18 Burst results for "Ryan Naylor"

"ryan naylor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:07 min | 2 weeks ago

"ryan naylor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's for 35 now. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. The election of Joe Biden means a change at the White House and a change in many policies. Let's take a look now at healthcare. Biden ran on the promise of a public option and more federal involvement in the Corona virus crisis that has engulfed the nation and here to talk us through what to expect as NPR's Selina Simmons stuff in. Hey, Selena. Hi, Elsa. Hi. So first, can you just give us sort of a big picture of you on how the Biden administration's approach to health and healthcare could be quite different from President Trump's Yeah, I think the main difference that animates a lot of Biden's policies is the belief that access to health care is a right and that the federal government has a role to play in ensuring people have access to that right. So his platform included ideas like expanding access to Medicare, giving people the option to enroll at age 60. Of course, Right now it's 65 creating a public option as you mentioned, which is a government run programs like Medicare that people of any age could buy into and expanding subsidies on the insurance exchanges to make premiums more affordable for more people and the belief that the federal government should be more involved, and more invested, shows up in his plans to address the pandemic as well, Right. OK, so those air his ID Is I mean, those are the ideas he ran on. But what might actually he'd be able to get done? Well, that's a really big question mark right now, and a lot depends on which party controls the Senate. I talked to Larry Levitt of the Kaiser Family Foundation about this and here's what he said Many parts of Biden's plan are likely dead in the water if Republicans keep control of the Senate. So if Republicans do maintain control, which won't be clear until January, because we have these two run offs in Georgia attention will turn to what Biden Khun do with executive actions and pointed out that Trump has kind of made a playbook. For this. He wasn't able to get any significant health legislation through Congress. So he was creative about using the power of the presidency to shape healthcare, for instance, promoting short term or skinny healthcare plans and limiting federal funding for reproductive health So Biden could use the same power to undo many of those things and promote his very different health care agenda. Okay, so how would that play out like? What's one way? Well, Think about Medicaid That is the public health program for 68 million low income people, pregnant women and Children. Djamila. Mitch Ner, a professor of government at Cornell University, says that he could see states coming to the Biden administration with new ideas about how to use Medicaid funding. To cover housing costs right because the notion is that housing is health. So using that funding to help people from being evicted and thinking about health outside of what happens in doctor's offices and hospitals, and another point missioner made is that the pandemic is clearly a really critical crisis right now and definitely the first order of business. But she says it would be savvy for the Biden administration to use the pandemic as sort of AH, vehicle for making forward progress with respect healthcare. For instance, by rebuilding public health and federal health agencies like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Okay, But before we get to any of the stuff that you're talking about, there is, of course. A big Supreme Court case being argued tomorrow about the fate of the affordable care act does. How might that case affect the bite an agenda? You think Right. The Supreme Court will hear arguments tomorrow that whether the, which is also known as Obamacare is constitutional. Because of the details of the case, there might be a kind of simple way that President elect Biden could work with Congress to get rid of or change. The specific part of the love of the court case is focused on which could make the case moot. And if that doesn't happen, and the court does overturn the it could be a big problem. Tens of millions of people might become uninsured during a pandemic, and it's hard to see how a country and government this sharply divided could come together and pass a whole new comprehensive health law to prevent the chaos from happening. If the court rules to overturn the That is NPR's Selina Simmons. Duffin. Thank you, Selina. Elsa. President elect Biden may have started thinking about how to implement new policies. But one thing he cannot do it. This point is moved into any government office space received government funding for the transition because a key if little known, Trump Administration official has yet to formally determine that Biden won the election, NPR's Brian Naylor reports. Under the 1963 law, the Presidential transition Act. It's up to the General Services Administration. The G s a to determine or ascertain the winner of the presidential election at least as far as starting the process of turning over the keys to the new administration goes, Robert McKee conserved as general counsel to the during the Reagan and George H. W. Bush administrations. He says the law is kind of vague about what this actually means. There's no legal standard contained within this act as to what constitutes You know the ascertainment. The essay issued a statement saying that the NSA administrator ascertain DS thie apparent successful candidate once a winner is clear, based on the process laid out in the Constitution. It cites the 2000 election, which George W. Bush was declared the winner over Al Gore. But that came only after a December Supreme Court ruling. Still, McChicken thinks he s a administrator, Emily Murphy Trump appointee has so far acted properly if I were in her shoes right now, given what has been No publicly made available. I think it would be premature. If you look at the 2000 situation with Bush first score. I don't believe the administrator of the TSA at that time made the determination until the results of Florida were finally certified. But Chris Lou, who was president Obama's transition director in 2008 says the process then was much different. This was not an issue at all in 2008. The election was called at about 11 PM on election night and within about two hours I received a letter from the administrator ascertaining that Senator Obama was the president elect. And I'm not aware that This is really ever been an issue in previous elections being ascertained as the winner means the president elect gets office space and each government agency to begin the transition process, along with computers and $9.9 million to begin hiring and support and well, the logistics are nice. David Marr Chick, who directs the nonpartisan Center for Presidential Transition, says there are important really world implications for a delayed transition. He points to the delay in the transfer. Into the George W. Bush administration after the Supreme Court ruling that slowed the process of the Bush administration getting their national security team in place. Eight months later, we had 9 11 when the 9 11 Commission did their autopsy on what went wrong. One of the things they pointed to was the slow pace of the Bush administration getting their national security team in place, and they said It impaired our ability to react more. Chick says Americans want the outgoing administration and the incoming one to collaborate on national security and issues such as getting a covert 19 vaccine distributed and that the sooner that collaboration starts the better for the nation. Ryan Naylor. NPR news Tomorrow.

Joe Biden Biden administration President NPR Supreme Court Selina Simmons George W. Bush Elsa Chang administrator federal government Congress General Services Administratio Selena Ari Shapiro President Trump Trump Administration
"ryan naylor" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:24 min | Last month

"ryan naylor" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Auntie 20. It's the last time voters will get a side by side comparison of the two candidates before Election Day. NPR's Sam Greene glasses more Tonight is just the second presidential debate Last week, The candidates participated in separate town halls at the same time, but tonight, Trump and Biden will be on the same stage again. The last time they met up, the debate was plagued by interruptions largely from the president. Even some Republicans felt like that performance hurt Trump with undecided voters. This time, organizers hope to exercise a bit more control. At the start of each segment on Ly, the candidate who has the floor will have his microphone open. Sandrine Glass NPR NEWS Washington Jamie Cockney Barrett is a step closer to the Supreme Court. NPR's Brian Naylor reports. The Senate Judiciary Committee approved her nomination this morning, sending it on to the full Senate. The 12 Republicans on the panel voted unanimously in favor of Barrett. But Democrats on the committee boycotted the proceeding, saying Barrettes nomination was being rushed through the Senate during an election that's already underway. Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, a South Carolina Republican, brushed aside the absence of Democrats. And ordered the vote to take place. Mr Chairman, the votes or 12 years. 10 no votes. The nomination will be reported favor believe to the floor with the unanimous vote Barrettes nomination now moves to the full Senate, which is scheduled to vote on Monday. If, as expected, she's approved, the court will have a 6 to 3 Conservative majority. Ryan Naylor. NPR News, an independent board that will review Facebook's decisions over what content it allows users to post is up and running. NPR Shannon Bond explains. The board is unlikely to weigh in on post related to the U. S presidential election, though Facebook's new oversight board can overrule the company's decisions over which post it takes down and which it allows to stay up on its platform. Two years after Facebook CEO first proposed the board, it now says it will begin accepting appeals from Facebook and Instagram users who think their posts were unfairly removed. It will also review cases referred by Facebook itself. The company must abide by the board's decisions. The board is expected to review on Ly a tiny fraction of the millions of appeals Facebook receives every year. The review process can take up to 90 days. Shannon Bond. NPR news, with both business and leisure travel down dramatically due to the Corona virus pandemic, the major airlines reporting increasingly deep pools of red ink. American Airlines announced a lost $2.4 billion in the third quarter, while Southwest posted a loss of 1.16 billion. Stocks closed higher today that Alba 152 points the NASDAQ Rose 21 points the S and P 500 rows 17 points. This's NPR. Goldman Sachs has agreed to pay a record fined for its role in a bribery scandal involving a Malaysian investment fund. NPR's gyms are Oli reports top executives will have to return some of their pay is part of the agreement. Goldman acknowledged that its executives violated federal law by paying bribes to foreign officials in order to get business. The deal was announced by the Justice Department. Goldman earned hefty profits for helping the one mdb fund raise more than $6 billion, much of which was then diverted by corrupt government officials in Malaysia. The scandal led to the downfall of the country's prime minister. Under the terms of the deal, Goldman will pay fines of nearly $3 billion. The company also said it would claw back $174 million in compensation for the former and current executives, who include CEO David Solomon and former chief executive Lloyd Blankfein. Jims AA roly NPR NEWS GOP officials are asking the U. S. Supreme Court to shorten a recently extended deadline in North Carolina for accepting absentee ballots postmarked by Election Day. State Republican leaders in the Trump campaign filing appeals in the case. The North Carolina State Board of Elections announced in late September. The absentee ballots could be accepted by counties till November 12 as long as they were mailed by election Day. Will change lengthen the period for accepting ballots from three days to nine. Cordel futures prices closed higher today. Oil up 61 cents a barrel ending the session and 40 64 barrel on the New York Mercantile.

NPR News Facebook Senate Goldman Trump Washington Jamie Cockney Barre Senate Judiciary Committee Shannon Bond Ly Mr Chairman Supreme Court Goldman Sachs North Carolina State Board of CEO Sam Greene Ryan Naylor
"ryan naylor" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:26 min | Last month

"ryan naylor" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Lakshmi Singh. The dramatic standoff in Congress over President Trump's Supreme Court nominee has taken another turn today, the Senate Judiciary Committee advance Judge Amy Cockney barrettes nomination of the full Senate for a vote without the Democrats. NPR's Brian Naylor. The 12. Republicans on the panel voted unanimously in favor of Barrett. But Democrats on the committee boycott of the proceeding, saying Barrettes nomination was being rushed through the Senate during an election that's already underway. Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, a South Carolina Republican, brushed aside the absence of Democrats and ordered the vote to take place Mr Chairman, the votes or 12 years. 10 no votes. The nomination will be reported favorably to the floor with a unanimous vote Barrettes nomination now moves to the full Senate, which is scheduled to vote on Monday. If, as expected, she's approved, the court will have a 6 to 3 Conservative majority. Ryan Naylor. NPR news Now the court scheduled to hear a case over the Affordable Care Act a week after the election. In an interview with CBS's 60 minutes, President Trump says He hopes the high court will strike down. The Trump has often said that his administration has a plan or is close to a plan to replace Obamacare. However, Trump has yet to formally release one The Republican is getting ready to face the Democratic Party's presidential nominee Joe Biden, tonight in Nashville for a second and final debate before the general election. NPR's Ron Elving says, advises air hoping Trump is less combative than he was last time. President, maybe more deferential, and he's going to have his Mike at least briefly muted for two minutes at the beginning of every segment, he may have to go a little further in order to be distracting to Biden. We'll see if he does that or not, but his advisers are hoping that he'll dial it back and be his best self on stage. NPR's Ron Elving. The Corona virus pandemic, including relief is expected to figure prominently in tonight's debate. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says congressional Democrats and the Trump administration are just about there on the next round of Corona virus relief funding. NPR's Windsor Johnston. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says she in Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin are serious about reaching an agreement if these talks did not have a purpose And if we were not making progress, I wouldn't spend five seconds in these conversations. And I say that in friendship to the secretary, why would I even be talking to you? And he says the same thing to me. The two sides are trying to narrow their differences on the next bill. As millions of Americans remain out of work during the pandemic, the main sticking points continues to be the size and scope of the measure. With Pelosi pushing for additional funding for state and local governments and an extension of extra weekly unemployment benefits. Windsor Johnston. NPR NEWS Washington The Dow is up 162 points. This is NPR. And support for NPR comes from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American People and the CMC Foundation, Working to improve postsecondary educational outcomes for underserved students through evidence based innovation. Learn more at the CMC foundation dot org's support comes from L. A Metro building three new subway stations in downtown L. A During the pandemic. They continue their work to create better transit for L, a county starting October. 30th second Street between Spring.

NPR President Trump House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Senate Senate Judiciary Committee Joe Biden President Windsor Johnston Lakshmi Singh Trump Supreme Court Ron Elving Brian Naylor Steven Mnuchin Judge Amy Cockney Ryan Naylor Chairman CMC Foundation Lindsey Graham
"ryan naylor" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:45 min | 2 months ago

"ryan naylor" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Dot or GQ. The New York Times Report on President Trump's tax returns plus a government that commission in Maryland is set to investigate a harrowing part of the state's history. Racial lynchings those stories, but first this news Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. Democrats wasted little time in responding to The New York Times report that President Donald Trump ages $750 in federal income taxes in 2016 and 2017 videos hundreds of millions of dollars to lenders. NPR's Brian Naylor. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says the report, in her words, is a sign of President Trump's disdain for America's working families. She told MSNBC that the president's debt also outlined in the story is a national security issue because he reportedly owes more than $300 million in loans to home. Different countries. What is the leverage they have? So for me, this is a national security question. Democratic nominee Joe Biden is campaign quickly jumped on the story, releasing an ad on social media where people can compare the amount they've paid in taxes to the President. Trump has called the story fake news but has not released any documents that could refute its key elements. Ryan Naylor. NPR News. Southern California Wine country continues to deal with wildfires, the latest coming a strong winds fan flames in the already scorched region, prompting evacuation. What's been dubbed the glass spy resulted in the evacuation of tens of thousands of people among the Barbara Stone and her husband, who took what they could as they were forced to flee their homes. We grabbed our devices and our chargers and our medicine in our paper and some cash. And just basics thinking that would hold us till we got back. But now I wish I'd taken more and I wish I'd taken pictures, which I did not the fire that erupted on Sunday. The Napa Sonoma area north of San Francisco, comes in the third anniversary of fires that broke out in 2017, including one that claimed the lives of 22 people. The family of a black man killed by a black police officer in Maryland in January, will receive a $20 million settlement. NPR show quarterly reports It's one of the country's largest publicized settlements in a case involving police violence. 43 year old William Green died after he was shot six times while he sat in a police car, his hands cuffed behind his back. The officer involved Corporal Michael Owen Jr has been charged with second degree murder. Prince George's County executive, Angela Alsobrooks announced the $20 million settlement, saying the county was at fault and accepted responsibility. We believe that the actions taken that night against.

President Trump president NPR News Brian Naylor NPR The New York Times Ryan Naylor Maryland Dot William Green Joe Biden House Speaker Nancy Pelosi officer Jack Spear Corporal Michael Owen Jr San Francisco Barbara Stone MSNBC
"ryan naylor" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:32 min | 2 months ago

"ryan naylor" Discussed on KCRW

"Presidential election. Now news Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. Democrats wasted little time in responding to The New York Times report that President Donald Trump ages $750 in federal income taxes in 2016 and 2017, and that he owes hundreds of millions of dollars to lenders. NPR's Brian Naylor. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says the report, in her words, is a sign of President Trump's disdain for America's working families. She told MSNBC that the president's debt also outlined in the story is a national security issue because he reportedly owes more than $300 million in loans to home. Different countries. What is the leverage they have? So for me, this is a national security question. Democratic nominee Joe Biden is campaign quickly jumped on the story, releasing an ad on social media where people can compare the amount they've paid in taxes to the President. Trump has called the story fake news but has not released any documents that could refute its key elements. Ryan Naylor. NPR News. Southern California Wine country continues to deal with wildfires, the latest coming a strong winds fan flames in the already scorched region, prompting evacuation. What's been dubbed. The glass spire resulted in the evacuation of tens of thousands of people among the Barbara Stone and her husband, who took what they could as they were forced to flee their homes. We grabbed our devices and our chargers and our medicine in our paper and some cash. And just basics thinking that would hold us till we got back. But now I wish I'd taken more and I wish you'd taken pictures, which I did not the fire that erupted on Sunday. The Napa Sonoma area north of San Francisco, comes in the third anniversary of fires that broke out in 2017, including one that claimed the lives of 22 people. The family of a black man killed by a black police officer in Maryland in January, will receive a $20 million settlement. NPR show quarterly reports It's one of the country's largest publicized settlements in a case involving police violence. 43 year old William Green died after he was shot six times while he sat in a police car, his hands cuffed behind his back. The officer involved Corporal Michael Owen Jr has been charged with second degree murder. Prince George's County executive, Angela Alsobrooks announced the $20 million settlement, saying the county was at fault and accepted responsibility. We believe that the actions taken that night against.

President Trump NPR News president NPR House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Jack Spear Ryan Naylor Brian Naylor Joe Biden officer William Green Corporal Michael Owen Jr San Francisco Barbara Stone MSNBC California second degree murder Prince George
"ryan naylor" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:48 min | 2 months ago

"ryan naylor" Discussed on KCRW

"Saying President Trump heads into his first debate tomorrow with his Democratic rival, former vice President Joe Biden, fending off allegations that as a wealthy businessman, he'd game the tax system and paid alarmingly little in federal taxes. Today. Trump staunchly defended himself, saying that, contrary to what The New York Times claimed in its explosive reporting of Trump's tax information he paid millions was entitled to tax breaks and that he is not facing a massive debt problem. Today. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said she believes Trump is much more vulnerable than he's letting on. If they have outstanding debt. That is an important factor because that means somebody else has leverage over them. This president Pierce Toe have over $400 million in debt for 20. Whatever it is Million dollars in debt. To home. Different countries. What is the leverage they have? So for me, this is a national security question. Speaker Pelosi in an interview with MSNBC shape the US Senate is expected to begin the confirmation process in the next two weeks for Judge Amy Cockney Barrett, who has been nominated to the U. S Supreme Court. NPR's Gloria Greece, Alice reports it For now. Republicans have the votes they need to move the nomination forward. The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Lindsey Graham, said the panel will begin its confirmation hearings on October 12th that will be followed by two days of questioning in the nomination could be reported out of committee within 10 Days on October 22nd. Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin, a member of the committee, says Democrats on Ly have a few options to delay the process. Here He is on a bee sees this week we can slow it down, perhaps a matter of hours, maybe days at the most. But you can't stop the outcome The full Senate could have about 10 days or so to approve the nomination before Election Day. Clotting CHRYSALIS NPR NEWS Washington A federal judge in Pennsylvania is blocking the US Postal Service for making changes that could affect mail in voting in the November election. NPR's Brian Naylor reports. It's the second such ruling in as many days. The court is ordering the Postal Service not to restrict over time or late trips by mail trucks prior to the November 3rd election. District Court Judge Gerald Accused ruling follows similar actions by three other federal judges in Washington, D C. Washington state and New York attorneys general from several Democratic led states filed suits to reverse actions taken by Postmaster General Lewis to joy that they say will delay Say the mailing and counting of ballots because of the Corona virus pandemic, a record number of voters are expected to cast their ballots by mail this year did Joy has said he's already put off making any changes in election male operations until after the election. Ryan Naylor. NPR news This is NPR. A curfew is being lifted in Louisville, Kentucky, side of recent unrest over a grand jury's decision not to charge officers with Briana Taylor shooting death in March. Today. Mayor Greg Fischer said he had decided to allow a curfew to expire early this morning in recent night's protests had turned violent, resulting in many arrests. Secretary of state. My Pompeo is in Greece. He's attempting to ease tensions between Greece and Turkey over maritime borders is the NATO allies explore offshore oil and gas? Joanna Kisses, has the latest from Athens. Pompeo is in the northern Greek city of Thessaloniki, where he and his Greek counterpart Ning Cause. Then Bia's declared that the conflict with Turkey should be resolved. Quote. Peacefully in accordance with international law. The dispute has prompted a military buildup in both Greece and Turkey in 1996 when the two nations almost went to war over an uninhabited I'll. Washington mediated this time, Germany is doing most of the negotiating, but the Greeks see Pompeo's visit his second here in less than a year, is a sign of support. Pompeo is said to travel tomorrow to the NATO naval base in Suda Bay on the Greek island of Crete. For NPR news. I'm Joanna Ka Kis ISS in Athens. Washington's reportedly signalling it may close. Its diplomatic mission in the Iraqi capital of insurgent violence continues this coming after a Recent series of attacks on US and other interests in the country. This news reported by The Associated Press and Reuters. This is NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include Raymond James Affirm focused on transforming lives, businesses and communities through tailored wealth management, banking and capital markets. Solutions. Learn more at Raymond James dot com. And Americans for the arts. I have no illusions that the road ahead of me will be easy, either for the short term or the long haul. I never imagined that I would find myself in this position. But now that I am I assure you that I will meet the challenge with both humility and courage. Judge Amy Cockney Barrett, speaking this weekend in the White House Rose Garden after President Trump officially named her as his pick to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court. Barrett is a dream pick for conservatives and seen widely as the successor to another lady, just Antonin Scalia. She quit for him, and he reportedly said.

NPR Trump Pompeo Judge Amy Cockney Barrett US Senate President Washington Greece Speaker Pelosi Turkey US Athens NATO Court Judge Gerald Accused Senate Judiciary Committee vice President Joe Biden
"ryan naylor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:43 min | 2 months ago

"ryan naylor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It one day at a time. I'm Lily Jamali those stories next time on the California report. Check it out. Tomorrow morning at 5, 51, 6 51 and 8 51 tonight attend. We'll have our forum rebroadcast with Michael Krasny pandemic restrictions, wildfires and the shift toward working from home. Have some local workers considering an exit from our region. Even as rents are falling for him. We'll discuss the trend of what it may mean for the regional housing market. The forum rebroadcast with Michel Crazy tonight at 10 o'clock. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm such a favour. Absentee ballots for the upcoming November election has already been mailed to voters in North Carolina, and voters in about two dozen more states can expect there's in the coming weeks. A record number of Americans are expected to cast their ballots by mail this year due to the pandemic. NPR's Brian Naylor reports on how the Postal Service is gearing up. Postmaster General Lewis to Joy pledge to senators last month that the agency he heads is in his words capable and committed to delivering the nation's election male fully and on time. Some 37% of American cited in a recent survey say they plan to cast their ballots by mail this year. Amber McReynolds, who directs the National voted Home Institute, says that shouldn't stretch the capacity of the Postal Service. They process over 400 million pieces of mail a day. There's not even half of that many voters in the country so even if every single voter requested a mail ballot That would essentially add a little bit of capacity. And that would all mean that that would have to be returned on one day, which we also know doesn't happen. The Postal Service has begun preparing for the election male influx. Ron Stroman, the former number two at the agency, says much of that preparation involves training postal workers isn't very intense Training regiment. To make sure that the employees were gonna handle elections. They'll understand all the processes that are required in all the practices that have been put into place so that they can officially who in process election. Bail practices, such as making sure all balance receive a postmark and are tagged to make sure they receive special attention. Upon becoming postmaster general de Joy instituted cost cutting changes at the agency decreeing that late arriving male be left behind rather than using additional trucks. In addition, some mail sorting equipment deemed surplus was removed from service. Stroman, who stepped down from the postal Service after D Joy took over says while there is enough capacity at most postal facilities to handle more mail, there could be some problems at specific locations where, for example, only a single sorting machine remains in place. You have no backup. And it may take hours. It could take days to fix that. And if that happens in the middle of election, what is the impact on the election Day Joy established an election male task force, which meant late last month. Among its members is Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson, who says she's concerned about actions taken in her state by the Postal Service. Including the removal of 26 mail sorting machines, the cages themselves and the messaging around that the crest coverage of it and all the controversy has created a scenario where there's confusion among voters about the reliability of what previously wass. A scene as a reliable way of voting this fall. Benson says she hopes the Postal Service will help restore voters faith in the reliability of their operations as the election approaches. Ryan Naylor. NPR news You either loved it or you loved to hate it. But after 20 seasons and 14 years, the reality TV show keeping up with the Kardashians will come to an end in 2021. If you are in the love to hate it Category, the show follows the lives of Kim Kardashian West, her mother, Kris Jenner, and an ever expanding cast of characters and its subjects. Became more famous and more well known as the show continued in a statement Kim Kardashian West posted to social media, she said, quote without keeping up with the Kardashians, I wouldn't be where I am today. Unquote. Well, we asked Julia Alexander of the verge to explain to us just where Kim Kardashian is today. Here's what keeping up with the Kardashians really did is led to a family monetizing themselves. They were the people that you were willing to watching. You wanted to watch, but then you are also buying their products. You were signing up for meet and greets, and the idea of what the Kardashians are able accomplish, was born out of this concept of Web 2.0 of blog's and the Tablet. Came from blood on the rise of social media. They were able to dominate that market and turned themselves into a product even more fuel in the show. The show just kind of acted as a vessel to get them toward. They are today. But what was it specifically about this family? Like, what was it about their relationships, their dynamics that kept sucking people in when the show first started, there was this beautiful sisterhood with them all, and I think what I really claim to what I really came to was no matter what was happening in this show. Early seasons. Kim and Kourtney and Khloe had each other and they always came back to each other in their mom. And that was what their life was, as the show progressed, and as they became more influential, as became bigger celebrities. The show became this really sorrowful, strange kind of connection of people that there was no choice but to kind of watch because their lives were so dramatic and so public and in many ways very sad and I feel like we were so tuned in to this family that we had this Para social relationship with which is a one way connection between us and then because we believe we knew who they were. Well, I am having trouble imagining the Kardashians suddenly disappearing after this show is over. So what do you think they're going to do next? The beauty of the Kardashians and this is what they inspired Entire culture of instrument. Looters and tic tac creators and even YouTubers to really understand is that they are in many ways bigger. In their name. Even they are individually if their own brand.

Postal Service Kardashians Kim Kardashian NPR Ron Stroman Jocelyn Benson Michael Krasny de Joy Lily Jamali Kim Kardashian West Elsa Chang Michel Crazy California Ryan Naylor North Carolina Brian Naylor
"ryan naylor" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

04:38 min | 10 months ago

"ryan naylor" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Shay Stevens the. US Senate has concluded its questioning of house managers and defense attorneys the impeachment trial of president trump. NPR's Ryan Naylor says the next step will be a vote on whether to call witnesses while the questioning has taken place inside the Senate Chamber. The big question outside is whether at the end of the week there will be fifty one votes to call for witness testimony. Something Democrats have been seeking but the Senate democratic mechanic leader Chuck Schumer of New York sounded pessimistic when he spoke to reporters during a break. It's an uphill fight are we. Is it more likely than not probably no but but is it a decent good chance yes four. Republicans would have to join with all Senate Democrats to vote in favor of calling witnesses. That vote is likely to come on Friday Friday. And if there aren't the votes for witnesses there could be an immediate vote on whether to acquit the President Brian Naylor. NPR News Washington. More than two hundred Americans Eric. And you're being tested at an air reserve base in southern California after arrived in promoting China. NPR's Richard Harris reports that the evacuees are undergoing screenings meanings for signs of corona virus. Group has been monitored frequently since their flight left China included a stop in Alaska. They're now being provided housing at the March Air Reserve base face in Riverside County California officials say they are not under official quarantine but people seem eager to sit tight for the next seventy two hours while the Centers for Disease Control and prevention contests them to see if anyone is infected with the corona virus. NPR's Richard Harris Toronto virus has sickened nearly eight thousand people in China including one hundred. It's seventy victims who died. The disease has also spread to at least fifteen other countries prompting the World Health Organization to consider whether to declare a global health emergency the. Who is set to hold an emergency meeting on the matter. Thursday the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released some new statistics indicating indicating that the average life span of an American has increased slightly for the first time in four years as NPR's RETU- Chatterjee reports. The improvement is driven in part by decline in deaths from drug overdoses. The new numbers show that life expectancy in two thousand eighteen was seventy eight point seven years about a month longer than in two thousand seventeen but it reverses a troubling trend to four years when the average lifespan had been declining driven largely by drug overdoses and suicides but in two thousand eighteen there was a full percent decrease in overdose deaths as the. CDC's Bob Anderson this is the first time The drug overdose deaths has declined in twenty eight years. The decline was in debts involving prescription opioids. Methadone and heroin but but debts from other drugs like fennel and cocaine continued to rise as debts by suicide RETU- Chatterjee this is. NPR News Senate. Republicans in Kansas have approved a constitutional amendment that's meant to ban most abortions in the state. They proposal is aimed at overturning. Twenty Nineteen State Supreme Court decision protecting abortion rights. The amendment is modeled after a change Tennessee. Voters approved in their constitution in two thousand fourteen. The measure now goes to the Kansas House. The French sporting world is facing me too movement with female athletes coming forward with accusations of sexual assault. The cover of French sports newspaper keep reads end of silence. The story from NPR's Eleanor Beardsley in Paris. Leaky has published a special Investigative issue full of testimony from tennis players swimmers than Ice Skaters about the abuse suffered at the hands of their coaches. One of the most prominent victims is ten time. French figure figure Skating Champions Sarah Abbott Bowl. She says her coach began raping her in Nineteen Ninety when she was only fifteen. I beat bold described a whole ecosystem system of silence. That protects the abuser in an editorial that keeps editor said after sexual abuse revelations in the Catholic Church and Metoo rocking the literature richer and cinema world. It's quote time for fear to change sides in the sporting world to eleanor beardsley. NPR News Paris to aspiring actresses in the US testified at Harvey Weinstein Sexual Assault Trial Wednesday. One windass told the jury that Weinstein raped her at his apartment in two thousand five during what she thought might be an audition. Another another woman said the defendant fondled her doing twenty four two thousand four meeting Weinstein Denies All nine consensual sexual encounters. This is N._p._R...

NPR Senate RETU- Chatterjee CDC China Washington Harvey Weinstein president Senate Chamber Richard Harris assault Eleanor Beardsley Chuck Schumer Shay Stevens drug overdose Ryan Naylor windass World Health Organization
"ryan naylor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"ryan naylor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Live from NPR news. In Washington, I'm Shay Stevens. President Trump says he pulled back on plans for retaliatory US military strikes on Iranian targets Thursday, because of the likelihood of collateral damage as NPR's Ryan Naylor reports. Trump says he didn't like the idea of killing Ronnie's for the downing of an unmanned US aircraft. The interview with NBC Trump said he stopped the airstrikes before any planes where in the air, he said he acted after asking military leaders, how many people might die in the operation. He said they told him a hundred and fifty here we are sitting with one hundred fifty dead people that would have taken place, probably within a half an hour after I said, go ahead. And I didn't like it. I didn't think it was I didn't think it was proportionate Trump had earlier tweeted that he's in. No hurry to respond to the attack on the drone the US alleges the aircraft was shot down over international waters. But Iran says the drone was in its airspace. Brian Naylor, NPR news. Washington. Acting ice director, Mark Morgan is defending the Trump administration's plan to begin immigration rates around the country this weekend. Morgenthau's NPR's, John Burnett, that the thousands of families being targeted already received deportation orders. The history has shown they do not. So what, what are options they had due process, they, they had access to attorneys have had access to interpreters majority of them. Don't even show up. We have no choice. It's about the rule of law. Morgan says he rejects any notion that ISIS abusive and doesn't care about immigrant families. He says the agency is in interested in maintaining the integrity of the nation. Immigration system. The governor of Texas Greg Abbott says he sending a thousand Texas national guard troops to the state's border with Mexico. Ashley Lopez of member station. K UT Austin reports that Abbas says estate is experiencing an escalating crisis at the border and that congress is refusing to fix it says he's sending national guard troops to assist customs and border patrol officials. The troops will be stationed at holding facilities for adults travelling without children, as well as ports of entry Abbott says the state has been forced to intervene as the situation at the country, southern border worsens, all of these actions are necessary because congress has failed to do this job and leaves states, like Texas fending for themselves. Avid, says that in the past three weeks alone more than forty five thousand people have been apprehended at the state's border with Mexico for NPR news. I'm actually Lopez in Austin, newish home sales jumped two and a half percent during the month of may is lower interest rates. Appear to help buyers overcome challenges affording a mortgage. The national association of realtors says existing home sales at a seasonal sold at a seasonally adjusted rate of five point three million last month. This is NPR news. That of Oregon Senate has ordered the state capital closed on Saturday because of what he called a possible, militia threat. The move came after group supporting Republican lawmakers posted messages of support on social media. Governor Kate Brown had dispatched state police around GOP, senators, left, the capital, Thursday to block vote on climate change legislation under Oregon law. The lawmakers will be fine five hundred dollars a day for each day. They don't show up to allow vote. Thousands of students from across Europe gathered in a west German city of Aachen Friday to protest the country's reliance on fossil fuels from Berlin on enor- sketch reports that a western coal mine is become a flash point for European climate activists urging the European Union to do more to reduce carbon emissions, the coal mine in the western state of North Rhine-Westphalia is one of the country's largest and as a key source of lignite dirty coal, which Germany, so heavily relies situated only miles away from the borders of Belgium, and the Netherlands, the mind have previously become the focus of environmental protests. After operator are w e plan to cut down a nearby forest on Friday. An estimated twenty thousand campaigners from sixteen countries including some of Germany's most famous social media stars descended on the nearby city of often called on Angola Merkel's government to speed up the transition to clean energy for the protests are expected throughout the weekend, and a large number Felise officers have been deployed for NPR news. I'm. On our scavenging bolan Wall Street stocks at the week on download the Dow Jones industrials lost thirty four points. This is NPR news. Support for NPR from NPR stations. Other contributors include.

US President Trump NPR Mark Morgan Washington Ashley Lopez Texas Austin Greg Abbott Trump administration Mexico Ryan Naylor Shay Stevens Brian Naylor Iran national association of realto Governor Kate Brown NBC
"ryan naylor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"ryan naylor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Who's covering this story next waking the witch is the new book by author and podcast host Pam Grossman to talk with Pam about what it means to be a practicing witch and twenty nineteen and white, powerful magical women have captured our cultures imagination and Charlie Herman joins us again this week to tells about some things, do and see this weekend today, we'll be joined by make music New York's James Burke for special solstice addition of Charlie for the culture, we will get all of it. I'm Alison Stewart, and I will meet you on the other side of the news. Live from NPR news. In Washington, I'm Shay Stevens. President Trump says he pulled back on plans for retaliatory US military strikes on Iranian targets Thursday, because of the likelihood of collateral damage as NPR's Ryan Naylor reports. Trump says he didn't like the idea of killing Ronnie ins for the downing of an unmanned US aircraft and interview with NBC Trump said he stopped the air strikes before any planes were in the air. He said he acted after as military leaders, how many people might die in the operation, he said they told him one hundred fifty hill, we are sitting with a hundred and fifty dead people that would have taken place, probably within a half an hour after I said, go ahead. And I didn't like it. I didn't think it was I didn't think it was proportionate Trump had earlier tweeted that he's in. No hurry to respond to the attack on the drone the US alleges the aircraft was shot down over international waters. But Iran says the drone was in its airspace. Brian Naylor, NPR news. Washington acting ice director, Mark Morgan is defending the Trump administration's plan to begin immigration rates around the country this weekend, Morgan tells NPR's, John Burnett, that the foul kinds of families being targeted of already received deportation orders. The history has shown they do not. So what, what are options, they had due process? They they've had access to attorneys have had access to interpreters majority of them. Don't even show up. We have no choice. It's about the rule of law. Morgan says he rejects any notion that ISIS abusive and doesn't care about immigrant families. He says the agency is in interested in maintaining the integrity of the nation. Immigration system. The governor of Texas Greg Abbott says he sending a thousand Texas national guard troops to the state's border with Mexico. Ashley Lopez of member station. K UT in Austin reports that Abbas says estate is experiencing an escalating crisis at the border, and that congress is refusing to fix it says he's sending national guard troops to assist customs and border patrol officials. The troops will be stationed at holding facilities for adults travelling without children, as well as ports of entry Abbott says the state has been forced to intervene as the situation at the country, southern border worsens, all of these actions are necessary because congress has failed to do his job and leaves states, like Texas fending for themselves. Avid, says that in the past three weeks alone more than forty five thousand people have been apprehended at the state's border with Mexico for NPR news. I'm actually Lopez in Austin, new home sales jumped two and a half percent during the month of may is lower interest rates. Appear to help buyers overcome challenges affording a mortgage. The national association of realtors says existing home sales at a seasonal sold at a seasonally adjusted rate of five point three million last month. This is NPR news. The head of Oregon said it has ordered the state capital closed on Saturday because of what he called a possible, militia threat. The move came after group supporting Republican lawmakers posted messages of support on social media. Governor Kate Brown had dispatched eight police to round-up GOP senators left, the capital, Thursday to block a vote on climate change legislation under Oregon law. The law makers will be fine five hundred dollars a day for each day. They don't show up to allow vote. Thousands of students from across Europe gathered in a west German city of Aachen Friday to protest the country's reliance on fossil fuels from Berlin on enor- skits reports that a west German coal mine has become a flash point for European climate activists urging the European Union to do more to reduce carbon emissions, the coal mine in the western state of North Rhine-Westphalia is one of the country's largest and as a key source of lignite dirty coal, which Germany, so heavily relies situated only miles away from the borders of Belgium, and the Netherlands, the mine have previously become the focus of environmental protests after operator are w e plan to cut down a nearby forest on Friday and estimated twenty thousand campaigners from six in countries, including some of Germany's most famous social media stars descended on the nearby city of often called on Angela Merkel's government to speed up the transition to clean energy for the protests are expected throughout the weekend, and the large number police officers have been deployed for NPR news. I'm. On our scavenge in Berlin. Wall Street stocks ended the week on down moat, the Dow Jones industrials lost thirty four points. This is NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the Andrew, w Mellon foundation guided by the belief that the arts and humanities are essential to the well-being of diverse democratic societies. Learn more at Mellon dot org, and the Annie E Casey foundation. Welcome back, all.

NPR President Trump US Mark Morgan Washington Texas Ashley Lopez Greg Abbott Oregon Alison Stewart Mexico Charlie Herman Pam Grossman Trump administration James Burke Ryan Naylor Shay Stevens
"ryan naylor" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"ryan naylor" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from frame bridge. They make custom framing easy and affordable frame year. Art in photos at frame bridge dot com or visit their new stores located on fourteenth street and Bethesda row. Get fifteen percent off your first frame bridge. Order with code NPR. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Janine Herbst. The Pentagon is disputing a series of claims made by Iran about its donning yesterday of a military drone above the straight of Hormuz NPR's David welna reports in a statement tonight, they also conclude are included corrected map of what the Pentagon says was the flight path in what's becoming something of a war of words. US central command spokesman disputes, Iran's claim that an American spy plane with thirty five people aboard was flying near the down drone, and that it too could have been shot down for invading Iranian airspace. The spokesman says American aircraft never left, the international airspace, about the straight of Hormuz and noted that the spy. Plan can only carry a maximum of twenty eight people. He says the US failed to find any debris from the down drone because it was scattered widely amid high winds and heavy seas NPR's David welna. This supreme court is throwing out the murder conviction of a Mississippi man who didn't get a fair trial when the state blocked potential. Jurors from hearing, the case NPR's Ryan Naylor says the high court also struck down his death sentence. The men Curtis flowers is an African American who was tried six times for the murder of four people in a furniture store in each trial. The prosecutor in the case trying to block African American jurors from serving all told he's truck forty one out of forty two possible African American jurors Justice. Brad Kavanagh wrote the majority opinion saying quote the numbers, speak loudly justices and Gorsuch, descended. Thomas writing that lawyers for flowers. Presented no evidence whatsoever of purposeful race discrimination, by the state flowers is currently on death. Throw. It's possible Mississippi could try him a seventh time. Brian Naylor, NPR news Washington Spain's supreme court sentenced five men fifteen years in prison for raping an eighteen year old woman. It took place during the country's famous running of the bulls festival in two thousand sixteen the men call themselves the Wolfpack and filmed the attack on their cell phones. Lucia Benedetti's has the latest to lower courts head initially sentenced the men to nine years in jail for the lesser crime of sexual abuse. That verdict sparked outrage among women's rights groups in Spain prompting its own metoo movement, and a review of Spain's rape loss. Prosecutors had called on Spain's highest court to upgrade the conviction to rape. The defendants had also appealed, the ruling saying they were not guilty because the victim had consented on Friday, the judges ruled the attack could be classified as rape, which was aggravated by being committed in. Group for NPR news. I'm Lucia been visas in Barcelona, Wall Street, lower by the closing bell. The Dow down thirty four points at twenty six thousand seven hundred nineteen the NASDAQ down nineteen points at eight thirty one the s&p five hundred down three points at twenty nine fifty. This is NPR news. The Trump administration is going ahead with plans to deport Iraqi nationals who they say, face persecution and death of return to that country serve Swick from Michigan radio has more. These Araki's are part of a court case that challenged their plan, deportations many have criminal records and standing deportation orders. But they say a rock is too dangerous to return to, they won temporary victories. But lost their case on appeal. Now, it appears the government is aggressively moving to deport them attorney, Sean to drive a represents twenty Iraqis from the case three now face deportation in the next week, it's like a death sentence to be sent back there and the US government knows it, many of the Iraqis are the Christians, they say they face likely persecution, torture, and death in Iraq for NPR news. I'm Sarah Swick in Detroit. California. Governor Gavin Newsom says he will give financial help to the state's major utilities that are dealing with results of destructive wildfires but only they agreed tie executive compensation to safety performance. The proposal unveiled today is meant to stabilize California investor on utilities, and protect wildfire victims PG, the largest of the three investor owned utilities filed for bankruptcy in January and faces the possibility of billions of dollars in costs related to fires blamed on their downed power lines. Crude oil prices higher by the closing bell gaining thirty six cents and the day at fifty seven dollars. Forty three cents a barrel, on the New York Mercantile Exchange. I'm Jeanine Herbst. And you're listening to NPR news from Washington.

NPR US Spain Lucia Benedetti rape Jeanine Herbst frame bridge Ryan Naylor Sarah Swick Mississippi Washington murder David welna Hormuz prosecutor Iran Governor Gavin Newsom Pentagon California
"ryan naylor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"ryan naylor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And off. We ask our reporters in Berlin Baghdad and Jerusalem, how it's playing in those cities, also we'll Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell, hold the line against democratic demands for bills to protect US elections. I need our Republican colleagues to stand up into say there's something bigger than this partisan politics. And that is protecting our democracy and should cops. Enjoy the same free speech rights as the rest of us. Police officers don't give up their first amendment, right? By the mere fact that they're police officers. Those stories coming up after the news headlines. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Janine Herbst. The Pentagon is disputing a series of claims made by Iran about its donning yesterday of a military drone above the straight of Hormuz NPR's, David welna reports, and the statement tonight, they also conclude are included corrected map of what the Pentagon says was the flight path in what's becoming something of a war of words. US central command spokesman disputes, Iran's claim that an American spy plane with thirty five people aboard was flying near the down grown and that it too could have been shot down for invading Iranian airspace. The spokesman says American aircraft never left, the international airspace, about the straight of Hormuz and noted that the spy plan can only carry a maximum of twenty eight people. He says the US failed to find any debris from the downed drone because it was scattered widely amid high winds and heavy seas NPR's David welna. This frame court is throwing out the murder conviction of Mississippi man who didn't get a fair trial when the. Estate locked potential. Jurors from hearing, the case NPR's Ryan Naylor says the high court also struck down his death sentence. The man Curtis flowers, is an African American who was tried six times for the murder of four people in a furniture store in each trial. The prosecutor in the case trying to block African American jurors from serving all told he struck forty one out of forty two possible African American jurors Justice. Brad Kavanagh wrote the majority opinion saying, quote, the numbers speak. Loudly, justices Thomas, and Gorsuch, descended. Thomas writing that lawyers for flowers. Presented no evidence whatsoever of purposeful race discrimination, by the state flowers is currently on death row. It's possible Mississippi could try him a seventh time. Brian Naylor, NPR news Washington stains supreme court sentenced five men, fifteen years in prison for raping an eighteen year old woman. It took place during the country's famous running of the bulls festival in two thousand sixteen. The men. Call themselves the wolf pack and filmed the attack on their cell phones. The Nevada has the latest to lower courts had initially sentenced the men to nine years in jail for the lesser crime of sexual abuse. That verdict sparked outrage among women's rights groups in Spain prompting its own metoo movement, and a review of Spain's rape loss. Prosecutors had called on Spain's highest court to upgrade the conviction to rape. The defendants had also appealed, the ruling saying they were not guilty because the victim had consented on Friday, the judges ruled the attack could be classified as rape, which was aggravated by being committed in a group for NPR news..

NPR Curtis flowers US rape Spain Mississippi David welna prosecutor murder Hormuz Washington Mitch McConnell Iran Pentagon Brian Naylor Senate Brad Kavanagh Ryan Naylor
Trump grounds 737 Max 8 jets

All Things Considered

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Trump grounds 737 Max 8 jets

"The US has now joining other countries in grounding, all Boeing seven thirty-seven max jets after two deadly crashes in recent months NPR's Ryan Naylor has more on President Trump's announcement today. Speaking in the Oval Office, Trump said new information and evidence recovered from the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines seven thirty seven max Sunday led to the decision to ground the plane in the US any played currently in the air. We'll go to its destination and thereafter, be grounded until further notice so planes that are in the air will be grounded Trump said he spoke with transportation secretary, Elaine Chao, the acting FAA administrator and the CEO of Boeing who he said all agreed with the action. Most other nations had already grounded the seven thirty seven max following two fatal crashes of the jet. The groundings will affect several US airlines including south west American and

President Trump United States Ethiopian Airlines Ryan Naylor Elaine Chao NPR Ceo Of Boeing Oval Office FAA Secretary Administrator
"ryan naylor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"ryan naylor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Episode hardwired first this news. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Janine Herbst. The US has now joining other countries in grounding, all Boeing seven thirty-seven max jets after two deadly crashes in recent months NPR's Ryan Naylor has more on President Trump's announcement today. Speaking in the Oval Office, Trump said new information and evidence recovered from the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines seven max Sunday led to the decision to ground the plane in the US any played currently in the air. We'll go to its destination and thereafter, be grounded until further notice so planes that are in the air will be grounded Trump said he spoke with transportation secretary, Elaine Chao, the acting FAA administrator and the CEO of Boeing who he said all agreed with the action. Most other nations had already grounded the seven thirty seven max following two fatal crashes of the jet. The groundings will affect several US airlines including southwest American and United. Brian naylor. NPR news, Washington UK's parliament has voted against leaving the European Union without a deal NPR's. Frank Langfitt has more from London. The tally was three twenty one to two seventy eight. It was a nonbinding vote. But makes it highly unlikely the UK would leave without a deal on the exit date, March twenty ninth most British lawmakers oppose walking away from the ease huge single market without any arrangement because the economic damage it would cause UK businesses have warned repeatedly of the impact of new tariffs and customs checks suddenly being imposed after decades of frictional trade. You k is even said that in a no deal. Brexit would not impose tariffs on goods coming from Ireland into Northern Ireland to avoid hard border. Their parliaments next vote comes Thursday when lawmakers will decide on whether to postpone Brexit had motion is also expected to pass if it does the UK would then go to the U and request an extension. Frank Langfitt, NPR news, London. Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort was. Sentenced to an additional three and a half years in prison today for total of roughly seven years for conspiracy misleading the government over his foreign lobbying work and encouraging witnesses to lie after today's sentencing. An indictment was unsealed in New York charging him with state crimes including mortgage fraud. Republican Senator Lindsey Graham says the courts made the right call..

NPR President Trump US UK Frank Langfitt Trump Janine Herbst London Senator Lindsey Graham Brexit Brian naylor Ethiopian Airlines Washington Paul Manafort Elaine Chao Ryan Naylor New York CEO of Boeing Oval Office
"ryan naylor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"ryan naylor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In the public interest ninety three point nine FM and AM eight twenty NPR news and the New York conversation. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Janine Herbst. The house is expected to take up legislation today that would fully fund the Internal Revenue Service for the rest of the fiscal year. The IRS is one of the agencies that's been closed during the partial government shutdown NPR's. Brian Naylor reports the White House now says tax refunds will continue to go out during the shutdown. It was uncertain how soon people expecting refunds would be getting them during this partial government shutdown, but the White House says those checks will go out, even if the shutdown drags on an official telling reporters that the Trump administration wants to make the shutdown as painless as possible, it's not clear, hominy employees will be called back to work. Some seventy thousand have been furloughed during the shutdown NPR's Ryan Naylor, Amazon is taking its turn at the top and furious. Giles Snyder reports the ecommerce leader. Is now the world's most valuable publicly traded company. Amazon overtook another tech giant Microsoft to claim the top spot. Amazon shares in Monday trading rose, three percent to close at more than sixteen hundred twenty nine dollars a share it gives it a market value of more than seven hundred ninety six billion surpassing Microsoft, which took the most valuable title from apple back in late November. This is the first time Amazon is finished at the top NPR's. Joel Snyder reporting you're listening to NPR news from Washington. This is WNYC from New York. I'm Richard Hake. A new report finds medical staff at city jails are reporting many more serious inmate injuries. Then the department of correction itself WNYC's Cindy Rodriguez has the details. The discrepancy was especially dramatic in two thousand seventeen when medical staff documented eight hundred sixteen serious injuries while correction staff documented one hundred and fifty eight Dr Venter's a former chief medical officer at city, Jay. Sales says the medical staff used sophisticated electronic records while correction staff use paper and pen what that means is that a person who has injured is less likely for the severity or even the occurrence of their injury to be properly. Documented department of corrections says moving forward the two sides will reconcile their data on a monthly basis. Former New Jersey Governor Jim mcgreevy was unceremoniously ousted from his job as the head of a Jersey City nonprofit yesterday in what he's described as an act of political retaliation by mayor Steve Fulop WNYC's Quin HOGAN reports for the last five years, but grevious headed jersey city's employment and training program. It's a nonprofit that gets federal in city funds to provide job training and services to address populations. Mcgreevy says his firing is political retaliation from Jersey City mayor Steve Fulop who appoints the nonprofits board retaliatory, and I can tell. For the people's lives will be measurably impacted mcgreevy was hired by full up in twenty thirteen and served as a political mentor of sorts for the young mayor mcgreevy says the relationship soured after he fired one of the mayor's patronage hires for taking cash payments from program participants but mcgreevy isn't going down without a fight. He used his unique status as former governor to summon dozens of his supporters to Monday's board meeting where he expected to get the axe. After more than an hour of testimony from his supporters board members voted five to three to fire mcgreevy without comment. Vice chairman, Robert Knapp, a holdover from the previous administration was one of the three dissenting votes. But I've never seen the tentacles of politics, so deeply entrenched after the meeting board chair Sudan Thomas who is now leading the program on an interim basis spoke to reporters he disputed McCreevy's claims of political retaliation. This is just one more sub smokescreen among the many that has been put in front of us. The mayor has nothing to do with this. He doesn't give instructions, and if he did, you know that I won't listen to Thomas says mcgreevy has been focusing his efforts on job placement for the formerly incarcerated through a statewide nonprofit. He also runs while leading jersey city's program fall by the wayside mayor. Phillips office denies a hand in the former governors firing mcgreevy says he plans to fight the decision when HOGAN WNYC news support for NPR comes.

Governor Jim mcgreevy NPR Amazon WNYC Jersey City New York Washington IRS New Jersey Steve Fulop Janine Herbst White House Brian Naylor Giles Snyder Microsoft Internal Revenue Service Ryan Naylor
"ryan naylor" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"ryan naylor" Discussed on KCRW

"E grant and best adapted screenplay awards eligible in all categories. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Janine Herbst. The house is expected to take up legislation today that would fully fund the Internal Revenue Service for the rest of the fiscal year. The IRS is one of the agencies that's been closed during the partial government shutdown NPR's. Brian Naylor reports the White House now says tax refunds will continue to go out during the shutdown. It was uncertain how soon people expecting refunds would be getting them during this partial government shutdown, but the White House says those checks will go out, even if the shutdown drags on an official telling reporters that the Trump administration wants to make the shutdown as painless as possible, it's not clear how many IRS employee's will be called back to work some seventy thousand have been furloughed during the shutdown NPR's Ryan Naylor, Amazon is taking its turn at the top and furious. Charles Snyder reports the ecommerce leader is now the world's most valuable publicly traded company. Yeah. Massana overtook another tech giant Microsoft acclaimed, the top spot Amazon shares in Monday trading rose, three percent to close at more than sixteen hundred twenty nine dollars a share that gives it a market value of more than seven hundred ninety six billion surpassing Microsoft, which took the most valuable title from apple back in late November. This is the first time Amazon is finished at the top NPR's. Joel Snyder reporting you're listening to NPR news from Washington. One of two girls in Wisconsin who tried to kill a friend, please an online horror character called slender man, subpoenaing her conviction as my in silver of member station. W W N ima walkie reports the girls attorneys argue she shouldn't have been prosecuted in adult court. It's been nearly five years since Morgan geyser and another twelve year old stabbed a classmate nineteen times and left her for dead in a wooded park. The victim who is also in sixth grade managed to crawl out of the park and survive geyser was found not guilty of attempted first degree intentional homicide by reason of mental disease and was ordered committed for forty years, but geysers attorney is now appealing. He says guys are genuinely believed that the stabbing would protect your family from slender man under Wisconsin law. That's known as a claim of imperfect self defense. He says that would have dropped the charge to an attempted second degree intentional. And by statute, the case would have had to have been. Handled in juvenile court for NPR news. I'm my aunt silver in Milwaukee. Robots are a hot item at the Consumer Electronics Show getting underway today in Las Vegas, one robot serves as a personal Butler, it's called teeny. Following you around the house, another is a fluffy automated, Pat, and then the travelers helper the oversized suitcase that volleys you around at airports. Other new releases include an AK TV, I'm Janine Herbst. NPR news in Washington, and I'm Cheri Glazer. And you are listening to KCRW already number of trouble spots out on the freeways this morning. Starting out.

NPR Janine Herbst Washington Amazon Morgan geyser IRS Wisconsin White House Charles Snyder Brian Naylor Microsoft Internal Revenue Service Joel Snyder Ryan Naylor Cheri Glazer KCRW Massana
"ryan naylor" Discussed on BiggerPockets

BiggerPockets

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"ryan naylor" Discussed on BiggerPockets

"I selling half my portfolio this year it's actually my love it we'll see and yeah i would say that my belief is i have a job i love and i'm very happy doing this and so i am not looking to as aggressively as possible take on as much work as possible outside of that too dull passive cash flow rate what you call passive cashflow right instead i can buy one passage it's always quote unquote passive instead ripping his hair out about the latest drama and his forty thousand dollar house that is the is that if they but let's say you know i can buy one property a year stabilize it and have a nice investment them don't have to really worry about too much throughout the rest of the year save up my cash through my my career in what i'm doing when i you know the other cash with my properties and just by awards your property instead of more properties each year and that's how else can my portfolio sensor it makes it shows that does different what's the the phrase different strokes different villainous so all right next question of this one's will do this when a how i went this was your host how it went from new england high went from zero dollars net worth while qualified for a million dollars a real estate financing in two and a half years which by the way guy them all on the forms ryan naylor said this quote probably one of the best articles i've ever read on yeah articles on amazing if you have not ready to go to the show notes bigger pockets accomplish show to twenty three and read it unbelievable.

new england ryan naylor cash flow real estate forty thousand dollar million dollars zero dollars
"ryan naylor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"ryan naylor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Plus more coming up on form we'll bring that to you from nine to eleven today here on weedy where it's no eight nineteen from npr news in washington i'm lacks me saying the trump administration is lifting the federal hiring freeze of the president imposed shortly after he took office that in peers ryan naylor reports there are conditions federal agencies will have to comply with trump's budget priorities which likely means there will be more hiring by the va book not the epa trump's hiring freeze was never exactly across the board because he didn't include military personnel who make up more than a third of the federal workforce the associated press reports a firm headed by president trump's former campaign chairman paul manafort receive more than a million dollars in payments citing documents adjusted the ap reports of payments match a ledger that ukrainian investigator said reflected off the books payments from a pro russian political party manafort has maintained that any payments his company received through what wire transfer were legitimate the president of china is reaffirm ing pledge that he made to the trump white house to help de escalate the nuclear threat posed by north korea that's china's allied and piers anthony keen reports from beijing president trump called his chinese counterpart last night president xi jinping offered to coordinate with the us on the north korea issue but he apparently did not say china would pressure north korea any harder to give up its nukes president trump meanwhile tweeted that he'd give china a better trade deal if it helped with north korea that would be a reversal of his tough talk about china on the campaign trail this is npr unease eight.

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