35 Burst results for "Ryan Lucas"

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Noel King, and I'm Rachel Martin. When Merrick Garland was announced as Joe Bidens pick for attorney general, he vowed to operate free of political influence. That has been sticking out legal positions that Democrats and the Biden administration's political allies sometimes don't like NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas reports at a recent hearing on Capitol Hill with Attorney General Merrick Garland. Democratic Senator Patrick Leahy opened his round of questioning with this observation attorney general In the past few weeks, Your department has endorsed some highly Controversial positions taken by the former president's Justice Department, Leahy pointed to two cases in particular. The first is the department's effort to block the release of an internal memo cited by former Attorney General Bill Barr and deciding that President Trump did not obstruct justice in the Russia investigation. The second is the department's decision to continue a controversial legal effort to intervene on Trump's behalf in a defamation lawsuit brought against him by the writer E. Jean Carroll, who says he sexually assaulted her in the 19 nineties. Channeling the thoughts of many Democrats and progressives lay he wanted to hear from Garland. What gives Garland defended the department's decisions. That job of the Justice Department in making decisions of law is not to back any administration previous or present. Our job is to represent the American people. That means Garland said that the same rules apply to Republicans and Democrats alike. Something, he said. That isn't always easy to do. Sometimes it means that we have to make a decision about the law that we would never have made and that we strongly disagree with as a matter of policy, a prime example of that maybe the defamation lawsuit brought against Trump by E. Jean Carroll. With bar in charge. The Justice Department stepped in last year to try to replace Trump as the defendant in Carol's lawsuit, a move that if successful, would effectively end the case. The legal argument revolves around whether Trump as president is an employee of the federal government. And whether he was acting within the scope of his job when he denied Carol's allegations, a District court judge in New York ruled against the department last year. This month, the Justice Department now under Garland forged ahead with its effort to defend Trump. Kim Whaley is a professor at the University of Baltimore School of Law and a former federal prosecutor. She says Garland perhaps would not have intervened in the case. But the fact is that Bill Barr did intervene. And produced a vision from a lower court that arguably hamstrings the presidency in ways that perhaps Attorney General Garland decided the Justice Department needs to manage on appeal. Whaley says. There are institutional interests that Garland has to take into account when making calls in these sorts of cases. It's actually a good thing that we're not seeing knee jerk reflexive political postures. State one would expect out of a Democratic president Stuart Gerson, led the department civil division during the George H. W. Bush administration. He says there are institutional interests that apply in the decision to fight the release of the obstruction memo, as well with regard to the disclosure of documents and the like of that those are positions that are taken by any administration, and he says that after the turmoil of the trump years Ireland also needs to restore the morale and confidence and the department's career staff. He is attending to that by proceeding in a business like way and standing behind institutional positions of the department, things that are argued from administration to administration irrespective of party. At his Senate hearing, Garland said that the department under the Biden administration has reversed several policies from the Trump era. Among the.

Rachel Martin Kim Whaley Noel King E. Jean Carroll Ryan Lucas Trump Joe Bidens Carol Garland New York Whaley Merrick Garland University of Baltimore School NPR George H. W. Bush Stuart Gerson Leahy Capitol Hill Democrats last year
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm surely. Well, that is NPR's Ryan Lucas. Thank you so much, Ryan. Thank you. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Illinois is poised to fully repeal criminal penalties for people who have sex without condoms while knowing they have HIV and without telling their partners. Illinois would become the second state in the country to do this after Texas here to talk about what it would mean for people living with HIV in Illinois is Timothy Jackson, director of government relations at AIDS Foundation Chicago. That's one of the groups that helped spearhead the legislation. Timothy Jackson welcome. Thank you so much. We're glad to have you with us. Let's start big picture because I know laws like the one that looks about to be overturned in Illinois. There are laws like that, in effect all over the country and in more than 30 states, according to the CDC. From where you sit What has been the impact of these laws? Uh, thank you. Thank you So much for that great question. Yes, we're looking at over 30 states that have these type of laws on the books. And what we know, um, is that they are overly discriminatory to people living with HIV. They don't do as they are intended. Not. One single study has shown where these type of laws have changed behavior or brought down the incidence or prevalence rates of HIV. Um, and it actually goes against current science. Essentially because it incentivizes people not to know their HIV status because you can't be charged with this crime. If you don't know you have HIV, and so we know that it acts as a barrier to testing and treatment and in flake stigma and harm on people living with HIV. Is there any evidence that it protects people who might be at risk of contracting HIV? No. None. It is really rooted out of the initial fears and misinformation and ignorance around HIV in the late eighties and the early nineties, when these laws began popping up around the country. Um and so in our discussion here in Illinois working on this bill was We were going to lead with science and truth and humanity, as opposed to fear and misinformation, which is a key point to make, because so much has changed in the decades that we have been living with this epidemic in terms of how much we understand about HIV and about AIDS, and we should note there are drugs that you can take now that pretty much block the chances that even if you have the virus that you could transmit it Absolutely. We have over three dozen treatment options for HIV. We have something called pre exposure prophylaxis prep, which is for people who are HIV negative that they can take. And it's up to 99% effective in preventing HIV. Um and then we also have something called you equals you, which is Undetectable equals transmissible. Which means that a person living with HIV with an undetectable viral load poses zero risk of transmitting the virus. So how will this bill Change. Things change life for people in Illinois who are living with HIV or AIDS. Yeah, it will allow people to breathe again. Um, to be able to live their life openly without fear of their health condition being used against them, criminally, Um, it allows people living with HIV to not have that stigma on their shoulders. I'm going to really allows us to be able to turn the page and ending the HIV epidemic because making sure that we remove barriers to testing and treatment is the best way to do that. And at the top of the list are these laws that criminalize people living with HIV? We've been talking to Timothy Jackson, director of government relations at AIDS Foundation, Chicago. Thank you so much. Thank you.

Ryan Timothy Jackson Ryan Lucas NPR AIDS Foundation late eighties CDC early nineties One single study Texas over 30 states Chicago more than 30 states second state one HIV over three dozen treatment up to 99% zero Illinois
DOJ Has Charged Nearly 500 With COVID-Related Fraud In The Past Year

90.3 KAZU Programming

00:56 sec | 2 years ago

DOJ Has Charged Nearly 500 With COVID-Related Fraud In The Past Year

"People so far with fraud and other schemes tied to the Corona virus. Pandemic is NPR's Ryan Lucas explains. The department is made fighting such crimes a priority. Over the past year, The covert 19 pandemic has created a rich environment for fraudsters. One particularly enticing target has been the hundreds of billions of dollars to government doled out as part of the cares Act passed a year ago this week. The Justice Department says that over the past year it has charged 474 people with fraud and other crimes connected to the pandemic. That includes attempts to defraud the paycheck protection program, as well as other loan programs and unemployment benefits that were created by the cares act. The government says the amount of money fraudsters tried to steal in the cases charged so far. Around $570 million. Attorney General Merrick Garland says the department remains committed to protecting the public from those who would use the health crisis to illegally enrich themselves. Brian Lucas. NPR NEWS Washington A coalition

Ryan Lucas NPR Justice Department Attorney General Merrick Garla Government Brian Lucas Washington
U.S. Intelligence Agencies Warn Of Heightened Domestic Extremism Threat

All Things Considered

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

U.S. Intelligence Agencies Warn Of Heightened Domestic Extremism Threat

"The office of the director of National Intelligence says domestic violent extremists pose a growing threat in 2021. NPR's Ryan Lucas has more the new unclassified assessment from U. S intelligence agencies. The one page executive summary from the intelligence community provides a 30,000 ft view of the threat of domestic extremism. Report says that individual domestic violent extremists or small cells of them are more likely to conduct attacks than extremist organizations. The intelligence community also says that racist or militia, violent extremists pose the most lethal homegrown threat. Report concludes that recent socio political developments like the attack on the U. S Capitol, and the cove in 19 pandemic will almost certainly prompt some extremists to take up violence. White Supremacist, meanwhile, are the homegrown extremists with the most persistent and concerning overseas

National Intelligence Ryan Lucas U. NPR
U.S. Intelligence Agencies Warn Of Heightened Domestic Extremism Threat

BBC World Service

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

U.S. Intelligence Agencies Warn Of Heightened Domestic Extremism Threat

"News. I'm Shea Stevens, the office of the director of National Intelligence, says domestic violent extremists are posing a greater threat. In the United States. NPR's Ryan Lucas has more on the newly unclassified assessment from intelligence agencies. The one page executive summary from the intelligence community provides a 30,000 ft view of the threat of domestic extremism. Report says that individual domestic violent extremists or small cells of them are more likely to conduct attacks than extremist organizations. The intelligence community also says that racist or militia, violent extremists pose the most lethal homegrown threat. Report concludes that recent socio political developments like the attack on the U. S Capitol, and the cove in 19 pandemic will almost certainly prompt some extremists to take up violence. White Supremacist, meanwhile, are the homegrown extremists with the most

Shea Stevens National Intelligence Ryan Lucas NPR United States U.
9 Oath Keepers indicted for conspiracy in Washington DC Capitol riot

All Things Considered

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

9 Oath Keepers indicted for conspiracy in Washington DC Capitol riot

"News. I'm Jack Spear. The Justice Department says six more people affiliated with the right wing Oath Keepers paramilitary group have been indicted in connection with Capitol insurrection. NPR's Ryan Lucas reports They joined three members of the group already facing federal charges. The six new defendants, who come from Florida, North Carolina and Ohio are all in federal custody. They and the three previously indicted oath keepers face a range of charges, the most serious of which is conspiracy. Prosecutors say that several of the defendant's dressed in paramilitary gear and participated in a military style stack formation. Push up the Capitol steps and storm the building on January 6th. Indictment alleges that some of the defendants coordinated ahead of the event discussing what to bring their travel plans and where to stay in the Washington area. Prosecutors have brought some 200

Jack Spear Oath Keepers Paramilitary Grou Ryan Lucas Justice Department NPR North Carolina Ohio Florida Washington
Dem’s lawsuit accuses Trump of inciting deadly Capitol riot in Washington, DC

All Things Considered

00:59 sec | 2 years ago

Dem’s lawsuit accuses Trump of inciting deadly Capitol riot in Washington, DC

"A Democratic congressman from Mississippi has filed a civil lawsuit accusing former President Trump and his attorney, Rudy Giuliani off conspiracy to incite the January 6th. The riot at the U. S. Capitol. As NPR's Ryan Lucas reports too far right groups, the proud boys and the oath keepers are also named as defendants in the suit. Congressman Bennie Thompson is suing Trump in the others for allegedly conspiring to incite the capital Riot. Disrupt the official counting of electoral college votes. The lawsuit alleges that was a violation of the Ku Klux Klan Act, which protects against conspiracies that seek to prevent members of Congress from fulfilling their constitutional duties. Suit says that trumpet Giuliani inside of the crowd at the January 6th rally near the White House, while the proud boys and the oath keepers spearheaded the attack on the capital. Thompson had to shelter in the House gallery during the attack before being ushered to safety by security. The lawsuit is the first against Trump over the Capitol riot since the Senate acquitted him on Saturday on the impeachment charge of inciting in

President Trump U. S. Capitol Ryan Lucas Congressman Bennie Thompson Rudy Giuliani Mississippi NPR Donald Trump House Gallery Giuliani Congress Suit White House Thompson Senate
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"News Just ahead on this Wednesday morning on KQED Public radio. I'm Dave Freeman. And the time now is 6 30. Live from NPR News in Washington. I'm Dave Magically Day two of former President Donald Trump. Senate impeachment trial gets underway this afternoon. House accuses Trump of inciting insurrection at the U. S. Capitol on January 6 yesterday, Trump's lawyers argued an impeachment trial of an ex president is unconstitutional. The Senate rejected that argument. In a 56 to 44 vote, six Republicans joined Democrats and declaring the trial to be constitutional. NPR's Ryan Lucas says Trump was not happy with the job his legal team did on day one. A number of Republican senators weren't particularly impressed either even a couple of Republicans who voted that the trial itself is unconstitutional. Told reporters that they thought the defense's arguments were poorly organized and rambling. Trump was acquitted in his first Senate impeachment trial a year ago on charges related to Ukraine. The head of the European Commission says the use 27 countries aren't doing enough to get covert 19 vaccines rolled out to their populations. We need more coordination on the supply off key ingredients. We need to improve manufacturing surge capacity. And we need to boost cooperation between the public of the private sector. That's commission President Ursula von der Leyen. Speaking in Brussels this week, the You topped a half million deaths from covert 19. This is NPR news Live from KQED News. I'm Brian what Several Bay area Asian American advocacy groups are calling on the city of Oakland to provide a victim's fund for those injured in recent assaults in Chinatown. This comes after a string of violent, unprovoked attacks against elderly people in that neighborhood. Al Vino. Wong is with the Asian Pacific Environmental Network. She says Recent budget cuts have removed community resource officers from Chinatown, which is very disappointing. We really need to think about how do we increase the feeling of safety over time and really think about how we can continue to build up our cultural vibrancy in the neighborhood? Oakland officials recently charged a 29 year old man for assaulting three elderly people in Chinatown last month. The mayor's office did not respond to requests for comment. In San Jose, The Happy Hollow Park and Zoo is welcoming guests for the first time since November. The zoo shut down last month last March and had reopened for three weeks before the latest stay at home order was issued. Zoo manager Kevin her Tell says the zoo has made preparations to ensure all covert guidelines are met. There's a lot of directional fencing if you will to make sure that folks stay on the one way in and one way out, So it kind of loops through the areas and make sure that people don't congregate. People don't mingle. Yes, we'll have to make reservations prior to their visit due to reduced capacity. They will go through a quick health screening and we'll get.

Donald Trump Senate NPR News Chinatown Happy Hollow Park and Zoo president Oakland KQED NPR Dave Freeman Wong President Ursula Washington Brussels European Commission Ryan Lucas Al Vino San Jose KQED News Asian Pacific Environmental Ne
Biden's Justice Department to ask nearly all Trump-era U.S. attorneys to resign

NPR News Now

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

Biden's Justice Department to ask nearly all Trump-era U.S. attorneys to resign

"Plans to begin. The transition process for senate confirmed us attorneys as early as today as npr's ryan lucas reports. Two us attorneys conducting politically sensitive investigations are expected to remain in their current roles. One of the. us attorneys. Who is expected to stay on in his job is the us attorney for delaware. David weiss his office is conducting criminal investigation into president. Biden's son hunter. A senior justice department official tells. Npr that acting attorney general. Monty wilkinson called weiss on monday evening and asked him to hold in his current role. Thunder biden probe is one of two high profile politically sensitive investigations. The biden justice department inherited from the trump era. The other is special. Counsel john durham's investigation into the origins of the russia probe. Npr has learned that. Durham is expected to resign his post as us attorney for connecticut. What his appointment. As special counsel will remain in effect. Ryan lucas npr news washington. A team of

Ryan Lucas United States Monty Wilkinson David Weiss NPR Thunder Biden Senate Biden Justice Department Biden Delaware Justice Department Counsel John Durham Weiss Hunter Durham Russia Connecticut Washington
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:13 min | 2 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

"This is all things considered from NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. Senators will gather tomorrow for the second impeachment trial of Donald Trump, The former president is accused of inciting the deadly insurrection by his supporters on January 6th at the Capitol. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer says the arguments this week will shine a light on Trump's role in that riot. You must have all the truth come out, and then the accountability once the truth comes out. That's what we aim to do with this trial. Trump's lawyers say the former president can't be blamed for the actions of his supporters. We're joined now by NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas to talk about what we know and what lies ahead. Hello there. Hi. All right. To start with you. Ryan, President Trump's legal team filed their pretrial brief today. What did it say? Well. Last week, we got an outline of their defense in the response to the article of impeachment. And then today we got it was a 78 page brief, So there's more detail on this. But one thing that stood out is the jabs that they take. Trump's lawyers take it. The House managers and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. They argue that the impeachment push is driven by what they called Trump Derangement syndrome in the hunger for quote unquote political theater. They say Democrats are using impeachment as a tool to silence a political opponent. And they accuse Democrats of taking advantage of what they call the horror and confusion that all Americans felt when watching the violence on January 6th at the Capitol, And they say that instead of trying to heal the nation after this violence that Democrats quote have callously tried to harness harness the chaos of the moment. Their own political gain. So attacks on Democrats there in terms of legal arguments. What's the nature of their defense? What are they arguing? Well, Trump's lawyers, David Cronenberg's cast are leaning very heavily into the constitutionality argument. They say that the Senate Has no jurisdiction to hold a trial of Trump Now that he is no longer president. They say a conviction in a Senate trial requires the possibility of removal from office. Since Trump is no longer in office. They say there can't be a trial in this whole process. This whole thing is unconstitutional. Now. As for the incitement of violence allegation, they say Trump didn't direct the violence and shouldn't be blamed for the crimes of a small group of criminals. They argue that this speech that he gave a zwelithini allegations of election fraud, baseless allegations we should say leading up to the January sticks that all of that speech is constitutionally protected. And they say a high crime and misdemeanor can't be something that is protected by the Constitution. And I know we got a response from the members of the house. We're going to be managing the impeachment in the Senate. Kelsey. What did they say? Basically, they dismissed everything that Ryan just outlined there. They didn't dismiss the entire argument from the Trump team. They say that evidence against the former president is as they describe it overwhelming and they say what Trump is trying to do is to escape accountability. They also say that you know that the arguments that his lawyers are putting up basically don't meet the definition of what is constitutionally protected. They say that they're going to argue That the president should have been held to account for his actions because they happen well. He was in office, therefore, making him subject to impeachment. They're basically trying to undermine all Republican attempts to make this an argument about the process about the constitutionality about whether or not the Senate could even have the trial. They want to bring it back to having an argument about the events of that day. And Trump's actions leading up to that day. Let's talk about how this is gonna play out. Listeners may remember a year ago, the first impeachment trial of President Trump took almost three weeks, the two sides argued late into the night and on the weekends. Kelsey What's the plan for this one? Well, this time we expect things to get underway tomorrow, and instead of just jumping right into the trial, we're going to see four hours of debate on the constitutionality question. And then they will revote that question because we have already seen the Senate voted the majority of Republicans. Voted that this is an unconstitutional trial. After that. The trial will begin Wednesday at noon, and each side will have up to 16 hours toe to present their arguments after that is when we get some debate and vote on witnesses if the House managers choose to call witnesses that is NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Thanks to both of you. Thank you. Okay. Pandemic news Now Corona virus vaccines are available, but many questions persist. Like where do you go to sign up to get one? Do you need to get on a local health department list? Or do you contact that hospital where you got surgery a few years ago or hang out at the grocery store in case the pharmacy has an extra dose or two left over at the end of the day. Do you do all of the above? It is a messy, confusing patchwork out there right now, So we have asked NPR health policy reporters Selena Simmons Duffin to round up a few tips Say, Selina. Hi, Mary Louise before we get to your tips, why is it such a mess? Health officials knew. Once vaccines were out there, we're going to need to get the shots out to people. Right, but it seems like what happened is there just wasn't a lot of attention on this part of the rollout, the scheduling appointments and managing the band part so clear Hannon, who runs the Association of Immunization Managers, the people who worked for months through the fall, planning the vaccine rollout in each state. Told me that it just wasn't a big focus. We did talk about this a little bit, but not a lot. The focus from CDC and the focus from Operation works speed was that initial rollout, So Yeah, there wasn't a lot of vision for the next phase where we are now. And you don't have to tell her that it's a mess. She herself could barely figure out how to get a shot for her dad in Maryland. He's on the pre registered waiting list for our county since January, 15th. And we haven't heard one thing and I'm like, who could possibly be ahead of him. He's 95 like, come on. I should say she was ultimately able to get him vaccinated in another county. Well, that's good news. Help us understand one other piece of this puzzle, which is how does this actually work in terms of the vaccine, getting to the places that are scheduling the shots? Right, so you can kind of picture this vaccine flow chart. The federal government buys the vaccine doses and then allocates them out to states and then states distribute them into three separate buckets. Local public health departments, hospital systems and sometimes pharmacies. The pharmacy program is actually expanding later this week. But now here is a key point. They don't talk to each other, which is why you might feel like you're clicking randomly from one system to another, and they're all different. Local health departments often don't even know who has doses in a point apartments available in their local areas. So given all this confusion if it's your turn, if it's your if you're eligible, what is the best advice for how to figure out where to go on what to do. The best advice at this point is to start with your state Health Department website and that will hopefully tell you First of all who's eligible where you are right now and where the doses are being sent in your state, and then you have to check in each of those buckets, public health departments, hospitals and pharmacies. It's a huge pain. You might not get appointments because there's just not enough doses to go around. Right now. You have.

President Trump Senate president Ryan Lucas NPR NPR News Kelsey Snell Mary Louise Kelly Kelsey What Chuck Schumer state Health Department Ari Shapiro Kelsey Nancy Pelosi fraud Maryland CDC
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:32 min | 2 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. Senators will gather tomorrow for the second impeachment trial of Donald Trump, The former president is accused of inciting the deadly insurrection by his supporters on January 6th at the Capitol. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer says the arguments this week will shine a light on Trump's role in that riot. You must have all the truth come out and then the accountability Once the truth comes out, that's what we aim to do with this trial. Trump's lawyers say the former president can't be blamed for the actions of his supporters. We're joined now by NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas to talk about what we know and what lies ahead. Hello there. Hi. Hi To start with you, Ryan, President Trump's legal team filed their pretrial brief today. What did it say? Well. Last week, we got an outline of their defense in the response to the article of impeachment. And then today we got it was a 78 page brief, So there's more detail on this. But one thing that stood out is the jabs that they take. Trump's lawyers take it. The House managers and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. They argue that the impeachment push is driven by what they called Trump Derangement syndrome in the hunger for quote unquote political theater. They say Democrats are using impeachment as a tool to silence a political opponent. And they accuse Democrats have taken advantage of what they call the horror and confusion that all Americans felt when watching the violence on January 6th at the Capitol, and they say that instead of trying to heal the nation after this violence that Democrats Quote, have callously tried to harness harness the chaos of the moment for their own political gain. So attacks on Democrats there in terms of legal arguments. What's the nature of their defense? What are they arguing? Well, Trump's lawyers, David Cronenberg's cast are leaning very heavily into the constitutionality argument. They say that the Senate Has no jurisdiction to hold a trial of Trump Now that he is no longer president. They say a conviction in a Senate trial requires the possibility of removal from office. Since Trump is no longer in office. They say there can't be a trial in this whole process. This whole thing is unconstitutional. Now. As for the incitement of violence allegation, they say Trump didn't direct the violence and shouldn't be blamed for the crimes of a small group of criminals. They argue that this speech that he gave a zwelithini allegations of election fraud, baseless allegations we should say leading up to the January sticks that all of that speech is constitutionally protected. And they say a high crime and misdemeanor can't be something that is protected by the Constitution. And I know we got a response from the members of the house. We're going to be managing the impeachment in the Senate. Kelsey. What did they say? Basically, they dismissed everything that Ryan just outlined there. They didn't dismiss the entire argument from the Trump team. They say that evidence against the former president is as they describe it overwhelming and they say what Trump is trying to do is to escape accountability. They also say that you know that the arguments that his lawyers are putting up basically don't meet the definition of what is constitutionally protected. They say that they're going to argue. That the president should have been held to account for his actions because they happen well. He was in office, therefore, making him subject to impeachment. They're basically trying to undermine all Republican attempts to make this an argument about the process about the constitutionality about whether or not the Senate could even have the trial. They want to bring it back to having an argument about the events of that day. And Trump's actions leading up to that day. Let's talk about how this is gonna play out. Listeners may remember a year ago, the first impeachment trial of President Trump took almost three weeks, the two sides argued late into the night and on the weekends. Kelsey What's the plan for this one? Well, this time we expect things to get underway tomorrow, and instead of just jumping right into the trial, we're going to see four hours of debate on the constitutionality question. And then they will revote that question because we've already seen the Senate voting. The majority of Republicans Voted that this is an unconstitutional trial. After that. The trial will begin Wednesday at noon, and each side will have up to 16 hours toe to present their arguments after that is when we get some debate and vote on witnesses if the House managers choose to call witnesses that is NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Thanks to both of you. Thank you. Okay, Panda. My canoe is now Corona virus. Vaccines are available, but many questions persist. Like where do you go to sign up to get one? Do you need to get on a local health department list? Or do you contact that hospital where you got surgery a few years ago or hang out at the grocery store in case the pharmacy has an extra dose or two left over at the end of the day. Do you do all of the above? It is a messy, confusing patchwork out there right now, So we have asked NPR health policy reporters Selena Simmons Duffin to round up a few tips Say, Selina. Hi, Mary Louise before we get to your tips, why is it such a mess? Health officials knew once vaccines were out there, we're going to need to get the shots out to people. Right, but it seems like what happened is there just wasn't a lot of attention on this part of the rollout, the scheduling appointments and managing the band part so clear Hannon, who runs the Association of Immunization Managers, the people who worked for months through the fall, planning the vaccine rollout in each state. Told me that it just wasn't a big focus. We did talk about this a little bit, but not a lot. The focus from CDC and the focus from Operation works speed was that initial rollout, So Yeah, there wasn't a lot of vision for the next phase where we are now. And you don't have to tell her that it's a mess. She herself could barely figure out how to get a shot for her dad in Maryland. He's on the pre registered waiting list for our county since January, 15th and we haven't heard one thing and I'm like, who could possibly be ahead of him. He's 95 Come on. I should say she was ultimately able to get him vaccinated in another county. Well, that's good news. Help us understand one other piece of this puzzle, which is how does this actually work in terms of the vaccine, getting to the places that are scheduling the shots? Right, so you can kind of picture this vaccine flow chart. The federal government buys the vaccine doses and then allocates them out to states and then states distribute them into three separate buckets. Local public health departments, hospital systems and sometimes pharmacies. The pharmacy program is actually expanding later this week. But now here is a key point. They don't talk to each other, which is why you might feel like you're clicking randomly from one system to another, and they're all different. Local health departments often don't even know who has.

President Trump Senate president Ryan Lucas NPR Kelsey Snell Kelsey What Chuck Schumer Louise Kelly Ari Shapiro Kelsey Nancy Pelosi fraud Maryland CDC David Cronenberg Mary Louise
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

"This is all things considered from NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly. I'm Ari Shapiro. Senators will gather tomorrow for the second impeachment trial of Donald Trump. The former president is accused of inciting the deadly insurrection by his supporters on January 6th at the Capitol. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer says the arguments this week will shine a light on Trump's role in that riot. You must have all the truth come out and then the accountability Once the truth comes out, that's what we aim to do with this trial. Trump's lawyers say the former president can't be blamed for the actions of his supporters. We're joined now by NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas to talk about what we know and what lies ahead. Hello there. Hi. Hi. To start with you. Ryan, President Trump's legal team filed their pretrial brief today. What did it say? Well. Last week, we got an outline of their defense in the response to the article of impeachment. And then today we got it was a 78 page brief, So there's more detail on this. But one thing that stood out is the jabs that they take. Trump's lawyers take it. The House managers and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. They argue that the impeachment push is driven by what they called Trump Derangement syndrome in the hunger for quote unquote political theater. They say Democrats are using impeachment as a tool to silence a political opponent. And they accuse Democrats of taking advantage of what they call the horror and confusion that all Americans felt when watching the violence on January 6th at the Capitol, and they say that instead of trying to heal the nation after this violence that Democrats Quote, have callously tried to harness harness the chaos of the moment for their own political gain. So attacks on Democrats there in terms of legal arguments. What's the nature of their defense? What are they arguing? Well, Trump's lawyers, David Cronenberg's cast are leaning very heavily into the constitutionality argument. They say that the Senate Has no jurisdiction to hold a trial of Trump Now that he is no longer president. They say a conviction in a Senate trial requires the possibility of removal from office. Since Trump is no longer in office. They say there can't be a trial in this whole process. This whole thing is unconstitutional. Now. As for the incitement of violence allegation, they say Trump didn't direct the violence and shouldn't be blamed for the crimes of a small group of criminals. They argue that this speech that he gave a zwelithini allegations of election fraud, baseless allegations we should say leading up to the January sticks that all of that speech is constitutionally protected. And they say a high crime and misdemeanor can't be something that is protected by the Constitution. And I know we got a response from the members of the house. We're going to be managing the impeachment in the Senate. Kelsey. What did they say? Basically, they dismissed everything that Ryan just outlined there. They didn't dismiss the entire argument from the Trump team. They say that evidence against the former president is as they describe it overwhelming and they say what Trump is trying to do is to escape accountability. They also say that you know that the arguments that his lawyers are putting up basically don't meet the definition of what is constitutionally protected. They say that they're going to argue That the president should have been held Tol account for his actions because they happen well. He was in office, therefore, making him subject to impeachment. They're basically trying to undermine all Republican attempts to make this an argument about the process about the constitutionality about whether or not the Senate could even have the trial. They want to bring it back to having an argument about the events of that day. And Trump's actions leading up to that day. Let's talk about how this is gonna play out. Listeners may remember a year ago, the first impeachment trial of President Trump took almost three weeks, the two sides argued late into the night and on the weekends. Kelsey What's the plan for this one? Well, this time we expect things to get underway tomorrow, and instead of just jumping right into the trial, we're going to see four hours of debate on the constitutionality question. And then they will revote that question because we have already seen the Senate voted the majority of Republicans. Voted that this is an unconstitutional trial. After that the trial will begin Wednesday at noon, and each side will have up to 16 hours to, uh, to present their arguments after that is when we will get some debate and vote on witnesses if the House managers choose to call witnesses The big change here is that we won't see a Saturday argument. The President's council former President's Council requested no trial during the Sabbath. So between Friday at 5, P.m. on DSA Sunday afternoon, there will be no trial and they will return on Sunday. February Yes, February 14. So Valentine's Day trial for for those people watching a senator spouses Will not be with their loved ones. This Valentine's Day That is NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Thanks to both of you, Thank you. Okay. Pandemic news Now Corona virus vaccines are available, but many questions persist. Like where do you go to sign up to get one? Do you need to get on a local health department list? Or do you contact that hospital where you got surgery a few years ago or hang out at the grocery store in case the pharmacy has an extra dose or two left over at the end of the day. Do you do all of the above? It is a messy, confusing patchwork out there right now, So we have asked NPR health policy reporters Selena Simmons Duffin to round up a few tips say Selina. Hi, Mary Louise Before we get to your tips, Why is it such a mess? Health officials knew once vaccines were out there. We're going to need to get the shots out to people..

President Trump Senate president NPR Ryan Lucas NPR News Kelsey Snell Mary Louise Kelly Ari Shapiro Kelsey What Chuck Schumer Kelsey Nancy Pelosi Mary Louise fraud President Selena Simmons Duffin David Cronenberg
"ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:59 min | 2 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. Senators will gather tomorrow for the second impeachment trial of Donald Trump, The former president is accused of inciting the deadly insurrection by his supporters on January 6th at the Capitol. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer says the arguments this week will shine a light on Trump's role in that riot. You must have all the truth come out, and then the accountability once the truth comes out. That's what we aim to do with this trial. Trump's lawyers say the former president can't be blamed for the actions of his supporters. We're joined now by NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas to talk about what we know and what lies ahead. Hello there. Hi. Hi. To start with you. Ryan, President Trump's legal team filed their pretrial brief today. What did it say? Well. Last week, we got an outline of their defense in the response to the article of impeachment. And then today we got it was a 78 page brief, So there's more detail on this. But one thing that stood out is the jabs that they take. Trump's lawyers take it. The House managers and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. They argue that the impeachment push is driven by what they called Trump Derangement syndrome in the hunger for quote unquote political theater. They say Democrats are using impeachment as a tool to silence a political opponent. And they accuse Democrats of taking advantage of what they call the horror and confusion that all Americans felt when watching the violence on January 6th at the Capitol, And they say that instead of trying to heal the nation after this violence that Democrats quote have callously tried to harness harness the chaos of the moment. Their own political gain. So attacks on Democrats there in terms of legal arguments. What's the nature of their defense? What are they arguing? Well, Trump's lawyers, David Cronenberg's cast are leaning very heavily into the constitutionality argument. They say that the Senate Has no jurisdiction to hold a trial of Trump Now that he is no longer president. They say a conviction in a Senate trial requires the possibility of removal from office. Since Trump is no longer in office. They say there can't be a trial in this whole process. This whole thing is unconstitutional. Now. As for the incitement of violence allegation, they say Trump didn't direct the violence and shouldn't be blamed for the crimes of a small group of criminals. They argue that this speech that he gave a zwelithini allegations of election fraud, baseless allegations we should say leading up to the January sticks that all of that speech is constitutionally protected. And they say a high crime and misdemeanor can't be something that is protected by the Constitution. And I know we got a response from the members of the house. We're going to be managing the impeachment in the Senate. Kelsey. What did they say? Basically, they dismissed everything that Ryan just outlined there. They didn't dismiss the entire argument from the Trump team. They say that evidence against the former president is as they describe it overwhelming and they say what Trump is trying to do is to escape accountability. They also say that you know that the arguments that his lawyers are putting up basically don't meet the definition of what is constitutionally protected. They say that they're going to argue. That the president should have been held Tol account for his actions because they happen well. He was in office, therefore, making him subject to impeachment. They're basically trying to undermine all Republican attempts to make this an argument about the process about the constitutionality about whether or not the Senate could even have the trial and they want to bring it back to having an argument about the events of that day. And Trump's actions leading up to that day. Let's talk about how this is going to play out. Listeners may remember a year ago, the first impeachment trial of President Trump took almost three weeks, the two sides argued late into the night and on the weekends. Kelsey What's the plan for this one? Well, this time we expect things to get underway tomorrow, and instead of just jumping right into the trial, we're going to see four hours of debate on the constitutionality question. And then they will revote that question because we have already seen the Senate voted the majority of Republicans. Voted that this is an unconstitutional trial. After that. The trial will begin Wednesday at noon, and each side will have up to 16 hours toe to present their arguments after that is when we get some debate and vote on witnesses if the House managers choose to call witnesses The big change here is that we won't see a Saturday argument. The President's council former President's Council requested no trial during the Sabbath. So between Friday at 5 P.m. on DSA Sunday afternoon, there will be no trial and they will return on Sunday. February Yes, February 14 Valentine's Day trial for For those people watching a senator Spouses will not be with their loved ones is Valentine's Day. That is NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Thanks to both of you, Thank you. Okay. Pandemic news Now Corona virus vaccines are available, but many questions persist. Like where do you go to sign up to get one? Do you need to get on a local health department list? Or do you contact that hospital where you got surgery a few years ago or hang out at the grocery store in case the pharmacy has an extra dose or two left over at the end of the day. Do you do all of the above? It is a messy, confusing patchwork out there right now, So we have asked NPR health policy reporters Selena Simmons Duffin to round up a few tips say Selina. Hi, Mary Louise Before we get to your tips, Why is it such a mess? Health officials knew once vaccines were out there. We're going to need to get the shots out to people. Right, but it seems like what happened is there just wasn't a lot of attention on this part of the rollout, the scheduling appointments and managing the band part so clear Hannon, who runs the Association of Immunization Managers, the people who worked for months through the fall, planning the vaccine rollout in each state. Told me that it just wasn't a big focus. We did talk about this a little bit, but not a lot. The focus from CDC and the focus from Operation works speed was that initial rollout, So Yeah, there wasn't a lot of vision for the next phase where we are now. And you don't have to tell her that it's a mess. She herself could barely figure out how to get a shot for her dad in Maryland. He's on the pre registered waiting list for our county. Since January, 15th and we haven't heard one thing and I'm like, who could possibly be ahead of him. He's 95 like, come on. I should say she was ultimately able to get him vaccinated in another county. Well, that's good news. Help us understand one other piece of this puzzle, which is how does this actually work in terms of the vaccine, getting to the places that are scheduling the shots? Right, so you can kind of picture this vaccine flow chart. The federal government buys the vaccine doses and then allocates them out to states and then states distribute them into three separate buckets, local public health departments, hospital systems and sometimes pharmacies. The pharmacy program is actually expanding later this week, But now here is a key point. They don't talk to each other, Which is why you might feel like you're clicking randomly from one system to another, and they're all different. Local health departments often don't even know who has.

President Trump Senate president Ryan Lucas NPR NPR News Kelsey Snell Mary Louise Kelly Kelsey What Chuck Schumer Ari Shapiro Kelsey Nancy Pelosi fraud Maryland CDC Mary Louise
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:02 min | 2 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Noel King, and I'm Steve Inskeep. We now know Maura of how House managers will argue their case against former President Trump and how the ex president will defend himself. At a Senate trial next week. Some of the facts here were witnessed by millions on January 6th and in the months before the defeated president duped his supporters within elaborate con about the election. He then told a crowd to fight for him and they marched on the capital and attacked January 6. NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas has been reading what advocates for each side, saying their legal briefs Ryan Good morning. Good morning, Steve. I feel in conversation with people. People are sometimes still confused about the basics, so I just want to lay it out again. Remind people he's been impeached by a vote of the House of Representatives. That's on his record. It's not the same as an indictment, but it's sort of like that. He's been charged next week. It goes to trial before the Senate and managers from the house, which indicted him make their case like prosecutors. So what is their case? Well, they begin their case. Actually, the summer of 2020 saying that Trump back then was laying the foundations for what we ultimately saw. In January 6 they site interviews from the summer in which Trump refused to commit to a peaceful transfer of power if he lost. And then, after the election, Trump repeatedly was pushing his baseless claims that the election had somehow been stolen. The House managers document those, and they say that Trump's rhetoric, groom or and more incendiary as the weeks passed after the election, and ultimately came to a crescendo on January 6th when he took the stage near the White House. Managers say on that stage, Trump whip the crowd into a frenzy and aim them quote like a loaded cannon at the Capitol when he told them to quote, fight like hell, they say Trump inside of the mob. They say he incited the violence and for that the House managers say he should be convicted. Barred from holding office in the future. Who are the people in Trump's latest legal team? And how are they shaping their defense? Will trump's to new lawyers are David shown, and Bruce Castor Jr And what they say in their filing is that the proceedings against Trump are unconstitutional because he is no longer in office. They say the Constitution requires that a person be in office to be impeached and tried before the Senate and since Trump is clearly out of office. This trial, in their view is is moot. Now there is a legal debate on this point. Scholars do come down on both sides of the question. The House managers for their part in their case argued that this is indeed constitutional and that a president Has to be held accountable for his actions from the first day to the last day of his presidency. They say there is no January exception. But what maybe more pertinent here is that the constitutionality argument seems like something that's registering with a lot of Senate Republicans since 45 of them voted last week. At impeaching a former president was in their view. Unconstitutional. Yeah, that's politically pertinent, although of course there's also this president, where a former official was, in fact, put on trial before the Senate in in the past, so we know what the facts of the president Are there? Um, How is the former president dealing with the big lie here? Everything that, he said, falsely for months leading up to the January 6 attack. His lawyers brought up his Trump's election fraud claims. But I wouldn't say that they focused on them. What they say is that when Trump publicly was challenging the election outcome that he is within his rights producer that he was just expressing his opinion. They also argue that there's insufficient evidence to conclude that Trump's claims of fraud or false now his lawyers gloss over the fact that dozens of courts had rejected the Trump campaign's legal challenges to the vote instead. His lawyers spend their time in their brief to nine allegations against their client. They deny that trump inside of the mob. They deny that he violated his oath of office and they deny that he committed any sort of high crimes or misdemeanors. So what happens before the trial begins next week? Well, we expect a full trial brief from Trump's legal team by next Monday. And of course, we will keep an eye out to see whether any Republicans start to perhaps waver on supporting Trump. And, of course, a bunch of Republicans would have to vote to convict for there to be a conviction. NPR justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Thanks thank you. U. S officials expressed outrage when Russian court ordered opposition leader Alexei Navalny to be sent to prison for more than two years. There's a debate, though, about what the U. S should or even can do. The Biden administration is reviewing its approach to Russia. Here's NPR's Michele Kelemen. At his first daily briefing at the State Department spokesperson, Ned Price made clear that he and his staff want to be on their toes, not on their heels. So they were quick with a statement calling on Russia to free Aleksei Navalny. We're going to look very carefully at the deteriorating human rights situation in Russia. What has happened with Mr Navalny specifically what has happened with the mass detentions of those who have bravely taken to the streets. In the aftermath of Mr Navalny's arrest, Navalny supporters have sent the Biden administration a list of Russian officials that they think should face sanctions. The Atlantic Council's Dan Freed, who used to work on sanctions policy at the State Department, says that's one place to begin. The fastest way to respond is to go after Individuals who were in Putin's corrupt circle or their Children who have gotten rich because their Children of members of Putin's corrupt inner circle and that would be appropriate Given that Navalny himself is an anti corruption activist Freed, says he thinks the Biden administration is sending the right signals So far, President Biden agreed with Russian President Vladimir Putin to extend a key arms control agreement. But made clear that the U. S. Is looking into Russia's troubling behavior elsewhere that includes a cyber attack that experts believe was an espionage operation and reports that the Russians put bounties on U. S soldiers in Afghanistan. The Navalny case poses yet another early test, says Freed They will want point rightly to take a step back and think about Russia policy. And they're right to do so. But life doesn't let you do things in the proper order. Aleksei Navalny was medevac'd to Germany last year after he was poisoned with a nerve agent. He was immediately arrested when he returned to Russia on an old case that the European Court of Justice had described as unlawful in arbitrary. Germany's foreign minister called his sentencing a bitter blow to the rule of law in Russia. Us is likely to work together with Germany and other partners in Europe on more targeted sanctions. I could see some of that happening. That's probably not going to do very much to freedom only from jail. Georgetown University's Angela Stent says the U. S. Has a careful balancing act in Russia with very limited in what we can do to affect what happens inside Russia. You know, we've had 30 years of democracy promotion and what we have is an increasingly authoritarian Russia. Vladimir Putin has been in power since Bill Clinton was president of the United States. But stent says his crackdown on Navalny may be a sign of weakness. These are not the act of a really self confident leader, Former assistant Secretary of State for Europe Dan Freed agrees, saying Putin's early years were marked with stability and growth, but he's been running out of steam and ideas. And his government is more and more just a kleptocratic scheme to keep them all rich and love only has exposed that with his fabulous documentary about from his palace more than 100, Million people have watched Navalny's YouTube video freed once the US to pick up on that and take early steps together with its friends in Europe to impose some costs on corrupt Russian officials. Michele Kelemen. NPR NEWS Washington Some American elected officials have lately discovered angry people outside their homes. New Hampshire's Republican governor, Chris Sununu, had armed protesters. Outside his house. And then there's the targeting of Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker in the seaside community of Swamp Skit. GBH radios..

Trump president Aleksei Navalny Senate Russia President Biden Vladimir Putin NPR Ryan Lucas Dan Freed Steve Inskeep Michele Kelemen House of Representatives Europe State Department Noel King
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

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01:53 min | 2 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noel King, and I'm Steve Inskeep. We now know Maura of how House managers will argue their case against former President Trump and how the ex president will defend himself. A Senate trial next week. Some of the facts here were witnessed by millions on January 6th and in the months before the defeated president duped his supporters within elaborate con about the election. He then told a crowd to fight for him and they marched on the capital and attacked January 6. NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas has been reading what advocates for each side, saying their legal briefs Ryan Good morning. Good morning, Steve. I feel it in conversation with people. People are sometimes still confused about the basics, so I just want to lay it out again. Remind people he's been impeached by a vote of the House of Representatives. That's on his record. It's not the same as an indictment, but it's sort of like that. He's been charged next week. It goes to trial before the Senate and managers from the house, which indicted him make their case like prosecutors. So what is their case? They begin their case. Actually, the summer of 2020 saying that Trump back then was laying the foundations from what we ultimately saw. In January 6 they site interviews from the summer in which Trump refused to commit to a peaceful transfer of power if he lost, And then after the election, Trump repeatedly was pushing his baseless claims that the election had somehow been stolen. House managers document those and they say that Trump's rhetoric groom or and more incendiary as the weeks passed after the election, and ultimately came to a crescendo on January 6th when he took the stage near the White House. Managers say on that stage, Trump whip the crowd into a frenzy and aim them quote like a loaded cannon at the Capitol when he told them to quote, fight like hell. They stayed trump inside of the mob. They say he incited the violence and for that the House managers say he should be convicted. Barred from holding office in the future. Who are the people in Trump's latest legal team?.

Trump Ryan Lucas Steve Inskeep president Senate House of Representatives NPR News Noel King White House NPR Ryan Good Maura
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:50 min | 2 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles and I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington. The second Senate impeachment trial of Donald Trump is set to begin in one week. Today. House impeachment managers and Trump's legal team. Both filed briefs to the Senate in preparation. NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas has been reading through them Both. He's here now, you, Brian either, All right, let's start with the brief from the House impeachment managers. It ran 80 pages. What is the case that they lay out in those 80 pages in favor of impeachment? Well, they really give us the most detailed look yet at the case that they want to make. They build a narrative that begins before the election and comes to a deadly crescendo in January, 6 with the insurrection at the Capitol in their brief, the House managers point out that back in the summer, Trump refused to commit to a peaceful transfer of power. And then, after the election for weeks, Trump was pushing baseless claims of election fraud. They say that he fed lies to his supporters that made them think that they were the victims of some massive conspiracy. And they say that he then summoned his supporters to D. C on January 6th, and that's where he took to the stage near the White House and told them to quote, fight like hell. The manor states say Trump whip the crowd into a frenzy and aim them quote like a loaded cannon down Pennsylvania Avenue at the capital. They say he incited the mob. They say he did nothing to call it off on. They say that he violated his oath of office and deserves to be convicted and barred from office. Okay. And what is Trump's legal team, saying they have found an answer to this article of impeachment. So Trump's lawyers David, shown in Bruce Castor junior, argue, first and foremost that the proceedings are in their view unconstitutional Because Trump is no longer in office. They say the Constitution requires that a person be in office to be impeached. And since Trump is out of office, the trial is in their words, Quote. A legal melody. I'll note that some legal scholars would agree with them on that point. Many legal scholars, however, would not. It is a point of debate. It's a point, however, that appears to resonate with importantly, Senate Republicans. Since in a procedural vote last week, 45 of them voted that impeaching a former president was unconstitutional. Okay, so underscoring the point there that we are once again when it comes to Donald Trump in uncharted waters. We did expect, though, that his defense team was going to raise this issue of constitutionality did their brief also get into rebutting some of the charges that the House managers made these false claims of election fraud. They did get into the president's claims of election fraud, but it was not a focus of their brief. His legal team says that Trump exercised his first Amendment right to free speech when he questioned the election results. But they argued that there's insufficient evidence to conclude that what Trump said was actually false. They don't bring up the fact that one court after another shot down the Trump campaign's legal challenges to the vote, though instead his lawyers in their brief spend more time denying the allegations against their client. They deny that trump inside of the mob. They deny that he violated his oath of office. They argued that all of his statements are protected by the First Amendment. That's a point. I'll note that the House managers today tackle directly and argued that incitement to violence is not protected. Speak, all right. Meanwhile, we are going to see how this all works out one week from today when the trial actually begins. What else happens between now and then? Trump's lawyers will have a chance to file a trial brief by next Monday. That will likely be more fulsome than the case we saw today, but it's worth repeating. Ultimately, the question of whether Trump should be convicted and removed from office is up to the senator's alone. They alone will make that call. All right. And PR's Ryan Lucas reporting Thank you, Ryan. Thank you. The college basketball world, has lost a pioneering coach John Chaney. He died on Friday at the age of 89. Chaney was born in Jacksonville, Florida, but he was an adopted son of Philadelphia, where he spent his life coaching basketball, including 24 years at Temple University. And he was, in the words of Tyler times and avatar of black resilience, achievement and daring conviction. Times is a staff writer for the ringer and joins us Now. Welcome. How you doing Good. You know, your piece is titled The Gospel of John Chaney. What exactly was John Chaney's gospel In your view? Well, you know to me is somebody who grew up in north side of Philly in the nineties going into early two thousands. You know, the gospel of John Chaney. Woz. Really the book that all Philadelphians read by, you know, we are small city with a brash big heart and a, you know some people would describe in a blue collar town. Somebody like John Chaney, a son of Jacksonville adopted by the city, and we could become the best player in the public school leagues in the fifties, when he didn't have an opportunity. Go to the N B. A is an all American. You think of a guy who just adopted our style immediately and brought into the national forefront. Those temple teams were tough. They're ready to punch you in the mouth. They played a strong matchup zone. Tainted with an avatar for the city. He was us. You know, he was adopted by our city. But he became one of us overnight and 24 years. A temple university. He had folks thinking it was the hbcu. Yeah, like you right in your piece, Quote. For what felt like my entire life. There was no better brawler on behalf of the black athlete than Cheney. He made the entire country believe in the excellence of black boys for gotten by major universities, Industries, cities and the rest. Of the world. I mean being someone from North Philadelphia. Tell us like what did Coach Chaney mean to the Black boys? A Philly? You know, he's one of us Public league superstar. A guy who into an hbcu came back made Cheyney University of Division two and another Hbcu outside of Philly into a national champion. And so not only was he somebody who came in adopted our swag adopted who we were as a person as a city. But then he started to transform the mechanisms that were truly near and dear to North Philadelphia. He didn't back away. From that moment. You put your hands in the community You gave food out to people who needed it. You help people who didn't have homes. He was just genuinely a nice guy, a warm spirit, and he loved hard for a lot of those kids like Aaron McKie Mark making Chris Clark Guys like that. He took them in. He made them ballplayers. They ended up You know, I am a key, of course, ended up going to the MBA. And now he is the head coach of Temple University's basketball program. And so it's a full life cycle and I'm just happy coach Chaney was able to see as he referred to them. One of his sons take over and help continue to build the legacy he set forward. Well. Part of Cheney's passion was also the fact that he could be confrontational, like there was this time he charged at the coach of an opposing team, John Calipari shouting..

Donald Trump Coach Chaney Senate Temple University Ryan Lucas basketball fraud Philly White House NPR Philadelphia Cheney Jacksonville Mary Louise Kelly Elsa Chang Los Angeles Washington Brian
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04:35 min | 2 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NPR's Ryan Lucas explains Kevin Kline Smith has also been ordered perform 100 hours of community service. Have inclined. Smith pleaded guilty last year to altering an email that was part of an FBI application to get surveillance on a former Trump campaign advisor. At his sentencing hearing, the former FBI attorney took responsibility for his actions. He said he deeply regrets the harm he caused. The bureau, the Justice Department and his former colleagues. U. S District Court Judge James Boasberg says clients miss actions did indeed inflict damage, including to the reputation of the court. The judge says clients. Miss actions appear to be quote the on Lee Stain on his record and character and handed down a sentence of probation client. Smith is the only person so far to face charges as part of special counsel John Germs investigation into the origins of the Russia probe. Brian Lucas. NPR NEWS Washington president bind. His named Robert Malley especially was envoy for Iran. He was part of the negotiating team for the one nuclear deal, which the Trump Administration pulled out of more from NPR's Michele Kelemen. The Biden administration is telling Iran that if it comes back into compliance with the 2015 deal, the U. S will, too. New U S. Secretary of State. Tony Blinken is building what an official calls a dedicated team to work on this drawing from quote, clear eyed experts with a diversity of views. Rob Malley will lead the team as a special envoy for Iran. Malli is a long time Middle East expert who was involved in the Iran nuclear talks as well as the Camp David summit between Israel and the Palestinians. More than two decades ago. Those who want the US to take a hard line on Iran are outraged by his appointment, while progressive groups and former diplomats have rallied behind him. Michele Kelemen NPR NEWS Washington RAF into a rough week for U. S financial markets, and for the month, the Dow, the NASDAQ and the S and P were also down sharply. The Dow fell 620 points today, the NASDAQ was down 266 points. S and P dropped 73 points. This is NPR. This is W. N. Y. C in New York. I'm Lance. Lucky Governor. Cuomo has given the green lights for indoor dining to resume with restrictions in New York City. Starting Valentine's Day, February, 14th restaurants will be limited to 25% capacity. Governor says he made the decision because Kobe 19 cases have gone down since the holidays, though he's aware new variants of the virus could pose new risks. You deal with the fax When you know them. If the numbers change, we change. Cuomo also announced a new initiative to allow wedding receptions with 50% capacity upto 150 people starting March 15th. New York City Council is introducing a package of police reforms over the next two weeks that members say will reduce the NYPD is footprint in the city and increase accountability of the 11 different proposals. One gives the council the power to confirm or deny a mayor's choice for commissioner. Another calls for taking final decisions on officer discipline out of the hands of the Commissioner, City Council members, Steven Levin says public safety laws are in dire need of an update. Well and with some, having been on the books for generations, well, it's not 1937. We should be updating our laws to reflect our city today. Legislation also addresses the role of school safety agents and how the city responds to mental health emergencies. Yankee Stadium will become a covert 19 vaccination site for Bronx residents. Governor Cuomo said that the National Guard will help convert the South Bronx landmark and the nonprofit so most community care will operate the vaccination center. It's unclear when the stadium will be ready for appointments that he field is also supposed to become a vaccination site. But that opening has been delayed. Under 16. Overnight. W N Y C support for NPR comes from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, supporting those working towards a day when no one has to choose between paying rent, putting food on the table and protecting their health and the health of others are wjbf daughter work. Been curious about the history of black people in America my whole life. I think I got it from my dad. This drive to know everything about my community's history. And yet I have never been able to connect with black history Month. So this February, I'm going to figure out why. Chi, right in this week on the United States of Anxiety, the origin story of Black History month Join me for the United States of Anxiety Live Sunday evening at six on 93.9 FM and AM a 20 W N. Y. C. Welcome.

NPR New York City Iran Governor Cuomo Kevin Kline Smith Robert Malley New York City Council United States Michele Kelemen FBI Malli Washington Justice Department Valentine Ryan Lucas Brian Lucas Trump Tony Blinken Yankee Stadium
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

"Here's NPR's Ryan Lucas. Have inclined. Smith pleaded guilty last year to altering an email that was part of an FBI application to get surveillance on a former Trump campaign advisor. At his sentencing hearing, the former FBI attorney took responsibility for his actions. He said he deeply regrets the harm he caused. The bureau, the Justice Department and his former colleagues. U. S District Court Judge James Boasberg says clients miss actions did indeed inflict damage, including to the reputation of the court. The judge says clients. Miss actions appear to be quote the on Lee Stain on his record and character and handed down a sentence of probation client. Smith is the only person so far to face charges as part of special counsel John Germs investigation into the origins of the Russia probe. Brian Lucas. NPR NEWS Washington An investigation is underway into what caused nearly a dozen soldiers to get sick during a training exercise in El Paso, Angelika Terek of member station Katie Pieces. Two of the soldiers are hospitalized in critical condition. The 11 Fort Bliss. Soldiers required medical attention after consuming a substance Thursday at the end of a training exercise for Bliss has not identified what caused the illness except to say it was not food for police officials say they're working with law enforcement to investigate the incident, and leaders are in constant contact with families of the six soldiers. I'm Angela, co chaired in El Paso. The Dow Jones industrial Average is down 471 points or 1.5% at 30,131. This is NPR. President Biden's first trip outside the White House since taking office was to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where he was meeting today with wounded service members. His son, Beau, who served as a major in the Delaware Army National Guard, died at Walter Reed in 2015 from cancer. Mexico has now surpassed India in the number of people dying from Cove in 19, putting that country in third place behind the United States. In Brazil. MPR's Carrie Kahn reports more than 1.8 Million people in Mexico have tested positive for Corona virus more than 155,000 of them. Have died. In the past weeks, new records in the number of confirmed cases and death have been shattered in the past 24 hours, Nearly 20,000 new cases were detected in more than 1500 deaths confirmed But officials admit Mexico's numbers are much higher due to the low rate of testing in the country. In Mexico City and surrounding suburbs. Hospitals are full ambulances reportedly wait hours to discharge patients and oxygen supplies are limited. Mexico's ambitious vaccination program has run into logistical snags to mostly due to delays and delivery of vaccines. Carrie Kahn NPR NEWS Mexico CITY New allegations of miss spending our emerging in Puerto Rico more than three years after the U. S territory filed for the biggest U. S. Municipal bankruptcy in history. Today, a federal control board overseeing the Commonwealth's finances announced it even after being warned of a problem What our egos Education Department still kept paying salaries to people. It was no longer employing more than $28 million in.

Mexico Smith NPR FBI El Paso Carrie Kahn Ryan Lucas Mexico City Walter Reed National Military Fort Bliss Walter Reed Brian Lucas U. S District Court James Boasberg Delaware Army National Guard President Biden Justice Department Trump
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Was assassinated. We'll make 10 had been in flames. The National Guard Patrol the streets. That turmoil. Inspired me to become a public defender. Step I never anticipated would lead me towards this improbable journey binds remarks coming hours before his inauguration as the 46th, president of the United States, the nation's capital, is on high alert for the ceremony and wake of the violent insurrection. At the U. S Capitol two weeks ago. President elect Biden, this nominee for secretary of state testified and his nomination hearing on Tuesday. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports that Europeans are looking forward to turning the page on the Trump administration. When he comes to US diplomacy. Relations between Europe and the US under President Trump were contentious from the start. The U. S pulled out of the Paris climate Accord and the Iran nuclear Agreement in lesser is president of the German Marshall Fund in Brussels, secretary state in particular. Payal was openly critical, several very prominent speeches in Brussels. This has been remembered. This will not be the approach of new Secretary of State Tony Blinken. If confirmed, he grew up in Paris and has close connections across Europe. Lesser says Blinken exemplifies a generation in American foreign policy with um or Eurocentric view. He is maybe the last generation whose view of international affairs is formed by the relationship across the Atlantic, and that's quite meaningful. Eleanor Beardsley. NPR NEWS PARIS In after hours treating US futures are mixed chairs are also mix on markets in Asia. This is NPR news. North Carolina U. S. Senator Richard Burr is no longer being investigated for insider trading. Details from NPR's Ryan Lucas. Senator Burke came under scrutiny last spring because of stock sales he made shortly before the public was fully aware of the scale and threat of the pandemic. As a member of Congress, Birkhead received briefings on the virus before he made his transactions. That field questions of whether he was trading on nonpublic information. Justice Department opened an investigation of the trades. Now the department has concluded that investigation without bringing criminal charges. That's according to bruise. Lawyer Alice Fisher, a department spokesman confirmed the investigation has been closed. Bird, who had denied any wrongdoing, says he's happy to hear it and is ready to move on. Ryan Lucas NPR NEWS Washington Hall of Fame pitcher Don Sutton has died. NPR's Tom Goldman has this remembrance. When Don Sutton was inducted into baseball's Hall of Fame in 1998. He praised the players he was joining as artists. It's not a description he used for himself, he once said. All he wanted was to be consistent, dependable, and you could count on me. He ended up being all those things in two plus decades in the major. Prison on five teams. The years with the Dodgers, 1966 to 80 and then a final season in 1988 were his most notable, He won more games, struck out more batters and pitch more shut outs than any Dodger in history. Raised in Alabama and Florida sudden also left a legacy in the South. He was a beloved longtime broadcaster for the Atlanta Braves, who put him in their hall of Fame for that work. Tom Goldman..

NPR Don Sutton United States Tom Goldman president Eleanor Beardsley Ryan Lucas Tony Blinken Europe Brussels Dodgers National Guard Patrol Justice Department Senator Burke Paris climate Accord Birkhead Hall of Fame U. S. Senator Richard Burr
Several Capitol Police officers have been suspended, says police chief

Morning Edition

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

Several Capitol Police officers have been suspended, says police chief

"The acting chief of the U. S. Capitol. Police says several Capitol police officers have been suspended following last week's riot. The officer's actions during the assault are being reviewed. One officer took a selfie with a rioter. Another was seen wearing a pro trump camp. NPR's Ryan Lucas reports that federal agents are still tracking down some of the rioters. Prosecutors are identifying and charging more and more people pretty much every day who they say took part in the events. Some of them have been pretty easy to identify because of the photos or videos that they took of themselves at the Capitol. Some of them have been harder. To idea, though, but investigators are getting help. As of last night, the FBI had received 70,000 tips from the public to help them identify the folks who took part in the

U. S. Capitol Ryan Lucas Capitol Police NPR FBI
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:39 min | 2 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

"Good morning. It's four o'clock. Good morning, With only eight days to go and President Trump's term. The House will vote today on a measure to invoke the 25th amendment declaring the president unfit for office. It's morning edition from NPR news. Vote on impeachment comes tomorrow. I'm Tanya Muesli and I'm Rachel Martin. The article of Impeachment accuses the president of inciting the violent attack on the U. S capitol and trying to change the outcome of the election. Investigators are tracking down participants around the country from that riot on the capital will look into one charge. They could face seditious conspiracy and some big corporate names have paused on their political spending. It's Tuesday, January 12th Jeff Bezos, the CEO of Amazon is 57 today. The news is next. Live from NPR news. I'm Corvette Coleman, the acting chief of the U. S. Capitol. Police says several Capitol police officers have been suspended following last week's riot. The officer's actions during the assault are being reviewed. One officer took a selfie with a rioter. Another was seen wearing a pro trump camp. NPR's Ryan Lucas reports that federal agents are still tracking down some of the rioters. Prosecutors are identifying and charging more and more people pretty much every day who they say took part in the events. Some of them have been pretty easy to identify because of the photos or videos that they took of themselves at the Capitol. Some of them have been harder. To idea, though, but investigators are getting help. As of last night, the FBI had received 70,000 tips from the public to help them identify the folks who took part in the riot. NPR's Ryan Lucas reporting The White House is signaling that President Trump and Vice President Pence plan to serve out their complete terms in office, despite efforts by the House of Representatives to remove trump from power. NPR's Tamara Keith reports. Trump and Pence met late on Monday. A senior administration official, who declined to speak on the record said the two men met in the Oval Office and quote pledged to continue the work on behalf of the country for the remainder of their term. Fence has been silent as congressional Democrats call on him to invoke the 25th amendment to remove President Trump from office after inciting a mob to storm the capital. Pence, was presiding over the electoral college vote tally at the time and had to take shelter while Trump criticized him via tweet. This statement following their meeting is the nearest indication Yet that Pence doesn't intend to force Trump out and Trump doesn't intend to resign. The House is expected to vote later this week to impeach Trump for a second time. Camera. Keith NPR NEWS. The state of Arizona has converted the NFL Cardinal Stadium outside Phoenix into a vaccination site. It's open 24 hours a day. Member station Cage's Katherine Davis. Young reports. Arizona currently has one of the highest rates of Corona virus infection in the nation, and the state ranks below most others in terms of the number of shots administered per capita State wants to accelerate its vaccination efforts by opening up eligibility to teachers, law enforcement and anyone over 75. Arizona's top health official, Dr Cara Crist hopes the launch of a massive 24 hour vaccine site at State Farm Stadium will aid in the process so far over 10,000 people. Have successfully registered and they've registered throughout the end of the month. So it's it's been a very good response. She says The site will eventually have the capacity to vaccinate 6000 people per day for NPR news. I'm Katherine Davis Young in Phoenix. It's NPR. In the last few days of the Trump administration. The State Department has put Cuba back on the U. S list of states that sponsor terrorism. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says Cuba shelters rebel leaders from other countries This reverses efforts by the Obama administration to warm US ties with Cuba. Some Democratic lawmakers are making a new push to end federal capital punishment. NPR's one on summers reports, Democrats are focusing on the issue as they prepared to take full control of Congress and the White House. Proposal from Illinois Senator Dick Durbin, the incoming chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Massachusetts representative Iona Presley would end capital punishment at the federal level. It also would require the re sentencing of all federal inmates currently on death row. In an exclusive joint interview with NPR. Durban, noted one of the long standing criticism of capital punishment and the United States the history of racial disparities. If we truly believe that all lives matter, and black lives matter, and brown lives matter, and the lives of poor people matter It is time for us to make sure that our system of justice reflects that. President elect Joe Biden has said that he wants to work with Congress to abolish the federal death penalty and would incentivize states to follow That example. Juana Summers. NPR news. At least two gorillas at the San Diego Zoo have tested positive for the coronavirus. Zoo officials say they've shown symptoms of covert 19 and are now being treated. The officials think an asymptomatic worker at the zoo infected them. On Korver.

President Trump NPR president Pence Trump Ryan Lucas Arizona White House Katherine Davis Congress Phoenix Capitol police Jeff Bezos US Tanya Muesli official officer Vice President
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KCRW

"To KCRW. Live from NPR News on Janine Herbst. Democratic House lawmakers have drafted an impeachment article against President Trump, accusing him of inciting an insurrection over the attack on the Capitol building this week. Least five people died. They plan to formally introduce the proposal on Monday. A vote is possible by Wednesday. Meanwhile, a West Virginia lawmaker arrested and charged in connection with the attack. Has resigned his post 90 others have been arrested More than a dozen face federal charges. NPR's Ryan Lucas has more. One question that looms over all of this is whether there was an organized effort by right wing or self styled militia groups in the rampage at the Capitol. There has been public reporting, suggesting as much, officials say they are aware of those reports. They say they're looking at every angle here, but they had nothing to confirm on that front at this point, but that, of course, is something that we will be keeping an eye on in the days and weeks to come. Is this investigation proceeds? MPR's Ryan Lucas. Daily coronavirus deaths in the U. S have topped 4000 this week for the first time as new daily infections near 300,000 this as the CDC says only seven million of the 22 million vaccines that were distributed have been administered. NPR's Amy held reports the U. S is still facing weeks of a worsening surge post holiday festivities. The government's top infectious disease. Doctor, Anthony Fauci, tells NPR that the holidays also contributed to vaccination delays Right now, I think we just need to give a little bit slack, not a lot. We're past the holiday season. Now, let's really turn the afterburners on. It comes as the incoming Biden administration announced a major change in vaccination policy instead of keeping millions of doses in reserve as booster shots. Plan is to spread them out as first doses for more people. The goal remains to give the second shot on time, provided manufacturing speeds up how she expects by April. It will be what we call open season on vaccines, Everyone will be able to get a vaccine. Amy held NPR news. President elect Joe Biden plans to extend student loan payment relief to federal borrowers on quote Day one, according to his transition team. The latest suspension of payments and interest is set to expire on January 31st MPR's Elissa Nad Warney reports. Relief for more than 40 million borrowers has been extended and extended, and Biden plans to continue that on his first day in office. David Cayman is Biden's incoming deputy director of the National Economic Council who advises on economic policy. We've announced that on day one The president elect will direct the Department of Education to extend the.

NPR Joe Biden NPR News Ryan Lucas President Trump Amy President Janine Herbst Elissa Nad Warney West Virginia Democratic House Anthony Fauci CDC National Economic Council deputy director David Cayman Department of Education
"ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Dr. Gupta has been a practicing neurosurgeon for about 20 years. Also, we hear from Maria Ressa, a journalist in the Philippines whose coverage of authoritarian President Rodrigo do TERT. Has resulted in Internet trolls, death threats, criminal charges jail and being chosen this time magazine's 2018 person of the year. She's the subject of a new frontline documentary called 1000 Cuts. And book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews a new Western that she describes as the Handmaid's tale meets Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid First News. Live from NPR news. I'm Janine Herbst. Democratic House lawmakers have drafted an impeachment article against President Trump, accusing him of inciting an insurrection over the attack on the Capitol building this week. Least five people died. They plan to formally introduce the proposal on Monday. A vote is possible by Wednesday. Meanwhile, a West Virginia lawmaker arrested and charged in connection with the attack, has resigned his post. 90. Others have been arrested. More than a dozen face federal charges. NPR's Ryan Lucas has more. One question that looms over all of this is whether there was an organized effort by right wing or self styled militia groups in the rampage at the Capitol. There has been public reporting, suggesting as much, officials say they are aware of those reports. They say they're looking at every angle here, but they had nothing to confirm on that front at this point, but that, of course, is something that we will be keeping an eye on in the days and weeks to come. Is this investigation proceeds? MPR's Ryan Lucas. Daily coronavirus deaths in the U. S have topped 4000 this week for the first time as new daily infections near 300,000 this as the CDC says only seven million of the 22 million vaccines that were distributed have been administered. NPR's Amy held reports the U. S is still facing weeks of a worsening surge post holiday festivities. The government's top infectious disease. Doctor, Anthony Fauci, tells NPR that the holidays also contributed to vaccination delays Right now, I think we just need to give a little bit slack, not a lot. We're past the holiday season. Now, let's really turn the afterburners on. It comes as the incoming Biden administration announced a major change in vaccination policy instead of keeping millions of doses in reserve as booster shots. The plan is to spread them out as first doses for more people. The goal remains to give the second shot on time, provided manufacturing speeds up how she expects by April. It will be what we call open season on vaccines, Everyone will be able to get a vaccine. Amy held NPR news. President elect Joe Biden plans to extend student loan payment relief to federal borrowers on quote Day one, according to his transition team. The latest suspension of payments and interest is set to expire on January. 31st MPR's Elissa Nad Bernie reports. Relief for more than 40 million borrowers has been extended and extended, and Biden plans to continue that on his first day in office. David Cayman is Biden's incoming deputy director of the National Economic Council who advises on economic policy. We've announced that on day one The president elect will direct Department of Education to extend the existing paws on student loan payments and interest for millions of Americans with federal student loans came and also reiterated by the support of a proposal to cancel up to $10,000 of federal student loan debt to help ease the burden of the pandemic. Listen at morning NPR news and you're listening to NPR news. You're listening to W N. Y C in New York. Good evening on my on Levinson. Confederate flag was found tied to the front door of the Museum of Jewish Heritage in Lower Manhattan sometime between Thursday night and Friday morning, museum CEO Jack Kliger said the incident was reported to the police referencing the fact that in search insurrectionists Rated at a Confederate flag inside the Capitol building. This week, he called it a potent symbol of white supremacy. And he said that hate has now arrived at the museum's doorstep. The Museum of Jewish Heritage Houses a train car that once transported Jews to the Auschwitz death camp. In the new year. Governor Cuomo says will push for more election reform in order to see absentee ballots counted more quickly. I'm going to propose legislation to speed up the county by requiring county boards to process absentee ballots as soon as they're received. And begin counting and reporting them on Election Day in New York. Absentee ballots must be counted no later than 14. Days after Election Day, the New York City Board of Elections waits a full seven days. Reports. Rather, the reforms would also increase the amount of time to request an absentee ballot from 30 to 45 days and also extend early voting hours. Buffalo Bill's earned their first home playoff victory in a quarter century when Josh Allen threw two touchdown passes scored another rushing and Micah Hyde batted down. Philip Rivers. Desperation heave for 27 24 wild card win over the Indianapolis Colts and a limited.

NPR Joe Biden Ryan Lucas MPR President Jack Kliger Maureen Corrigan time magazine New York Amy Dr. Gupta President Rodrigo Maria Ressa President Trump Butch Cassidy New York City Board of Electio West Virginia
"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:12 min | 2 years ago

"ryan lucas" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Many were armed and violent condemnation has been swift. Your senator Chris Murphy, who was inside the Capitol building when the mob attacked, there was a failure at almost every level to protect the capital. You know, you didn't have to be on the dark Web to know that something really terrible might happen on Wednesday. There are so many unanswered questions. How did rioters enter the capital with so little resistance? Lower black lives matter protestors who were unarmed, treated with such force by federal officers last year while these white rioters were not And why did it take so long to activate the National Guard? We speak this weekend, top officials have resigned or been fired Democrats in the House of preparing an article of impeachment, several lawmakers, including Republican representative Adam Kinzinger, have called for the president to be removed from office. All indications are that the president has become unmoored not just from his duty. Or even itself. But from reality itself. Law enforcement agencies across the country are trying to track down those who attacked the capital. NPR. Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas, of course, has been following this, Ryan. Thanks for being with us. Makes for having me what is the latest on what must be a next ence of investigation. It is a big investigation. Yes, the U. S Attorney's office here in DC is working with the FBI, The Capitol police A T F the U. S. Marshal Service and the D. C. Metro police on it. Officials say there are hundreds of prosecutors and agents working from three command centers. They're working 24 hours a day, officials say on what they described as very active, very fluid on very much evolving investigation Now Federal officials say no resource is are going to be spared and finding and holding rioters accountable and people have been charged more than 50. In fact, at this point, the majority of those are in superior Court here in D C for more minor offenses, But more than a dozen individuals so far are facing federal charges. Do we know who they are? We do from the charging documents? Yes, One of them is Richard Barnett. You may have seen pictures of a man leaning back in a chair and house Speaker Nancy Pelosi is office with his feet up on the desk. Well, that was Barnett Hey, was arrested in Little Rock, Arkansas on Friday morning. He faces unlawful entry, disorderly conduct and theft of public property charges. Another one is Lonnie Kaufman of Alabama. Authorities say that they found 11 Molotov cocktails in his pickup truck that was parked on Capitol Hill as well as guns. He's in custody. He faces firearms charges. And then another one that stood out is Derrick Evans. And he's notable because he's a newly elected West Virginia state lawmaker and prosecutors say that he is facing a charge of entering a restricted area. And I guess it's worth noting Ryan that from these three cases alone, we we see that people, in fact came in from all over the country. They really did. There were a couple of more just in the cases charged so far from Florida and Illinois, so they really did come in from all over the country. Some people who took part, of course, have already gone back home. But the assistant director in charge of the FBI's Washington field office Stephen Day, Antoine Oh, said that doesn't mean that they're going to get off Scot free, he said. Even if you have left the D C region, you can still expect to knock on the door if the FBI finds out that you took part in the violence at the Capitol. Course. One aspect of this investigation involves the death of Brian Sick. Nick, the Capitol police officer, one of the details on that well sick. Nick was injured while protecting the capital. During the During the rampage. He was taken to a local hospital where he died. On Thursday night. Prosecutors and the FBI have refused to provide any details or clarity on sick Nick's injuries where the circumstances that led to his death. All they're saying publicly at this point is that the FBI is investigating along with the D. C. Metro police. Where does the investigation into Wednesday's insurrection go from here? The FBI and its partners are combing through social media photos and videos of which there truly is an astounding amount to identify the rioters. Theo FBI has set up a tip line and a portal on its website for the public to submit tips. The FBI says it has received a ton of tips from the public, and they say they're going through every single one of them. Now. One question that looms over all of this is whether there was an organized effort by right wing or self styled militia groups in the rampage at the Capitol, there has been public reporting, suggesting as much Officials say they are aware of those reports. They say they're looking at every angle here, but they had nothing to confirm on that front at this point, But that, of course, is something that we will be keeping an eye on in the days and weeks to come. Is this investigation proceeds? NPR justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Thanks so much, Thank you. So what might any consequences for the president be after this week's assault? In the nation's capital. NPR's senior Washington editor and correspondent Ron Elving joins us, Ron. Thank you good to be with you. Scott Donald Trump has little more than a week left in office, Senator Murkowski of Alaska called on him to resign yesterday, Democrats in the House or working up articles of impeachment. There has been talk about the 25th amendment being invoke. Any chance any of these efforts may succeed before President Trump does one or more of the things that they fear he might. We are not likely to see the 25th Amendment Scott. It's never been used, except for a matter of hours for medical situations and resignation would not seem to be in President Trump's nature. So unless vice president Pence decides to push for it, there does not seem to be enough motivation within the Cabinet. To remove him using the 25th amendment that leaves impeachment and the single article has already been drafted Impeachment for inciting violence against the government of the United States. And the Democrats seem resolved to press for it. On Monday they would have the vote in the House. But of course, the Senate would have to follow suit that seems unlikely before the scheduled transfer power on January 20th. We could see a return to the issue after that, when Trump is gone with the idea of barring him from federal office for life that historically has been done in a few cases of Federal judges who had been impeached and removed. A jarring bracing note this week when Speaker Pelosi asked the Pentagon Um, I'm not what the options that were for keeping President Trump's hand off the nuclear trigger. The Pentagon will only say that she called and a conversation took place. But Pelosi was clearly shaken by Wednesday's traumatic events, and she is deeply concerned about what else trump or perhaps some of his followers might be capable of in these final days. Let me separate that out. What? What can the president do say even this weekend pardons, for example. Yes, he has already issued a slew of pardons. Many consider some of those to be unsavory, including for his former associates, who had pled guilty to lying to the FBI and We're about to be sentenced to prison. He has pardoned individuals who killed civilians in Iraq while on contract with the U..

FBI president Scott Donald Trump Ryan Lucas NPR Speaker Pelosi Richard Barnett Theo FBI D. C. Metro Washington senator Nick Adam Kinzinger National Guard Capitol police Derrick Evans Chris Murphy vice president
Trump pardons Paul Manafort, Roger Stone and Charles Kushner

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:42 sec | 3 years ago

Trump pardons Paul Manafort, Roger Stone and Charles Kushner

"Trump has granted pardons to his former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort is former adviser Roger Stone and Charles Kushner, the father in law of Ivanka Trump. The case but least Manafort and Stone. NPR's Ryan Lucas has more on White House grounds for the pardons. The White House said that the president had granted man for a full and complete pardon on then, as we have seen with others that Trump has pardoned who were implicated as part of the rush investigation. The White House called that probe hoax. It claimed that Manafort was a victim of prosecutorial overreach. Trump today Pardon 26 people and commuted the sentences of three others the second consecutive night of pardons and was expected be a flurry of acts of clemency before he leaves office.

Manafort Paul Manafort Roger Stone Charles Kushner Donald Trump Ryan Lucas Ivanka Trump White House NPR Stone Pardon
Barr agrees with Pompeo that Russians appear to be behind US government hack

BBC World Service

00:51 sec | 3 years ago

Barr agrees with Pompeo that Russians appear to be behind US government hack

"Barr has weighed in on the major hack of U. S government agencies at his last newscast. As attorney general Bar says Russia appears to be behind the breach. NPR's Ryan Lucas reports, the U. S government is still assessing the extent of the hack that first came to light just over a week ago. Experts say it is potentially unprecedented in scope. The Trump administration has not formally attributed the hack at this point, Although Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said over the weekend that it was pretty clearly the Russians Speaking at a news conference, bar says he agrees. It's certainly appears to be the Russians, but I'm not going to discuss it beyond that, while barring Pompeo have both pointed the finger at Moscow President Trump has refused to do so. Instead, Trump has sought to minimize the severity of the hack and has suggested China might have been behind it. Ryan Lucas, NPR NEWS Washington On Wall

U. S Government Ryan Lucas Trump Administration Mike Pompeo Barr NPR Russia President Trump Pompeo Moscow Donald Trump China Washington
Democratic leaders blast Trump's pardon of Flynn

Morning Edition

00:47 sec | 3 years ago

Democratic leaders blast Trump's pardon of Flynn

"President Trump has pardoned former national security adviser Michael Flynn, who pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI in connection with Trump's Russia contacts before the inauguration. Flynn later tried to walk back that guilty plea, NPR's Ryan Lucas has more. Flynn became a rallying cry of sorts for Trump and his base and allies on the hill, who have felt that he was unjustly prosecuted. They welcomed this part. Republican Senator Lindsey Graham, a key ally of the president, for example, called this pardon of good move. Democrats. On the other hand, unsurprisingly declared this corrupt. The Democratic chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Adam Schiff, said that this was an abuse of the president's pardon power. He said that Trump is using it to reward his friends and political allies and protect those who lied to cover up for him. NPR's Ryan Lucas

Donald Trump Ryan Lucas Flynn Michael Flynn Senator Lindsey Graham FBI NPR Russia House Intelligence Committee Adam Schiff
Trump grants 'full pardon' to Michael Flynn

90.3 KAZU Programming

00:50 sec | 3 years ago

Trump grants 'full pardon' to Michael Flynn

"Granted a full pardon to his first national security adviser, Michael Flynn. As NPR's Ryan Lucas reports, Flynn had pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI. During the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. The president announced his decision on Twitter. He congratulated Flynn and his family and said they will now have a quote. Truly fantastic Thanksgiving. Pardon brings an end of Lynn's long running legal saga. He pleaded guilty in 2017 the line to the FBI about his contacts with Russia and cooperated with investigators. But last year, Flynn reversed course and proclaimed his innocence. He claimed he was set up by the FBI, and he tried to withdraw his guilty plea. The Justice Department then sought to drop its case against him, although a federal judge refused to do so immediately and the matter has remained tied up in court. The case is Moz now that Flynn has received a full presidential pardon. Ryan

Flynn Ryan Lucas FBI Michael Flynn NPR Pardon Lynn Twitter Russia Justice Department Ryan
DOJ Files Google Antitrust Lawsuit

The Takeaway

00:54 sec | 3 years ago

DOJ Files Google Antitrust Lawsuit

"Of Justice is suing Google. NPR's Ryan Lucas reports. The antitrust lawsuit filed today in federal court sets the stage for the biggest battle over the power of a dominant technology company in decades. The Justice Department is accusing Google of anticompetitive behavior to try to maintain what the government calls the company's monopoly, an online search and search advertising. The DOJ was joined by 11 State attorneys general in this lawsuit, more than 90% of searches worldwide happen on Google, according to researchers. That dominant position has allowed the company to create an online advertising business that generates almost all of Google's $160 billion in annual sales. Critics have long accused the company of monopolistic behavior in its search engine. To benefit its own properties such as Google maps and YouTube. The lawsuit comes amid increasing calls on Capitol Hill for greater scrutiny of Big tech. Ryan

Google Ryan Lucas Justice Department NPR DOJ Big Tech Youtube
U.S. charges 6 Russian military officers for massive cyberattacks

All Things Considered

01:00 min | 3 years ago

U.S. charges 6 Russian military officers for massive cyberattacks

"Russian intelligence officers are facing federal charges in connection with a Siri's of high profile and destructive cyberattacks. The charges detail hacks targeting the 2017 French elections in the 2018 Winter Olympics, among others. NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas is here to tell us more. Hi, Ryan first. What do we know about the defendants and what they've been charged with? The Justice Department says that these six defendants are all current or former officers with Russia's military intelligence agency. That's the Dru It's the same agency that was behind the hacks in the 2016 U. S election. Now there's no allegation in this indictment of any hacking tied to the 2020 vote, the one in there in a couple of weeks. The defendants in this instance face seven counts in all those include hacking, conspiracy, wire fraud, computer fraud and identity theft. And this is for a really stunning string of cyber attacks over the past five years, U. S officials say this is the single most disruptive and destructive Siri's of cyber attacks that have ever been attributed to just one group.

Ryan Lucas Siri Wire Fraud Justice Department Fraud NPR Russia U. S
6 Russian Intelligence Officers Charged In High-Profile Cyberattacks

All Things Considered

03:55 min | 3 years ago

6 Russian Intelligence Officers Charged In High-Profile Cyberattacks

"Officers are facing federal charges in connection with a series of high profile and destructive cyberattacks. The charges, detail hacks targeting the 2017 French elections and the 2018 Winter Olympics, among others. NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas is here to tell us more. Hi, Ryan first. What do we know about the defendants and what they've been charged with? The Justice Department says that these six defendants are all current or former officers with Russia's military intelligence agency. That's the GR EW. It's the same agency that was behind the hacks in the 2016 U. S election. Now there's no allegation in this indictment of any hacking tied to the 2020 vote, the one in the inn Ah, a couple of weeks. The defendants in this instance face seven counts in all those include hacking, conspiracy, wire fraud, computer fraud and identity theft. And this is for a really stunning string of cyber attacks over the past five years, U. S officials say this is the single most destructive and destructive Siri's of cyber attacks that have ever been attributed to just one group. What were those attacks Tell us about them? Well, it's a long list. It includes hacks in 2015 and 2016 that targeted Ah, Ukraine's power grid. Those knocked more than 200,000 customers offline at one point or as one U. S official said Today, it turned out the lights and turned off the heat in the middle of an eastern European winter. There's also a devastating attack known is not Pecchia that began in Ukraine and spread across the globe that crippled companies and industries and hospitals. It cause billions of dollars in damages, including here in the U. S. There are hacks targeting the investigations by British and international authorities into the use of a Russian nerve agent to poison a former Russian spy in the UK. That was the episode involving the Spice Sergei Scribble and a few others write. Each of these incidents has been widely reported on their own. It's interesting to see all of these people tied together with all of them exactly right, And there's actually even Maurine the indictment their cyber attacks that targeted the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea. And then there's the hack and leak operation against the 2017 French elections that targeted the political party of France is now president Emmanuel Macron. So it is really quite a list any insight into why the defendants allegedly chose those targets. The Justice Department says that all of these hacks furthered Russia's interests further. Russia's Geo Geo political aims You look at Ukraine Russia has been in a grind in war with the government there in the east in the 22 18 Olympics. Russian athletes couldn't compete under the country's flag because of a massive doping scandal. In the case of the nerve agent poisoning, British and international authorities had pinned the blame for that attack on the Kremlin. And in the case of France's elections, the operation there fits into Russia's geopolitical goals. Now the head of the Justice Department's National Security Division, John Dimmers, said today that Russia Stands alone in the sort of destructive cyberattacks that its agents conduct. Here's a bit of what he said. No country has weaponized. It's cyber capabilities as maliciously and irresponsibly as Russia. Wantonly, causing unprecedented collateral damage to pursue small tactical advantages and fits of spite. Surrounding these defendants are presumably still in Russia and not in U. S custody. What does that mean about next steps for this case? Well, none of these men are in U. S custody right with that, And it is unlikely that any of them will ever face trial here in the United States. One of them actually is already facing charges in the U. S. He was charged by special Counsel Robert Mueller in connection with Russia's hacking in the 2016 election. So there is a big question of just how effective bringing charges like these are But Justice Department officials say it's important to put the weight of the U. S government behind these sorts of allegations. It helps expose what hackers are up to, and the methods that they used. It also makes clear to the international community what Russia is doing. And while it may not be a satisfying as seeing the defendants in court, U. S officials say, it is still a valuable thing to do. NPR's Ryan Lucas. Thank you. Thank you.

Russia Justice Department Ryan Lucas Ukraine NPR Nerve Agent France U. S Inn Ah John Dimmers Sergei Scribble South Korea Geo Geo Wire Fraud Olympics Siri UK
6 Russian Intelligence Officers Charged In High-Profile Cyberattacks

All Things Considered

02:05 min | 3 years ago

6 Russian Intelligence Officers Charged In High-Profile Cyberattacks

"Officers are facing federal charges in connection with a series of high profile and destructive cyberattacks. The charges, detail hacks targeting the 2017 French elections and the 2018 Winter Olympics, among others. NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas is here to tell us more. Hi, Ryan first. What do we know about the defendants and what they've been charged with? The Justice Department says that these six defendants are all current or former officers with Russia's military intelligence agency. That's the GR EW. It's the same agency that was behind the hacks in the 2016 U. S election. Now there's no allegation in this indictment of any hacking tied to the 2020 vote, the one in the inn Ah, a couple of weeks. The defendants in this instance face seven counts in all those include hacking, conspiracy, wire fraud, computer fraud and identity theft. And this is for a really stunning string of cyber attacks over the past five years, U. S officials say this is the single most destructive and destructive Siri's of cyber attacks that have ever been attributed to just one group. What were those attacks Tell us about them? Well, it's a long list. It includes hacks in 2015 and 2016 that targeted Ah, Ukraine's power grid. Those knocked more than 200,000 customers offline at one point or as one U. S official said Today, it turned out the lights and turned off the heat in the middle of an eastern European winter. There's also a devastating attack known is not Pecchia that began in Ukraine and spread across the globe that crippled companies and industries and hospitals. It cause billions of dollars in damages, including here in the U. S. There are hacks targeting the investigations by British and international authorities into the use of a Russian nerve agent to poison a former Russian spy in the UK. That was the episode involving the Spice Sergei Scribble and a few others write. Each of these incidents has been widely reported on their own. It's interesting to see all of these people tied together with all of them exactly right, And there's actually even Maurine the indictment their cyber attacks that targeted the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea. And then there's the hack and leak operation against the 2017 French elections that targeted the political party of France is now president Emmanuel Macron. So it is really quite a list any insight into why the

Ryan Lucas Ukraine U. S Inn Ah NPR Justice Department Pecchia Sergei Scribble South Korea Emmanuel Macron Wire Fraud Nerve Agent France Siri Russia Fraud President Trump UK
6 Russian Intelligence Officers Charged In High-Profile Cyberattacks

All Things Considered

03:56 min | 3 years ago

6 Russian Intelligence Officers Charged In High-Profile Cyberattacks

"Federal charges in connection with a Siri's of high profile and destructive cyberattacks. The charges, detail hacks targeting the 2017 French elections and the 2018 Winter Olympics, among others. NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas is here to tell us more. Hi, Ryan first. What do we know about the defendants and what they've been charged with? The Justice Department says that these six defendants are all current or former officers with Russia's military intelligence agency. That's the GR EW. It's the same agency that was behind the hacks in the 2016 U. S election. Now there's no allegation in this indictment of any hacking tied to the 2020 vote, the one in the inn Ah, a couple of weeks. The defendants in this instance face seven counts, and all those include hacking, conspiracy, wire fraud, computer fraud and identity theft. And this is for a really stunning string of cyber attacks over the past five years, U. S officials say this is the single most disruptive and destructive Siri's of cyber attacks that have ever been attributed to just one group. What were those attacks Tell us about them? Well, it's a long list. It includes hacks in 2015 and 2016 that targeted Ah, Ukraine's power grid. Those knocked more than 200,000 customers offline at one point or as one U. S official said Today, it turned out the lights and turned off the heat in the middle of an eastern European winter. There's There's also also a a devastating devastating attack attack known known is is not not Pecchia Pecchia that that began began in in Ukraine Ukraine and and spread spread across across the the globe globe that that crippled crippled companies companies and and industries industries in in hospitals. hospitals. It It cause cause billions billions of of dollars dollars in in damages, damages, including including here here in in the the U. U. S. S. There There are are hacks hacks targeting targeting the the investigations investigations by by British British and and international international authorities authorities into into the the use use of of a a Russian Russian nerve nerve agent agent to to poison a former Russian spy in the UK. That was the episode involving the Spice, Sergei Scruple and a few others write. Each of these incidents has been widely reported on their own. It's interesting to see all of these people tied together with all of them exactly right, And there's actually even Maurine the indictment their cyber attacks that targeted the 2018 Winter Olympics. In South Korea. And then there's the hack and leak operation against the 2017 French elections that targeted the political party of France is now president Emmanuel Macron. So it is really quite a list. Any insight into why the defendants allegedly chose those targets. The Justice Department says that all of these hacks furthered Russia's interests further. Russia's Geo Geo political aims You look at Ukraine Russia has been in a grinding war with the government there in the east in the 22 18 Olympics. Russian athletes couldn't compete under the country's flag because of a massive doping scandal. In the case of the nerve agent poisoning, British and international authorities had pinned the blame for that attack on the Kremlin. And in the case of France's elections, the operation there fits into Russia's geopolitical goals. Now the head of the Justice Department's National Security Division, John Dimmers, said today that Russia Stands alone in the sort of destructive cyberattacks that its agents conduct. Here's a bit of what he said. No country has weaponized. It's cyber capabilities as maliciously and irresponsibly as Russia. Wantonly, causing unprecedented collateral damage to pursue small tactical advantages and fits of spite. Surrounding these defendants are presumably still in Russia and not in U. S custody. What does that mean about next steps for this case? Well, none of these men are in us custody, all right with that, And it is unlikely that any of them will ever face trial here in the United States. One of them actually is already facing charges in the U. S. He was charged by special Counsel Robert Mueller in connection with Russia's hacking in the 2016 elections, so There is a big question of just how effective bringing charges like these are, but Justice Department officials say it's important to put the weight of the U. S government behind these sorts of allegations. It helps expose what hackers are up to, and the methods that they used. It also makes clear to the international community what Russia is doing. And while it may not be a satisfying as seeing the defendants in court, U. S officials say, it is still a valuable thing to do. NPR's Ryan Lucas. Thank you. Thank

Russia Justice Department Ryan Lucas Ukraine Nerve Agent NPR U. S France Siri Inn Ah Pecchia Pecchia South Korea Geo Geo Wire Fraud John Dimmers Olympics UK United States
Two ISIS "Beatles" members charged with hostage-taking of Americans

Fresh Air

00:52 sec | 3 years ago

Two ISIS "Beatles" members charged with hostage-taking of Americans

"Islamic state militants are facing federal criminal charges in the United States for their alleged role in the killings of American hostages. NPR's Ryan Lucas reports. The men are accused of being members of the notorious Isis cell nicknamed the Beatles. The two defendants Alexander Coty and El Shafie. L shake face eight counts in all, including conspiracy, hostage taking, resulting in death and material support to a terrorist organization. According to the indictment, the men played a leading role in Islamic states kidnapping, torturing and killing of U. S and European citizens. Among the groups victims were four Americans journalist James Foley and Steven Sotloff and aid workers Peter Kasich and Kayla Mueller. Assistant Attorney General John Deemer says while the U. S government cannot bring the four Americans back, the Justice Department quote can and will seek justice for them their families and for all Americans.

Ryan Lucas Justice Department Alexander Coty United States El Shafie Kayla Mueller John Deemer Assistant Attorney General James Foley Peter Kasich NPR Kidnapping Steven Sotloff U. S
Judge Partially Blocks Trump Administration From Enforcing Visa Ban

NPR News Now

00:46 sec | 3 years ago

Judge Partially Blocks Trump Administration From Enforcing Visa Ban

"A federal judge has ordered the trump administration's law enforcement commission to halt its work as NPR's Ryan Lucas reports. The judge has also barred the group from releasing its final report. The ruling from US District Court Judge John Debates comes less than a month ahead of the law enforcement commission's deadline to wrap up its work although it reportedly has already submitted draft to the Attorney General the end of Lacey Pe- filed suit in April it. Argued that the panel violates a law that requires among other things that a federal commission include a diversity of viewpoints in his ruling Judge Bates found that the law enforcement commission is made up entirely of current and former law enforcement officials. It also has violated the law by conducting much of its work behind closed doors. The judge ordered the Commission to halt its work until it meets the requirements under the

Law Enforcement Commission Judge John Debates Judge Bates Ryan Lucas Us District Court Lacey Pe NPR Attorney