35 Burst results for "Ryan Lucas"

"ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:07 min | Last month

"ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Live from NPR news. I'm Janine Herbst. President Biden attends a NATO summit Monday as part of a series of multilateral meetings with one overriding message. America's back. As NPR's Tamara Keith reports over the weekend. At the G seven meeting, the world's leading a economies agreed to donate a billion covid vaccine doses. President Biden came into the G seven with a big pledge aimed at pushing allies to do the same. The U. S will donate 500 million Pfizer vaccine doses to the world's poorest nations starting later this year. Coming out of the G seven meeting in corn, while the other six nations agreed to donating another half a billion doses in a way. This is the world's largest democracies, teaming up to counter the influence of Russia and China who have been aggressively distributing vaccines they developed. At the NATO summit. The White House says President Biden will affirm America's commitment to the transatlantic security and defense coalition. Former President Trump while never pulling out of NATO openly trashed its value to the US Tamara Keith NPR news The Justice Department secretly subpoenaed Apple in 2018 for account information of then White House counsel Don McGahn as NPR's Ryan Lucas reports. McGann's wife's account information was also subpoenaed. Apple informed Don McGahn and his wife about the subpoena last month, the company did so only after a gag orders secured by the government had expired. That's according to a person familiar with the matter. It's unclear what the Justice Department was investigating, or whether prosecutors actually obtained any of McGann's account information. News, which was first reported by The New York Times comes days after it emerged that the Trump era Justice Department had secretly subpoenaed Apple in 2018 for communication metadata belonging to two Democratic members of the House Intelligence Committee, as well as staff and family. In that case, the department was investigating leaks of classified information to the media. Ryan Lucas. NPR NEWS Washington Controversies over the handling of sex abuse cases and critical race theory are likely to dominate the Southern Baptist annual meeting, which gets underway on Tuesday in Nashville. It comes amid an uproar over leaked letters from former top public policy official Russell Moore, who claims other leaders tried to slow down efforts to address sexual abuse and intimidate those who pushed for change. And more, says he was the victim of quote constant threats from white nationalists for his racial reconciliation work. The Southern Baptist Convention is the nation's largest Protestant nomination, and it's been a powerful force in conservative politics for a generation. More than 16,000 delegates are expected at the meeting. US futures contracts are trading in positive territory at this hour. The Dow futures contract up about a fraction NASDAQ Futures contract Up nearly 2/10 of a percent. You're listening to NPR news. This is w N Y C. Good evening on my own, Levinson. Yorkers send over a million tons of food, waste of a landfill each year and next week's food waste fairs trying to change that by educating people about the problem. Julie Raskin is the executive director of the Sanitation Foundation, which is running the event. She says the most effective way to decrease food waste is by preventing it from happening in the first place. It's about better managing what you're buying and paying attention to expiration dates and being smarter about what you have in your own fridge and what you can do with it. And if you do end up with extra food you can't use it should either be donated or composted at the city's drop off sites. Curbside compost will start again this October, and residents can apply for pickup in their buildings on the Department of Sanitation website and that will be starting in August. The Reverend Al Sharpton says he will not endorse any candidates in the New York City primary election, including the race for mayor, he says the last time he endorsed a mayoral candidate, Bill de Blasio in 2013. It was in large part to stop another candidate, Bill Thompson, who he disagreed with on policing issues. There's no one saying.

Don McGahn Julie Raskin Bill Thompson Bill de Blasio Tamara Keith Janine Herbst Russell Moore McGann 2018 2013 Ryan Lucas Nashville House Intelligence Committee Sanitation Foundation August Levinson 500 million Trump Tuesday NPR
"ryan lucas" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:13 min | Last month

"ryan lucas" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"NPR's Frank Langfitt has more. The Group of seven of the world's largest economies said it would call out China and human rights abuses in the country's foreign northwest region of Xinjiang and repression in Hong Kong. The group also called for an expert lead study on the origins of the coronavirus in China. Speaking at a press conference, President Joe Biden said Western democracy face a fundamental challenge. I think we're in a contest. Not with China per se, but a context with autocrats. Autocratic governments around the world. Is whether or not democracies can compete with them in the rapidly changing 21st century, Reuters quoted a spokesman from the Chinese Embassy, saying the days when global decisions were dictated by a small group of countries are long gone. Frank Langfitt. NPR NEWS London Israel's parliament today voted to oust Prime Minister Benjamin and Yahoo in favor of far right politician of Holly Bennett that ends Netanyahu's record breaking 12 years in office. President Biden congratulated Bennett and pledged to work on security issues, including Iran. Biden, who had a sometimes tenuous relationship with Netanyahu also said he looks forward to working with the new prime minister, to quote strengthen all aspects of the close and enduring relationship. Netanyahu railed against the vote, calling the incoming government fraudulent and dangerous and vowed his party would be back soon. The U. S. Justice Department secretly subpoenaed Apple in 2018 for account information of then White House counsel Don McGahn as NPR's Ryan Lucas reports. McGann's wife's account information was also subpoenaed. Apple informed Don McGahn and his wife about the subpoena last month, the company did so only after a gag order secured by the government had expired. That's according to a person familiar with the matter. It's unclear what the Justice Department was investigating, or whether prosecutors actually obtained any of McGann's account information. News, which was first reported by The New York Times comes days after it emerged that the Trump era Justice Department had secretly subpoenaed Apple in 2018 for communication metadata belonging to two Democratic members of the House Intelligence Committee, as well as staff and family. In that case, the department was investigating leaks of classified information to the media. Ryan Lucas. NPR NEWS Washington At the French Open. Novak Djokovic top Stefano CC pass to win his 19th Grand Slam overall championship. Top seeded Djokovic beat his opponent 67266362 and 64. Djokovic is now one major trophy away from tying the men's world record of 20 career Grand Slams shared by Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal. You're listening to NPR news. President Biden has landed in Brussels, the second leg of his first foreign trip in office. On Monday. He meets with NATO leaders, the first time the U. S president is meeting with the group since 2018 when former President Donald Trump fought with allies over their defense spending. Biden says he supports the alliance. He says he wants to see changes to including modernizing and taking a close look at cyber threats.

Roger Federer Holly Bennett Rafael Nadal Frank Langfitt Don McGahn Netanyahu 2018 McGann Novak Djokovic Monday Ryan Lucas 12 years Bennett Hong Kong House Intelligence Committee Brussels Reuters 21st century French Open NPR
DOJ Has Charged Nearly 500 With COVID-Related Fraud In The Past Year

90.3 KAZU Programming

00:56 sec | 4 months ago

DOJ Has Charged Nearly 500 With COVID-Related Fraud In The Past Year

"People so far with fraud and other schemes tied to the Corona virus. Pandemic is NPR's Ryan Lucas explains. The department is made fighting such crimes a priority. Over the past year, The covert 19 pandemic has created a rich environment for fraudsters. One particularly enticing target has been the hundreds of billions of dollars to government doled out as part of the cares Act passed a year ago this week. The Justice Department says that over the past year it has charged 474 people with fraud and other crimes connected to the pandemic. That includes attempts to defraud the paycheck protection program, as well as other loan programs and unemployment benefits that were created by the cares act. The government says the amount of money fraudsters tried to steal in the cases charged so far. Around $570 million. Attorney General Merrick Garland says the department remains committed to protecting the public from those who would use the health crisis to illegally enrich themselves. Brian Lucas. NPR NEWS Washington A coalition

Ryan Lucas NPR Justice Department Attorney General Merrick Garla Government Brian Lucas Washington
U.S. Intelligence Agencies Warn Of Heightened Domestic Extremism Threat

All Things Considered

00:50 sec | 4 months ago

U.S. Intelligence Agencies Warn Of Heightened Domestic Extremism Threat

"The office of the director of National Intelligence says domestic violent extremists pose a growing threat in 2021. NPR's Ryan Lucas has more the new unclassified assessment from U. S intelligence agencies. The one page executive summary from the intelligence community provides a 30,000 ft view of the threat of domestic extremism. Report says that individual domestic violent extremists or small cells of them are more likely to conduct attacks than extremist organizations. The intelligence community also says that racist or militia, violent extremists pose the most lethal homegrown threat. Report concludes that recent socio political developments like the attack on the U. S Capitol, and the cove in 19 pandemic will almost certainly prompt some extremists to take up violence. White Supremacist, meanwhile, are the homegrown extremists with the most persistent and concerning overseas

National Intelligence Ryan Lucas U. NPR
U.S. Intelligence Agencies Warn Of Heightened Domestic Extremism Threat

BBC World Service

00:50 sec | 4 months ago

U.S. Intelligence Agencies Warn Of Heightened Domestic Extremism Threat

"News. I'm Shea Stevens, the office of the director of National Intelligence, says domestic violent extremists are posing a greater threat. In the United States. NPR's Ryan Lucas has more on the newly unclassified assessment from intelligence agencies. The one page executive summary from the intelligence community provides a 30,000 ft view of the threat of domestic extremism. Report says that individual domestic violent extremists or small cells of them are more likely to conduct attacks than extremist organizations. The intelligence community also says that racist or militia, violent extremists pose the most lethal homegrown threat. Report concludes that recent socio political developments like the attack on the U. S Capitol, and the cove in 19 pandemic will almost certainly prompt some extremists to take up violence. White Supremacist, meanwhile, are the homegrown extremists with the most

Shea Stevens National Intelligence Ryan Lucas NPR United States U.
9 Oath Keepers indicted for conspiracy in Washington DC Capitol riot

All Things Considered

00:50 sec | 5 months ago

9 Oath Keepers indicted for conspiracy in Washington DC Capitol riot

"News. I'm Jack Spear. The Justice Department says six more people affiliated with the right wing Oath Keepers paramilitary group have been indicted in connection with Capitol insurrection. NPR's Ryan Lucas reports They joined three members of the group already facing federal charges. The six new defendants, who come from Florida, North Carolina and Ohio are all in federal custody. They and the three previously indicted oath keepers face a range of charges, the most serious of which is conspiracy. Prosecutors say that several of the defendant's dressed in paramilitary gear and participated in a military style stack formation. Push up the Capitol steps and storm the building on January 6th. Indictment alleges that some of the defendants coordinated ahead of the event discussing what to bring their travel plans and where to stay in the Washington area. Prosecutors have brought some 200

Jack Spear Oath Keepers Paramilitary Grou Ryan Lucas Justice Department NPR North Carolina Ohio Florida Washington
Dem’s lawsuit accuses Trump of inciting deadly Capitol riot in Washington, DC

All Things Considered

00:59 sec | 5 months ago

Dem’s lawsuit accuses Trump of inciting deadly Capitol riot in Washington, DC

"A Democratic congressman from Mississippi has filed a civil lawsuit accusing former President Trump and his attorney, Rudy Giuliani off conspiracy to incite the January 6th. The riot at the U. S. Capitol. As NPR's Ryan Lucas reports too far right groups, the proud boys and the oath keepers are also named as defendants in the suit. Congressman Bennie Thompson is suing Trump in the others for allegedly conspiring to incite the capital Riot. Disrupt the official counting of electoral college votes. The lawsuit alleges that was a violation of the Ku Klux Klan Act, which protects against conspiracies that seek to prevent members of Congress from fulfilling their constitutional duties. Suit says that trumpet Giuliani inside of the crowd at the January 6th rally near the White House, while the proud boys and the oath keepers spearheaded the attack on the capital. Thompson had to shelter in the House gallery during the attack before being ushered to safety by security. The lawsuit is the first against Trump over the Capitol riot since the Senate acquitted him on Saturday on the impeachment charge of inciting in

President Trump U. S. Capitol Ryan Lucas Congressman Bennie Thompson Rudy Giuliani Mississippi NPR Donald Trump House Gallery Giuliani Congress Suit White House Thompson Senate
Biden's Justice Department to ask nearly all Trump-era U.S. attorneys to resign

NPR News Now

00:58 sec | 6 months ago

Biden's Justice Department to ask nearly all Trump-era U.S. attorneys to resign

"Plans to begin. The transition process for senate confirmed us attorneys as early as today as npr's ryan lucas reports. Two us attorneys conducting politically sensitive investigations are expected to remain in their current roles. One of the. us attorneys. Who is expected to stay on in his job is the us attorney for delaware. David weiss his office is conducting criminal investigation into president. Biden's son hunter. A senior justice department official tells. Npr that acting attorney general. Monty wilkinson called weiss on monday evening and asked him to hold in his current role. Thunder biden probe is one of two high profile politically sensitive investigations. The biden justice department inherited from the trump era. The other is special. Counsel john durham's investigation into the origins of the russia probe. Npr has learned that. Durham is expected to resign his post as us attorney for connecticut. What his appointment. As special counsel will remain in effect. Ryan lucas npr news washington. A team of

Ryan Lucas United States Monty Wilkinson David Weiss NPR Thunder Biden Senate Biden Justice Department Biden Delaware Justice Department Counsel John Durham Weiss Hunter Durham Russia Connecticut Washington
Several Capitol Police officers have been suspended, says police chief

Morning Edition

00:48 sec | 7 months ago

Several Capitol Police officers have been suspended, says police chief

"The acting chief of the U. S. Capitol. Police says several Capitol police officers have been suspended following last week's riot. The officer's actions during the assault are being reviewed. One officer took a selfie with a rioter. Another was seen wearing a pro trump camp. NPR's Ryan Lucas reports that federal agents are still tracking down some of the rioters. Prosecutors are identifying and charging more and more people pretty much every day who they say took part in the events. Some of them have been pretty easy to identify because of the photos or videos that they took of themselves at the Capitol. Some of them have been harder. To idea, though, but investigators are getting help. As of last night, the FBI had received 70,000 tips from the public to help them identify the folks who took part in the

U. S. Capitol Ryan Lucas Capitol Police NPR FBI
Trump pardons Paul Manafort, Roger Stone and Charles Kushner

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:42 sec | 7 months ago

Trump pardons Paul Manafort, Roger Stone and Charles Kushner

"Trump has granted pardons to his former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort is former adviser Roger Stone and Charles Kushner, the father in law of Ivanka Trump. The case but least Manafort and Stone. NPR's Ryan Lucas has more on White House grounds for the pardons. The White House said that the president had granted man for a full and complete pardon on then, as we have seen with others that Trump has pardoned who were implicated as part of the rush investigation. The White House called that probe hoax. It claimed that Manafort was a victim of prosecutorial overreach. Trump today Pardon 26 people and commuted the sentences of three others the second consecutive night of pardons and was expected be a flurry of acts of clemency before he leaves office.

Manafort Paul Manafort Roger Stone Charles Kushner Donald Trump Ryan Lucas Ivanka Trump White House NPR Stone Pardon
Barr agrees with Pompeo that Russians appear to be behind US government hack

BBC World Service

00:51 sec | 7 months ago

Barr agrees with Pompeo that Russians appear to be behind US government hack

"Barr has weighed in on the major hack of U. S government agencies at his last newscast. As attorney general Bar says Russia appears to be behind the breach. NPR's Ryan Lucas reports, the U. S government is still assessing the extent of the hack that first came to light just over a week ago. Experts say it is potentially unprecedented in scope. The Trump administration has not formally attributed the hack at this point, Although Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said over the weekend that it was pretty clearly the Russians Speaking at a news conference, bar says he agrees. It's certainly appears to be the Russians, but I'm not going to discuss it beyond that, while barring Pompeo have both pointed the finger at Moscow President Trump has refused to do so. Instead, Trump has sought to minimize the severity of the hack and has suggested China might have been behind it. Ryan Lucas, NPR NEWS Washington On Wall

U. S Government Ryan Lucas Trump Administration Mike Pompeo Barr NPR Russia President Trump Pompeo Moscow Donald Trump China Washington
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 8 months ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR News. I'm Shea Stevens and Alaska health care worker has suffered the nation's first reported serious allergic reaction to the cove in 19 vaccine manufactured by Fizer. That hers with Alaska Public media has the story. The middle aged woman is one of 100 Healthcare workers vaccinated Tuesday at a hospital in Juneau officials say she had no history of allergic reactions. Woman symptoms developed about 10. Minutes after her injection. She was treated and kept overnight in the hospital. One of her doctors Noble, Anderson, says the reaction didn't change the woman's outlook on the vaccine. She was excited that she got the first dose and was disappointed that she will not be getting the second dose. And she encouraged all of us to press upon. Alaska officials say they're making no changes to their vaccination program. And they stress that allergic reaction to the visor injection have been extremely rare for NPR news. I'm not hers in Anchorage, the former top federal official responsible for election security. Says continuing efforts to sow doubt about the outcome of the November vote are corrosive to democracy. More from NPR's Ryan Lucas testified before the Senate Homeland Security Committee, Christopher Krebs says attacks on the election process an outcome undermine democracy and the institutions that support elections. Krebs was fired last month by President Trump after he declared the 2020 election the most secure in U. S history. Since then, Krebs, like other election officials, has faced death threats, which Krebs said is shameful. You name it, whether it's emails, whether it's phone calls whether people showing up your house Just don't This is not America. I recognize And it's gotta stop. He called on political leaders, particularly members of his own Republican Party to doom or to call out and end this sort of behavior. Ryan Lucas NPR NEWS Washington Republican Georgia Senators carry La Flor and David Perdue are refusing to acknowledge President elect Joe Biden's victory in last month's vote. S W A. B. E S M a HURT reports. Both lawmakers are facing run offs that will determine which major party controls the U. S. Senate Senators Purdue and Leffler are standing firm with President Trump to refuse to acknowledge Biden's electoral college victory. After addressed the media after early voting Wednesday. Look,.

Christopher Krebs NPR News President Trump Alaska Ryan Lucas allergic Alaska Public NPR Joe Biden Fizer Shea Stevens Republican Party Senate Homeland Security Commi U. S. Senate Juneau Anchorage Anderson President America
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:26 min | 8 months ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Stored in science. Vaccine. For a major virus like this, and in six months seriously, give the guy some credit. He deserves credit. Meanwhile, in a virtual press briefing this afternoon, soon to be White House press Secretary Jen Psaki confirmed that the Biden transition team will announce picks for its health team early next week by and communications director Kate Bedingfield also said that Dr Anthony Fauci has in fact accepted the president elect's offer. To serve as his chief medical advisor, as well as to continue in his longtime role is director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Other news of former FBI lawyer who has pleaded guilty to altering a document in the Russia investigation is asking for a sentence of probation. NPR's Ryan Lucas reports the government Is recommending at least some prison time. Kevin Kline. Smith is the only person so far to be charged as part of the investigation into the origins of the Russia probe. He pleaded guilty to altering an email used by the FBI to get court approval to conduct surveillance on a former trump campaign adviser. And a man was submitted to the court ahead of sentencing clients. Miss. Lawyers say he made a grievous mistake and takes responsibility for it, and they request a sentence of probation. The government's case is being led by now Special counsel John Durham. He is recommending a sentence on the mid to high side of the guidelines range of 0 to 6 months. Decision ultimately will be made by Judge James Boasberg at a sentencing hearing next week. Ryan Lucas NPR NEWS Washington The Dow is up 172 points. You're listening to NPR news. Live from KQED news. I'm Brian. What different parts of the state face New Stay at home orders If intensive care bed capacity drops below 15% Alameda County has just over 30% staffed ICU beds available in nearly 40% of regular hospital beds. Free cake you Edie's Polish striker reports. Alameda County Data show that covert patients and ICUs have tripled in the past month. Supervisor Wilma Chan, chair of the county's health committee, says she worries what the Thanksgiving holiday might do to those numbers. She also worries that the federal cares Act money is due to run out at the end of the month. It goes towards PPE testing and food. Alameda County received about $270 million and cares money to pay for these things. So it's really a worry because the money may stop, but the epidemic has not. A spokeswoman for Oakland's Highland Hospital says they have about 10 covert patients at latest count, but only one in the ICU, which is more than 80% full. Adrian Jackson is a respiratory therapist. There. He works with intubated. Covert patients were cleaning out the patient's mouth suctioning out the patient's loans were actively involved with the patient's breathing through. Well, you know the course until there Until that tube was removed, and they're off their breeding machine. Jackson heard he could get vaccinated this month, which he says will make him feel safe. Hugging his parents again. I'm Polly striker KQED news. Nathan Ballard of political strategist and former aide to Gavin Newsom, in the years before he became governor is facing domestic violence and child abuse charges. Napa County prosecutors filed a two count felony complaint against Ballard yesterday. Brian what? KQED.

Alameda County Adrian Jackson Ryan Lucas FBI government Russia KQED NPR Napa County Gavin Newsom National Institute of Allergy Supervisor Wilma Chan Kevin Kline Nathan Ballard Judge James Boasberg John Durham Jen Psaki
Democratic leaders blast Trump's pardon of Flynn

Morning Edition

00:47 sec | 8 months ago

Democratic leaders blast Trump's pardon of Flynn

"President Trump has pardoned former national security adviser Michael Flynn, who pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI in connection with Trump's Russia contacts before the inauguration. Flynn later tried to walk back that guilty plea, NPR's Ryan Lucas has more. Flynn became a rallying cry of sorts for Trump and his base and allies on the hill, who have felt that he was unjustly prosecuted. They welcomed this part. Republican Senator Lindsey Graham, a key ally of the president, for example, called this pardon of good move. Democrats. On the other hand, unsurprisingly declared this corrupt. The Democratic chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Adam Schiff, said that this was an abuse of the president's pardon power. He said that Trump is using it to reward his friends and political allies and protect those who lied to cover up for him. NPR's Ryan Lucas

Donald Trump Ryan Lucas Flynn Michael Flynn Senator Lindsey Graham FBI NPR Russia House Intelligence Committee Adam Schiff
"ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:05 min | 8 months ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Live from NPR news. I'm Janine Herbst. The Supreme Court has temporarily barred New York Governor Andrew Cuomo's mandate limiting the number of people who can attend religious services in Corona virus hot spots. 5 to 4 decision released last night comes as confirmed cases of coronavirus surge around the country. NPR's Jacqueline Diaz has more. The court's new conservative majority says Cuomo's executive order violated the First Amendment's free exercise clause. And discriminated against religious institutions, Chief Justice John Roberts and the courts. Three liberal justices dissented the majority opinion, the court says the state imposed severe limits on attendance at houses of worship. Not with secular businesses in the same neighborhood. The executive order Limited service attendance to his lowest 10 people in certain areas. The court's ruling is in contrast to two decisions earlier this year that allowed state officials in California and Nevada to restrict capacity in churches. Jack India's NPR News President Trump has pardoned former national security adviser Michael Flynn, who pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI in connection with Trump's Russia contacts before the inauguration. Flynn later tried to walk back that guilty plea, NPR's Ryan Lucas has more. Flynn became a rallying cry of sorts for Trump and his base and allies on the hill, who have felt that he was unjustly prosecuted. They welcomed this part. Republican Senator Lindsey Graham, a key ally of the president, for example, called this pardon of good move. Democrats. On the other hand, unsurprisingly declared this corrupt. The Democratic chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Adam Schiff, said that this was an abuse of the president's pardon power. He said that Trump is using it to reward his friends and political allies and protect those who lied to cover up for him. NPR's Ryan Lucas reporting a long list of retailers have decided to close their doors on Thanksgiving, many for the first time in years. The pandemic has finally prompted the closures that labor advocates have long called for. MPR's Alina Cell York has more for years..

Supreme Court NPR Trump Michael Flynn Governor Andrew Cuomo president Ryan Lucas Adam Schiff Janine Herbst executive Chief Justice John Roberts Senator Lindsey Graham Alina Cell York Jacqueline Diaz New York Corona Russia
Trump grants 'full pardon' to Michael Flynn

90.3 KAZU Programming

00:50 sec | 8 months ago

Trump grants 'full pardon' to Michael Flynn

"Granted a full pardon to his first national security adviser, Michael Flynn. As NPR's Ryan Lucas reports, Flynn had pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI. During the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. The president announced his decision on Twitter. He congratulated Flynn and his family and said they will now have a quote. Truly fantastic Thanksgiving. Pardon brings an end of Lynn's long running legal saga. He pleaded guilty in 2017 the line to the FBI about his contacts with Russia and cooperated with investigators. But last year, Flynn reversed course and proclaimed his innocence. He claimed he was set up by the FBI, and he tried to withdraw his guilty plea. The Justice Department then sought to drop its case against him, although a federal judge refused to do so immediately and the matter has remained tied up in court. The case is Moz now that Flynn has received a full presidential pardon. Ryan

Flynn Ryan Lucas FBI Michael Flynn NPR Pardon Lynn Twitter Russia Justice Department Ryan
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:37 min | 9 months ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

"And the Dodgers could win it all when they take on the Tampa Bay Rays in Game six of the world. Siri's Tonight the boys in Blue are up 3 to 2 in the Siri's and need to take one more game to clinch it. First pitch is at five our time. Now it's an lit and mourning becomes a collective good morning in good morning, cherry fingers crossed goose. I can't even talk, but I can't even I can't even talk about it. Let's talk about the power in numbers Drive case here w dot com slash give is the place to go. This is the last day Cherry and I know there's some amazing people who have already supported us. Yes, and their two listeners who really stood out to me for the comments. I was looking over and more of Arcadia, who says I'm a previous monthly donor, but wanted to increase my monthly Nations since I can love Casey ar w happy that I can contribute and the other one K koi, too. I think it is of Woodland Hills, she says. My daughter has been listening to K C R W every day in my car for years while I take her to school, she's now 16 has her own driver's license. And she's listening to case here. W in her own car because the station has made her a well informed person with the real fax. All right, That's what I'm that's called good parenting right there. Got it. Nothing like brainwashing the new generation. I absolutely thank you so much. Jerry have a great day, and we will get back into music with morning becomes eclectic after news headlines from NPR stay with US. Lie from NPR news. I'm Laxmi, saying the presidential rivals have only one week left to win the hearts and minds of voters who will help determine which one of them will occupy the most powerful office in the land. NPR's Mara Liasson reports on where President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden stand in national polls. Widens lead nationally is stable. It's smaller in the swing states. Republicans are hoping that their voters now start turning out in droves between now and November, 3rd to offset the advantage. The Democrats are believed to have from mail in votes and early votes. Democrats are hoping they can continue strong turnout of minorities and women. And they're very optimistic about young voters who are surpassing their record from turnout record from 2016 by multiples. NPR's Mara Liasson. Just one week after the election, the U. S. Supreme Court will take up and Obama care case and the sixth conservative who's just been added to the 90 court will help determine its fate. Amy Cockney Bear received the judicial oath from Chief Justice John Roberts this morning. Last night she was administered the constitutional oath. Legal setback for President Trump Today, A federal judge is denying the administration's request to make the US instead of trump the defendant against a Manhattan defamation lawsuit brought by a woman who alleges Trump raped her in the 19 nineties. NPR's Ryan Lucas, the Justice Department sought in federal court last month to make the U. S government instead of President Trump, the defendant in the defamation lawsuit filed by the writer E. Jean Carel. But in a 61 page ruling, US District Court Judge Lewis Kaplan has denied the department's attempt to do so. Kaplan says that President Trump is not an employee of the government and even if he were, Kaplan says Trump's alleged defamatory statements would not have been within the scope of his job as president. Carol accused the president of raping her in the mid 19 nineties. Trump denied the allegations and called her a liar. Caroline sued him for defamation. Ryan Lucas NPR NEWS Washington Philadelphia police shot and killed a black man yesterday afternoon after yelling at him to drop his knife, the incident, sparking protests and looting. Across the city. At least 30 police officers were injured. Robbie Broad with member station of U H Y Y in Philadelphia, has more police were responding to reports of a man with a weapon when they shot and killed 27 year old Walter Wallace Jr..

President Donald Trump NPR US Mara Liasson Ryan Lucas Siri president Dodgers US District Court Judge Lewis Kaplan Carol Chief Justice John Roberts Vice President U. S. Supreme Court Cherry Tampa Bay Rays Arcadia Justice Department Woodland Hills Blue
DOJ Files Google Antitrust Lawsuit

The Takeaway

00:54 sec | 10 months ago

DOJ Files Google Antitrust Lawsuit

"Of Justice is suing Google. NPR's Ryan Lucas reports. The antitrust lawsuit filed today in federal court sets the stage for the biggest battle over the power of a dominant technology company in decades. The Justice Department is accusing Google of anticompetitive behavior to try to maintain what the government calls the company's monopoly, an online search and search advertising. The DOJ was joined by 11 State attorneys general in this lawsuit, more than 90% of searches worldwide happen on Google, according to researchers. That dominant position has allowed the company to create an online advertising business that generates almost all of Google's $160 billion in annual sales. Critics have long accused the company of monopolistic behavior in its search engine. To benefit its own properties such as Google maps and YouTube. The lawsuit comes amid increasing calls on Capitol Hill for greater scrutiny of Big tech. Ryan

Google Ryan Lucas Justice Department NPR DOJ Big Tech Youtube
U.S. charges 6 Russian military officers for massive cyberattacks

All Things Considered

01:00 min | 10 months ago

U.S. charges 6 Russian military officers for massive cyberattacks

"Russian intelligence officers are facing federal charges in connection with a Siri's of high profile and destructive cyberattacks. The charges detail hacks targeting the 2017 French elections in the 2018 Winter Olympics, among others. NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas is here to tell us more. Hi, Ryan first. What do we know about the defendants and what they've been charged with? The Justice Department says that these six defendants are all current or former officers with Russia's military intelligence agency. That's the Dru It's the same agency that was behind the hacks in the 2016 U. S election. Now there's no allegation in this indictment of any hacking tied to the 2020 vote, the one in there in a couple of weeks. The defendants in this instance face seven counts in all those include hacking, conspiracy, wire fraud, computer fraud and identity theft. And this is for a really stunning string of cyber attacks over the past five years, U. S officials say this is the single most disruptive and destructive Siri's of cyber attacks that have ever been attributed to just one group.

Ryan Lucas Siri Wire Fraud Justice Department Fraud NPR Russia U. S
6 Russian Intelligence Officers Charged In High-Profile Cyberattacks

All Things Considered

03:55 min | 10 months ago

6 Russian Intelligence Officers Charged In High-Profile Cyberattacks

"Officers are facing federal charges in connection with a series of high profile and destructive cyberattacks. The charges, detail hacks targeting the 2017 French elections and the 2018 Winter Olympics, among others. NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas is here to tell us more. Hi, Ryan first. What do we know about the defendants and what they've been charged with? The Justice Department says that these six defendants are all current or former officers with Russia's military intelligence agency. That's the GR EW. It's the same agency that was behind the hacks in the 2016 U. S election. Now there's no allegation in this indictment of any hacking tied to the 2020 vote, the one in the inn Ah, a couple of weeks. The defendants in this instance face seven counts in all those include hacking, conspiracy, wire fraud, computer fraud and identity theft. And this is for a really stunning string of cyber attacks over the past five years, U. S officials say this is the single most destructive and destructive Siri's of cyber attacks that have ever been attributed to just one group. What were those attacks Tell us about them? Well, it's a long list. It includes hacks in 2015 and 2016 that targeted Ah, Ukraine's power grid. Those knocked more than 200,000 customers offline at one point or as one U. S official said Today, it turned out the lights and turned off the heat in the middle of an eastern European winter. There's also a devastating attack known is not Pecchia that began in Ukraine and spread across the globe that crippled companies and industries and hospitals. It cause billions of dollars in damages, including here in the U. S. There are hacks targeting the investigations by British and international authorities into the use of a Russian nerve agent to poison a former Russian spy in the UK. That was the episode involving the Spice Sergei Scribble and a few others write. Each of these incidents has been widely reported on their own. It's interesting to see all of these people tied together with all of them exactly right, And there's actually even Maurine the indictment their cyber attacks that targeted the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea. And then there's the hack and leak operation against the 2017 French elections that targeted the political party of France is now president Emmanuel Macron. So it is really quite a list any insight into why the defendants allegedly chose those targets. The Justice Department says that all of these hacks furthered Russia's interests further. Russia's Geo Geo political aims You look at Ukraine Russia has been in a grind in war with the government there in the east in the 22 18 Olympics. Russian athletes couldn't compete under the country's flag because of a massive doping scandal. In the case of the nerve agent poisoning, British and international authorities had pinned the blame for that attack on the Kremlin. And in the case of France's elections, the operation there fits into Russia's geopolitical goals. Now the head of the Justice Department's National Security Division, John Dimmers, said today that Russia Stands alone in the sort of destructive cyberattacks that its agents conduct. Here's a bit of what he said. No country has weaponized. It's cyber capabilities as maliciously and irresponsibly as Russia. Wantonly, causing unprecedented collateral damage to pursue small tactical advantages and fits of spite. Surrounding these defendants are presumably still in Russia and not in U. S custody. What does that mean about next steps for this case? Well, none of these men are in U. S custody right with that, And it is unlikely that any of them will ever face trial here in the United States. One of them actually is already facing charges in the U. S. He was charged by special Counsel Robert Mueller in connection with Russia's hacking in the 2016 election. So there is a big question of just how effective bringing charges like these are But Justice Department officials say it's important to put the weight of the U. S government behind these sorts of allegations. It helps expose what hackers are up to, and the methods that they used. It also makes clear to the international community what Russia is doing. And while it may not be a satisfying as seeing the defendants in court, U. S officials say, it is still a valuable thing to do. NPR's Ryan Lucas. Thank you. Thank you.

Russia Justice Department Ryan Lucas Ukraine NPR Nerve Agent France U. S Inn Ah John Dimmers Sergei Scribble South Korea Geo Geo Wire Fraud Olympics Siri UK
6 Russian Intelligence Officers Charged In High-Profile Cyberattacks

All Things Considered

02:05 min | 10 months ago

6 Russian Intelligence Officers Charged In High-Profile Cyberattacks

"Officers are facing federal charges in connection with a series of high profile and destructive cyberattacks. The charges, detail hacks targeting the 2017 French elections and the 2018 Winter Olympics, among others. NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas is here to tell us more. Hi, Ryan first. What do we know about the defendants and what they've been charged with? The Justice Department says that these six defendants are all current or former officers with Russia's military intelligence agency. That's the GR EW. It's the same agency that was behind the hacks in the 2016 U. S election. Now there's no allegation in this indictment of any hacking tied to the 2020 vote, the one in the inn Ah, a couple of weeks. The defendants in this instance face seven counts in all those include hacking, conspiracy, wire fraud, computer fraud and identity theft. And this is for a really stunning string of cyber attacks over the past five years, U. S officials say this is the single most destructive and destructive Siri's of cyber attacks that have ever been attributed to just one group. What were those attacks Tell us about them? Well, it's a long list. It includes hacks in 2015 and 2016 that targeted Ah, Ukraine's power grid. Those knocked more than 200,000 customers offline at one point or as one U. S official said Today, it turned out the lights and turned off the heat in the middle of an eastern European winter. There's also a devastating attack known is not Pecchia that began in Ukraine and spread across the globe that crippled companies and industries and hospitals. It cause billions of dollars in damages, including here in the U. S. There are hacks targeting the investigations by British and international authorities into the use of a Russian nerve agent to poison a former Russian spy in the UK. That was the episode involving the Spice Sergei Scribble and a few others write. Each of these incidents has been widely reported on their own. It's interesting to see all of these people tied together with all of them exactly right, And there's actually even Maurine the indictment their cyber attacks that targeted the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea. And then there's the hack and leak operation against the 2017 French elections that targeted the political party of France is now president Emmanuel Macron. So it is really quite a list any insight into why the

Ryan Lucas Ukraine U. S Inn Ah NPR Justice Department Pecchia Sergei Scribble South Korea Emmanuel Macron Wire Fraud Nerve Agent France Siri Russia Fraud President Trump UK
6 Russian Intelligence Officers Charged In High-Profile Cyberattacks

All Things Considered

03:56 min | 10 months ago

6 Russian Intelligence Officers Charged In High-Profile Cyberattacks

"Federal charges in connection with a Siri's of high profile and destructive cyberattacks. The charges, detail hacks targeting the 2017 French elections and the 2018 Winter Olympics, among others. NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas is here to tell us more. Hi, Ryan first. What do we know about the defendants and what they've been charged with? The Justice Department says that these six defendants are all current or former officers with Russia's military intelligence agency. That's the GR EW. It's the same agency that was behind the hacks in the 2016 U. S election. Now there's no allegation in this indictment of any hacking tied to the 2020 vote, the one in the inn Ah, a couple of weeks. The defendants in this instance face seven counts, and all those include hacking, conspiracy, wire fraud, computer fraud and identity theft. And this is for a really stunning string of cyber attacks over the past five years, U. S officials say this is the single most disruptive and destructive Siri's of cyber attacks that have ever been attributed to just one group. What were those attacks Tell us about them? Well, it's a long list. It includes hacks in 2015 and 2016 that targeted Ah, Ukraine's power grid. Those knocked more than 200,000 customers offline at one point or as one U. S official said Today, it turned out the lights and turned off the heat in the middle of an eastern European winter. There's There's also also a a devastating devastating attack attack known known is is not not Pecchia Pecchia that that began began in in Ukraine Ukraine and and spread spread across across the the globe globe that that crippled crippled companies companies and and industries industries in in hospitals. hospitals. It It cause cause billions billions of of dollars dollars in in damages, damages, including including here here in in the the U. U. S. S. There There are are hacks hacks targeting targeting the the investigations investigations by by British British and and international international authorities authorities into into the the use use of of a a Russian Russian nerve nerve agent agent to to poison a former Russian spy in the UK. That was the episode involving the Spice, Sergei Scruple and a few others write. Each of these incidents has been widely reported on their own. It's interesting to see all of these people tied together with all of them exactly right, And there's actually even Maurine the indictment their cyber attacks that targeted the 2018 Winter Olympics. In South Korea. And then there's the hack and leak operation against the 2017 French elections that targeted the political party of France is now president Emmanuel Macron. So it is really quite a list. Any insight into why the defendants allegedly chose those targets. The Justice Department says that all of these hacks furthered Russia's interests further. Russia's Geo Geo political aims You look at Ukraine Russia has been in a grinding war with the government there in the east in the 22 18 Olympics. Russian athletes couldn't compete under the country's flag because of a massive doping scandal. In the case of the nerve agent poisoning, British and international authorities had pinned the blame for that attack on the Kremlin. And in the case of France's elections, the operation there fits into Russia's geopolitical goals. Now the head of the Justice Department's National Security Division, John Dimmers, said today that Russia Stands alone in the sort of destructive cyberattacks that its agents conduct. Here's a bit of what he said. No country has weaponized. It's cyber capabilities as maliciously and irresponsibly as Russia. Wantonly, causing unprecedented collateral damage to pursue small tactical advantages and fits of spite. Surrounding these defendants are presumably still in Russia and not in U. S custody. What does that mean about next steps for this case? Well, none of these men are in us custody, all right with that, And it is unlikely that any of them will ever face trial here in the United States. One of them actually is already facing charges in the U. S. He was charged by special Counsel Robert Mueller in connection with Russia's hacking in the 2016 elections, so There is a big question of just how effective bringing charges like these are, but Justice Department officials say it's important to put the weight of the U. S government behind these sorts of allegations. It helps expose what hackers are up to, and the methods that they used. It also makes clear to the international community what Russia is doing. And while it may not be a satisfying as seeing the defendants in court, U. S officials say, it is still a valuable thing to do. NPR's Ryan Lucas. Thank you. Thank

Russia Justice Department Ryan Lucas Ukraine Nerve Agent NPR U. S France Siri Inn Ah Pecchia Pecchia South Korea Geo Geo Wire Fraud John Dimmers Olympics UK United States
Two ISIS "Beatles" members charged with hostage-taking of Americans

Fresh Air

00:52 sec | 10 months ago

Two ISIS "Beatles" members charged with hostage-taking of Americans

"Islamic state militants are facing federal criminal charges in the United States for their alleged role in the killings of American hostages. NPR's Ryan Lucas reports. The men are accused of being members of the notorious Isis cell nicknamed the Beatles. The two defendants Alexander Coty and El Shafie. L shake face eight counts in all, including conspiracy, hostage taking, resulting in death and material support to a terrorist organization. According to the indictment, the men played a leading role in Islamic states kidnapping, torturing and killing of U. S and European citizens. Among the groups victims were four Americans journalist James Foley and Steven Sotloff and aid workers Peter Kasich and Kayla Mueller. Assistant Attorney General John Deemer says while the U. S government cannot bring the four Americans back, the Justice Department quote can and will seek justice for them their families and for all Americans.

Ryan Lucas Justice Department Alexander Coty United States El Shafie Kayla Mueller John Deemer Assistant Attorney General James Foley Peter Kasich NPR Kidnapping Steven Sotloff U. S
Judge Partially Blocks Trump Administration From Enforcing Visa Ban

NPR News Now

00:46 sec | 10 months ago

Judge Partially Blocks Trump Administration From Enforcing Visa Ban

"A federal judge has ordered the trump administration's law enforcement commission to halt its work as NPR's Ryan Lucas reports. The judge has also barred the group from releasing its final report. The ruling from US District Court Judge John Debates comes less than a month ahead of the law enforcement commission's deadline to wrap up its work although it reportedly has already submitted draft to the Attorney General the end of Lacey Pe- filed suit in April it. Argued that the panel violates a law that requires among other things that a federal commission include a diversity of viewpoints in his ruling Judge Bates found that the law enforcement commission is made up entirely of current and former law enforcement officials. It also has violated the law by conducting much of its work behind closed doors. The judge ordered the Commission to halt its work until it meets the requirements under the

Law Enforcement Commission Judge John Debates Judge Bates Ryan Lucas Us District Court Lacey Pe NPR Attorney
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

"Live from NPR news in Washington I'm David Mattingly Vermont senator Bernie Sanders is the winner among the democratic presidential contenders in the New Hampshire primary here's NPR Scott Tetro it wasn't the twenty point blowout Sanders one four years ago but a week after earning the most votes in still unsettled Iowa Sanders eked out a victory in a crowded field in New Hampshire former south bend Indiana Merope booted judge finished second in Minnesota senator any club which are finished a surprising third former vice president Biden finished fifth in New Hampshire a decision by the justice department to seek a shorter prison sentence for one of president trump's former campaign advisers is raising questions the DOJ says it disagrees with the seven to nine year sentence recommended for Roger stone for lawyers who prosecuted stone have now withdrawn from the case NPR's Ryan Lucas says the move is considered highly unusual one former US attorney told me that it's essentially unheard of yes US attorney's offices do communicate with the department leadership on cases particularly big cases but I'm told it's very rare for the leadership to step in and overrule career prosecutors when it comes to the sentencing of a case stone was convicted of lying to Congress witness tampering and obstructing a house investigation stemming from former special counsel Robert Muller is Russia investigation the DOJ says the decision was made before president trump tweeted about stone yesterday this is NPR news president trump's national security adviser Robert o'brien says he's cautiously optimistic the US will reach a peace agreement with the Taliban in coming days or weeks but he says the withdrawal of American military forces from Afghanistan is not imminent the Taliban deny they were behind yesterday's suicide bombing in Kabul he targeted a military academy six people were killed and a dozen others wounded no injuries are reported after small letter bombs exploded today at two companies in the Netherlands one detonated in a mail room at a bank the other exploded in the mail room of a Japanese electronics firm teri Schultz says these were the latest in a series of bombs an employee in the mail room and it ABN amro bank in Amsterdam managed to throw the letter away from himself once he realized it was a live explosive a police spokesperson says while the bomb was only comparable to that of a firecracker it could have caused injury half an hour later another package exploded in Kerr credit a city in the southern Netherlands on the German border both locations have been evacuated as investigations are under way the Dutch national coordinator for counter terrorism and security says is monitoring the situation over the last several weeks seven mail bombs have been delivered to hotels car dealers and gas stations in addition to another one to an A. B. N. amro branch but none of those went off no arrests have been made for NPR news I'm teri Schultz I'm David Mattingly NPR news in Washington and on this Wednesday morning you are listening to Casey are W. I'm sherry Glaser good to have you here looking pretty good so far out on those Wednesday morning freeways we are dealing with Iraq in the east.

Washington Bernie Sanders NPR David Mattingly Vermont senator
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

"From NPR and KCRW. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jack Speer. Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell announced today, the green new deal will get a vote in the Senate. But NPR's Daniel Kurtz, Leibman reports the bills Senate sponsors calling in a way to sabotage the Bill without giving it hearings or debate McConnell frames. The decision to hold a vote not as a way to advance the democratic legislation. But as a way to make lawmakers weigh in on it, we're going to be voting on that in the Senate give everybody an opportunity to go on record. And they feel. About the green new deal. New York Representative Alexandria, ocasio Cortez and Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey unveiled the non-binding resolution last week it calls for drastically cutting carbon emissions while overhauling large swaths of the economy in the process. Climate advocates say grand scale changes are needed the critics of the green new deal, including some climate experts say it's unrealistic and lacking in specifics, Danielle Kurt Slaven NPR news, President Trump's nominee to lead the Justice department. William bar is moving one step closer to confirmation. NPR's Ryan, Lucas explained senators today advanced bars nomination for a final confirmation vote. The fifty five to forty four procedural votes sets up bar for his final confirmation vote on the Senate floor. Three Democrats Joe Manchin, Doug Jones and Kirstin cinema joined Republicans in support of bar Republican Senator rand Paul. Meanwhile, voted against him if confirmed this would be bars second stint in charge of the Justice department. He previously served. As attorney general in the George H W Bush administration. Democrats have concerns about how far will handle special counsel? Robert Muller's Russia investigation bar has pledged to make public as much of Muller's final report as possible, but he has refused to promise to release the full report. The Senate is likely to vote on bars confirmation later this week Ryan, Lucas NPR news, Washington..

Senate NPR Lucas NPR William bar Danielle Kurt Slaven NPR Mitch McConnell Joe Manchin Robert Muller Washington Senator Ed Markey Justice department Jack Speer Ryan Senator rand Paul New York Daniel Kurtz ocasio Cortez special counsel
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:29 min | 3 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Live from. NPR news in, Washington I'm Nora raum Rick gates is testifying. For a second day in the trial of, former Trump campaign chairman Paul, Manafort gates was, manafort's longtime deputy NPR's Ryan Lucas is covering, the. Trial and Alexandria Virginia he, reports gates said today he spent years disguising millions of. Dollars in foreign income so. Manafort could avoid taxes he talked about creating loan documents for, loans that didn't exist talked about how he had foreign Bank accounts from. Bookkeepers and, tax accountants and ultimately the US government talked about wiring money to businesses in the in the US from, secret Bank accounts overseas and he talked about how he did all of this. At Paul, manafort's direction NPR's Ryan Lucas manafort's defense attorneys are attempting to blame gates for any wrongdoing Republicans in Kansas are voting today on their choice to run. For governor in November President Trump is not endorsing, the incumbent Jeff Collier but in Stead supports Kansas secretary of state Chris Kobuk for member. Station k. c., you are Celia yo pass Jefferson reports both. Men are conservatives but call your bagged endorsements, that signal a more traditional, establishment backing like. One time presidential nominee Bob Dole a Republican, from. Kansas co Bach is Trump's, ally on voter fraud he helped stare Trump's short-lived voter. Fraud commission some polls put. Kobuk in the lead call your has tried using his opponents, legal was against him coke was fined and held in contempt as part. Of a, federal court case he lost in June over blocking tens of thousands of people from registering to vote for, NPR news I'm silly opus Jepson into Pika primaries are also being held today. In Missouri, Michigan and Washington in a special election in Ohio voters are selecting the next person to represent the twelfth congressional district that has been held by Republicans. For decades polls show a tightening race between Republican, Troy Balderstone And democrat Danny O'Connor the Mendocino complex fires in northern California are blackening more land than any wildfire in the state's history within. Three hundred ninety two hundred ninety thousand acres Reverend public, radio's April Ehrlich reports the Mendocino complex fires are growing rapidly in three, rural counties one hundred miles north of San Francisco fire officials have evacuated entire towns Cal fire spokesman Ron Oatman. Says these massive fires are burning. Through diverse stretch of. Terrain such a large area that we're looking at, everything from shields to rolling hills to steep rugged terrain to trees grass, brush is everything be out there is out there these fires are burning in largely rural forces areas so. They haven't destroyed nearly as many homes. As the deadly car fire which. Is still burning to the north that fire has destroyed more than one. Thousand homes for NPR. News I eight pro Ehrlich on Wall Street the SNP is up twelve points you're listening to NPR news from Washington from k., q. e.. D. news I'm Tiffany Cam high a south bay group is pushing back against the San Jose police officers association's efforts to. Oust the city's independent police Auditor. Kick Peter Jon Shuler reports at a. News conference Monday people acting in. Community together or. Packed said the Union's campaign against auditor errands answer is undermining grassroots efforts, to expand police oversight volunteer pack leader Frank Richardson says he's seen no compelling.

Ryan Lucas manafort NPR Ryan Lucas Chris Kobuk gates US Kansas Trump Rick gates April Ehrlich Bach Washington Paul Manafort gates Mendocino Bob Dole Auditor
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:32 min | 3 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Get to, work About the lane split everything that I'm Tiffany. Cam high motorcyclist and lane splitter hear more on this controversial practice coming up, on morning edition We'll bring you that report at. Six twenty three stay with us it's coming up here on Sunny skies and breezy afternoon with Hayes. In areas of smoke once again. We'll have highs from the upper. Sixties to the mid nineties it's now seven minutes past six it's morning, edition. From NPR, news I'm Noel king in Washington DC and I'm David Greene in Culver City California good morning prosecutors, car called, their star witness to the stand yesterday in the. Trial of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort Rick gates is manafort's former. Deputy and business partner he is now testifying against Manafort who faces, Bank, and tax fraud charges NPR's Ryan Lucas. Has been in court covering this trial in Alexandria Virginia and he joins us, Ryan good morning so can we just remind people Manafort chaired Trump's campaign in two. Thousand sixteen but all this is dating back? To, a much earlier time his own business dealings but what was he doing that former life well this is when he. Was working as a political consultant and lobbyist in Ukraine for a pro Russian political party there and this. Is, work that he did from about two thousand five to around two. Thousand fifteen or so okay So gates is former associate is there testifying yesterday against him, what what exactly did this former associates say well gates says. That he, began working for Manafort in around two thousand six and over. A decade or so he became. Manafort's right hand man essentially they. Talked on the phone text of the Email all the time constant contact, engaged, told jurors, yesterday that he conspired with Manafort in committed crimes with him he says that he helped Manafort falsify, tax returns, he did so at manafort's direction he said gates. Also says that they misled accountants and bookkeepers they hid millions of dollars. In secret income that Manafort had in secret foreign Bank accounts and, they, did this gates says so that Manafort. Would have to pay less in taxes okay so he's saying a lot about, Manafort the fact that he came into that courtroom just reading about it right it. Sounds like it was one of those movie? Moments, where a witness comes in everyone is gasping was it that dramatic well it was in a sense you know we. Were told earlier in the day yesterday that gates would take the stand and yet still there was this. Gas Space in the courtroom from members of? The, public when the government actually called him in tax and Bank fraud trials generally pretty dry affairs and this. Testimony from gates is this trials. Moment, of high drama so you have gates and Manafort who worked closely. Together for years they were actually indicted together and then yesterday gates walks into the courtroom. Clean-shaven wearing a blue suit yellow tie he raises. His right hand and takes the. Oath to testify against his former boss and then up on. The stand gates did not look at Manafort at all Manafort had laser like focus on, gates the whole time however giving, him like the evil lies he's right right and while. Gates. Is testifying against Manafort he did say at one point that Manafort is the most politically brilliant strategists that, he's. Ever worked with so I wonder if this came up yesterday how gates got here. I mean there's, testifying under a plea? Deal, he he was indicted as. You said, with Manafort but he made a deal with prosecutors that's right gates pleaded guilty in February two making false statements and And? Conspiracy, in that plea deal with the government includes the possibility of a reduced prison sentence he loses that possibility if he lies when he's up on the witness stand yesterday in court he acknowledged crimes that he'd. Committed on his own behalf as well he says that he'd misled. A mortgage company and a credit card company and he also said. That he embezzled hundreds of. Thousands of dollars from Paul Manafort by filing false expense claims and it's, no coincidence. Here that manafort's attorneys have made Rick gates the centerpiece of their defense strategy they, want to put Rick gates on trial here they've placed the brunt of the. Blame for manafort's troubles on gates they say he abused, manafort's, trust they say he stole from. Him and, agreed. To cooperate with prosecutors when he got, caught and now he's he's agreeing he's cooperating in order to save his own skin essentially and that's going. To be essentially the defense argument I mean, this is only just. Begun right I mean wasn't on the stand. For something like an hour yesterday so what happens, today is this gets going again well. He was. On the stand for about an hour and a half Two? Hours yesterday, so yes he will be back in court on the. Stand for several more hours of testimony today the? Government, has said they expect to continue for about three hours with him That will then turn to cross examination from from the defense, now jurors have heard testimony from manafort's accountants and bookkeepers, seen Bank documents they've. Seen emails, other evidence to support the government's charges now what the government, wants from gates is for him to. Cooperate corroborate that and get to the question of. Manafort's intent what Manafort was, thinking so yes we're going to hear the end of question from the government then. It will, be the. Defenses, turn that. Could be a very uncomfortable experience for gates because as I said earlier the defense is trying to pin all of the blame for manafort's troubles on gates NPR's Ryan Lucas Ryan thanks. Thank you could the president hire. And fire civil servants at will that question is at the heart of a concept that's. Likely to, come up often at supreme court nominee Brett Kavanagh's confirmation hearings this fall NPR's Legal Affairs. Correspondent Nina totenberg has the story Donald Trump made a career hiring in fire Hiring people. Like Gary Busey on.

Paul Manafort gates Rick gates Paul Manafort Rick gates Manafort government Ryan Lucas Ryan NPR Donald Trump Sunny skies Ryan Lucas Noel king Culver City California David Greene Gary Busey Washington Hayes Nina totenberg Alexandria Virginia
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Flip rudy giuliani is newish to the president's legal team is this reflecting a new strategy giuliani is certainly taking a more public and more publicly aggressive stance in his criticism of special counsel robert muller in his investigation one big outstanding question at the moment is whether the president will indeed sit down for an interview with muller's team negotiations over that have been going on for a long time giuliani says that as of now he's inclined to tell the president not to do the interview he says it could be perjury trap but giuliani also says he's not shutting the door on this at this point he still open to a possible compromise that's npr's ryan lucas ryan thank you thank you the news that donald trump repaid his attorney for hush money given to stormy daniels carries legal considerations for the president it also carries a political considerations how will the public respond to the president acknowledging that he bankrolled a payment to a porn star to buy her silence npr's scott horsely joins us now from the white house to talk about that hey scott i'm there's a huge irony inherent all of this i got to know what began as an effort apparently to silence trump's accuser has wound up giving her a huge megaphone what are the politics of this house how's the weight has playing this you're absolutely right uses the payoff was first reported by the wall street journal back in january this story has practically been on continuous loop on cable tv the supposed hush money in effect just bought daniels and her attorney one hundred thirty thousand dollars soapbox but when you look at the polling numbers it's hard to see that it's really made a lot of difference the president's approval rating in the gallup poll right now's around forty two percent that's actually a little higher than it was when the story broke four months ago and it's been bouncing around in a pretty narrow range rudy giuliani explained that.

rudy giuliani president robert muller ryan lucas donald trump attorney daniels white house wall street journal special counsel perjury npr scott horsely one hundred thirty thousand do forty two percent four months
"ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Investigators will use all the leverage that they can come up with to try to get going to flip rudy giuliani is newish to the president's legal team is this reflecting a new strategy giuliani is certainly taking a more public and more publicly aggressive stance in his criticism of special counsel robert muller and his investigation one big outstanding question at the moment is whether the president will indeed sit down for an interview with muller's team negotiations over that have been going on for a long time giuliani says that as of now he's inclined to tell the president not to do the interview he says it could be perjury trap but giuliani also says he's not shutting the door on this at this point he's still open to a possible compromise that's npr's ryan lucas ryan thank you thank you the news that donald trump repaid his attorney for hush money given to stormy daniels carries legal considerations for the president it also carries political considerations how will the public respond to the president acknowledging that he bankrolled a payment to a porn star to buy her silence npr's scott horsely joins us now from the white house to talk about that hey scott i may lose there's a huge irony inherent all of this i got a note what began as an effort apparently to silence trump's accuser has wound up giving her a huge megaphone i mean what are the politics of this house the way house playing this you're absolutely right uses the payoff was first reported by the wall street journal back in january this story has practically been on continuous loop on cable tv the supposed hush money in effect just bought daniels and her attorney one hundred thirty thousand dollars soapbox but when you look at the polling numbers it's hard to see that it's really made a lot of difference the president's approval rating in the gallup poll right now's around forty two percent that's actually a little higher than it was when the story broke four months ago and it's been bouncing around in a pretty narrow range rudy giuliani explained that the payment to daniels was supposed to prevent this from say coming out just on the eve of the last presidential debate but you know the access hollywood tape came out on the eve of the.

rudy giuliani president robert muller ryan lucas donald trump attorney daniels white house wall street journal special counsel perjury npr scott horsely hollywood one hundred thirty thousand do forty two percent four months
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A sanctuary state mal death the latino civil rights group called hohmann 's comments unhinged vitriol and said the acting ice director should be rejected when he comes up for senate confirmation later this year john bernett npr news president trump is calling ex chief strategist steve bannon a former staffer who lost his mind after losing his job trump is responding to an upcoming book shedding an unflattering light on administration insiders as npr's ryan lucas reports the book quotes bannon is making especially harsh comments about donald junior betting calls treasonous the june 2016 meeting that donald jr the president's soninlaw jared kushner and campaign chairman paul manafort had at trump tower with a russian lawyer offering dirt on hillary clinton the meeting is under scrutiny by spa petrol counsel robert muller's russia investigation bannon says muller's team is quote going to crack done junior like an egg on national tv bannon's remarks published by the guardian newspaper are excerpts from fire and fury inside the trump white house by author michael wolff the book is based on interviews with administration officials and trump insiders and and lost his job as white house chief strategist in august he has since resumed working for the right wing website breitbart ryan lucas in washington this is npr news the president's voter commission has been dissolved citing a lack of cooperation by many states refusing to hand over information requested by the panel commission also faced a series of lawsuit including one that was filed by a member in virginia elections officials today plan to hold a random drawing to decide the winner of a house of delegates race democrats shelly simon's was declared the winner by one vote until a recount court last month determine the race was tie a win by simon's would force virginia delegates to share power if republican incumbent david yancey wins the gop retains its one vote majority in the state house more than twenty schools in the state of.

david yancey gop shelly simon virginia white house michael wolff russia chairman jared kushner donald jr donald junior john bernett senate civil rights hohmann washington chief strategist robert muller hillary clinton trump tower paul manafort president ryan lucas npr steve bannon trump director
"ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"His opponents were corrupt the constitution of rigged elections focusing on particular ethnic groups and setting them against other ethnic groups and country star lien womack stops by to talk about her new album and what it means to be a crossover artist i'm from texas and texans have a way of not so much categorising thank put things in mock says he now and and so i just wanted to make music making music our number here is aches seven seven eight might take you can tweet us at the take away stay with us on this following take away right after the headlines if you dare live from npr news in washington i'm lakshmi sang president trump is venting his frustration over criminal charges filed against three of his campaign aides including his former chair paul manafort trump has previously call the fbi investigation into alleged russian collusion with his presidential campaign a witchhunt and a distraction from pursuing a job growth agenda and peers ryan lucas reports on some of the advice trump is getting reportedly chief of staff john kelly and some of the president's lawyers including ty cobb told him to kind of be cautious but i think from a political and pr our standpoint this is something that the president and the white house feels that they feel that they need to to respond to npr's ryan lucas the white house chief of staff is facing backlash for remarks fueling the national debate over confederate monuments in slavery and pierre's camilla dumb an oscar reports that last night john kelly he said.

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"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Here is eight seven seven eight might take you can tweet us at the take away stay with us on this following take away right after the headlines if you dare live from npr news in washington i'm lakshmi sang president trump is venting his frustration over criminal charges filed against three of his campaign aides including his former chair paul manafort trump has previously call the fbi investigation into alleged russian collusion with his presidential campaign a witchhunt and a distraction from pursuing a job growth agenda and peers ryan lucas reports on some of the advice trump is getting reportedly chief of staff john kelly and some of the president's lawyers including ty cobb told him to kind of be cautious but i think from a political and pr standpoint this is something that the president and the white house feels that they feel that they need to to respond to npr's ryan lucas the white house chief of staff is facing backlash for remarks fueling the national debate over confederate monuments in slavery and pierre's camilla dumb an oscar reports at last night john kelly said the civil war was caused by a lack of compromise acclaim historians have been swift to challenge in an interview on fox news kelly was asked about confederate monuments being removed he called it a mistake the lack of ability to compromise led to the civil war and the men and women of good faith on both sides made their stand in fact the.

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"ryan lucas" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Specifically the three scientists identified three key qian's cold period timeless and doubletime that are like the gears in a welloiled clock they keep everything in our bodies running on a carefully calibrated 24hour cycle a cycle that is now known to be crucial for health and wellbeing the research led to the whole field known as crono biology or corno medicine rob stein and pr news more than five years after the deadly attack on a us diplomatic compound in benghazi libya one of the suspected ringleaders is going on trial npr's ryan lucas has more the trial of aqua double cathala opens today in federal court in washington d c he has pleaded not guilty to terrorism and murder charges the us says abu qatada was one of the leaders of the attack on the american diplomatic post benghazi on september 11th two thousand twelve four americans were killed that night including ambassador christopher stevens in 2014 us special operations forces seized abu catala in a clandestine rate in libya is the only person facing trial for the benghazi attack legal experts say his case is likely to raise questions about due process and how the us interrogates terrorism suspects the trial is expected to last at least four weeks ryan lucas and pierre news washington you're listening to npr the house energy and commerce committee will consider extending the children's health insurance program known as chip there are taking up the bill days after the law authorising the program officially expired and peers allison kojak reports that at least one state has frozen new enrolments as it waits for congressional action most states have enough money to keep their chip programs going through the end of the year the program provides health insurance coverage to about nine million lowincome kids whose parents make too much money to qualify for medicaid but last month utah said it would stop enrolling new children in that states chip program until it's clear that the federal money would be there next year.

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"ryan lucas" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from npr news in washington on giles snyder president trump has wrapped up his campaign rally in phoenix arizona oba protesters remain on the streets television pictures show police using would appear to be smoke and tear gas in an effort to disperse the protestors trump's appearance was his first since the violence in charlottesville virginia and he returned to a familiar theme but the very dishonest media those people right up there with all the cow the president lashed out at the press for its portrayal of his response to what happened in charlottesville and he also held out the possibility of a pardon for joe are pyo the arizona sheriff convicted last month of criminal contempt in a racial profiling case jury but i'll make a prediction i think he's gonna be just fine okay trump says he did not issue the pardon in phoenix because he does not want to cause controversy the president is spending the night in phoenix he is scheduled to travel to renew nevada in the morning to speak at the american legion's national convention senate's investigators met tuesday with the head of the private investigation firm that compiled the dossier that alleged donald trump had ties with russia paris ryan lucas reports on why members of congress are interested in what glen simpson had to say simpson talked with senate judiciary committee staff behind closed doors tuesday the committee is not leading the russia investigation but lawmakers do want to know more about the dossier how it was drawn up in importantly who paid for it the document was leaked and published online in january simpson's firm hired a respected former british intelligence officer to compile the report.

glen simpson senate judiciary committee ryan lucas russia donald trump tear gas arizona giles snyder npr officer washington congress senate american legion nevada phoenix joe charlottesville president virginia