21 Burst results for "Ryerson University"

Names erased: How Indigenous people are reclaiming what was lost

Unreserved

05:50 min | 2 months ago

Names erased: How Indigenous people are reclaiming what was lost

"You don't have to look very far to find Examples York region Ontario was named after your can the UK Regina is named after Queen Victoria Regina being the Latin for Queen and well British Columbia obviously. For Christina. Gray reclaiming those place names is vital and it's personal. The Simpson and Denny lawyer is one of two researchers behind reclaiming indigenous place names. The policy report was released in October of two thousand nineteen by the Yellow had institute at Ryerson University in Toronto. I've reached her at her home in Prince Rupert BBC. Welcome to unreserved thanks for having me. So you are a CO researcher with Daniel Ruck and you looked into naming practices and the erasure of indigenous place names. What did you find? We really wanted to do a cross section of the history of settler colonial renaming practices from indigenous place names to places that are an English or in French, or there's also note anglicised version as well and none look at what is the practice of reclaiming indigenous place names that is happening in various places are ranging from like the Northwest Territories, Quebec B. C. Saskatchewan Manitoba to give. People a different idea of what's going on across these places and territories, and so how do original place names get changed? You know from from the original indigenous words into you know the things that they become how does that happen? Basically what's happening as a result of mostly white people or settlers who were? Changing the names to suit their whims, our desires or values when places were being changed from indigenous place names, saedtler place names like we have to remember the population of Canada at that time was a lot lower than it is now yes. There were indigenous peoples on these lands and territories, but there is also a different perspective by settlers at that time as well, and so they I think they wanted the the places to reflect. What was going on in their life for different ideas that were important to them. I can think that Greek in Vancouver I was looking into the two sisters, which is now called the lions and a lot of people go heikal lions in in Vancouver, and they kind of overlook how sound and you can see them pretty much any point in Vancouver. But before they were called the lions, they recalled the two sisters and it relates to an oral history. Of The squamish nation and it's an oral history that also relates to northerners like myself because the oral history it's it's about making peace offerings between the northern and the southern people's. used to war with each other and so that has much significance to me as a simpson person who used to live in Vancouver the two sisters in Vancouver is definitely one that I've heard about Are there any other striking examples of renamed places that you found y'all like almost makes me want to cry actually there's a place that was called Lake Squat Kit. It's like near Kenmore, but the word squad specifically, Drago Tori term to refer to indigenous women and. Terrible. Stereotypes associated with it as well, and those are based off of how some settlers song about indigenous. and so you can just think about like it's a Grayson, deeply misogynistic but. People like had such a personal connection to the place name of squash it and like didn't want it to be renamed and. But like that I think has such a affect the way that you call places. And think about there are so many missing murdered indigenous woman in Canada and how you referred to that something that. So awfully in calling squad like those have affects real-life affects on people it's not just about placing. And is renaming more. Can it be more than just a symbolic gesture you know on how is renaming more than just a symbolic gesture i? Guess I think we always hope that naming practices or the revitalization of indigenous place names will go beyond just symbolic gestures who also have substantial effects as well and sue. Enrich policy really wanted to also look at like what are some of the mechanisms. In which indigenous people are. Using policy and Law to revitalize indigenous place names and so we looked up land use planning conservation co-management. Events and also modern day treaties and self government agreements in which indigenous peoples are using these different mechanisms available to on to re attribute and revitalize indigenous placing you know this work is being done by indigenous people. So think it's really important to attribute that recognition to them.

Vancouver Lions Simpson Queen Victoria Regina Canada Prince Rupert Bbc Christina Examples York Uk Regina Quebec B. C. Saskatchewan Mani Ontario Daniel Ruck British Columbia Toronto Researcher Lake Squat Kit Ryerson University Drago Tori Yellow Had Institute Kenmore
Learning with our Kids through Digital Play with OK Play App Co-founders Chris Ovitz and Dr. Colleen Russo Johnson

SuperMamas

07:53 min | 3 months ago

Learning with our Kids through Digital Play with OK Play App Co-founders Chris Ovitz and Dr. Colleen Russo Johnson

"Hi I'm probably next high embraced. The I'd were sisters, Fred Solders, wives, and business. And we're just falling three. We know. To be a better version of herself every day. All right and we're also. Welcomes. Sisterhood. Hi Emma what's up everybody? How are you? Do everybody I'm great. How are you? Yourself. Do I wanNA, introduce myself. Yes I do. Hi everybody. My name is Lena. I, am Bruce's sister. And I am a mom of three girls nine, six and three year old right now, and we're just trying to survive. who at you on the other side of the Mike. I am also your sister Duh. I am but he Lopez mother of two of a three month old and a fighter old little boy and my little girl who was just born three months ago. Just trying to be me being you know the best near can be embracing be. Husband. I had to have a high note shuttle the has. To the husband's Yeah I mean, we're just assist in women trying to be better rational results every day. If you're new to the show. Welcome to the Super Sisterhood, and if you are og longtime listener Sept- ladies, we love you. Also. Don't forget to follow us on our Social Media Instagram and twitter at underscore. So but Romance Facebook, Super Roma's podcasts, and on the Web Superman dot com, you can check out or previous episodes newsletter subscription newsletter all the articles that we have just check it out to romance dot COM If you WANNA, send us a note you can do it by sending us an email at hello at superman dot com or you can call us at four to four, three, two, six, three, seven, seven. End At the end of the show, we have our favorite favorite segment, the pick or tip of the week. So stay tuned for that. And my favorite segment mind theory subject to subject segment not subject my second subject to subject to name to. who do we have on the show this week? Today on the show this week we have two great very smart in a in a high achievers I would say On the today we have Chris over to is a president of the company called. Okay play. It's an APP that I started using that will come very much in handy these days of virtual learning. So again, we have Chris Hogan, who was President a dad on for your boy and Dr Colleen, Russo Johnson. PhD, and she is a chief scientists and Mama up two toddlers for for the okay company in the okay play APP, which is a little bit about Chris who is again the CO founder and President He is just a serial entrepreneur I mean like his bio I can go on and on and on. Angel investor he's invested in companies like beyond me and block renovation. When he is a member of terrorists next establishment list and graduated from Ucla with the history by just like a serial entrepreneur and Dr Combing Russo she is again hundred scientists in she is a de mental psychologist with expertise in children's media and technology who serves as an adjunct professor at Ryerson University in codger rector of Ryerson's children medialab She is a senior scholar for silly center for scholars and storytellers and the CO author bestselling Children's Book Dino Dana Dana Field Guide again she is like the. Best person to talk about what's happening right now with virtual learning and what did we talk about Alina? Love. This episode I love the APP. I think it will. It's first of all they launched this. This APP during the during a pandemic, which is in of itself. Amazing we talk about emotional learning. We talk also about how to choose right even a good app for your kids and what makes this APP different which is again, the emotion social emotional learning and. How these actually involves the parent lonely the children and how it translates from the APP in the device to outdoor play to more than play and I, love how they came up with the name any. To play with the kids. So we talk about that. We talk about perspective of screen time. What's good what's not good you know what what to do right now with the kids and how this APP has helped our families as well in many other families. So I'm excited for for this episode end for the APP. Awesome. So but before we get into that base, yeah, what's up with you? What's going on what's up with me? You know. With me like every day seems to be the same thing. I'm just trying to gain for routine with were in. You know just having a Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday schedule Northern, I actually took up a new wouldn't say my. was is that a hobby is. Added something we were routine which I really like he's in writing letters to his friends. Then he would aches and we're going to the post office like every other day I try not to do it every day, but he wants to go every day. here's a couple of letters and heap envelope and puts his postage stamp, and then just you know we go to the office in everything. That's pretty cool. That's kind of like the new thing we're doing here I bought him some stationary. We should be coming next week, which I'm so excited Abou-, he has going to have his own stationary. And the customized initials yes. It has his name I got I couldn't decide I couldn't decide on witch on which science. So I got him to design. I'm very site for people to receive a customer stationary and the baby. She's she's just living her best cuter every day Chubbier every day or she's those beautiful three months old like chummy legs and Chevy she eats them. As she started to mile a lot more and talk a lot more and. She's being like the Pistons such a great baby you know I can't really complain about her. She's awesome. Obviously still not sleep through the night actually migrated her bedroom I don't know if I share that already. Oh. Yes. She's been living. She's living in her bedroom for the past two weeks already. Like I actually moved into her bedroom before to turn three months. And she's been doing well, she's only waking up once usually runs for now. I, mean I'm just hoping that like continues

Chris Hogan Fred Solders Emma Super Sisterhood President Trump Facebook Twitter Lopez Ryerson University Bruce Mike Dino Dana Dana Dr Combing Russo Pistons Alina Abou Ryerson PHD
"ryerson university" Discussed on SuperMamas

SuperMamas

02:43 min | 3 months ago

"ryerson university" Discussed on SuperMamas

"Have Chris over to is a president of the company called. Okay play. It's an APP that I started using that will come very much in handy these days of virtual learning. So again, we have Chris Hogan, who was President a dad on for your boy and Dr Colleen, Russo Johnson. PhD, and she is a chief scientists and Mama up two toddlers for for the okay company in the okay play APP, which is a little bit about Chris who is again the CO founder and President He is just a serial entrepreneur I mean like his bio I can go on and on and on. Angel investor he's invested in companies like beyond me and block renovation. When he is a member of terrorists next establishment list and graduated from Ucla with the history by just like a serial entrepreneur and Dr Combing Russo she is again hundred scientists in she is a de mental psychologist with expertise in children's media and technology who serves as an adjunct professor at Ryerson University in codger rector of Ryerson's children medialab She is a senior scholar for silly center for scholars and storytellers and the CO author bestselling Children's Book Dino Dana Dana Field Guide again she is like the. Best person to talk about what's happening right now with virtual learning and what did we talk about Alina? Love. This episode I love the APP. I think it will. It's first of all they launched this. This APP during the during a pandemic, which is in of itself. Amazing we talk about emotional learning. We talk also about how to choose right even a good app for your kids and what makes this APP different which is again, the emotion social emotional learning and. How these actually involves the parent lonely the children and how it translates from the APP in the device to outdoor play to more than play and I, love how they came up with the name any. To play with the kids. So we talk about that. We talk about perspective of screen time. What's good what's not good you know what what to do right now with the kids and how this APP has helped our families as well in many other families. So I'm excited for for this episode end for the APP. Awesome. So but before we get into that base, yeah, what's up with you? What's going.

Chris Hogan Dr Combing Russo Dr Colleen President Dino Dana Dana president Ryerson University senior scholar Russo Johnson Alina PhD adjunct professor CO founder Ucla Mama
"ryerson university" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"ryerson university" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"They had had an agreement for thirty four years but now Ryerson University in Toronto is cutting ties with the Ryerson students. Union saying it's lost confidence in the school student government. The split comes after the union faced allegations of misspending last January an investigation by Ryerson Student newspaper. The eye opener revealed that members of the Union may have racked up roughly two hundred and fifty thousand dollars in credit card charges in under a year. The alleged spending include purchases at Ontario liquor stores nightclubs and casinos after the allegations were made public former student. Union President Ram Ganesh was impeached forensic audit was completed and just days ago. The students wants Union asked Toronto Police to investigate the alleged financial mismanagement back when that story broke Carol spoke with Sharia Harris who was part of the team that I reported on the Oh scandal from our archives. Here's part of their conversation. She we in a has the student union at Ryerson provided an explanation as of yet for how much money could have been spent on what what appears to be spent on booze nightclubs and casinos among other things. No they haven't the eye opener has given the student even multiple opportunities to comment and as well at the board of directors meeting last week several representatives asked the president directly to explain and some of the expenses and he repeatedly said that he would be able to provide a full explanation and context once the Receipts were reconciled on February first but there were no explanations given up the meeting. How did you learn about this? How did you learn that? The student union president might be spending this kind of money so we had received some tips from people as early as this fall that we should be looking into the credit card statements and we should be looking into some of their finances but at that time we weren't able to verify the information just because it was screen chalked up their online bank account. You didn't want to publish something based on information. Can we couldn't confirm so. Recently we started looking into it more because the president actually had told us directly that the student union had to credit cards on he had a credit card and the vice president operations had a credit card. When we looked into this further we learn about this is breaking financial bylaws and policies are issue? Because does the executive aren't supposed to have credit cards. We've heard from a student director. Got The total amount of purchases is two hundred fifty thousand dollars but we've only seen a small sliver the statements and our Seo in the Ryerson Student Union now so tell us about some of the expenses. What have you seen as far as what raised your eyebrows? The most based over two thousand dollars spent at EFSA Toronto which is a nightclub. There was over two thousand five hundred dollars spent at cineplex rec room over a thousand three hundred dollars at Nick Sport shot and then we're also just a lot of smaller ones that we weren't really sure how they could have been used for about benefiting students there was money. Money spent on hotels airbnb es three hundred dollars at A. He's lounge which is like a sheesha lounge that was ryerson. The Student Journalists Sharona Harris speaking with Carol last January today Ryerson University announced it was cutting ties with the Ryerson Students.

Union Ryerson Student Union Ryerson Student Ryerson University Ryerson Students president Carol Toronto President Ram Ganesh Sharona Harris EFSA Toronto vice president operations misspending Ontario Nick Sport executive director
"ryerson university" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"ryerson university" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"They had an agreement for thirty four years but now Ryerson University in Toronto is cutting ties with the Ryerson students. Union saying it's lost confidence in the school student. Government demint the split comes after the union faced allegations of misspending last January an investigation by Ryerson Student newspaper. The eye-opener revealed that members of the Union in May have racked up roughly two hundred fifty thousand dollars in credit card charges in under a year. The alleged spending included purchases at Ontario liquor stores nightclubs clubs and casinos. After the allegations were made public former student. Union President Ram Ganesh was impeached. A forensic audit was completed and just days ago. The Students Union asked Toronto Police to investigate the alleged financial mismanagement back when that story broke Carol spoke with Serena Harris who was part of the team that I reported boarded on the scandal from our archives. Here's part of their conversation. Sharinau has the student union at Ryerson provided an explanation as of yet for or how much money could have been spent on what what appears to be spent on booze nightclubs and casinos among other things. No they haven't the eye opener has given the student union multiple opportunities to comment and as well at the board of directors meeting last week. Several representatives asked the president directly to you explain some of the expenses and he repeatedly said that he would be able to provide a full explanation and context once the Receipts Were Reconciled oiled on February first but there were no explanations given up the meeting. How did you learn about this? How did you learn the student? Union president might be spending this kind the money so we had received some tips from people as early as the fault that we should be looking into the credit card statements and we should be looking into choose some of their finances but at that time we weren't able to verify the information just because it was screen shots of their online bank account. You didn't want to publish something based on information. We couldn't confirm so recently we started looking into it more because the president actually had told us directly that the student union had to credit cards that he had a credit card and the vice president operations had a credit card when we looked into this further we learned about this is breaking. Financial Bylaws and policies are issue because the executives aren't supposed to have their own credit cards. We've heard from a student director that the total amount of purchases two hundred fifty thousand dollars. But we've only seen small sliver of the statements are as you referred us the Ryerson Student Union. Now tell us about some of the expenses. What have you seen as far as what raised? Your eyebrows is the most over two thousand dollars spent at E F S Toronto which is a night club. There was over two thousand. Five hundred dollars spent at cineplex REC room over a thousand three hundred dollars at Nick Sport shot and there were also just a lot of smaller ones that we weren't really sure how they could have been used for about benefiting. Students is there was money spent at hotels. AIRBNB is three hundred dollars a cave lounge which is like a sheesha lounge that it was ryerson. Student Journalists Serena Harris speaking with Carol last January today Ryerson University announced it was cutting ties with the Ryerson Students Union. You've been listening to the as it happens. podcast our show can be heard Monday to Friday on. CBC Radio One and on Sirius Xm following the world at six. You can also listen to the whole show on the web this Goto. CBC DOT CA slash. Ah and follow the links to our online archives. Thanks for listening. I'm Carol off and I'm Chris. How for more C._B._C.? PODCASTS GO TO C._B._C.. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts..

Ryerson Student Union Union Ryerson University Ryerson Student Ryerson Students Union Toronto president Students Union Carol Sharinau Serena Harris President Ram Ganesh AIRBNB vice president operations CBC demint Ontario misspending
Obama endorses Canada's Trudeau for re-election

BBC World Service

03:54 min | 1 year ago

Obama endorses Canada's Trudeau for re-election

"The former US president Barack Obama has urged Canadians to reelect prime minister Justin Trudeau in a tweet backing that Mister Trudeau will welcome as he faces a tough battle in the general election next week the campaign has been dominated my policies but by a series of scandals the BBC's Persian Gulf and has been looking at the impact these scandals of hat on political discourse in Canada twenty nineteen has been the year of the scandal in Canadian politics prime minister Justin Trudeau violated the conflict of interest act when he tried to convince his former Attorney General to help SNC Lavalin avoid a criminal trial photo of Justin Trudeau dressed as a Latin in brown face separate instances have emerged showing Trudeau in black face every sure never actually was an insurance program despite the fact that I've got his biography here this is officially said before entered public life and to work in the private sector as an insurance roping a fourteen year old video of conservative leader Andrew here arguing against gay marriage will help convince voters in the run up to Canada's general election on the twenty first of October news coverage social media and political debate have all been dominated by a series of revelations about party leaders and back benchers alike the popularity of prime minister Justin Trudeau took a serious hit this year when Canada's ethics commissioner ruled that he tried to improperly influence the legal strategy of his Attorney General that seem to kick start a race particularly between Mr Trudeau's liberals and his main rivals in interest yours Conservative Party both sides have attacked each other for failing to expel backbench candidates who tweeted racist or sexist messages in years past one prospective Tory MP has been criticized for a friendship with a far right online media personality accused of being a white supremacist the problem is that instead of supplementing the political policy discussion the focus on muckraking has all too often replaced it here's how Andrew Scheer responded in a televised debate when asked about protecting Canada's interest on a global stage of course I will always stand up for Canada and defend our interests all around the world but Justin Trudeau only pretends to stand up for Canada you know he's very good at pretending things he can't even remember how many times he put black face on it's a noticeable change from the last Canadian election in twenty fifteen when issues like the environment the economy refugee resettlement and the well being of indigenous communities struggling with health care infrastructure and safety took center stage Daniel Rubinstein is an associate professor at Ryerson university in Toronto where he researchers political campaigns and communication definitely I think that the important stuff gets left behind there's not been that much talk about ideas and policy and where the country's going and these kind of big things that we ought to perhaps be interested in and in particular issues of you know indigenous rights and governance and so on sadly I don't think I've ever really got as much attention as they should and even less so when campaigns are driven by things that are not policy related at all the race to rid of damaging details from candidates pass has also led to misinformation earlier this month the Conservative Party issued an official press release demanding to know why Justin Trudeau left his job as a high school teacher several years ago it appeared to be a reference to a widely debunked internet conspiracy theory that suggests Mr Trudeau was sacked because of some severe misconduct it's hard to predict how these various transgressions will influence Monday's vote but there can be little doubt that Canada's politicians have found a new way to tear each other down that report was by peace at girlfriend and you can hear more of pieces series on the Canadian election in the coming days here on the BBC world

Barack Obama Prime Minister Justin Trudeau United States President Trump Fourteen Year
"ryerson university" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"ryerson university" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"They want to use it for transatlantic communication, talk to our allies Sunday fused until, like chunks up their trunks do damage to things that would hit them. Each of them was like the size of a postage stamp in length. And so in the vacuum cold of where they weren't space. They just something called cold. Welding metal on metal just views to each other up there in the weirdness that is not being on earth. Got hit by what would happen if you were in orbit. And you got hit by one would rip straight through your body immediately a warning, and you would be very hurt could be either very dead or very hurt. But nothing in between. This is basically why the United Nations established rules for what you're allowed to do space. The first thing when they're like people were like we can do whatever and the US find, like, okay, you can't give you on, it would be okay to let you be responsible. You proved us wrong is they're just another capsule. Still up there with a bunch of these needle has that been? Yes, the first one they believe the first one might have fallen apart, or, or fragmented, and they don't really know what happened to those. So that might have been some of the ones that picking up on radar today. They special space rate art to look for this stuff. I just imagine that, like it just left the solar system, and like some aliens picked it up, and they opened it up. And they're like they got glitter bombed base. Pretty big mess all over space biggest mess. I mean. I mean, maybe in terms of square miles. Yeah. I want to reiterate that in the meantime, we have put so much more stuff in space. That is small fraction of all of the other space, junk. Yeah, but it's the weirdest Spain. Stephon, that was a good fact Jewish water. So my hot mess is about the flushable wipes industry. That's a really good one. It's a pretty big mess. So there's this team at Ryerson university in Toronto that had in their lab. They set up a toilet with all like the piping. Let's tach knit flushes. And they wanted to test a bunch of different a different like white products and things some of which were flushable or labeled as flushable and see if they could be processed by, like, sewer systems. The two main things are like within a certain number of flushes the product has to clear like the piping, it's twenty meters of pipe with a couple like ninety degree bends all the products. Did that like within five flushes like everything was through the piping, but then they do like disintegration test, where they sort of sloshed the water around in a box. It's all very specific like the number of degrees that you tell them the mocks. So like sure so that matches like what you would experience in the sewer system. And so their standard was that needs to disintegrate within thirty minutes to avoid having danger of clogging and zero of the products out of.

United Nations US Stephon Ryerson university Spain Toronto thirty minutes ninety degree twenty meters
What does an election look like when local news is dying?

The Big Story

06:13 min | 1 year ago

What does an election look like when local news is dying?

"You probably don't need anyone to tell you that local media outlets newspapers in particular are in trouble. We in the media have told you all about that. And if you're listening to a daily news podcast, you probably care at least a little bit about the disappearance of these publications. I hope so anyway, the problem though, is often framed in specifics for the industry, which is understandable since we're talking about the media covering the media, and we do like to do that. That means what you hear is about. How many people will lose their jobs who's making cuts which newsrooms are impacted and that matters, of course. But maybe it's not the most relevant way to communicate to you the public. What's actually happening? We have an election coming up. You may have heard it is a pretty important one given the current state of the world. So what happens when a media trying like hell to do everything on a shoestring budget has to cover a huge national campaign, but also three hundred and thirty eight local campaigns. What kind of coverage can these outlets afford to take on? And what's the first to go when they can't what replaces that kind of coverage. What options do voters who want to be informed have to seek out the analysis they need, and of course, how will savvy political campaigns take advantage of this situation and take advantage of you? Jordan, heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. April Lindgren is a professor of journalism at Ryerson university. More importantly, she runs the local news research project, which digs down into exactly this. Thanks for joining US, April. My pleasure. Can you? I try to give me a sense using any paper in particular of the state of local news political coverage right now, I was doing some research recently and looking at a paper called red deer advocate serving red deer, and now Berta hundred thousand people, and I spoke with a journalist there who retired a few years ago, but was still involved in the local union, and she had some pretty interesting in sobering store stories to tell me about a newsroom that back in two thousand twelve had twenty four people still in it and today going into the federal election coming up. This fall is now down to about nine people who are going to be providing political coverage of the local races. And you know, the leader comes through town covering that as well. And. Part of the story that she told me was, you know, years ago in previous elections not in two thousand fifteen but before that they used to do was called a ride around. So that's when a journalist and a reporter quote, and they ride around in the writings, and they talked to people get a sense of what's going on get a feel for the mood who's who's doing? Well, who's in trouble? And that was eliminated in two thousand fifteen and isn't going to happen this time either. So you have sort of less coverage of in-depth like that fewer writings because they just don't have the people to do it. And also doing stories that are more probing in-depth because there's a missive from management. That's a each reporter has to produce at least two stories day and do some briefs short snippets of stories issues. Come up, maybe do so shoot some video. And when you got that on your plate as a sort of daily mandate. There's not a lot of time to produce any sort of in-depth profiles of the candidates or look at issues in more depth than find out where local people stand on those issues, and and explain white matters. So with. Out that stuff with reporters having no time to kind of do more than the straightforward stories where do people get that in depth coverage? Does it exists still? Well, I think if you're lucky enough to live in a bigger city where there's a sort of a bigger pool of media chances are you can get a little bit more information. Now, keep in mind, I'm talking about coverage of local candidates and the races to represent a writing not the leaders not the leaders race because you know, you can find out all sorts of stuff online about what's Justin Trudeau is going to be doing that day or or or Andrew Scheer that's going to be there. But the the issue is what's happening locally in. How do you? Hold those local candidates accountable. So if there's an incumbent what's that income and done for the last four years that they've been in Ottawa or in the provincial capital. So holding power accountable is a big part of what local journalists do. And also, you know, people think that well who cares? I mean the local race. It's the national race that really determines what happens in a campaign and. What the leaders are doing. And that's what's going to determine how the election turns out. That's what we talk about in the national conversation. Yeah. Absolutely. But there's actually been some recent research that shows about ten percent of all writings are decided by people based on who the local candidates are ruler. So you know, that's that's enough. That's the difference between a majority and a minority or between winning. And losing those local races do matter and to the extent that people are covering them, the coverage matters, but what happens when reporters aren't on the ground. Well, one of the things that happens is candidates start shaping their own messages and putting their own message messages out. So they're using a lot of social media direct mailings. And basically they are telling their version of reality. Here's what I did the last four. Yes. An army by. Yeah. You could be sure they're not saying here's what I did. In the last four years, you might want to think about my record. And whether he really wanted me on my wins and losses here. Yeah. Absolutely. So, you know, people say, well, I'm getting the information. I can go to the candidates website. They send me emails. They I you know, I can find that out. But people forget is that journalists do is they have the time because they're not they're paid to sort of take the time to look at Ken how the candidate or the incumbent voted what they said in parliament. Did they bring forward any legislation? How responsive were they to local constituents like did they ever show up in the writing? And you're only going to get that sort of coverage. If you've got a reporter who's got some time, and is paid to actually ask those questions. So why is this kind of

Reporter United States Ryerson University Justin Trudeau Ottawa April Lindgren Andrew Scheer Berta KEN Professor Of Journalism Jordan Heath Rawlings Four Years Ten Percent
"ryerson university" Discussed on Fashion Hags

Fashion Hags

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"ryerson university" Discussed on Fashion Hags

"So of course, of course, I mean, it makes perfect sense with Montreal Montreal has such a. LA? Yeah. It makes perfect sense in cities that have gone through some kind of economic disaster. I feel like Detroit is going to be the next facet. There you go fashion capital to explore because it's really when the traditional industries move out that artists and young people really creative people can move in and Ford spaces and afford life. Yeah. And actually start start building something that does experimental. So these also Vancouver's. Yeah. Those things thanks giving. Like fifteen years the whole. The bubble's waivers. But I mean Vancouver's is really really interesting because it has Puckett's right true. It's like n people are holding on. Old white knuckle hanging onto those. Yeah. Absolutely. Yeah. That is true. Sonate? That's how he wrote your books. And then you started the scholars tell us about that was looking at the network. The network added. When I was doing research for the Montreal book. And I realized that there are there networks within different organizations or within different cities really connected to certain school. So there was always around Ryerson university in Toronto because they are the goodness fashion programs. Don't they they have like one of the only full degree program at university for fashion in the country for long when we were. Yeah. Yes. That we know of I have since discovered the department of human ecology, good luck. Figuring out. Not have come up. I actually went to the U of M Amazon, and I did not know that this program exists because if you search fashion up. Yeah. And the reason it's called human ecology is because it used to be back in the day home economics. Now is the Jing jaded phrase..

Montreal Montreal Ryerson university Vancouver Montreal LA Detroit Puckett M Amazon Toronto fifteen years
"ryerson university" Discussed on If These Ovaries Could Talk

If These Ovaries Could Talk

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"ryerson university" Discussed on If These Ovaries Could Talk

"Her son came out, his transit. He was like three right three. He was three. And I think I think Penelope is like ten now. And so in the book, she talks about how she didn't know. She's like I'd never even heard of trance before out Nonni transpeople. You know, she had a come from Lineas of really strong women. I was so prepared for my daughter to be this beautiful girl. And my daughter is just is is now my son. And so what she did was like, she was like, you know, I it takes ten thousand hours to to master anything, and I'm going to master this, you know, because she had the intention of being the best mother that she could be to guide hurt her three-year-old son and to protect him on this journey of of his transition as she wanted that attention to have the right impact. So she learned and that's the thing you just you have to. Care enough to educate yourself because you don't know you can't expect other people and other groups to do that emotional labor to help you learn you know, what I'm saying. Like, it wasn't like when she was looking at her son her son threes o-, obviously couldn't teach her you know, how to respond to him, you know, but it wasn't necessarily, you know, the obligation of other transpeople to teach her right either. You gotta do that work for yourself. So people really people really want to have what their intention to meet their impact. They don't know where to start. And then like, I don't know what's going on, you know, or think of that person as have the compassion for that person as you would your three year old child. That's a nice add. I think that's a way from. That's takeaway for me. Yeah. Compassionate. And have that empathy? You know, like, I think I think that empathy is is really important where we talk about. Execution. I think empathy is really important. We talk about like, empathy and empathy is we're talking about like moving forward. You know? So like, grounding yourself in compassionate empathy, and working from that place. You know, and which which I which I found let me tell you it notes doing. So I did this. I did this panel right at Ryerson university in in in in Toronto. And it was about masculinity. I was only guy on on the panel in this in the straight straight guy was like, you know, what I have always been taught that empathy is at to Thiokol to efficiency in as leader saying, I don't have time to like take your feelings. Right. And that's a very like masculine male man thing to kind of. Bullshit. You know what I'm saying? Like, it's have to be grounded, in empathy in order to be able to to to lead people at have an impact and for growth Iki said something that I'm still it's still stuck in my brain, you said or Ganic masculinity. Oh, yeah. What is this? What is this concept mean? Okay. So for me as a transgender, man. I know I started my transition at twenty five I started living fully as twenty five before I came out as lesbian fourteen. So like, my whole, I'm very very queer. Like, all I know since my sexuality developed, you know, when I started, you know, it's all been it's always been inquiry community and so increase community..

Penelope Nonni transpeople Iki Ryerson university Thiokol Lineas Toronto ten thousand hours three year three-year
"ryerson university" Discussed on The Hoop Collective

The Hoop Collective

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"ryerson university" Discussed on The Hoop Collective

"Which is in Canada and some team sometimes practice there, but it's a little bit out of downtown a little bit out of where they stay so teams when they practice in Toronto prefer to practice at the arena. There's a practice floor on the the fourth floor. It's in the upper deck. This was a thing back in the nineties where teams practice courts in the upper deck because I don't know if they just didn't have room underneath. But it was a strange decision. There's a couple of court arenas out there. They were building nineties have these. And so they the warriors right Nick, they they like to stay on west coast time. So they practice at night. Right. So tell us what happened that night. Yeah. It's it's the first team I've ever been around that. They go from west to east, and this is already happened twice this year. It started with their road trip to New York. The words like the practice, right when they land. So the warriors flew from Oakland to Toronto got off the bus, and there they are at the raptors practice court, which is inside Scotiabank arena. There's a vape Elise game going on. So it's like the it's right before the game starts here comes the worst team buses. Everybody's walking through some fans. Saw a new executive who they were. It's official like what is going on? And didn't even. Give them a second because real quick to clarify. The players have to come out of elevators and walk through the concourse. It's not even like back way to get there. Also real quick I was mistaken. It is not McGill MacGill's in Montreal. It's Ryerson university's in Toronto. So please stand down my Canadian friends. All right. I'm sorry. So the players have to literally walk through a divorce. They're going to go sit at the hockey game that you are you're on the concourse is if you're going to go walk up to section one twenty two and go take your seat or in this case, probably three twenty two. But either way the buses full up here. Come the players some fans recognize him some fans, don't and then there's Draymond green. Who looks at the popcorn. It's not he's and I will say he's not practicing right now. He's out with the. Madrid odd sees the popcorn stand with with some other snags right next to the door. That's that gets you onto the practice for and he stops any mice and popcorn any walks big smile on his face. So that was a lighthearted moment in the midst of everything else that was going on. But so to the original question about where Kerr was in his decision making prior to Steph in that game. He flat out said if this were a playoff game Steph would be playing this is November in in this ties back in what I'm saying. With the words in general. They're pointing the long game Steve Kerr, Rick celebrating who is in charge of the the words sports medicine team and their performance, they know they're playing for six seven months down the road. I did not think there was gamesmanship in that. Hey, let's. Keep it close without Steph. It's the raptors I thought Steve Kerr looked at the calendar said it was November. And they're like, okay. You know, whatever he could have said why not why not send them the whole road trip? I mean, my thing is he was he was ready to come back. And they're like, you know, what let's not bring him back against Toronto because he comes back against Toronto and place poorly. And we lose that we lose a little bit of an edge there. And nobody would be surprised if he played poorly coming back from injury. But on the other hand if we don't play them against Toronto. And we win or we play. Well in lose. We always have that. Even if we lost. We always have that while we didn't have we didn't have staff, and I think it played out. Exactly the way they wanted to preferrably they would've won. But they could walk away from the game saying we're better than that team. Yeah. They got the win. But we're better than that team. I don't know. And maybe I'm not eve, maybe I'm naive. But I think there were two factor. Here. One injury. Yeah. Well. So there was a groin injury..

Toronto Steve Kerr Steph Canada McGill MacGill Nick Scotiabank arena Ryerson university Draymond green Elise Montreal Oakland hockey raptors New York executive official Rick six seven months
"ryerson university" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"ryerson university" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Special entrepreneurial and leadership series of those leadership. Brought to you by my friends at equity. The come so excited to sit down and talk with your welcome to the show. Thank you. Thank you. And you've got a storied career from a leadership perspective. How did you get? How did you? And we were talking before the recording in Yugoslavia Toronto gains, the city Californian, you're here in Wichita. How did you get here? How did you get to this leadership role? That's a good question. Well, you know, the leadership. I it wasn't a plant. It wasn't. I didn't wake up, and and think to myself, I gotta be a seal. It was a sort of a sequence of of of events. You know, when I got when I started working and so being an employee stock observe the leadership around you, and I thought to myself. This is not really all that affective. I don't you know, they're the way in which they interact with me with other people. It's it. It's not it doesn't produce the results that it could. And and as I as I moved through my career, and it and it progressed. I just kept thinking about how would I receive this? If I was on the other side, and I don't know whether that was what what and that up putting me further and further into the management chain. But every time I had an opportunity to be in the leadership role. I practiced the art of what would I what would IB doing on the on the bottom, and how would I be perceiving my leadership style? You know, that's impressive. Because it's so true. I've always said, I think back to all the examples of leadership have been exposed to the greatest lessons have been sometimes from those really poor examples right in the fact that you had the awareness and the ability to go man, I'm going to do that. And then, but but the I'm curious about okay. So you're given a leadership role. So it wasn't your plan. It's always funny. Lot of people say that they never thought it'd be in this role. What was the intention? What was the idea when you got your degree at Ryerson university? When you when you're entering the workforce. What was the intention? Well, originally was imagined wanted to be an engineer. He and I end so that's what I did. I started off designing electric heaters. And and then I thought man there's more to it than and and. Just this ineffectiveness of of of the people that were providing leadership to me and to other engineers, I would end up stepping up to do some of the things that that I thought well, we we need some guidance. We need some encouragement we need some direction on some of this stuff. And so that in I just sort of evolved in a piece by piece, but the willingness to go I'm not going to want to do something different. Right. That's I think that's a little different. Sometimes particularly people with I've worked with a lot engineers, and engineering mindset, you know, and certain type of mindset, you have it. But you're also said, you know, I'm gonna this. Ain't right. I'm going to change the world. Right. So where did that come from? Do you think? Yeah. Well, he Noah some immigrant as you said, I was born in informing us live. It was just as small kid when we laugh, so we had nothing I'm my family had zero. And so when when we ended up in Canada, you know, going throw a stray Elia and. In high school, and we have nothing. And so I realized was my mum's value system that if you want to get something you're going to have to work for yourself. And so that work ethic was there very early on. And I just you know, working progressing through. And I realized that it for me personally to to grow ahead. Make a lot of effort into into doing that and to go back to the engineering piece within very short period of time. I realized that the people that made the money, and the people that had, you know, had really the ability to influence the business were the the guys up at the top. And and I'm receiving their leadership styling thinking, this is really not very effective such that thinking along the lines..

Elia Ryerson university Yugoslavia Wichita engineer Noah Canada
"ryerson university" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

The Rich Eisen Show

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"ryerson university" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

"To inoculate me from this overreaction and just maybe proof that the NFL isn't the only league or sport that is prone to overreaction because we will overreact to whatever we see tonight from either Arnold for the jets or anything. Anything for the patriots Brady tonight. I act one human being outed arth please. Let's sit or just he struggles against eagles. Let's struggles you know is a forty year old in the Super Bowl. He's winging it all over the lot through for five hundred yards tonight as a forty one year old preseason. Oh my goodness. He looks terrible, patriots trouble. That could be are the get ready for that tomorrow? Out of me, we're moving on week three. All right. So I say that is big time caveat here online Williamson, but. On behalf of all mix fans everywhere. On behalf of any team in the NBA not named the Golden State Warriors. And with all due respect to the rockets or whomever I would tank every single NBA regular season contest I would go, oh, and eighty. Two tank them all. Thank them all what's crazy rich is that this kid. Based on the recruiting numbers. He's not even the best player on on Duke this year come on Duke was able to land three of the top five players in the country. Zion is number five. There's a guy named RJ Barrett who's also supposed. He could be the number one picnics year and a guy named Cameron reddish who was the number two ranked national player. Duke landed all three of these were Suming. They're all going to be one and done coach case. Yes, even the one done. I mean, he's like, he's like showing Calipari. You think you could do one and done. Let me show you one and done. These three guys could be that verse three picks in the draft. I wonder what that conversation. The first ever conversation. Coach k. had with the provost at Duke to say, I'm gonna. We're gonna start doing little or the provost, which is basic say, you know, coach, Mike or coach, we've noticed that you're coming up with a bunch of players that are only gonna be here pretty much on in one year. What you know, what are we? What are we doing? What are we doing? We're doing here at Duke. Is of higher. What you know what I don't hear and you don't hear this anybody and me as a Michigan, you know, with my Michigan degree on the wall, I'm not sitting here saying, well, might Michigan degrees any less because you're bringing in kids reckon I hang around the academic experience. Okay. So you're telling me that my team doesn't have to tank all eighty two games to get Zion, Williamson, no. Next next tank like seventy or sixty five games tank them all. Like Frank Pantano. Now, while this. Now while we got right, he's six eight two eighty five shouldn't be jumping from the free throw line. Dunking like this guy. I wondered last night how many backboards he's gonna shatter this year. What's the record of Ryerson? Is it Ryerson college? Is it Ryan and university is at the community college of Rier. So that's I mean going to Canada. Let's go to Canada and start beating up on the Canadians, the Ryan Ryerson university Rams the Ryerson rans. The Ryerson university speed bumps man. Wow. They're located in Toronto Ontario Canada. They've been Roman of thirty six thousand. While is all their mascot is Eggy the ram hanging around. Oh, it's not cute. What does he the rim? I don't even wear McCormick is a notable alumni from willing grace go tad who had no idea the. I saw that last night..

Duke Brady Canada Zion Ryerson college patriots Ryerson rans Williamson Ryan Ryerson university NBA Michigan provost RJ Barrett NFL jets Frank Pantano Coach k. Arnold Cameron reddish
"ryerson university" Discussed on One Shining Podcast with Titus and Tate

One Shining Podcast with Titus and Tate

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"ryerson university" Discussed on One Shining Podcast with Titus and Tate

"So the fact that you're gonna watch national championship on the national championship in both national finals on national TV is kind of a big deal. And Halifax is host like there's a long bread Halifax heritage with hosting the national championship and they can comfortably sell five thousand tickets. It's just a, it's just an eighteen tournament national championship here on your guys decide on your is is idea of on your last podcast and talking about candidate playing it off? I four, the timing works out. It's like the the ninth or the eleventh of March is when they play the national championship and then even just hop on a flight from Halifax or Ottawa, whoever sows in the national championship last year that here, that's why down to the first four go there. Ooh, that actually would workout Tate. That's perfect because Halifax is on the east coast and Dayton is Dayton as we knows on the east coast as well. Uh-huh. For the first four that could actually work so, but hold on. So is Canada. Like, do you have all the? Do you have all the archaic rules about paying players and stuff like Chia does because then say would not let that happen like if candidates guys are like making money on the side or something did they're not going, but there's not even that much of a scholarship will around players like you can get guys. It's like t- gentlemen in the states though, like big programs, dine with different athletic. Here's the buyers like Ryerson university's like the flagship Nike school when you.

Halifax Ryerson university Chia Dayton Nike school Canada Ottawa
"ryerson university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"ryerson university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"This Monday the stories we're keeping an eye. On today Omarosa had released phone, call tapes one with. The president actually that took place a day after she was fired by, White House chief, of staff, John Kelly She also says she had a tape of that meeting and in the meeting with the the, phone call, with the president he apparently says he had no idea that this. Was coming although John Kelly when he laid out the reasons for her firing, said that there were some some questions of integrity for her President, Trump questioning weather Bob Muller's investigation, will be dropped now. That the FBI has fired one of Muller's former investigators Peter Struck the answer is no answer is no probably and a big meeting today up in Seattle seatac airport officials airline officials that use that airport the TSA the FAA everybody got together to try to answer questions about how. This ground crew, guy was able to pilot a plane was. Able to take off and fly, around the Puget Sound. Area for about an hour and fifteen minutes before you eventually put that, thing into the, ground at Friday night Just a strange. Strange story Peter Vronsky is an, investigative historian teaches history at Ryerson university, in Toronto and his third book is out it's called sons, of Cain a history of serial killers from the stone age to. The present this, book catalogs seventeen thousand years of homicidal maniacs from Cain to Jack the ripper to the green. River killer it is exhaustive and he tried to find reasons behind. The atrocities he was taking a look at specifically what was behind the huge number of Ciller. Serial killers we had from nineteen fifty to two thousand and his hypothesis is that it was a broken generation of soldiers referred returning from World War Two that these were Traumatize fathers who had returned home from battlefields in Europe and the Pacific and that there was. This generation of murderous emotional cripples I think you're hypothesis is more accurate this was a time when we had all come together for the war. Effort and everybody was getting along, because we have this shared goal to, beat the Nazis and the whole bit galvanized against the greater, evil and you know women were going to work in the factories. And they're playing, baseball and the the roles changing we're all doing our part for the war effort and I. Think it did give the country a false sense of security and. When you have a false sense of security you're more likely to have criminals that take advantage. And you're more likely to become victimized in I would say though that that while we were galvanized while we were fighting for a common good that the nobody's Suffered. Fools I don't, know if that's the right way to put it but nobody would stand up for anything like. This and fewer people would perpetrate this I mean. The idea of boiling this down to just daddy issues is a strange. Way to put it but he does have some, compelling evidence this guy research serial killers and he talked about a dramatic rise in serial homicides. Starting from the seventies through the eighties and nineties and having been alive in most of the seventies and eighties nineties I should say all of the eighties and nineties I remember there being sort of a fascination and and the one. I remember most vividly was the night stalker even northern, California wasn't really a possibility, that we were under threat but I remember, people talking about painting their homes changing the, color of their homes because this night stalker guy. Was only going into yellow homes or something like. That I remember, that being very very top of mind subject and what this guy says is we've made. All sorts of theories about why that is why the seventies, eighties nineties were really the heyday for serial killers and awesome we associated with what. Was happening, in the United States increased violence of the sixties a new kind of hedonism in the seventies, and he said that he went back..

president John Kelly Peter Vronsky Bob Muller Cain Omarosa California Puget Sound United States FBI baseball White House Ryerson university Europe Seattle seatac Ciller Toronto FAA Pacific
"ryerson university" Discussed on And That's Why We Drink

And That's Why We Drink

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"ryerson university" Discussed on And That's Why We Drink

"So those dreams were dashed. So she started playing flute in the school band and according to her high school friend, Karen Kay ho who I mentioned, who later wrote this, this big expose on this whole story. According to Karen ho Jennifer's dad. Han was seen as quote, the classic tiger dad and BIC was his quote reluctant accomplice. So basically they monitor Jennifer's extracurriculars, extremely carefully. They forbade her from dating attending school dances, prom friends, parties, hanging out anywhere outside of school unless it was for an extracurricular for fear that it would distract from academic commitments. So when she graduated eighth grade and wasn't valedictorian and yeah, received no words, nothing. And it was just. Rocky road. It was unacceptable in her family. It was one of those things where her family was like, well, this is not who you are and she just felt like she couldn't live up to what was expected of her. So unfortunately, she started self harming a young girl because she felt so out of place in like she couldn't live up to what her family wanted, which is just really heartbreaking. She was like thirteen already hurting yourself. So in highschool, halfway through her freshman year high school, she was getting like straight C's and this was again not acceptable. In her family. So what she did was she would afford to report cards. She basically found a way to like old school way of getting the paper and then like white out and like copy, paste in the whole, the whole nine yards of like just fooling your parents into thinking you're getting as which I feel like is funny. Looking back with some families, like my mom like, oh, yeah, like lied to you out like this. Assign. But with this it was very much like it was a survival thing like she needed to prove to her parents who's getting as so a little bit darker. And so she was convincing her parents this whole time that she was fine. She was getting as her band practice was going great. So high school goes by her senior year high school. She's set to Ryerson university achieve actually received early admission, and our parents were like fine with it. They actually, they wanted her to go to university of Toronto to study pharmacology. Okay. But she got early admission to Ryerson and they were like, I guess we'll take it so they weren't thrilled, but they were fine with it. Unfortunately, senior gear, Jennifer failed calculus. So her early admission was rescinded, oh boy, and she couldn't bear to tell her parents. So she didn't tell them, nor did she tell anyone? Oh, so she just she just left to go to campus and then just never actually went into the buildings to just went to college without going to college. So as though nothing was. Is wrong. She basically told her parents, I'm starting school and when the school year began, she would go to her quote college classes. But instead she'd go sit in cafes, teach piano to kids to make some money and work as a server in a restaurant. She told her parents, she'd received scholarship so they didn't have to worry about the financial aspect. She even just say, I got scholarship. She forged documents saying that she got financial aid and scholarships from from the from the country or from state, and then that she got scholarships from the university itself, and instead of leaving it that Jennifer just kind of piled onto the lies. It almost like escalated just because she was so far in that she couldn't stop it. So like I said, her father had always dreamed that she'd go to pharmacology at the university of Toronto. So two years into her quote college career that this this entire time, she's not going to call her dad. One day goes. So whatever happened to like this plant OC told her dad. I'm going to Ryerson for two years because she wanted to please them. So she said, when she was originally admitted to arson, she's like, I'm only going for two years and then I'm going to transfer to university of Toronto to do pharmacology like you want. So two years into not actually being at Ryerson, her father asks, how's it going? What's the deal with like, are you gonna? Go transfer and she says, oh, yes. I've been accepted into university of Toronto's pharmacology program, and they were thrilled. And yeah, she us far is to purchase textbooks..

Karen ho Jennifer Ryerson Ryerson university Karen Kay university of Toronto Toronto BIC Han OC arson two years nine yards One day
"ryerson university" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"ryerson university" Discussed on TechStuff

"The two leads who i came up with the concept for hitch but were david harris smith and franca zeller and i'm probably an mispronouncing mrs ehlers heard it from franco kraken zeller it's a name that i am i was not familiar with totally new for making and they're out of port credit antero yes and smith is assistant professor at mcmaster university in the department of communication studies zeller is an assistant professor in the school of professional communication at ryerson university communications professors now this makes perfect sense because they're fishing for the way people interact with us they wanna find out exactly how people respond to this how irresponsive them this interaction is really really interesting for these people in particular i'm sure right and zeller she got her phd her thesis was on human robot interaction while this is it and they were joined by lot of other people i've just got a couple of names i'll i'll mention but the team itself is quite large you can actually read up on all of them on the websites funny because the way the website is written it's written from hitch butts perspective so hitch hitch bought saying oh this is the person who helped me learn how the talk it's very cute this is the person that takes care of my electric's yeah on a daily basis i think they're about fourteen or fifteen people on that team if it's a big team is largely not just the two to leads here right so you've got people like colin gada gauge or gadget who as developer of hitch bought and he's also at mcmaster university student he helped design and test hitch to make sure it would be able to withstand the various environments that it would encounter keep in mind this summer in canada so it wasn't going to have to deal with the canadian winter us love canadian summer yeah it's a little bit different from the atlanta summers get say slightly slightly less warm and humid about sixty.

mrs ehlers assistant professor mcmaster university developer canada david harris smith franca zeller ryerson university colin gada atlanta
"ryerson university" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"ryerson university" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"I am actually a lot on my iphone here a lot on my iphone from where i have apps so i go on the different apps of our different media and also well we receive paper at the heritage so i look at that but mainly through my phone and sometimes also through facebook and twitter so facebook is is what i want to talk to you about could cause at not long ago you announced that facebook is going to start working with ryerson university in toronto the brainstorming the future of news on facebook but then like last week facebook says it's going to put a bigger emphasis on on post from friends and family all we heard of the news was that they were going to stay away from sort of news content they were going to stay away from branded content unless it led to a greater discussion between friends a family i think we can both agree that probably means less news on her on our facebook platform how does the square with your efforts to make facebook the future of news i don't i'm not saying that facebook needs to be the maturity deal do you know what i'm asking uh yeah i get your point so for me it's what's the future of the new sector so there's two things we reinvested in our public broadcaster six hundred seventy five million dollars in the cbc in order to have much more local content what i am concerned about is the future of news in the country while there's so many newsrooms that have been cut in people losing their jobs and specially in you know look local news and so i i'm really looking forward to find solutions with the sector to make sure that a lot of the revenues they advertising revenues of digital platforms can be also having a positive impact on our new sector because it's it's it's i think that the digital platforms have a responsibility like i told you there's no free right.

iphone different media facebook ryerson university twitter toronto advertising revenues six hundred seventy five milli
"ryerson university" Discussed on 99% Invisible

99% Invisible

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"ryerson university" Discussed on 99% Invisible

"After graduation i took the radio and television arts course at ryerson university were excelled at reading weather reports on the student radio station cfr have onsite days i would call for rain on chile days i would call for warms i was a real barrel of stupid collegiate laps after my freshman year ryerson i got lucky and landed summer jobs away friday at a toronto recording studio call morgan earls house it was the lowest rung on the ladder might daily duties included vacuuming picking up my boss' drycleaning cataloguing takes an endlessly restocking midpriced wind for our clientele of attractive at agency creative department workers these are the beautiful people and now i was among the morgan ourselves specialized in making two things radio commercials and jingles on any given day i'd here amazing cortege of radio commercials with the voices of catherine o'hara eugene love heat brick miranda's john kennedy dav whom were household names gatt luke bakaa were paying you to say door val circle harland auto as to get through as the are to talk to the easy route number one take the metropolitan to the coq daily as exluton followed glee as to the winner's circle saarland auto at the door you want to get a male four easy route number to take the trans canada the sources full of a cell phone sources to highway 120 plane went through the winner's circle it's door valzer can you say that move your mouth move your up door rao gore rao were paying in the morning one or zargar there you're where you should leave with a vested general motors car sales answer parlor not always been there for years and per years they feel the art of that if you're thinking gm car look at the winner's circle are you having problems at home or something you can't read the script i mean it's right there in front door foul i've had enough of it really i mean alone leave your line all that you want.

ryerson university john kennedy dav luke bakaa rao gore rao car sales chile toronto trans canada general motors gm
"ryerson university" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"ryerson university" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"The results have been mixed in some studies unconscious racial bias on the test seems to predict how people will behave research has found for example that doctors who score high in implicit bias are less likely to prescribe clot busting heart drugs to black patients compared to white patients but other studies also looking a doctors in black and white patients find no correlation between results under by stessed an actual behavior this discrepancy bother psychologist feltet lock at the university of pennsylvania is a critic of the eia thi it's a task that is enormously intuitively appealing i mean i've never seen a psychological tests take off the way the id and has no end is gripped the popular imagination the where it has because it just seems on a surface to be measuring something like prejudice tat lock and other critics are concerned the just because someone shows bias on the eia t doesn't mean that they're going to act in biased ways in real life if a test cannot predict how you're going to act isn't it just an academic exercise there is the question of whether or not people who score as prejudiced on the it actually act discriminatory ways to word other human beings real world situations and if they don't if there is very costa zero relationship between those two things what exactly is the i t measure it turns out a lot this new evidence that suggests the ieti does in fact predict behavior but to see it you have to assume out you have to widen the lends to look beyond the individual and into the community hello my name is our cayman he's a psychology professor at ryerson university every cut interested in the i t as he was researching the use of lethal force and policing he was trying to design a statistical model that would predict where in the united states people of color are disproportionately likely to be shot and killed by police forced he needed some baseline data this proved hard since the federal government does not require police departments to report deadly shootings by officers really had no idea.

unconscious racial bias eia professor ryerson university united states federal government university of pennsylvania
"ryerson university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"ryerson university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And thoughts about game shows today whether you have been a contestant or just a faithful watcher share what you know on our facebook page tweet us at one a or email one a acts w eight m u dot org eric duggan's what's up with all the game show reboots this season it seems like veered just dipping back into the bag and say well what have we not produced in the last thirty years and remake yet what's going on you understand how television works very well run well part of it is these game shows a recognizable brands right i mean match game family feud hundred thousand dollar pyramid these are shows that have decades in decades a brand recognition with viewers and yet young viewers don't necessarily know them because they haven't been a new episodes for quite a while so it's an it's a chance to take a classic format and revamp it and reintroduce it to a new audience and hopefully what you do is you get a young people interested in the actual show and may be the host people like uh jamie foxx hosting beach zan or alec baldwin hotel hosting match game and the older people who remembered the the original show will shoot tune in the see house been revamp for their age and it makes a lot of sense especially in summer because as you pointed out a thing slow down a little bit on the broadcast networks especially and it's a way for them to do something that's cheap but mike arner some eyeballs and if they figure out that combination of host and format and brand it could actually be a pretty potent combination amy intracacies davis talk about the business case for game shows you know i i will readily admit i love game shows always have but i have to admit it seems a little weird to reboot you know the blockbuster is or password or so some of these older games what's the business case for game show well first of all i'm in your previous congregation and i'm trying to figure out what game too i can make called act can by host for back gentleman over at the station is too old to now i'm sorry go ahead an jared kushner house that show zidane well player now goodness um i am so happy that you love game.

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