having this dream about a year ago and in the dream you hear Alabama, what? Say it again. Alabama has voted for Trump. Uh huh. It was an announcement. Yes, that interesting. So I hear this, right? The next thing it cuts to. And I'm in a bedroom. Felt the sides may be of our bedroom here in the house. And I see a figure if I'm standing at the foot of the bed, he would be to the right, but if you're standing at the head of the bed he would be to the left, okay? I'm standing at the foot of the bed watching this. I see a figure with white hair. Very decrepit, very old and bed dying. In the bed. In the bed. Dying. Dying. And at the head of the bed with him right next to his head is Obama. And in the room with Obama was a bunch of Middle Eastern looking people. And they're waiting for this individual to die as well. And so I saw Obama's left on the floor. There were three shoes, pairs, the shoes that were in a row. One of them was a Middle Eastern Paris sandals, one of them was a pair of dress shoes that I couldn't really tell what the third one was. And on the bed is a piece of apricot candy like Turkish Delight. And Obama was getting ready to celebrate. He was waiting for this. He was waiting for the old man in the bed to die.

Amanda Grace Alabama Manda Donald Trump Barack Obama Middle Eastern Paris Middle Eastern
Amanda Grace Knows Animals Feel the Presence of the Lord

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:33 min | 2 d ago

Amanda Grace Knows Animals Feel the Presence of the Lord

"And I thought, wouldn't it be fun to visit with our friend Amanda grace and talk about God and all that crazy stuff that conspiratorial stuff about there being a God and hearing from him? And we said, yeah, let's reach out to Amanda and son of a gun. We got her. Amanda, I hear animals in the background. Is that normal? Where are you? It is. I'm in my office, actually. We have an animal sanctuary here. So that's little Oliver, the button quail and the big aviary in back of me. The button quail got this big. And he makes that much noise. That's amazing. He does. You know, when I start talking and the presence of the lord starts to move, they all begin to chatter. It's quite comical. All of the animals and there are people who think that's crazy talk. I used to be one of them. I no longer am. It's amazing when you've experienced what we call the presence of God. It's hard to describe. It's certainly not something that you can explain too much. But it is palpable. And I have heard people say that sometimes animals notice it. So you're telling me you live in this animal sanctuary or next to an animal sanctuary and that you have actually noticed this. This is real. This is real, and this isn't they have noticed over years. So this isn't something I just noticed once or twice and made a theory out of it. This is something I distantly noticed again and again with these

Amanda Grace Amanda Oliver
Nadal reaches Australian Open quarterfinals for 14th time

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 4 d ago

Nadal reaches Australian Open quarterfinals for 14th time

"Madison Madison Madison Madison keys keys keys keys and and and and Jessica Jessica Jessica Jessica the the the the goal goal goal goal have have have have one one one one through through through through to to to to the the the the quarter quarter quarter quarter finals finals finals finals of of of of the the the the Australian Australian Australian Australian Open Open Open Open case case case case conceded conceded conceded conceded just just just just four four four four games games games games the the the the eighth eighth eighth eighth seeded seeded seeded seeded Spaniard Spaniard Spaniard Spaniard pulled pulled pulled pulled us us us us up up up up and and and and that that that that set set set set up up up up a a a a last last last last eight eight eight eight showdown showdown showdown showdown with with with with the the the the fourth fourth fourth fourth seeded seeded seeded seeded Czech Czech Czech Czech Barbora Barbora Barbora Barbora strycova strycova strycova strycova the the the the goal goal goal goal of of of of completed completed completed completed the the the the American American American American double double double double with with with with the the the the fighting fighting fighting fighting to to to to said said said said whenever whenever whenever whenever the the the the fifth fifth fifth fifth St St St St Maria Maria Maria Maria soccer soccer soccer soccer eight eight eight eight the the the the next next next next assignment assignment assignment assignment is is is is world world world world number number number number one one one one ash ash ash ash Barty Barty Barty Barty who who who who accounted accounted accounted accounted for for for for a a a a resurgent resurgent resurgent resurgent Amanda Amanda Amanda Amanda and and and and the the the the some some some some of of of of the the the the six six six six four four four four six six six six three three three three Canadian Canadian Canadian Canadian fourteen fourteen fourteen fourteen St St St St Denis Denis Denis Denis Shapovalov Shapovalov Shapovalov Shapovalov pulled pulled pulled pulled off off off off the the the the man's man's man's man's up up up up to to to to the the the the day day day day knocking knocking knocking knocking out out out out the the the the third third third third seed seed seed seed Alexander Alexander Alexander Alexander Zverev Zverev Zverev Zverev to to to to face face face face Rafa Rafa Rafa Rafa Nadal Nadal Nadal Nadal in in in in the the the the quarter quarter quarter quarter I'm I'm I'm I'm Graham Graham Graham Graham my my my my guts guts guts guts

Madison Madison Madison Madiso Jessica Jessica Jessica Jessic Soccer Czech Czech Czech Czech Barbora Barbora Barbora Barbor Maria Maria Maria Maria Barty Barty Amanda Amanda Amanda Amanda Denis Denis Denis Denis Shapov Alexander Alexander Alexander Zverev Zverev Zverev Rafa Rafa Rafa Rafa Nadal Nadal Nadal Nadal Graham Graham
Cilic upsets No. 5 Rublev to reach 4th round

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 5 d ago

Cilic upsets No. 5 Rublev to reach 4th round

"Danielle Danielle Danielle Danielle Collins Collins Collins Collins has has has has become become become become the the the the fourth fourth fourth fourth American American American American to to to to reach reach reach reach the the the the Australian Australian Australian Australian Open Open Open Open women's women's women's women's fourth fourth fourth fourth round round round round the the the the twenty twenty twenty twenty eight eight eight eight year year year year old old old old from from from from Florida Florida Florida Florida through through through through to to to to thanks thanks thanks thanks at at at at least least least least militants militants militants militants after after after after come come come come back back back back three three three three set set set set win win win win over over over over nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen year year year year old old old old dying dying dying dying Clough Clough Clough Clough tells tells tells tells them them them them she she she she joins joins joins joins Madison Madison Madison Madison case case case case Amanda Amanda Amanda Amanda and and and and the the the the Somoza Somoza Somoza Somoza and and and and Jessica Jessica Jessica Jessica will will will will go go go go over over over over in in in in the the the the last last last last sixteen sixteen sixteen sixteen Taylor Taylor Taylor Taylor Fritz Fritz Fritz Fritz raised raised raised raised a a a a men's men's men's men's fourth fourth fourth fourth round round round round showdown showdown showdown showdown with with with with the the the the full full full full state state state state Stefano Stefano Stefano Stefano six six six six apos apos apos apos after after after after upsetting upsetting upsetting upsetting the the the the fifteenth fifteenth fifteenth fifteenth April April April April but but but but I've I've I've I've got got got got a a a a piece piece piece piece that that that that I I I I go go go go to to to to he he he he was was was was joined joined joined joined by by by by fellow fellow fellow fellow American American American American Maxime Maxime Maxime Maxime Cressy Cressy Cressy Cressy the the the the big big big big Chris Chris Chris Chris o'connell o'connell o'connell o'connell to to to to set set set set up up up up a a a a showdown showdown showdown showdown with with with with the the the the second second second second seed seed seed seed Daniil Daniil Daniil Daniil Medvedev Medvedev Medvedev Medvedev I'm I'm I'm I'm Graham Graham Graham Graham I I I I got got got got

Amanda Amanda Jessica Jessica Danielle Danielle Danielle Dan Florida Fritz Fritz Clough Clough Clough Clough Madison Madison Madison Madiso Somoza Somoza Somoza Somoza Taylor Taylor Taylor Taylor Stefano Stefano Stefano Stefan Chris Chris Maxime Maxime Maxime Maxime Cr Connell Daniil Daniil Daniil Daniil Me Medvedev Medvedev Medvedev Graham Graham Graham Graham
Anisimova upsets defending champion Osaka at Australian Open

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 6 d ago

Anisimova upsets defending champion Osaka at Australian Open

"Amanda Amanda Amanda Amanda Anisimova Anisimova Anisimova Anisimova has has has has pulled pulled pulled pulled off off off off the the the the biggest biggest biggest biggest upset upset upset upset today today today today to to to to the the the the Australian Australian Australian Australian Open Open Open Open the the the the twenty twenty twenty twenty year year year year old old old old rising rising rising rising American American American American style style style style knocking knocking knocking knocking out out out out the the the the defending defending defending defending champion champion champion champion Dale Dale Dale Dale male male male male soccer soccer soccer soccer in in in in a a a a hard hard hard hard hitting hitting hitting hitting two two two two hour hour hour hour and and and and fifteen fifteen fifteen fifteen minutes minutes minutes minutes third third third third round round round round battle battle battle battle and and and and as as as as a a a a mother mother mother mother say say say say to to to to third third third third set set set set match match match match points points points points before before before before closing closing closing closing out out out out the the the the dramatic dramatic dramatic dramatic win win win win ten ten ten ten points points points points to to to to five five five five in in in in an an an an extended extended extended extended tie tie tie tie break break break break up up up up her her her her reward reward reward reward is is is is a a a a showdown showdown showdown showdown with with with with the the the the top top top top seed seed seed seed ash ash ash ash Barty Barty Barty Barty the the the the Australian Australian Australian Australian continuing continuing continuing continuing her her her her straight straight straight straight sets sets sets sets run run run run through through through through the the the the draw draw draw draw after after after after a a a a solid solid solid solid win win win win over over over over Camilla Camilla Camilla Camilla Giorgi Giorgi Giorgi Giorgi Jessica Jessica Jessica Jessica to to to to go go go go left left left left and and and and Madison Madison Madison Madison keys keys keys keys also also also also reached reached reached reached the the the the fourth fourth fourth fourth round round round round I'm I'm I'm I'm Graham Graham Graham Graham like like like like us us us us

Soccer Amanda Amanda Amanda Amanda An Dale Dale Dale Dale Barty Barty Barty Jessica Jessica Camilla Camilla Camilla Camill Madison Madison Madison Madiso Graham Graham Graham Graham United States
The Latest: Alexander Zverev into 3rd round in Australia

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | Last week

The Latest: Alexander Zverev into 3rd round in Australia

"Women's women's women's women's defending defending defending defending champion champion champion champion Naomi Naomi Naomi Naomi Osaka Osaka Osaka Osaka has has has has reached reached reached reached the the the the Australian Australian Australian Australian Open Open Open Open third third third third row row row row but but but but not not not not before before before before fighting fighting fighting fighting off off off off a a a a second second second second set set set set fightback fightback fightback fightback from from from from the the the the American American American American Madison Madison Madison Madison Brengle Brengle Brengle Brengle Osaka Osaka Osaka Osaka upon upon upon upon six six six six love love love love six six six six four four four four and and and and now now now now faces faces faces faces another another another another American American American American and and and and Amanda Amanda Amanda Amanda I'm I'm I'm I'm Lisa Lisa Lisa Lisa mother mother mother mother who who who who advanced advanced advanced advanced after after after after upsetting upsetting upsetting upsetting the the the the twenty twenty twenty twenty second second second second state state state state Belinda Belinda Belinda Belinda bench bench bench bench H. H. H. H. dress dress dress dress like like like like a a a a goal goal goal goal at at at at Madison Madison Madison Madison case case case case also also also also reached reached reached reached the the the the women's women's women's women's third third third third round round round round and and and and in in in in men's men's men's men's action action action action Raleigh Raleigh Raleigh Raleigh okay okay okay okay okay okay okay okay and and and and Sebastian Sebastian Sebastian Sebastian Korda Korda Korda Korda kept kept kept kept the the the the American American American American flag flag flag flag flying flying flying flying corner corner corner corner through through through through after after after after a a a a marathon marathon marathon marathon five five five five set set set set win win win win over over over over the the the the Frenchman Frenchman Frenchman Frenchman current current current current up up up up move move move move today today today today I'm I'm I'm I'm Graham Graham Graham Graham like like like like US US US US

Osaka Brengle Women's Women's Women's Women Amanda Amanda Madison Naomi Naomi Naomi Naomi Lisa Lisa Lisa Lisa Raleigh Belinda Belinda Belinda Belind H. H. H. H. Madison Madison Madison Madiso Sebastian Sebastian Sebastian Korda Korda American American American Ame Graham Graham Graham Graham United States
Can 'Trumponomics' Exist Without a Truly Conservative GOP? Stephen Moore Explains

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:43 min | 2 weeks ago

Can 'Trumponomics' Exist Without a Truly Conservative GOP? Stephen Moore Explains

"Down. So here's my question to you. You've written the books. You've written Trump and nomics. Use the revised president Trump. You'll be advising him if God willing he comes back. But is it all for north if we don't have a Republican Party that is truly conservative and believes in Hayek? Believes in fond messes believes in laughter. Stephen, can we do it? You know, it's funny, you know, I don't think that Donald Trump even knew who he was. But you know, he instinctively got it. You know, he did. And so, you know, in Trump accomplished so much, even with the bureaucracy and the Republican Party kicking and screaming the whole way. I'll give you an example of something I didn't even agree with Amanda was China. I said, boy, you're going to be you're being really rough with China. You know, why are you, why are you picking a fight with China? Well, he was right. And I was wrong. He was the first president in modern times to recognize that China is that the Chinese leadership is evil that they are not friends. They're not allies, they're adversaries and enemies, and that they were engaged in incredibly predatory economic and trade practices. And he almost single handedly stood up to China. And now, I think everybody agrees that Trump was right. So. I think Trump has, and I don't, look, I think he probably will run for president and I agree with you if the Republicans take over the House and Senate, and it's a fair election. I think he could very easily win again. But he still facing so many in the party who are guns

President Trump Republican Party China Donald Trump Hayek Stephen Amanda Senate House
Daily Wire: Gov. DeSantis Did Not Have an Activist Removed From Presser Over Criticism

Mark Levin

01:18 min | 3 weeks ago

Daily Wire: Gov. DeSantis Did Not Have an Activist Removed From Presser Over Criticism

"Over here at the daily wire Amanda Preston giacomo media wrong again no desantis did not have an activist removed from my presser over criticism Here are the facts They just lie the American media lie and they line one direction They have no intention of covering Trump honestly no intention of covering a Republican honestly no intention of covering desantis honestly They see him as a threat So they have been trying to destroy him from day one but they have failed The establishment media ran with another disparaging narrative targeting Florida governor Ron DeSantis that turned out to be false False Claiming the Republican head quote a community activist on quota rested and removed from a news conference over criticism of the government But that's not what happened Oh really do tell A man was arrested for trespassing Oh tell me Garland Meritless Garland After he refused to leave a closed news conference about lifesaving monoclonal antibody treatment for only credentialed media by Jacksonville police not at the behest of desantis team or the governor who was not even there at the time of the

Desantis Amanda Preston Giacomo Ron Desantis Donald Trump Garland Florida Jacksonville
McConnell, Spears, Osaka: A look at 2021's notable quotes

AP News Radio

01:11 min | Last month

McConnell, Spears, Osaka: A look at 2021's notable quotes

"A a line line from from a a speech speech given given from from the the Senate Senate floor floor before before rioters rioters stormed stormed the the capitol capitol in in January January tops tops a a Yale Yale Law Law School School librarian's librarian's list list of of the the most most notable notable quotes quotes of of twenty twenty twenty twenty one one Fred Fred Shapiro Shapiro says says he he picked picked quotes quotes that that are are important important or or revealing revealing of of the the spirit spirit of of the the times times is is top top quote quote is is from from the the then then Majority Majority Leader Leader Mitch Mitch McConnell McConnell urging urging fellow fellow Republicans Republicans to to abandon abandon attempts attempts to to overrule overrule president president Biden's Biden's victory victory voters voters the the court court and and the the stage stage it it also also spoke spoke with with president president Biden Biden gave gave a a speech speech in in July July as as the the U. U. S. S. was was preparing preparing to to get get out out of of Afghanistan Afghanistan the the likelihood likelihood is is going going to to be be the the Taliban Taliban overrunning overrunning everything everything and and owning owning the the whole whole country country is is highly highly unlikely unlikely Swedish Swedish teenager teenager Greta Greta tune tune Burke Burke spoke spoke to to protesters protesters in in November November about about adults adults and and climate climate change change we we say say no no no no exploitation exploitation of of people people and and they they and and there there are are the the first first words words from from Amanda Amanda Gorman Gorman in in the the palm palm the the hill hill we we climb climb she she read read it it during during the the Biden Biden inauguration inauguration when when day day comes comes we we ask ask ourselves ourselves where where can can we we find find lights lights in in this this never never ending ending shade shade the the list list is is a a supplement supplement to to the the new new Yale Yale book book of of quotations quotations I'm I'm at at Donahue Donahue

Capitol Capitol Yale Yale Law Law School Schoo Fred Fred Shapiro Shapiro Biden Biden Mitch Mitch Mcconnell Mcconnel Senate President President Biden U. U. S. S. Taliban Afghanistan Greta Greta Burke Burke Biden Amanda Amanda Gorman Gorman Hill Hill Donahue Donahue
"s. amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:52 min | Last month

"s. amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"It's actually a kind of collection of you just poetry? Oh, oh, Chris does poetry. He's literally a writer. He's lit like two master degrees in poetry kind of guy. In our courtship, would be reciting poems to me. That's how it worked. I'm sorry. I'm sorry. I just forgot. No, it's cool. It's cool. You didn't know. Why would you know? Yeah, no, so we're big poetry nerds. He above all is a huge poetry nerd and is constantly finding wonderful opportunities to share poetry with me. And he's not much of a singer, so with our daughter, I do a bunch of singing at her. He recites her poetry. All of that, I love that. As I told you earlier, I'm really interested in this field of post traumatic growth. So I kind of want to leave with a question for you. Rabbi Harold Kushner when he was reflecting on the death of his son, he said, quote, I am a more sensitive person, a more effective pastor, a more sympathetic counselor because of Aaron's life and death than I would ever have been without it. And I would give up all those gains in a second if I could have my son back. If I could choose, I would forgo all the spiritual growth and depth, which is called my way because of our experiences. But I can not choose. So one can always think in the multiverse thought experiment, what would Amanda Knox what would it be to who would she be today if this experience didn't happen with her? But you can't choose that and you'll never know. So moving forward, what are some of the areas of growth that you're most excited about and that you think generally came about that wouldn't have come about if this didn't happen to you? That thank you for asking that and gosh. That makes me so sad. Also because it's like I'm a new parent. So I'm like newly appreciating the depths of that sadness. I'm really doing a great job making progress. You are, you're just like picking all the money. Yeah, so I think that my greatest I mean, even just becoming more attuned to the suffering of others, is something that I don't know that I had a good grasp on before all of this because honestly I before everything happened in Italy, I lived a very, very blessed life. I did not have difficulties. My family was very close and very supportive. I had everything, everything going for me. And I don't think I really understood the depths of loss and despair that human beings are capable of and routinely experience. And so it gave me a lot of compassion for people who experienced that and especially for people who experienced that in a very public way. And have that sort of extra dimension of suffering put on them by people perceiving them as and judging them while they are experiencing the worst experience of their lives. So that that is something that I have a new sort of ingrained radar for and perspective on that I have found to be not just useful for myself but also useful for people who reach out to me and feel really alone and isolated. There's like a special special suffering when it comes to people who are not only experiencing tragedy or loss or trauma, but are being judged very publicly in the process. So that's actually a really good point. Does this experience make you a little bit more skeptical when some people are tried in the court of public opinion? So when everyone else is jumping on someone, does it make you more sensitive to 100% and I hate the idea like it really bugs me out the idea that some quality about yourself that you can not control somehow makes it so that you aren't suffering. What are we talking about? Like, no, everyone who is being judged for some dramatic thing is suffering. And period. So I don't know. It also, when people say things like, oh, cancel culture isn't real. I'm like, no, it is. People are constantly trying to sort of pin down people for like one either real or imagined transgression and like define that person entirely by that thing and delete them, like literally cancel them, so I don't know. I feel like judgment in the public's square is not treated with the amount of weight that it actually carries on the person who experiences it. Pile on culture is really real. And mob justice is often devoid of due process and proportional sentencing. And these are all reasons why we have a criminal justice system in the first place and don't just deal with transgressors out in the open. There's a reason for that. And so yeah, I am a firm believer that we should have we should be way more cautious about the court of public opinion and have a lot more skepticism towards it. Yeah, I very much agree. Well, it looks to me like the gestalt media narrative around you is changing. There seems to be something in the air, you know, the Rogan appearance. If The New York Times profile, in our conversation today, my goal was quite simply for you to just show who you are. Just to show who you are. I didn't have to do anything. You are who you are, and I wanted people to see that. Thanks. And well, thank you. You strike me as someone who's very, very deeply empathetic and I would even say a poetic soul. I feel like you have a poetic soul, right? Is that resonate with you? Yeah, totally it does. And the way that I interpret that is I feel like I see a lot of beauty, even in the stuff that hurts. Which is what I feel like a poet is constantly doing is finding the beauty in the pain. And not reveling in it, but just like acknowledging it. I feel like acknowledging is a really important part of my life now. Yeah, so Viktor frankl called that tragic optimism. It's finding the beauty and meaning in tragedy. Thank you so much for coming to my podcast today, man. And I hope you feel like you were seen. I hope you feel seen. I totally feel seen today. Thank you very much. And you've given me a lot to think about. So I'll do that. I'll send you some follow-up nerdy papers and things. What I talked about today..

Rabbi Harold Kushner Amanda Knox Aaron Chris Italy trauma Rogan The New York Times Viktor frankl
"s. amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

09:14 min | Last month

"s. amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Because, again, when I think back to my prosecutor, I was never satisfied with the idea that, oh, this is happening to me just because bad people are doing bad things to me. No, that's not what was happening. It was more complicated than that. And so I had to take into consideration, well, is there a kind of confirmation bias happening here when the evidence finally came in that showed that it was Rudy gaday and not me? Was there a conservativism bias where they had made an already assumption about what the case was and they were only willing to tweak it just enough to accommodate a new set of information, but not to contradict their previous theory of the case. Like there are so many ways that even just the perception of me as a human being can be best explained like this ongoing perception of me as like a guilty person is due to the anchoring bias, the fact that PEEP the first piece of information that people have ever heard about me was that I was a guilty of a terrible crime. And so even when new evidence has come forth, revealing that not to be the case, people are biased towards the first thing that they ever heard. And that explains a lot of the why of my experience. It doesn't really explain how to get out of it, but at least I have a better understanding of the human psychology behind. My experience, yeah. Like I said, it's like you got a PhD in psychology through this whole situation. To your referring your prescribed referring to giuliano giuliano menini. Come on, Scott. You used to sing Italian opera. You can do better than that. You actually did it really well. Most people are like, Juliana. What if I sing it if I sing it, I'll do a better job? Yeah. My take of this cat from watching the Netflix documentary is that he sees himself as the modern day Sherlock Holmes. You know, he's like, you know, he just had build up in his mind, this whole I'm going to be the savior of the world. This goes to your point you said earlier, you know, people that do bad things don't think in their head. Oh, I'm doing a bad thing. They think mostly, it's usually I'm doing something for the greater good. But there's a profound narcissism associated with a lot of those instances because you think in your head that you and only you are going to save the world and that leads to hubris. And that leads to overconfidence. And that leaves the subjectivity. Yes. Which is what happened a lot of the kazoom. In your case, right? Yes, absolutely. But is there any chance for a reconciliation with him or? Well, that's an intriguing question because it is something that I have been contemplating and pursuing for a long time. I can't say much about it, but just because it's an ongoing project. But it is something that is deeply important to me. The idea that I can basically confront my accuser and do so in a way that would be not antagonistic, but restorative. Well, good. I really look forward to hearing something about that. Thanks, yeah. Good for you for I'd like to see you. You talked to Rudy someday. Yeah. Incredible. That would also be a very interesting experience. And I'm not very emotional in terms of the lens. Yeah. Yeah. It's not ready for that one. Yeah, I feel like I need a little more time for that one. Yeah. Absolutely. We're not gonna be like, no, we're bringing out. Itchy L drawer. Let's talk about ETL drawer. Love ETL drawer. Yes. I know, I know. And I want to thank you so much for bringing to my attention these amazing amazing researchers. So because you got me down rabbit holes, I was like, oh, wow, their forensic science literature has some really serious problems. Problems. Yeah. He said, I just want to quote something ETL said, which I completely agree with. He said, there isn't a psychologist on this planet. He's referring to cognitive psychologists, which is what I am. There isn't a cognitive psychology on this plan or any other planet who can come and say that judgment perception or objective. It's one of the most basic cornerstones of psychology. Yet the more you start to look into the literature, you realize just how much how many of these techniques even fingerprint analysis have never actually been scientifically validated. They've been used for over a hundred years, right? So my gosh, that's insane, right? That we assume that all these techniques are just completely objective and they don't involve bias when it turns out they very much do, and should we talk about one of the seminal studies that he conducted along those lines where he showed that fingerprint analysts when given anonymous prints from cases they themselves analyzed ten years or so ago, they were asked to judge those same prints as a match or not. And when they were told that the suspect confessed, the results of their analysis often was in the opposite direction of what they themselves had said about this very prince when they first analyzed them. That's shocking. Yes. I hope that everyone followed that. So DNA or fingerprint expert did a study many years ago, determined match or not match, then many, many years later, was confronted with the very same prince and came up with a very different result based upon being told that the person had confessed to the crime. So it's like and this is why Sal Cass's work is so important. Important because whether or not a person confesses is so, so biasing to people. People just can't wrap their minds around an innocent person confessing to a crime, so they assume that that person now must be guilty and even scientific experts are unable to separate their now bias in their own objective looks at physical evidence. And so that's why etail proposes a solution, which is linear sequential screening, or unmask, sorry, linear sequential, unmasking, where you only tell forensic experts as much information as they need to know in order to do their job. The fingerprint expert doesn't need to know whether or not the suspect confessed or not in order to determine whether or not a fingerprint is a match. So just don't give them that biasing information. It's that simple. Yeah, I mean, studies show possible error rates of one to 4% in fingerprint analysis there is an 10% or more in paint fiber and body fluid analysis alone. And then the more I dig into this, the more I realize all the problems with this. So this is a one chord I came across. You don't tell the crime lab scientists doing the DNA, for example, what the suspect's DNA profile looks like until they've extracted the DNA from the evidence profile for the victim first. I mean, it's like, right? You hear that you're like, of course. And yet, that's not what the practice is. Not with a practice. When teeny said that, when tiny, this kind of methodology also helps eliminate unwitting or unconscious bias towards linking evidence to a suspect. So there's so many things that bring in subjectivity into this. And these are real lives that we're talking about. Yeah, and they're being wrongful. And I think that it's important to note that, again, it's an unconscious bias that's impacting these these experts and these detectives, they're not knowingly and willingly making their lives easier and coming up with matches to the fingerprints because they heard someone confess, that just information unconsciously biased them to seeing results objective results very differently. And as a result, it is very, very important to not to acknowledge that that's just the case. It's not saying some kind of moral question about a forensic expert. It's just simply this is a human problem. This is not a you or me problem. It's a human problem. And actually, are you familiar with the psychopath test by John ronson? I mean, I'm sure you have well. So absolutely. So yeah, so one of the co authors of the psychopath test is one of my co authors on our late try on paper. Oh, great, yeah. He came over. He came over to the light side. Yeah, one of my favorite jokes from that book is John ronson said. As soon as I heard about confirmation bias, I started to see it everywhere. Yeah. So good. Yeah. It's also true. And it's so so true. And motivated reasoning, you see motivated reasoning so much, there's a whole line of research I'm writing an article right now for the Atlantic about this on moral tribalism and group narcissism and the extent to which we overlook the moral transgressions of people we see in our in group. But if we have perceived them as being in our out group, we will, in ambiguous information, we'll see mortal transgressions. Absolutely. So this is very important stuff. Very important stuff. Do you still write poetry? Is that still in you? So I have the most recent poetry that I have out in the world is a book of poems called the cardio tesseract that me and my husband wrote together..

Rudy gaday giuliano giuliano menini Juliana Sherlock Holmes Sal Cass Netflix Rudy Scott John ronson teeny
"s. amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

09:55 min | Last month

"s. amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"With more of an inner presence that doesn't need to be validated by others. Where you don't lead with uncertainty about yourself, but you lead with your authenticity that you always go high on, the more you can just lead with your authenticity. The less you'll feel these vulnerable narcissistic characteristics. Does that make sense? Yeah, no, that's actually really great. And I think that that does ring very true to me. I mean, I'm almost like getting sad. There's hope here, but I'm saying there's hope. Yeah. A thing she's been grappling with ever since this Italy trauma has been. It's just something I think we talked about with LeVar Burton, actually. And that season one episode of labyrinth that Amanda worries that the most notable thing about her forever will be a thing that didn't that she didn't do and that happened to her. And it's a most people don't have the opportunity to deal with that strange circumstance where the whole world associates your name and your identity and who you are and why you matter with this thing that has nothing to do with you. And she often wonders, will I ever contribute to the world in any way that will matter more? And that will have an impact more than this other thing that is not of me. And but I have a radical I have a radical suggestion and this may sound like I've just slipped into Oprah mode, but I have a radical radical suggestion. Had it ever occurred to you that in this precise moment you're enough. No. Like, that's it. Yeah. I do feel like your truth secret entertained that hypothesis for a second. You know, like, maybe this precise moment. It's like, oh wait. Everything else is just gravy from here. Yeah, I'll try that. I'll do a meditation on that today. Thanks. Awesome. Awesome. So Chris, thanks so much for joining us for this. Yeah. Do you have a mandate you have? I appreciate that man. Do you have a do you have another ten, 15 minutes to talk about cognitive bias? I want to be really respectful of yours. Yeah, yeah. I'm gonna hop out and attend to baby. Oh, is she awake? Well, I'm just cool. Oh, okay. Nice to talk to you. Thank you, Chris. Most talking to. Didn't expect to go off in that direction, but I'm actually glad I'm glad it did. No, I appreciate it too. Because I feel like are you okay? Yeah, yeah. I'm okay. This is like an ongoing conversation between me and Chris, because I've often been somewhat astounded by how confident he is in himself in the sense that this sort of things that would get me down. He's just like, well, I know that I'm a good writer. And I know that I'm like this that or the other. So I don't have to worry about whether or not the world is acknowledging that I am or not. And I struggle with that more where I feel like I have to prove myself constantly and I'm not giving myself as much space to just prove myself to myself. Yeah. Yeah, no, I hear you, but a lot of feeling will come from feeling whole inner inner wise. Great. Well, so you've been really interested in cognitive bias. And you learned a whole lesson. Now, you really wrote a nerdy blog post that you could probably submit to a scientific journal. With this bias, I mean, you give, did you hear Mike chat with kahneman on this podcast and by any chance? Have you ever listened to that one yet? Obviously, one of the cofounders leading researchers of the cognitive bias literature. But you had new ones that I had never seen before. Well, I've gone down the rabbit hole. Well, I appreciate you're in a safe nerdy space here. You're welcome. So you look, I thought this was really interesting. You literally coined a new bias that I think is really a good one and it's called the single victim fallacy. Can you talk a little bit about what that is? Because I think people's minds because it's almost dawn on people that can be multiple victims. Yeah, yeah. Well, and I think that just arises from these black and white narratives. But what I observed in my own experience was this false notion that if Meredith, the young woman who was raped and murdered is a victim, then anyone else who is within the vicinity of the story can not be a victim. And similarly, like if people say, well, Amanda's a victim, people have treated this case as if I'm not a real victim that there's a real victim, and then there is me. And I wanted to point out, just because Meredith was the original victim in this case, doesn't mean that there couldn't be other people who are victimized from this story. And I wanted to point out this black and white thinking process where it's like there seems to be this sort of zero sum bias that if there is if there's victimization on my part that that somehow takes away from the victimization on Meredith's part. And I want to point out, that's absolutely not true. But I continually have that thrown at me constantly by people online who say like any time that I am asserting my how I have been victimized, I am somehow diminishing the victimization of Meredith. And I push back against that constantly and I, to the point that I felt like I had to define a whole new bias about it. And I think that that happens a lot in wrongful conviction cases, where there is this tendency for people to say, well, because the family of the original victim needs closure, we can not explore the victimization of someone who has been accused. Yeah. There's such a horrible paradox here that Saul calls cast and has pointed out. And that's that being innocent, literally just being actually can put you in increased risk of not being seen as innocent. You know, you even making this point some British tabloids will be like, oh, defensive defensive Amanda. You almost can't win. It's like, what am I not supposed to defend my innocence? I should just shut up. What's the alternative here? You know, that I just shut up. So yeah, that's tough. Yeah. Are you familiar? Do you know sarcasm? Because I know him personally. And he reached out to you when you were in jail. Yeah, yeah. He's a really great guy. And has done a tremendous amount to help me with to process my experience because what goes on in interrogation rooms was completely foreign to me. And he very much after sort of hearing me out what I what I experience shared his research with me and I was just blown away. So anyway. Well, thanks for telling me about his work because I read some of his papers, found really interesting this paper he wrote on the psychology of confessions does innocence put innocents at risk. He said, recent recent research suggests that actual innocence does not protect people across a sequence of pivotal decisions. In pre interrogation interviews, investigators commit false positive errors, presuming innocent suspects guilty. Naively believing in the transparency of their innocence, innocent suspects, wave their rights. This is hard to say because there's a lot of innocent innocence. Despite her because of their denials, innocent suspects, illicit highly confrontational interrogations. This looks like textbook command and knocks, right? All Eva. Yeah. So grateful for his work. So tell me about your keynote that you did the American psychology and law conference. Oh, I mean, I am interested in how the question of why these things happen. And so when I'm invited to give a talk about this experience, I often will ask people like, well, what about what about this experience actually interests you? And looking at this, I was really happy to go to the psychology and law conference because I this is the part about wrongful convictions that I am most keen on. Why do first of all, innocent people end up in this process and how are these institutions sort of built not to not like Sal Cass's research shows that there are lots of ways that innocent people are simply not accounted for in the interrogation room where like if you make if someone accuses you of something and you say, no, no, that's not, that's not what I saw what I did, like the assumption is, oh, you're a guilty person who's lying. And not that you're an actually innocent person. And so the ways that those course of interrogation techniques, which are very, very effective at getting guilty people to confess to crimes, they're also very effective at getting innocent people to confess to crimes. But beyond that, I'm also interested in not just the psychology of the innocent person, but the psychology of the prosecutor and the detective and why it is that they end up honing in on the wrong person, not out of a sense of outright evil or corruption, but out of a sense of human fallacy. Because, again, when I think back to my prosecutor, I was never satisfied with the idea that, oh, this is happening to me just because bad people are doing.

Meredith Chris Amanda Mike chat LeVar Burton kahneman Oprah Italy Saul Sal Cass Eva
"s. amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

08:55 min | Last month

"s. amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"So big fan I mean, even the talking about the Nazis from a moment ago, like the whole question of, well, if that Nazi prison guard would happen to be born in Argentina instead of Germany, would he have become that guy? You know, I'm probably not, right? Yeah. How much does external twists of fate determine what our moral path is in life? And when you take that into account, especially neither of us believe in free will is another side of this when you get rid of all conversation, right? Then moral responsibility seems to go out the window in one light, but by the other light, no one's really, no one's really morally culpable because you're just the little meat robot doing what you were programmed to do. Or through the vicis of quantum fluctuations, right? Either way, it's hard to blame people and hate them for their actions. It actually leads to compassion, I think. Yeah, I hear you. I don't know if we want to open that camera. That's a four hour two part. I highly recommend I wish I was listed in my two part series with Sam Harris where we vehemently disagree about this. That's interesting. Yeah. Yeah, yeah, yeah. However, I read something in one of your blog posts I think is illustrates your own sense of compassion even for Rudy. So you had said that what you're angry about is that he just won't admit and save a lot of people out of heartache and uncertainty and just that he just won't admit that he killed Merida. However, you say, I doubt he ever will, but if the day he does, I will celebrate his rehabilitation and wish him the best on a new and honest chapter of his life. Yeah. I thought that was interesting. I thought that kind of speaks maybe a little bit to your instincts there for not defining anyone by their worst case, even Rudy. Yeah, yeah, and I stand by that because I think the thing that anyone who has experienced harm most wants from the person who harmed them is an acknowledgment of the harm, because at that point, I can say, all right, we at least are on the same page that what happened was shouldn't have happened and that I have been harmed and that you are not sort of pretending that that harm doesn't exist or that what you did didn't cause direct harm to me. Because when someone doesn't like admit to the harm that they've caused, it makes the person who has been harmed, feel, first of all, like they're being blamed for their own harm, but also it makes them feel unsafe. Like, oh, if you don't acknowledge what you've done, are you gonna do it again? If you didn't do anything wrong, well then who's to say whether or not you're gonna do it again? And so that's the sort of key thing for me. Like people make mistakes and do horrible things all the time, that doesn't mean that it defines them, but what does matter from a trauma standpoint is the acknowledgment of the harm and of the action that caused the harm? Yeah, I truly wish Rudy would do this someday. Yeah. Okay, so back to your dark triad score. So you score very, very low in psychopathy as I already mentioned, which is callousness and cynicism and then machiavellianism you scored very, very well, which is strategic exploitation and deceit. You know, everyone knows the machiavellian person. They're always scheming, right? They're always like, everyone knows that person. Every time you talk to them, they're like, oh, you know, if we move that just part and then we get this out of that person. Right. So you scored very well in that. That's not who you are, according to my test. However, yes. However, this is the most perhaps the most. We've been waiting. I saved this one for last because I suspected this is maybe where you two disagree. Your narcissism score was above average. It was above it now. It wasn't a 100%. It was approaching 60%, but it was greater than average by 12.45% to be precise. Yeah. Now, what do you two think of that? So I think that I because of how much my life has been because I've been accused of things that I didn't do, I potentially have become someone who has been deeply invested in my sense of self. And I worry then that has my narcissism been pushed up by as a sort of trauma response as a kind of like shield response to something, and I do worry about that. Now, Chris, so I want to hear what Chris has to say about this. I think she's one of the most selfless generous people I know, right? Yeah. And I think one of the issues with any sort of self reported test is you have your own cognitive blind spots towards your own behavior, tendencies to inflate good qualities or diminish bad qualities, et cetera, but also there's things like impostor syndrome. He thinks I have impostors. I think Amanda has a deep case of impostor syndrome. And that I think she has a big difficulty seeing her deeply positive traits actually. And if you were to look at the DMs that come in of people saying, wow, you're such an inspiration to me like Amanda reads those and she's like, no, I'm not. You know, she doesn't she doesn't believe that. Even though even if thousands of people are saying, wow, you're so strong and you really helped me change my life. That she doesn't believe that. She doesn't have that self belief. So the idea that she's narcissistic and thinks that she's a savior for people. It's not the manda I see. And I'm actually one of the you know it's better than we do. What are the questions? Well, I certainly can't reveal that. Oh, right. Right. Because that's actually telling the IQ test items. Okay. But there's an interesting link here between that I'm going to send you an article everyone scientific American on the link between a particular kind of narcissism and impostor syndrome. It's not the kind of narcis that most people are aware of, but it's one that I've conducted research for the past decade about. And I've been trying to increase awareness about because it's the one that's mostly linked to psychopathology. And that's called vulnerable narcissism. Now, it makes me think now I want to give you my vulnerable narcissism. But vulnerable narcissists, so most people when they think of nurse and they think of the grandiose narcissist, which is chest thumping, extroverted. Trump, okay, right? Because stereotypical stereotypical I'm great, right? The person that screams I'm great. But and this is something that my own healing process. So this is a very human thing. I'm not, I don't believe in separating narcissism not narcis I think we're all have narcis tendencies. But a lot of people who have gone through trauma develop and we found this we've published papers showing that an early childhood trauma and violation of expectations lead to a vulnerable kind of narcissism where the person feels shame all the time. But at the very so shame is the number one marker of it. And we found we were the first ones to publish a paper showing the linkage to impostor syndrome. So I'm actually going to send you the I'll send you that scientific note to send you that scientific American paper. And that makes me the idea that people are saying bad things or doing things to you and you think, oh, they're doing it because it's me and they think I'm a bad person and you're like, no, they're just, they're just doing their thing and it has nothing to do with you. And so you are being a little bit of a narcissist by thinking that people are being bad to you for whatever reason. It's a smoke and fire thing a bit, I think, when the whole world tells you for years on end that you're an evil monster, right? I think it's hard for anybody to not go, is there anything there, you know? Or and also, but I think it's totally true that I'm guilty of this where I when people are out in the world and I notice that they recognize me. I think are they talking to me because they've heard of this horrible story about me, or they or they just talking to me because I'm happen to be getting mushrooms at the grocery store next to them grabbing a cucumber. I do worry about that. So this is exactly what I helped my clients with. So I feel like do I slip into psychotherapy mode all of a sudden. But can I give you some advice, just to help you with your healing if I can in any way? The number one point of why voltage is at the root of the narcissism is an uncertain self esteem. There's literally literally there's an entire handbook called the handbook of uncertain self esteem. Okay. There's a whole research field on this. I suspect that's what you're plagued with. And if you could find a way of grounding yourself more with self compassion exercises, I love Sharon Salzburg's loving kindness meditations. If you.

Rudy narcis Sam Harris trauma response Merida Argentina Amanda impostor syndrome Chris Germany Sharon Salzburg
"s. amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:59 min | Last month

"s. amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Be released now. Exactly. Yeah, that's the reasonable assumption that's the reasonable assumption. Yeah, I watched an interview that was done with him where he said he first was attracted to you and then Meredith was kind of like the backup thing. So I know, I know. And he obviously he had talked to me before. Do you reckon he was there that day because of Meredith, or he just thought it might have been an empty house? I think that he probably thought it was an empty house. That's what I'm thinking too. It was the holiday weekend. It was understood that I didn't know this, but apparently the day of the dead the day after Halloween is a very common time for Italian people to go and visit their families and spend time with their families. I didn't know that. But that was the reason why so many of my Italian roommates were gone. And I had just happened to be spending the night over at my new, very new boyfriend's house who I knew of several days. And so I think that he went in there to because he knew the house. He had seen it before. He was looking to break and enter and get some money, that kind of thing. Okay. So let's get a little bit of a picture of Amanda Knox before this tragedy happened. So you wrote, you were a nerdy poetry and language student. You, correct me if all these things I'm saying are wrong, you were a non drinker and non smoker, your favorite pursuits include yoga and quote backpacking long distances with people I know. Your favorite films were Shrek and the full Monty and you like The Beatles and reading Harry Potter books. This is all correct. Yeah, the only thing that I would say is I was an occasional drinker and an occasional smoker at the time. But I was not heavy in either of those situations. But I don't think I was ever a non drinker or you know I went to parties. I went and had drinks with people, but I was not strict about. It wasn't out of control nor was I strict about never having it. Well, that's what you roll your MySpace page probably when you're like 14. Well, yes. MySpace who was a while ago, yeah, yeah. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, exactly. Exactly. Okay, so I get this picture of a young child, young girl who was just really curious about the world really innocent in a way. I sense a sort of innocence to you know sort of like Naya to have a D, how do you say it? Yeah, yeah. Naivete. Yeah. I think that would be accurate. I was the kind of person who really did well in school, never really got into trouble was I worked a number of jobs to save up money. I was a soccer coach for a young girls team and I was also very romantically and sexually inexperienced, so I was definitely like a late bloomer kind of dorky musical theater ren fair kind of individual. We're a musical theater. Oh, I love you. I was an opponent. You were. Me too. That is so I was a voicemail that Carnegie Mellon, my dream was to be javert and Les mis. That is amazing. I love opera and I don't have the voice for it, but man, so much respect. You could. You could have. You could be trained. I think anyone can be trained honestly. Do you ever sing anymore? I do. I do. Awesome. And I try to take lessons every now and then sometimes I even record something just with this microphone and karaoke music from stars from lamest in the background. I posted on my Twitter before. Cool. Yeah, I was inquire, so it's definitely not opera, but I was inquire and I love doing musical theater. Right on right on. You know, my heart really breaks in so many ways for the story, but one way is that I really can resonate with studying abroad. When I was about 24 25 I went over to England to Cambridge and I remember I just remember that what it was like. I remember everyone awkwardly having sex with each other. Everyone drinking, we're all away from home for the first time. They're really isn't innocence there. The last thing you would ever imagine, people say things like, well, why wasn't she more affected outside why is she kissing? Look, it's not like the first thing you assume. You know, in your worldview, you know, your worldview was literally a psychologist called a seismic earthquake. That's what they call it in the post traumatic growth literature, which is working on my next book on post traumatic growth. So this topic is really fun and center in my mind right now. And there's a whole summit of world theory that I think might really interest you if you want to. Tell me more about the seismic eruption. Earthquakes. Yes. Yeah, it's tied to this idea of a summit world theory where we have these traumas and I like to define trauma very broadly as anything any event because who am I to say, oh that counts the trauma or that doesn't count as a trauma, right? Like who am I to say that? In a lot of ways traumas in the eye of the beholder. And any event that causes this complete cognitive restructuring of, oh, I thought the world was safe. Yeah. We're basically you're a basic assumptions of the world are violated. And this happened to you in a span of an hour. Yes. You know? And the people are like, oh, why didn't she act more normal? Like there's any normal way to act when your entire assumptive world has been violated. I really appreciate you actually saying that because it's something that I've had a really hard time explaining to people. I did not go home that morning to take a shower, knowing that I was going to come across a crime scene. And even when it was made apparent to me that there was a crime scene, I had this like it was so surreal to me that I felt a little bit like disembodied. Like what is happening and also am I certain what's happening? Because everyone's yelling in Italian. It was so, so bizarre that I had trouble processing the experience. And a lot has been made of my behavior in those days. There's that footage of Raphael and I outside of that the house waiting for the police to tell us to go into the police station and he kisses me. And the amount of times that that moment of him just sort of trying to do what he could, which was just kind of hold me and kiss me and tell me I'm going to be okay. How that was twisted and distorted in the media into like, oh my God, she's such a sex fiend that she can't even keep her hands off them outside of a murder House. It's like, what is happening? Anyway, so that makes a lot of sense..

Meredith Carnegie Mellon MySpace Amanda Knox Naya Harry Potter soccer Cambridge Twitter earthquake England trauma Raphael
"s. amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

05:11 min | Last month

"s. amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"I put it in front of me. And I sort of disassociated from it a little bit and helped me at the very least get through the day. Let's see, that's textbook. So for instance, George, but you didn't know it, that's textbook psychology. You just devised it. But George banana, who was recently my podcast, actually, highly recommend listening to our chat. He just wrote a book called the end of trauma. It's all about his one of the leading researchers on resiliency. And he's really shown that self talk is a major major strategy. He has a whole chapter on self talk in his book. So that's really cool for you to hear that he was just he's just two episodes ago. Can you describe to me what he means by self talk because I'd be curious to know if it has to do with the narrative of one's life that one either feels they have control over or they don't have control over. I'd be interested to know that. I think he's more referring to an extent to which you tell yourself that you have deep reservoirs of resiliency that are untapped that you can handle this. You know, seeing just even saying words to yourself, you know, researchers have looked at the difference between just saying yourself, I can do this. You know what? I faced hard things before. You know, there will be a future versus thinking to yourself. This is it. There's no hope. You know? There's a very, very strong statistically significant difference between those two conditions. Interesting. Yeah, I think that that's squares with my own experience because I even would think to myself at certain times I went through a soccer training a lot when I was a kid and one of the things that I told myself to get through very difficult soccer practices occasionally was I would just do the little engine that could mantra over and over my head. I think I can. I think I can. I think I can. And the thing I really loved about that was the uncertainty. I was like, I think I can. I'm not sure, but I'm gonna try. I'm gonna try to get through this day. We'll see. Well, by the way, that's where you got the nickname Fox and Knox. You probably never want to hear that nickname ever again. But just for the record for this is helpful for you. For the record, you got that nickname because what you kind of like, you played soccer like a fox, like you were like, yeah, so good. I mean, I was so I was one of the smaller players and I was very quick and I was I played this position called top of the diamond, which is the first line of defense. And it's a position where you're constantly squirreling around or to try to steal the ball away from people. So in that way, I end my name rhymes with Fox. So that's how that came about. I want to call nickname. Right? I want a better one. I want a better one than what they called me around your age. When I was that age, they called me Scotty potty. Oh no. Is there just because it rhymes? Okay, no, no, I'll tell you. So I'm a little bit older than you, Amanda, but not by that much. Not by that much, but there was something called the sour patch kids cards back in the day. Have you ever heard of the sour patch kids? Eaten many a sour patch kid, but I did not know that they came with cards. I believe they had cards and one of them was one of the names of one of them was Scotty potty. So that was one of the sour patch kids. I'm pretty sure maybe I'm messing up my 80s references. It was called something else, but there were these cards and then they were a whole collection of these funny things. And are you thinking, are you thinking of the garbage pail kids? Yes. I think garbage can. Okay, okay, so that's just came in. That's a candy. That's a candy. You're right. You're right. Garbage. Well, see you. Okay, thank you. So you know what I'm talking about? Okay. Now I've been trying to change that narrative as an adult. I had a girlfriend of her own volition called me a Scottie two hottie. And I was like, okay, okay, I like that one better. I love that one too 'cause it's not even Scotty hottie. She took it to the next level, like MC hammered it. It was good. That's great. It was a great girlfriend. I just want to say for the rest of it. Appreciate it very much. So here's a quote I found when I was listening to your very interesting interview with Joe Rogan. I thought could set a stage for what we can really get into today. You said, I feel like I'm constantly trapped in a conversation with the fake version of me in people's minds that keeps getting recycled over and over again. That is, first of all, that is good writing. Oh, well. You're obviously going to second of all. That's very powerful. That is very, very powerful and I think a lot of us can relate. I can relate to your story just being very young, I was in special Ed and for an auditory disability I had and I write about this a lot and I wrote about this in various of my books. But the point here is that I felt as though I was reduced to how other people decide to put a label on me. And I feel like there's a connection here to probably how you felt and probably still feel to a large degree where you want to be able to create your own identity. You allow to create your own identity, and that's how I felt certainly as a child fighting my way. I had to actually fought my way out of special Ed and then I fought my way into gifted Ed, and then people still saw me as the special at kid..

George banana soccer Fox George Knox Scotty hottie Scotty Amanda Scottie Joe Rogan Ed
"s. amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:36 min | Last month

"s. amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Doing great. I'm a little sleep deprived, so you'll have to excuse my sleep deprived brain, but I appreciate it. Thanks for having me on. Oh, it's my pleasure. And it doesn't have anything to do with the fact that you just had a new baby girl. Oh my God, yes. We were awake. Yes, last night for a little bit together, just wandering around the house until she fell asleep again. So that's my world right now. Well, congratulations. To the birth of Eureka, muse, knocked Robinson. Congratulations. Thank you. There's a specific reason why you decided to tell the story of weed people on the journey to tell people about your journey, right? You wanted to kind of control the narrative in a way, is that right? Yeah, I mean, so yes, the issue that I faced from the second I got pregnant was the idea that my pregnancy and the birth of my child would like every other private aspect of my life, be deemed in the public interest and therefore not protected by privacy laws and that the tabloids would exploit those very intimate parts of my life to defame me and harm me psychologically. So I decided that I would try to disincentivize their coverage and the and their sort of impulse to go after me with paparazzi by, first of all, keeping the pregnancy journey in the birth journey to myself until I was ready to tell it and to tell it in my own way. So that at the very least, when people did first hear of my daughter's existence, it would be in the context of something that was exploring these difficult positions that I'm in and that I'm and this sort of position that I hope my daughter will be in in the future, which is to not be treated just like the latest scandal content for in the Amanda Knox saga as Tom McCarthy. So aptly put it. Well, look, that makes a lot of sense. So I'm a scientist here and in I really do extensive preparation for all my guests and you were certainly included on that. And what just boggled my mind were some of the things that people would just say online with no factual support whatsoever to it. And not only that, but there are various things I really because I really got really into the case in a really scientifically just no part. Yeah, yeah, yeah, no part in the horse sort of way. You know, I was like, what is the evidence? And I would really and I would wake up in the middle of the night actually at one point. I was like, oh, what about this? And I would go to do extensive Google searches like, okay, that answers that for me. I get it. But then I would still see things propagated over and over again. How do you have so much grace in handling that? Because I noticed you don't even respond to something. I wanted to fight for you. Some people respond my own Twitter page. I want to be like, are you serious? You didn't even look at this objectively whatsoever. Yeah, it's a good question because I feel like you have the same impulse as my husband. My husband is very, very protective of me. And deeply deeply offended when any whenever anyone makes a false claim about me online and vilify me. And he's just so outraged by it. He's like, of all the people in the world, why you like of all the people. And my relationship with it is a little bit different in part because I spent so long not being able to defend myself at all. I was in prison for four years between the ages of 20 and 24 when this was first happening. And I had very, very little opportunity to defend myself at all. So I wonder if, in part, I internalized some feelings of helplessness or hopelessness. I also feel like the sort of mental state that I was in in that time period was one in which I realized that, oh, wow, for so many people, the truth doesn't actually matter. Just the story matters and the characters of that story matter whether or not they correspond with reality. And the story that I was telling myself about my own life, like what I could expect from life, like go to school, find love, have children have a career, like those were all things that were also stories that I had been telling myself, and there had been no guarantee that that was actually going to be the course of my life. And so in the prison environment, I very much suddenly realized that there were no guarantees in life, and I had to instead be very present with what I did have. Be very aware of what I did have. And I didn't have much. So I could catalog it. And then since coming home, it's a little bit different because the prison and trial experience is one in which absolutely what people are saying about me out in the world very, very much impacts my right to live as a free human being in the world. But once I was exonerated, I realized that the game had changed. It was no longer about my freedom, it was about my identity. And that was the thing that remained the missing piece of my life that had been stolen from me. But my freedom and my identity are two very different things. I can live with myself and my identity in my small world and also understand that I don't actually have full control over my identity and the greater world. That doesn't like it does impact me, but it's not the same as someone trying to put me in jail. So I guess it put that into perspective. Yeah, it sounds like you became a PhD in psychology and formally throughout this whole process. Actually, a lot of psychologists say that to me where they're like, wow, some of the strategies that you used to get through that experience are strategies that we try to like therapists will share like one of the strategies that I had, which I wouldn't even consider strategy as sort of intuitively did it was I had conversations with my younger self about what she was going to experience in the future. So in a way I was sort of big sister coaching myself through the experience. In order to feel like less powerless over it, like, and so it sort of took a thing that felt very much on top of me and.

Tom McCarthy Amanda Knox Eureka Robinson Google Twitter
"s. amanda" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

03:04 min | 2 months ago

"s. amanda" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"I have faced is, you know, from the beginning, have said, I am not defined by this thing that happened to me. And then the rest of the world's like, yes, you are. And I'm like, no, no, I'm not. He's a C, look at all this work I'm doing. And look all these, you know, and they're like, no, you are. That's it. And so it's this ongoing struggle of like, oh, not only do we have to breach that conversation with ourselves like am I defined by this thing that happened to me? How is it changed me? How have I grown inevitably because of this experience? And can I be the author of my own growth or am I just the victim of my circumstances? These are all important questions that anyone who has gone through any kind of traumatic experience has to ask themselves. But then on top of that, to have the rest of the world saying, oh, and by the way, you live in this little box in our brains. And anytime you try to poke outside of that box, we're going to slam the lid shut on you again. That's what it feels like. The details of Amanda's story are entirely her own. And the truth of it is so relatable to so many. Those questions she brought up are ones that so many of us need the time and space to consider. How am I defined by this thing that happened to me? How have I grown inevitably because of this? And how can I be the author of my own growth? Or am I just the victim of my experiences? I've been fortunate. I really am grateful for the people that are in my life who recognize my humanity and who support me because there are a lot of times where I don't feel like I can just be the person who stands up to it all the time. There are sometimes where I just want to hide and I just want to disappear and I feel like there's nothing that I will ever do that is ever going to define me as much as this thing that happened to me that I had nothing to do with. And I have a partner and I have a family and I have friends who continually remind me that I am a valuable person in my own right and I have a valuable perspective. And I am not just what other people define me as I get to be an author of my own life. And I should be the most important author of my own life. And I'm acting as if that is the truth and hoping that eventually that reality will catch up to that. Another thing that I noticed and admired is that you got married and you kept your name. Yes. In fact, my husband was really tempted to take my name. But I think that would have upset his family a little bit. You could have been Amanda Robinson. I could have, but, you know what? My name is baller, and there's nothing wrong with my name, and I could have changed my name back in the day when I first came home. And I very, very stubbornly took.

Amanda Amanda Robinson
"s. amanda" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

07:49 min | 2 months ago

"s. amanda" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"When do you realize that not only is your story not your own, but that even being exonerated doesn't give you back your story. That is an ongoing problem that my parents knew was going to be an issue for me coming out. I could not have imagined and anticipated how real that problem was going to be. I was aware that in the courtroom, I was a character because I was given nicknames. I was called luciferin and I was called foxy knoxy. And these were all character names that are being talked about in the courtroom and a person that is not me who is being described to a jury and having words put literally into her mouth, like my prosecutor was like, Amanda probably said, oh, this is what you get for being such a pure and innocent girl. Now we're going to force sex on you. Like literal words being put into my mouth as this character. So I understood that there was a character that I was going to be combating in the courtroom. I did not realize how pervasive that character was going to be and how much of a feedback loop there was between the courtroom and the media and the outside world that really gobbled up this character. It really resonated with people for some reason because it was such an easy character to hate. It was such like a cardboard villain. Disney could not have come up with a better evil person than foxy knoxy. And they have tried. They have tried. And you know what? Maleficent could never. She couldn't. And I find that so interesting because you said I didn't really get a chance to have my 20s and I did and they were a shit show Amanda. I hear that. Disastrous. Yeah, you know, it's interesting. One of the running jokes in my family and also between me and my husband is of all the people in our family and in our friend group to have gone to prison Amanda went to prison. She's, you know, so to be represented as this mythological stereotypical girl gone wild, trying to do everything to get male attention was this incredibly misogynistic fantasy that was projected onto me based on nothing whatsoever. So that was unfortunate. And I'm in conversation with that to this day. It is misogynistic because even a true girl gone wild. This one. It contains multitudes, right? Even a girl who will dance on a bar to pour some sugar on me, who will do a keg stand in a dress. And you know what? Like in your 20s, you're being playful, you're experimenting, you're figuring yourself out as a person. I went to parties too. I don't think I've ever done a keg stand in a dress. But like there's nothing wrong with that and one of the things that I also wanted to point out to the world is like, I could have been a professional dominatrix and it shouldn't have mattered. I could have been a girl gone wild and it shouldn't have mattered because the evidence wasn't there. I didn't have anything to do with this. And so the idea that just by virtue of being associated with deviant sex or being associated with alcohol or partying automatically means that you're the kind of person who would rape and murder your friend is a huge leap and is totally unfair and not realistic and it's just amazing to meet the leaps that we can make about someone's guilt based upon something as divorced from murder as cake stands. Having survived this kind of judgment and prosecution in the public sphere, Amanda is very attuned to the way that it shows up in society. How our knee jerk reaction is to divide each other into neat piles of good and bad wind, mostly we're both. And what built up that reserve of nuance or empathy or whatever you want to call it was prison. Yeah, I mean, there's nothing like playing cards with the drug dealer and cooking together with someone who has murdered their own child to put some things into perspective like mental illness and drug addiction and neglect how many women that I encountered in the prison environment who were products of their prior environment, which was very much an environment of abuse and neglect and poverty and that was all they knew. And so I was in this environment where I was one of the few people who had all of my teeth. I was one of the few people who could read and write. I was one of the few people who actually had family who cared about me. I was one of the few people who knew that the earth was round. Who could tell time on a clock? Like this was how much neglect of large number of the women that I encountered in prison were exposed to. And they were survivalists who had made bad decisions in a bad environment and wound up in prison. And how much of that was their fault versus everyone's fault? Doesn't excuse their crimes but does put them into context. And it does speak to how we should treat them because dealing with these issues head on means not just locking people up and blaming them for their mistakes. But addressing the causes that led to them making bad decisions in the first place. I mean, even when we want to keep ourselves separate, and not just from the suffering of other people, but from the badness of other people or the mistakes of other people, we are so connected. There is nothing that happens in a vacuum. Yeah, I agree. And there's a lot of problems in society that we just have decided collectively that we don't want to deal with. So we're just going to let the police and the prosecutors deal with it. And we've only equipped those police and prosecutors with so many methods for dealing with those issues. And those methods are mostly punitive. So are we in a sense reinforcing our own problems by just being punitive because we're choosing not to understand where they're coming from. And are we then making our own society more unsafe because we're putting a band aid on a festering wound? Is it a question I'm constantly asking myself? Yeah. And probably not a question that you would have been asking, had you not been forced into this immersion of this, right? Yeah. I never would have thought of this. First of all, even just true crime as an idea was not something that was on my radar. Again, Voldemort was the closest I got to true crime. I was not at all involved or interested in that subject matter because I grew up in an environment where I just didn't really have to think about that, like that was what bad people had to think about. And I never had to think about that as I just followed the rules and did my thing and again, the police and the prosecutors would deal with that aspect of society that had nothing to do with me. And I very much became awakened to the reality that we are like you said all interconnected and we're all influencing each other. And to this day, I feel like I'm kind of a bridge between those two worlds. The world that I came from where I was totally oblivious, and I felt like I was totally disconnected..

Amanda foxy knoxy Disney Voldemort
Scottsdale Moms Targeted by Secret Dossier Speak Out

The Charlie Kirk Show

03:02 min | 2 months ago

Scottsdale Moms Targeted by Secret Dossier Speak Out

"We have with us two moms who are fighting for liberty and freedom Amanda ray and Valerie Shannon. Get those names right? Yeah, good. Thank you. From Scottsdale, Arizona, so our audience is sort of briefed and versed on this whole drama. And partially so because I called out Jan Michael Greenberg for being a creep like months ago when I spoke at the because I just was like kind of a weird guy. And you guys have been on the front lines of this for a while. In Scottsdale, moms that were concerned about your kids education and you came out and spoke out about that, but in the recent weeks and now days this has become a national news story of what we have seen in Scottsdale. So let's just start from there. Let's start first kind of why were you concerned about your kid's education and then how did you get your how do you get into this? Do you ever think that you would be kind of in the midst of a national news story like this? No, not at all. I think like all of us we were not really paying attention to what was happening in education. And then when COVID hit and our kids came home and we started to get a bird's eye view into the classroom of what's happening. And then I realized how much control that school boards have. I didn't know a single board member's name. So when I found out that they had the ability to keep us learning, online, we started researching, and we discovered Jan Michael Greenberg, who was a 24 year old boy, unmarried, no children in the district had run unopposed and elected to make decisions for our children. And so, we tried to figure out what's his, what's his reason here? He was listed as a politician on his Facebook page, and I was like, well, this is nonpartisan. Why is he here? So we started to advocate for parental rights and transparency in the district and moms have instincts. And I think we all just like there's something not right here. And so we followed that and we just pulled that thread and then in August, in an unsolicited email, Jan Michael sent a screenshot of his desktop to another parent, as he was harassing her and calling her anti semitic and a white supremacist and told us that we were dangerous. Because because of a George Soros implication. Yeah, a screenshot of something that was said in a private group, he attacked her. We've always kept it to his issues and his behavior on the board, but he pulls the race car. Of course he does. Yeah, and he's a white male so he's an impressive, unless he pulls a race car, so he's got to pull something. So that's how it started. And he sent us the screenshot. We actually didn't follow it for a long time, because who's dumb enough to send a URL without password protecting it? So we then typed in the URL and I clicked on the link and physically got ill seeing photos of my 8 and ten year old, photos of me, photos of my homes and property records, background checks on 47 different parents. And it was yeah. I mean, we all just I was

Jan Michael Greenberg Scottsdale Amanda Ray Valerie Shannon Arizona Jan Michael George Soros Facebook
FDA advisory committee considers Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine for children ages 5 to 11

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 3 months ago

FDA advisory committee considers Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine for children ages 5 to 11

"The U. S. has moved a step closer to vaccinating millions more children against covert nineteen with a government advisory panel endorsing kids size doses of Pfizer's vaccine for those ages five to eleven the FDA panel vote was unanimous with one abstention though Dr Paul Offit pediatrician says it wasn't an easy choice it's always nerve racking I think when you're asked to make a decision for millions of children based on studying it only a few thousand children but Pfizer study of elementary school kids showed the vaccine safe and that ninety one percent effective in five to eleven year olds doctor Amanda Cohn says the virus was the eighth leading killer of those kids over the past year in

Dr Paul Offit Pfizer U. FDA Amanda Cohn
 Bond and 'Willy Wonka' songwriter Leslie Bricusse dies at 90

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 3 months ago

Bond and 'Willy Wonka' songwriter Leslie Bricusse dies at 90

"Songwriter Leslie Bricusse died Tuesday at the age of ninety according to his son no cause of death was given I marches are a letter with a look at his career S. Leslie Bricusse room for stage and screen but his songs often became pop he wrote the score for the nineteen seventy one film **** Wonka and the chocolate factory which featured the candy man and your imagination precursor lyrics for John berry's music for the bond theme songs Goldfinger and you only live twice Amanda because when an Oscar for writing talk to the animals from doctor do little and then fees and he wrote Nina Simone signature song feeling good

Leslie Bricusse S. Leslie Bricusse John Berry Amanda Oscar Nina Simone
COVID-19 and pregnancy: Women regret not getting the vaccine

AP News Radio

01:03 min | 3 months ago

COVID-19 and pregnancy: Women regret not getting the vaccine

"An expectant mother who lost her baby after falling ill with coded nineteen is urging other women to get vaccinated against the deadly virus kindle Nipper lives in Georgia and had just a short bout with the corona virus but it was enough to cause a miscarriage in July just weeks from her baby boy's due date I did everything I could have possibly done the only thing I could do that I will have to carry with me see her doctor says the placenta was infected with the virus which likely hindered the baby's ability to get oxygen and nutrients nippers teamed up with Amanda Harrison who contracted cove it it had to be intubated but she and her baby survived and then it's almost like a survivor's guilt the two women are sharing stories in an attempt to persuade pregnant women to get covert nineteen vaccinations to protect themselves and their babies I'm Jackie Quinn

Amanda Harrison Georgia Jackie Quinn
Limits On Toilet Paper And Cleaning Supplies Are Back At Costco

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:06 min | 4 months ago

Limits On Toilet Paper And Cleaning Supplies Are Back At Costco

"Go to costco or your local big box. Perhaps you got toilet paper on your list. Maybe some water cleaning supplies as well. But when you go to load up your car you see the signs that say two per customer or whatever. The limit is not as you might think. Thanks to reprise of the apocalyptic stockpiling early on in this thing. It's a supply chain again. But as marketplace's amanda peach reminds us limits on how much consumers can buy can backfire on retailers. Trying to sell it when there was a run on certain products in pandemic early days. The explanation was simple. Basically consumers freaked out. Ken boyer studies operations management at ohio state university and people heard. There's gonna be a shortage so they went to buy more but shortages now are much more about shipping delays and other supply chain constraints boyer says take toilet paper even if it's manufactured in the us the chemicals to make it might come from china or thailand. They're sitting on a boat. Offshore that becomes a delayed the toilet paper manufacturers sometimes. The shortage is in packaging or containers like cans for soda or bottles for water in melbourne. Florida alley strands. Saw a sign at the grocery store. At limiting the number of cases of water customers could purchase to to literally. My first thought was hurting. Strands checked her phone. No hurricane warnings so she thought what's going on with bottled water. She bought two cases and had her son. Do the same. You drink the bottle of water. But he was getting his shopping part for me. Because is there going to be a run on water. And that's why stores have to be careful about signaling. Shortages with product limits on we realize goods are scarce. They become more valuable to us. Care me. Burke is a behavioral economist with the university of southern california. I might not new toy right now. But i know toilet. Paper is scarce. So i may go stock up on it as much as i can at the moment. In burke says that unnecessary purchasing can add pressure to supply chains at exactly the wrong time. I'm amanda pitcher for

Amanda Peach Ken Boyer Costco Ohio State University Boyer Thailand Melbourne China Florida United States Burke University Of Southern Califor Amanda
New film 'Dear Even Hansen' is a misfire on just about every level

The Big Picture

02:58 min | 4 months ago

New film 'Dear Even Hansen' is a misfire on just about every level

"Let's talk about youth or at least an attempt at representing youth. I'm talking about the weekend's big release. Dear evan hansen which is in theaters on friday. Who where to begin. Amanda dear oven has what is. Dear of enhancing amanda. It is an adaptation of a tony winning musical which will come back to and it is about a young man named evan hansen. Who is having a very difficult time in high school going through some mental health issues some social anxiety issues and has been encouraged to write himself letters of you know like self belief and pas positive thinking one of these letters falls into the hands of another person and i just i'm gonna say because we need to talk about what this film okay. Another troubled student at the high school who then takes his own life and the parents of the second teen find the letter. That evan hansen has written to himself. They believe their son wrote this last letter to evan hansen before he killed himself and then assume that evan hansen. This tea and with no friends actually had a beautiful friendship with their now deceased child and the main character. Evan hansen goes along with it. And it's like yeah. He was my friend and invents a whole story and friendship and ultimately like a philosophy on how to live and connect with other people that becomes like essentially a hit. Ted talk on the internet and then he become something of a mental health advocate but really just sort of friendship at a community of care for other people a wellness figurehead popular on the internet. And and then things sort of unravel but for the most part no one is held responsible for any of the choices made in in the in the musical and the movie and then people sing songs about discovering themselves and it ends. That is the one part. I want to underline you. You just described the bones of the story very accurately and it's a musical. This story is a musical and so of course. The character is break into song as the story unfolds. I thought this was very troubling movie. A movie that really did not work for a variety of reasons. I think neither you. Nor i saw the show on broadway and so we don't really have a relationship to the show. It was a big hit and of course it. Was tony winning. But it is. Unnerving film is unnerving in a in a variety of

Evan Hansen Amanda TED Tony
Episode 53 Part 1 Our Relationship with Planned Parenthood Ft Amanda Weber - burst 02

The Manic Pixie Weirdo

02:58 min | 4 months ago

Episode 53 Part 1 Our Relationship with Planned Parenthood Ft Amanda Weber - burst 02

"Like two. You kind of have the two extreme perspectives. And so for you to be able to come together and be able to say like, okay, so this is what this is what I found through my journey and experience with this object matter. I think that's really really wonderful. Yeah, the interesting thing is, is I could absolutely argue both points. You know, I know the talking points of both sides so well. I was actually I would go speak at the capitol in Sacramento California on behalf of Planned Parenthood and speak to the news outlets and speak to the representatives and stuff there. And then later, I ended up being a kind of social media coordinator for Abby. So I was responding to people on her social media platforms and stuff. And helping her with her outreach, not because I was pro life or not because I was opposed to abortion. But I could very much respond as she would, because I knew exactly what the talking points and the important points were. And. Her stances and her things have very much changed over time. But at the time when I volunteered at Planned Parenthood, I am not gonna lie. I hated the pro life movement. I mean, vehemently hated the pro life movement, partially because Planned Parenthood kind of set that in my mind that these were the bad guys. These were the people trying to take our rights away, and they were trying to ruin my life and all this. So I had this very strong narrative in my mind of what these people were, but also because I had a personal experience. And this is something I haven't talked about publicly, but I had this personal experience where I found myself in an unplanned pregnancy shortly after my mom passed away. And I panicked and I didn't know what to do and I didn't want to have an abortion and I reached out to the pro life movement to the people that had been protesting at my clinic for all this time and saying, we love you and we care about you and will help you no matter what. And I reached out, and I said, look, this is a situation I'm in. And here I am, you know, playing Paradise court putting her tail between her legs, saying I need your help. And it seemed on the surface. It's okay, we're going to take you to the crisis pregnancy centers and we're going to help you, but it was really, we're going to give you diapers and formula and you can figure out the hell out on your own. And that was very disheartening because here I am a person that just lost her mom. I'm on my own. I have no money. I have nothing to speak up. I'm literally scraping by month month and they're going, well, we'll give you some diapers and formula. And I just had the worst taste in my mouth about the entire movement because I thought that that's what they were, you know, or these people that were love you and we're going to take you under our wing. Oh, no, you're too much trouble. You're too needy. You have too many needs. And Abby was the first person that I came across that wasn't like that that she very much when I end up getting pregnant with my son said, what

Viral Human Anxiety Depression Mental Health Peace Hope Love Relationships Abby Sacramento Paradise Court California
A highlight from Episode 53 Part 1 Our Relationship with Planned Parenthood Ft Amanda Weber

The Manic Pixie Weirdo

01:56 min | 4 months ago

A highlight from Episode 53 Part 1 Our Relationship with Planned Parenthood Ft Amanda Weber

"We are creating as a society, it's become very much an us versus them mentality. And when you're stuck in that, when you're stuck in these are my beliefs and no one and nothing could ever swing me from those beliefs, you missed a really amazing opportunity to learn and to grow. And for me, learning different things and learning different perspectives helped me step away from the narrative that I was being given by whatever people, you know, by the representatives, like my state representatives or Planned Parenthood themselves or fellow volunteers, I could step away and say, but that's not what I believe that's not what I agree with. Let me formulate my own feelings and opinions instead of just parroting what I'm told. And that nowadays, I think, is more useful than ever and more needed than ever because we're so afraid that if we listen to another person or give even thought to another person's experience or opinion, then we're in some way, betraying our own, and that's just simply not true. Yes, I completely agree. The other thing that I find sometimes hard to do, especially when talking about difficult subjects like this is I will open myself up to because I am pretty adamantly pro choice. As far as like my abortion stance is concerned, I have mixed feelings about Planned Parenthood, just in general. And I think that's probably true for a lot of people, just like the organization itself. As a stand-alone like organization, but I have found myself where I where I'm somebody who I want to understand both sides. I want to understand what are all the points.

Viral Human Anxiety Depression Mental Health Peace Hope Love Relationships
"s. amanda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:05 min | 5 months ago

"s. amanda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"I say this is a big week because this saturday is the twentieth anniversary of nine eleven And did you know that. Nine plus eleven equals twenty. I just did that in my head. That's good even though as a humanities guy. I'm like a savant that way nine plus lebanon's twenty so the th anniversary of nine eleven as we all know. The occasion of this twentieth anniversary is dramatically different than it would have been. Let's say two months ago or a month ago even yeah It's very somber difficult anniversary to think about so sean foyt f. e. u. c. h. t. is holding a prayer event. This is not a rally. It's not a political things going to be. No trump flags. This is about a basing ourselves before the god of history and saying lord We need your help We really need to ask the lord for help because we are in such a dark place in america. I don't care what your faith is. Folks i hope you have enough faith to think that there is a god who here's our prayers. I know that that's true. And i know that when we gather on the mall in dc right to pray. That's what this is. This is not you know era of vent. This is just to pray. it's a solemn assembly. It's going to be the mall in. Dc it's the evening of Nine eleven twenty th anniversary so it's really important thing it's going to air on day star-tv live. I think it's the only place to see it. But i just want to say that If you can't come tune-in and no matter what. Pray because this is time. We need to fast and pray We're i'm going to speak at this event By god's grace. Finding their six o'clock on saturday this saturday. I'm going to speak at the end and i just think it's so important. The twentieth anniversary of this dark dark dark day and we've now entered another dark period. That's incomprehensible to most of us so we went off her hope So we're gonna pray we're gonna gather on the mall to pray to the lord of hosts and he. Here's our prayers folks. i just encourage you so We also have to announce our grand prize winners for food for the poor right. Thank so we're not gonna do that today but very soon. Stay tuned if you gave a penny to food for the poor. Your name is in the hat and we're gonna give away three wapping grand prizes I'm trying to think alvin. What what else do we have to mention before. We go to our guest amanda grace. Oh we have mike thomson. I'm sorry yes yesterday. Chris read today. Amanda grace tomorrow mike thompson but also this week. Yes we have. I think today. Mike lindell lindell a should be following a mayo. My gosh mentioned that you know mike lindell folks Mike needs our help. I'm not going to go into the details. But you're gonna hear today after grace. I'll talk.

sean foyt lebanon dc america amanda grace mike thomson Amanda grace alvin Mike lindell lindell mike thompson mike lindell Chris Mike
"s. amanda" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

03:40 min | 8 months ago

"s. amanda" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

"I have my first long form essay coming out in way. People will be able to see it. This may so more details will become available down the road for people who are fans if you wanna keep an eye out for it. I hope you enjoy it. I yes i absolutely end. You're always welcome to come back and promoted so. Yeah i'd love that I did love absolutely Around valentine's day you did fit fictional men review they're made to order girlfriends And i thought it was very clever The one that especially i loved was the product bell user the beast and ordered on a whim thought she'd be good for more but i ended up less hot than how i started and now i have no furniture zero stars. I think. talk about destroying the happily ever after autism. Movie was absolutely beautiful. Yeah yeah. I think the most personal thing i've done lately actually just came out a couple of days ago My newest anxiety dream where i am blocking the suez canal so i wish that wasn't so autobiographical but i'm glad i was able to take that cold sweat feeling and put it somewhere because i think in a lot of ways for all stuck and feeling about what to do Where else can we find your work. Besides sweeney's Others you you're you said you're doing mostly short kind of satire and other other places where we go to find your work. How a lot of them listed in my in my twitter bio so if you also. You're just looking for great publications to read widget online magazine Hilarious people writing for them in. The editorial team is outstanding casting for the bella donna which mostly focuses on writing by women. Nonbinary a one website that i love dearly and wish it got more press. It is the niche billed. As i believe a website or twelve people and i've had the pleasure of publishing a one piece for them. A similar push pin in string feeling as the as the springsteen king article. But it's more in depth looking at the different iterations of mrs dan versus the stern housekeeper rebecca and assessing whether or not she is indeed hot. Okay all right. Yeah i just. I just pulled that site upside the What's your twitter handle. Aweso it's at a. m. underscore lehrer and they are yup absolutely cool so going back you've been to one show. Let's go back to a little. Bit are are their songs that you because of the bond with your mom or because of your personal life that mean a great deal to you that you kind of hold in a special place in your heart a wonderful question and.

rebecca twitter zero stars one piece twelve people Aweso one show first long one website sweeney couple of days ago valentine's day springsteen dan
"s. amanda" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

04:00 min | 8 months ago

"s. amanda" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

"My music tastes now. Could mean we all probably think that we're eclectic. But i think that the only governing logic of things that i like is that they can tell a good story In addition to being locally distinctive and that was one of the things about I latched onto immediately. And i also think as A bit of a tomboy of sorts growing up. I there's something about his self presentation that resonated with me. I liked the kind of strip down jeans and bandanna swagger. It's not something that i could pull off. But i admire it from a distance. Yeah it's interesting bella. pouring is Also from the new york area and he she did a whole series of. She's been on the podcast multiple times but she did one of In some circles springsteen a lesbian icon. I was just going to bring that up and that she actually did this series where she ranked his most gaya songs and they'd be looking at the mmediately. After august was such a great. It was such a great article and talk about that. Yeah and it is kind of funny we And and i've had a rabbi on. Who talks about bruce's influence of the jewish community. You know and then you talk about with veterans. How in a lot of ways despite him not serving in vietnam. He's been incredibly influential in helping the veterans modern veterans work and you know for a furrow white lower middle-class y guy it's amazing diversity of you know i think he would say the only thing he regrets is the i think the african american community he would have liked to have been stronger influence in that and he's talked about that in his interviews and how they wished and that's why the super bowl was important to him because he was playing to everyone. Then that's good You i always like to preface this question. Amanda with The amount of time she seen him as not a fair barometer of how big of a fan you are I think too many not too many but there are a few select. You know fans that kind of that as an honor in kind of like you know but for just the record have you seen him live. And if so how many times. Once it's his. I was in nashville for grad school in primarily teaching career. So in two thousand fourteen became to the bridgestone arena. I was at that show you. You're kidding oh yeah yeah so i don't need to tell you. It was incredible. Then it was a criminal show. My only small and this is because i'm greedy. My very first time. I saw him was in dallas and don henley was living in dallas. I think he still does. But don henley from the eagles skewering him on stage for an encore and they did. I fought the law. I was like how cool is this. So hard top. So i was in national. Thinking frigging nashville. Who's going to join him at the end of the show. Like there's gotta be someone in town right and it was an amazing show. I'm not complaining. But i was like just one percent me because i'm a greedy as soapy. You know Could loretta lynn. Or someone have been there yes We got a burning love and satisfaction. And just really a great show. I didn't realize it was the first born in the..

Amanda vietnam don henley nashville new york dallas first first time one percent one loretta lynn jewish august bella. some circles african two thousand fourteen bridgestone arena bowl american
"s. amanda" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

04:31 min | 8 months ago

"s. amanda" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

"You know. I still teaching but in terms of why we left academia. I'm in a at the time i I married somebody else. Who was in academic and if you wanna have control over your life for where you live in any capacity. It's not a great field to be in right now so that we wanted to use our skills elsewhere so sometimes i do miss the bowl classroom experience but during the pandemic it ended up being a bit of mercy and i am grateful that i still able to have the kind of contact of switching over to say one on one tutoring because i like to have conversations and now it feels good to be able to tailor what you're doing to somebody's specific interest in needs would well. How are you doing during the pandemic. let's catch up. You guys I as a writer i soon. You're comfortable working from home. How about your partner. So i mean. I did pretty much set up from home since we moved to new york in mid twenty nineteen so this was already kind of my routine perversely and my partners working from home. Now as while we're very lucky to be able to have that option available to us. That's good yeah. Yeah so We've been pretty much In this is the world this is about it. How about you So pretty good. I live in texas where it's We are recently going through a a minor crisis the You know our governor just opened up. Everything told people. Hey you don't have to. I've gotten rid of the statewide mask mandate yet Businesses still have the right to ask you which i think is s after. I told you not to cuss You know that you know you now have pushed it on these poor you know. Independent you know Convenience stores or restaurants. And i've gone We last march of twenty twenty. We shut down our office. I was. I do roadside assistance team and so that was kin. Sittard a vital So we spent all most of march all of april and a half of may working from home and then we went back in. The office tried to be as protocol safe as we can. There was someone at the front door. Our office manager in every morning. She took her temperature. Asked you know have been exposed to covid. Have you had unusual cough or difficulty breathing and have a temperature. The last twenty four hours if you said no no no You could come in the building and we anytime we're not at our desk. We mirror mask and So we've been doing that over a year so in a lot of ways. Amanda my life is pretty normal. I wake up i get in the car. I drive to work You know. I work and then i drive home And we've gone to a couple of restaurants and we went a couple of weekends ago and all of a sudden it was packed. I mean there was not a empty in the place and my wife and i and my son were all looking at each other like okay Now on the plus side You know everyone who got up from their table. Warm ask and to walk to the restroom or deliver enter. All the wait staff kept masks on so I just don't know. But i did go. I met a buddy for lunch and we went into a small little restaurant. There was no one in there so it was very safe. But yeah the waitress like oh. I'm so happy. I don't have to wear a mask anymore in his this like So i but i did get my first cove shot couple of weeks ago and i'm scheduled on the first to get my next recording this toward the end of march so My wife's gotten her first shot..

new york Amanda texas april march end of march mid twenty nineteen couple of weeks ago first first shot last march couple of weekends ago twenty twenty over a year first cove twenty four hours last
"s. amanda" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

01:47 min | 11 months ago

"s. amanda" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

"As we have manda tapping today talking about her roles on sanctuary and stargate as one here she reminisces about starting the series sanctuary as an online series victorian england's one of my favorite time periods. I love the sees with her flashback with john. John good in like the coach and all that was kind of fun to do something like a period piece like. Oh my god. Yeah didn't we I mean it just. Even the costumes were phenomenal to play. That i've always wanted to do a period drama so just sort of allows me to have my cake and eat it too. I get to do everything show. And i imagine. There'll be a lot more of that flashbacks through the ages. But i hope we revisit a lot more declining in the early workings of their relationship vic great always need to is really seeing Helen's childhood hope it when she was a young girl that was interesting to actually break into her history and see really what drives her. I mean she's very much her father's daughter so i thought it was great that you know. We incorporated that part of her history. Was that something. That damian came up with her. Oh yeah cool. In terms of that the pilot it was really mostly damien. Martyn did a lot of tweaking yearly games. But this is easiest. Vevey start maybe high sake because of her lifespan. I think of you listen to or accent in the flashbacks and then modern times i detect. Because she's lived so long she picked up dialects from other people. Is that something that you did. Consciously the ass and i've gotten some really great homepod the accents and i've gotten a lot of flack for the actor. She lived all over the world and she's hundred fifty seven years old lived.

Martyn john Helen John today Vevey hundred fifty seven years old one of my favorite time one england stargate victorian
"s. amanda" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

Anna Faris Is Unqualified

09:09 min | 1 year ago

"s. amanda" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

"Closer direct relationship than they did in the past. I mean there's always been this feeling with phantoms that there is like A. There's a kind of personal vicarious relationship with the celebrity but I do think social media just makes that more literal. Do you think certain generations of celebrities are much better at like someone? Forty plus tends to be a little more tone deaf. I don't think so or are we all just ding bats. I mean I think about someone lake share who has like the most amazing twitter account. I think the most amazing celebrity twitter account so I think it just kind of depends on what your aptitude is. I mean there are always lake. We're using the the term celebrity broadly I think but there are always people who are more interested in that part of their public persona in existence than other people. And so. That's a part of it too. I think but I do remember the first time when I found out that a celebrity hired. Someone like an assistant to do their social media. This was like in the early days of Instagram and I had signed up for instagram and I was like. Oh it's this fun toy that I can use and then when I realized that someone was outsourcing. Its someone else I was like. Oh isn't that fun or is it something that I feel like I have to do and I'm someone hire someone to do it like it can't be that fun and now I think we're all sort of also in this backlash period towards social media just after understanding how much power it has. So that's shifted to. She used cite some examples. And we don't have to go into it necessarily but do you think this is a tough question because it requires you to imagine what these celebrities are imagining but in terms of tone deafness is it true sort of oblivious nece and worries me is that. I do shit that could be perceived as tone-deaf. I don't post that much but because other much. Bigger celebrities are clearly tone deaf in some cases. I assume that they're not realizing how their life is being perceived. That's the generous assumption. I make I think I mean I sympathize with them and say that in a lot of cases like wealth or somebody is like beautiful home. Are Things that people want to see? And that have been broadcast to people who really liked to see those images in sort of like vicariously live through that and we're just in this completely unprecedented national trauma that I think it's taken everybody a while to figure out what it means and one thing it means is that it's hitting some people in very different ways in it's hitting other people so like. I'm very lucky position where I'm employed. I'm employed in a job where I am not put at personal risk by typing my columns from my apartment and you know there are people who are out of work or who are working grocery stores. And that's just I mean we're all living through this thing but some of us are living a totally different kind of reality so yeah. I think maybe it sort of took some celebrities by surprise that CEO Aleki every his this. Maybe not as big net people really want right now. But there's also you know there are like really corrosive aspects to celebrity culture to where they're always is this push and pull between admiring someone in loving someone in resenting someone in hating someone you don't know so maybe we're just we're in the backlash in it might come back. Yeah Bob do you remember when we were at the Bowling Alley? Probably two thousand and three. Maybe two thousand to it was Christmastime. We were the Luma Bowling Alley and I got in my memory. I got kicked out but I think I just got cut off. I was trying to order another beer and the grumpy bartender was like no and I said the words to even know who I am. I know I know I know. I know I was debating whether or not to tell you. Amanda I love it thank you. That's not the only time I've ever said that. Yes yes okay. No no not forgivable but it was. I woke up the next morning. Feeling like Oh fuck just mortified and I just remember thinking. Have I been intoxicated by the you know the nonsensical attention that suddenly that felt like a head rush? That's just my own story and now regretting that. I reminded my brother of it because look at that grin that he has on his face. He's like I know I'm GonNa get a Lotta Shit for that. But did he did? Did he know who you are? No through so I was so it was appropriate that I it was if I was going to go there. At one point in my life was perfect juncture because it was the perfect person to shut me down. I think it's forgivable because of where you were in in your career no. I don't think it's ever forgivable. There's a huge difference between being and becoming and you were becoming at that time and that is a radical transformation social psychological track. Transformation becoming is liberty. It's way different than being what I've always felt like becoming famous has got to be one of the most. You know social psychologically traumatising really the most transformative thing you could imagine. But it's this is the suddenness with which those changes occur I think is could have some parallels to trauma and I don't want to. I want to make the pity party for the rich and famous. But it's such a radical shift in self concept that it's hard to to keep a level head to keep maintain perspective Basically Nova doesn't think suddenly being valued sort of your presence is valued more than say other peoples in the social environment or something. It's very complicated overwhelming. Feeling I think yeah. I think there's some research that shows that actually on average these. These transformations are accompanied by reductions in empathy the capacity for empathy but also cognitive impairment. Back my notes yeah. Social status could make stupid in a nutshell. That's so funny because I mean I don't spend a lot of time in like this celebrity Ron but occasionally you know I'll like for my job I'll go to dinner with someone and I'll see everyone looking at us and it makes me feel terrible for the person that I'm with I don't know it just seems doesn't feel that great the few times. I think that that it happens. It feels very intense. I feel very careful with my words are I. I think maybe at first when you're young it felt great to walk into a restaurant or a club and it feels very heavy and it feels like you've won something but it is hard to be watched. Some you're playing a different character or something. Amanda have to think about that question for a minute but my my short answer is now a little bit. You know as a proud big brother. I remember one of my favorite times Walking down the street in Bourbon Street in New Orleans was getting such a kick out walking down the street. You know watching people you know coming by then watching that recognition moment like grabbing their friends and stuff that that will kick out. It's a lot of ammunition for making fun of your little sister. Just donate yes. Yes one hundred percent. Bob Would you tell us a little bit because Amanda in her article also talks about the Guillotine Twenty Twenty Hashtag. Ut's twenty twenty. Which I hadn't heard about because I don't know anything until I read your article you asked me. I think your original question was is it a good idea. What should celebres be doing or something like that to that effect with respect Social Media My feeling is that you know clearly. People are not reading the room and part of it on on some of these platforms. Are there are? You've always got a bunch of trolls. Who are nasty. But even before corona virus we had I think fomenting Jacobson kind of faction on social media twitter as far as I can tell you explain to our listeners. A little bit. What Jacob Van Jacobson's worthy were among the most radical factions during the French Revolution? And they're the ones bringing people to the team. That was aware that has died. I'm guessing I guess the meeting but yeah so there's that so that that was already going on. I think to some degree and now the corona viruses only magnified. That magnified the socioeconomic differences. And I think you know so so. Celebrities have just been a lot of liberties have been completely clueless without that kind of athlete. Because it's Kinda like a analogize it to like the fat guy who goes out in like black face at Halloween or or at a Nazi.

Amanda twitter Bob Instagram Jacob Van Jacobson Luma Bowling Alley Guillotine Twenty Twenty New Orleans CEO Ut Aleki Ron
"s. amanda" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

Anna Faris Is Unqualified

08:26 min | 1 year ago

"s. amanda" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

"Manda thanks so much for doing this. Of course yet I have to tell you. I'm I'm a little nervous talking with you. That's so funny because I you know as a part of my job I. I do like celebrity interview also and I'm always very nervous interviewing like a famous person. So can we talk about that first? Second Shirt because I I actually. It was lower on my list of things that I wanted to ask you but I do wonder about interviewing techniques and how you approach something the profiles that I've read that you've done a really love that you tend to not start and forgive me if if you have started out a profile with like Farris is picking out a tuna salad salad's you could. You could've started with my greasy hair. That didn't WanNA show you right. I mean I'm lucky in that like the stuff that I do is often. It's actually focused on the work that the person is doing at the moment for the most part there are some exceptions like. I interviewed Tina Turner. Tina Turner is probably the most famous person that I've interviewed and she's retired and she's been retired for a long time so she's not really doing anything was she opened. She was so open. I mean I really recommend interviewing people who are like seventy nine or eighty years old because they have anything to say like they will say now something that I just never got from her public personas. That she's incredibly funny. Oh that's great yet. So that was nice. It's just nice to kind of learn a new thing about someone so I'm usually not. I'm not trying to find out something particularly scandalous although I do. There's always like a question that I don't want to ask that. I feel that I have to ask either because my editors asked me or just because I know that I wouldn't be doing my job if I didn't do it and so I get. I get like extremely nervous about asking this question but for the most part like usually when I asked the person I'm asking doesn't feel as bad about it as I do for asking right so just doing that over and over helps to make me less nervous about it the next time the Yorker years ago did a profile piece on me which at the time. When I was asked I was beyond thrilled. I couldn't believe that this honor was being bestowed. I think nine months later the journalists had friend worked on the piece for months and would fly out to La and we have these long conversations by the end when the fact checker called me. I was just terrified. I thought I am going to have to leave. Hollywood I mean it was a great piece but you know there's those of course there has to be some critical elements to it and he. He talked to a lot of people around town and he was wonderful to me and I couldn't adore more but on our very last interview. I think maybe two months before the piece was to be published. He asked me after. Maybe doing like nine intense interviews. He said you know so. I do have to tell you though and I'm very hesitant to ask this question but when i Google your name. The first thing that pops up is breast implants or Boob job and I wanted to know if you had a comment on that and I had this thing where I was like. Fuck we've gone this far and I I just. I just have to be honest. What's what am I going to do? What am I going to do? I like and also kind of I don't know why why not so I was like Yep Yep I did do that. I did have a BOOB job. I I don't think I've said I don't regret it. I I'm sure I was embarrassed but I felt for him because I knew that he really didn't want to ask me like I. You know our friendship had had developed to a point where I think he felt. That was a very intimate. It was but also I didn't want to lie to him at that point and I didn't want to lie in general right I mean it's it's an uncomfortable thing because obviously I'm sure that tad did feel bad but it's also this tactic that we use which is like waiting. A little bit fills really liked very actually. I'm glad that you brought that up because I thought about that profile many times. I remember when I first read it and I'm I hope this doesn't doesn't make you uncomfortable but I I loved the part about the breast implants because it was just. It was so honest but I've thought about that profile times over the years and I've always wondered what it was like from your perspective because it did seem like a particularly honest profile. Thank you Amanda of Reading in remembering it yet I was really terrified that through people under the bus you know I knew the Tad was wanted to comment on the comedic environment for women in Hollywood focused me I guess. But it was very intimate. It was intense but I was very flattered but it was a big moment in my life. I did really feel like okay. I'm going back to Edmonds Washington. I'll just take some of my scary movies savings but no it was great. It was great but I think there is that I mean when you see somebody having written about you it is i. It's it's just it's surreal. I wish I had better words to describe it. I think which I kind of I guess sort of segues into social media and celebrities. Which is what I wanted to talk to you about mostly but thinking about the shift of control of the narrative with celebrity and social media and I should preface by saying Amanda. I am really bad as social media. I don't really enjoy it that much. I was late to the game with it and I have a twenty three year old assistant. Who helps me with my social media? And he'll have to guide me like you got a notification or texted me last night saying that you had. I assumed me I guess that's what you call it. Instant Messaging Deanne probably. Yeah See. That's where I'm at. My personal relationship with social media is very reluctant. And I'm not quite sure why I don't enjoy it as much as other people but why I wanted to talk to you. Though was your amazing piece. Celebrity Culture is burning which I read. I think let's see. I have it right here. March thirtieth you published it? And if you don't mind for my listeners I'm just going to read a couple of quotes from it and then I wanted to ask you some questions because I struggle with exactly the idea of the tone deafness and the bubble environment so before we get into that. Just read a little bit of your piece if you don't mind going okay. Celebrity Culture is burning America's in crisis but the celebrities are thriving. They are beaming into our homes. Reminding us to stay indoors and stay positive as we're all in this together which you put stay positive. And we're all in this together in quotes when I watch their selfie public service announcements if I may tension drifting to the edges of the frame the understated wall molding visible from behind Robert Shoulder to the craftsman. Beams on Priyanka Chopra's balcony to Equa wallpaper. Framing Zoe Kravitz his crackling fireplace. And then you go on to write. Among the social impacts of the krona virus is it swift dismantling the cult of celebrity the famous our ambassadors of the meritocracy they represent the American pursuit of wealth through talent charm and hard work but the dream of class mobility dissipates. When society locks down the economy stalls. The death count mounts and everyone's future is frozen inside their own crowded apartment or palatial mansion. The difference between the two has never been more obvious. Hey this is Amanda Amanda. This is my brother Bob. He is a sociologist. At UC Davis. And I was just talking to him and he had some really interesting thoughts so I wanted him to join if that's okay matter of course Bob's and Sacramento and Davis Amanda New York La. So I sent the article to my brother as well. What do you think sort of on a broad scale in the past few decades as idea of celebrity change in terms of social media and how we've used celebrities in our imagination? Yeah I do think there's this feeling that celebrities are closer to non celebrities than maybe they used to feel. There's less of a like a person like me. It's like making my job obsolete. But somebody doesn't have to talk to me and have me transcribe it in the New York Times in order to like their message straight out Taylor fans so there's a way in which you know like people just feel closer together. They feel like they have this.

Amanda Amanda Tina Turner Hollywood Farris Bob Google New York Times Davis Amanda New York La Zoe Kravitz Priyanka Chopra UC Davis La Deanne Edmonds Washington America Sacramento Robert Shoulder Taylor