19 Burst results for "Ryan Leveque"

Taylor Welch On How Inexpensive Products Drive High-Ticket Sales

The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

06:26 min | 3 months ago

Taylor Welch On How Inexpensive Products Drive High-Ticket Sales

"We're Roland Taylor how you doing. Amazing or you Gus Rocket? Or happy to chat I, think the last time but actually when. You visit riches event rich. Shefrin in Florida. It was right before the. Movie Madness. For the world shut down did man. A massive gavitt gathering of people for twenty four hours. Like the covert thing wasn't even on my radar at that point like I hadn't even been thinking about it and then like within a week after we got back it just like went crazy. I think the travel bad had just happened and and then it was like. Everything went to zero. I remember thinking I'm like there's no way. There's no way that everything's GonNa shut down like it was in Europe and then starbucks closed and I was like it's over. Over. starbucks capitulated. We're all done. Point and then it was not that long over here. That was like the only thing that actually somehow did reopen I or stay open ended. They just had the longest lines in the world I might not no one makes coffee. Tea. Sarah Okay I was just in Charlotte. It is bad. They're still because. do do you go to starbucks? They could have like three people in the shop saint we're open here. Everything here is open in Nashville because we're not traders. Charlotte. Still I remember just being like what is going on was like fifty people at Align de man I would not wanna live here right now. To the Queen's city but. Put your mask on and going there I guess right did he goes still kind of like half shut like half like restaurants and stuff are kind of open like minimum capacity I think our gym's open yet but I think Close I don't. That's why. On. Gyms opened up because there's a gym in La Hoya that I'm Jay described to you because every time Jim they opened August thirtieth August thirty first. Let me guess you go to dit. La Hoya fit club or something. Yeah. Yeah. Because standard bracket stand to our buddy goes to be so yes, I. Do think it's open because I've heard him say Nice Nike solved. That I know that. Much to the gym. A. Gym. On A. Workout harder. So we're talking about working out I don't think but gives a scoop man because we. We've been following you guys for a long time you in Chris Evans you guys are partners traffic and funnels a physical newsletter. What the memo's I think it's called right Think, they changed the name to insiders access but. Hey Go. Yeah. It's cool because it's like short punchy just gets to the point I think monthly. Dirt cheap. So it's kind of a no brainer. That gives us a scoop of your story, dislike a little brief background, and maybe you know at t.f, trafficking funnels and all that. So. I started freelance as a copywriter in two thousand fifteen. and. I'm at Chris in a mastermind that was run by Ryan Leveque time, and if you haven't had heavies awesome already know him. So he he was a mentor of sorts to me back in the day. I met Chris in I. Think it was called like. You guys remember this this NASA got on facebook next level or next level masterminds Ryan levesque's thing. Yeah I remember. Yeah. Now, you can't call anything next level because it's so cliche but he was one like back in the day it was also. Who some next level shit back and it was the next level stuff. Exactly. So, Chris was doing advertising just space book advertising and I was doing copywriting and we met. Some. Of the stuff that I was doing, wanted it for some of his clients. So we kinda disconnected we sent clients back and forth for about six months in eventually was just like the list of partner up and see what we can do because I'm sitting implants you're sending me your clients, but if we could put it under one roof, you know it'd be amazing started agency. So we did the agency thing for a couple of months and it was great we. In the first three months we got up to like twenty, five, thirty game we started consulting in January -cause we were. We were doing work for people, but there were friends were asking us what was going on we that we started doing education because of that Excuse me a little Kobe remnants here. Not, really all. Now really okay. So we stopped, we actually hired a guy named Sam in January of two thousand sixteen and he looked at our economics in our business model and he was like you guys are GonNa make way more money. If you just teach the ropes rather than doing it, you're like I oh, you know we we kinda like doing it and but we got so busy on the consulting side that our prices were like two hundred brands of the funnel people don't WanNa pay that. Ended up. Yeah. We kinda discontinued it just from pricing so His been it's it's actually just hit. It's five year mark. says. It was actually started in September of two, thousand fifteen don't. We just crossed over that threshold twenty twenty. So it's been around for five years. started. Go really fast two, thousand, Sixteen Golf we were at half a million dollars a month. By the time we got to the beginning of two thousand seventeen be Kinda got stuck there for a little bit lassoed out of two thousand eighteen we started hiring a team did everything wrong lost the team tried again lost that team to but by the? Nineteen it pretty good team. We had a really good operator who came in our coo in we started sales mentor. The beginning of nineteen sort of wealth gap mid two, thousand, nineteen. We just acquired a business in Australia a couple of months ago. So now we have A. Four or five businesses kind under this portfolio of companies anti is it goes back and forth from being the biggest to the second business at biggest business actually. So kind will know for is becoming the second largest in the company of the portfolio companies

Chris Evans Starbucks Charlotte Roland Taylor Gus Rocket Florida Golf Nashville Europe Nasa COO Sarah Australia Ryan Leveque JAY Facebook Ryan Levesque Partner JIM
"ryan leveque" Discussed on The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

01:37 min | 7 months ago

"ryan leveque" Discussed on The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

"That thing is and I forget how long the workshop is, but it's basically super in depth like white morning all this stuff out, and so in this podcast. He basically talks about you know. Why do you want to use a quiz? All the different benefits and Crab Temeke studies and we talk about a little bit of like our experience with quizzes which have gone well, but we've always like hack job. Using just like you know like like I think Ryan said Scotch tape in in rubber bands. That's pretty much how we've done it without a full blown strategies, so in this episode he's going to walk you through the psychology, and like the results that people have gotten, but also really how to structure You know like why quiz can be this thing that really is you know catches attention, but also what happens right after their, and beyond, because there's more to it than just the quiz as the puzzle. Two quick things. This episode is brought to you by H rafts our favorite Seo tool that we use ourselves and love a lot We use it to keep an eye on where we're ranking for various key words where our podcast episodes are ranking One of our favorite things to do is when we bring podcast guests on. We try to rank for their their name, so we're GONNA try to rank for Ryan the vaccination and see if we can get on the first page of Google for people searching Ryan Leveque and we use to do that and we use HFC. Advice in their tools to do that kind of stuff. Stuff so if you're not using H. rests in Your Business. They've got a seven seven day trial. That you should check out. It's totally worth it over at a H. R.. E. F..

Ryan Leveque Google HFC
2 Unusual Hacks to Convert Your Inbound Traffic

Marketing School

02:01 min | 9 months ago

2 Unusual Hacks to Convert Your Inbound Traffic

"When we think about inbound traffic obviously that's people coming to you and in the context of I'm talking about right now. I'm going to talk about inbound traffic coming to my blog so this is like Seo content marketing basically organic search coming out. And so one thing that you can do when you think about converting people coming to your site is you can use survey funnels. And this is a tactic that was or strategy popularized by Ryan Leveque from the ask method. He has a book called. Ask method. That's a S K not the method of so he also has a tour that you can use to so the tool what it does. It's called bucket dot. Io and basically you're able to survey people coming to your site thing like. Hey maybe if I land on the single rainn website. Are you looking to start your own business? Are you looking for marking services? What are you looking for? A second? Funnel does people into very specific campaigns and a bucket that makes it very easy to do. There's a lot of different tools to use. But that's he's the guy that kind of popularized doing survey on also. I'll give him credit bucket that I owe one strategy that I use is mrs number to create some sort of free neom experienced. This could be on your website. This can anywhere so for example one thing. I'm implementing right. Now is the ability to pay for live chat with SEO expert so imagine a Intercom Style. Chat Bot about something that's man by human but instead of just having the Intercom Chat bought my team. Is We already designed something? That looks just like it. So when you click new conversation it'll say. Hey this feature is blocked. Only available to premium members click here to upgrade and then once they upgrade then they'll be able to see a real chat where they can chat but the point. I'm trying to make is including features and elements within your design and site and start blocking Ones you can use these tactics like Web APPs Stu but you can do it for any general site and generate more sales that way versus just driving people to sales paid all the time and selling them make him take action and charged for that action.

Ryan Leveque Intercom Style Rainn
"ryan leveque" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"ryan leveque" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

"Welcome back, quick, brain. Here's your question of the day, how do you use micro commitments to change your life? If you're listening or watching this episode right now, it's probably because you want to create a change in your life. Here are the wanna stop doing something or you want to start doing something you want to create a new results. And I'm excited about this conversation. We're here with Ryan Leveque much for being here. Thanks for being here. I love this conversation because as the author of ask, and now your new book, choose this is right in your wheelhouse. And so I love geeking out over the, the topic of behavioral change. Why do we do what we do or how do you make changes with your kids? Where do we start with this? You know, it's I four to start with how the brain response to change. Now, the brain whenever it's face with any sort of change in life perceives that changes the threat now it's interesting is the change can be negative. It could be positive and the brains job is to keep us safe. And it wants to preserve the state that were in in. So that's why whenever were presented with an opportunity to make some sort of change in our life. We oftentimes it elicits the fight or flight response in the limbic system in the Abdullah in our brain. Our brain says, wait time out in the second that's dangerous. We're not gonna let you do anything. So we either freeze, or we flee sometimes we fight for us to do something kind of feel combative. But the shows have been all sorts of areas of our life. It shows up in our selves. It shows up if you sell to anybody online, it shows up with your consumers if you buy anything it shows up in your own behavior when you're buying things. If your parent it shows up with your children, and what I think it'd be really interesting to talk about is how you actually have that fight or flight response to make any sort of change. You want to make in your life to get people around you to do what you want them to do and to improve your life, and especially influence. Not only the people around to whether it's your, your family, your friends repository for positive result, or your customers, but also fluence yourself totally. It's like, and I want to work out today, but I can't get myself, it's like this big giant thing. So the hack spoiler alert us using the power of micro microclimates now. I, I learned about the power micro commitment studying the work of Dr Robert Miller who's research out of California. He's published multiple books my academic background undergrad. I studied neuroscience, and it became really fascinated with the psychology of fear, because I'm one of these people like a lot of people, I know who earlier in my life. A lot of my decisions were driven by fear. I was afraid of failing was afraid of, you know, not job. I did a lot of things in my life. On the basis of fears of begin fascinated with the psychology and what's interesting about it is the way in which you can hack your fight or flight response is actually pretty simple. It's to ask yourself. A very simple question. The question is, what is a step toward this change? I'd like to take that is so small, it's impossible to fit okay? You have to say that Wilmore time for people listening. What something I can do right now in the direction? I wanna go that is so small, it's literally impossible to fit a giving exempt Pacific sample. The change you want to make your life is you want to work out. You want to go for a run the idea. If you present your brain with the idea of, let's go for ten mile run. Immediately your brain. The I mean, the Migdal is on high alert, right? The fight or flight responses warning warning danger danger. Right. You're talking to let you do it. It's gonna come up with all sorts of excuses. You're gonna find yourself, doing all sorts of things other than running these ten months. So the way you have. That fight or flight response is asked that question. What's a step, I could take that so small, it's literally impossible for me to fail and an example of an impossible fail. Step would be something like taking one step toward running shoes. It's laughable. Right. But you hear me say, it's a course I can do that, right? Of course. I can take that step. Well, that's an example of what we call a micro whenever you're facing resistance in your life from yourself. Someone around you, your children, a loved one your spouse or partner, you can ask yourself the same question while I want to make this change in this person's life. I want to influence this person to, to move in this direction. How can I shrink the size of the set hanging? I asked them to do this micro commitment when you take that one step towards your running shoes. It's hard to take one step. You take one step. You wanna take to take to you wanna take three before. You know you put your running shoes on. You're standing at the her at your doorstep. You're saying you went I actually can do the same. That's how I trick myself into exercise. I'm going to hop on the bike. I'm just going to do a five minute ride, and you could apply this. Towards whether it's running, or it's reading a lot of our listeners, and our watchers. We do a one book. It's literally hashtag the number one book week and people post a picture of the book, they hashtag it and we give out books to our some Amazon gift cards to our it's my favorites. And but what would the equivalent of a micro commitment, some people look at a book like your new book, and how it's two hundred something pages? Add leaned, that's so my amigos firing off. It's freezing. It's really simple a book, maybe the first depending on where you're at. Right. That impossible to fail step. It's for some people taking one step toward the running shoes is actually to put my running shoes on that's easy. In the context of a book. I might say you open the first page and just read one paragraph. That's it. You can read one paragraph and ten seconds seconds. Just read one paragraph, and you get to the end of that paragraph you kind of saying, you know what I'm going to be this next paragraph to writing. It's the same thing if you feel the daunting task of having. Right. An Email or social media posts or you know, a white caper something just stepped your keyboard. And just type when he struck where I do they don't open up your laptop type one key stroke. And then sometimes I'll go to the keyboard, when I'm feeling has been as I can just type nonsense. And it kind of create this muscle memory connection whereas, I know how to do this thing called writing. I can type real words in here, one word becomes too, because a paragraph becomes a page before you know what you're halfway done the thing that you were dreading exactly for so long. So the, the key idea is that it's to use the psychology of light row commitments to make change in your life and influence your market to do the things you want them to do when they land on your website. Ask them to take micro commitment steps. Instead of these big threatening steps that make them abandon and just freezing. They should either fleet data bounce off your website. They look at me say I'm gonna do this later who need it in an open. In town, and later, never comes this is very true. So the question to ask yourself, if you're listening to this, you're watching this right now is a number one. What's an area of your life right now that you felt this resistance, what's an example of a step that so small that you would be impossible to fail? And I would love everyone to share this. This is your quick challenge, as it take a screen shot of this episode tag. Ryan would is your social handles. Just ask Ryan Leveque asked for the title of my first book asks Ryan, Hlavac, and on face looking incident and myself at Jim quick. And when I want you to do is share exactly that list, their, their micro commitment. And so if someone's a parent, you could tell your child to clean the room, but that might be too big of Danzig pick one toil pick one toy and just pick the toy up. All right. You pick the toy up just throw it in the toy box. He YouTube toys for, you know, it the.

Ryan Leveque YouTube Abdullah Jim quick Wilmore Dr Robert Miller partner Danzig California Amazon Hlavac five minute ten seconds ten months
"ryan leveque" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"ryan leveque" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

"People <Speech_Music_Male> the single most <Speech_Music_Male> important decision needed <Speech_Music_Male> to make in your business, which <Speech_Music_Male> is before you ask <Speech_Music_Male> easy <Speech_Male> to choose <Speech_Music_Male> who you're going <Speech_Male> to have, <Speech_Male> who is your market, <Speech_Male> who is your niche. <Speech_Male> And so <Speech_Male> as a deep <Speech_Male> exploration <Speech_Male> through that process <Speech_Male> of deciding <Speech_Male> what <Speech_Music_Male> market to go into <Speech_Music_Male> what niche to pursue. <Speech_Music_Male> And who <Speech_Male> is your <Speech_Male> who <Speech_Male> that's powerful? <Speech_Male> You know, it's interesting <Speech_Male> when we do our <Speech_Male> our coaching, <Speech_Male> and we do our live events. <Speech_Male> Some <Speech_Male> people they're in <Speech_Male> a situation. <Speech_Male> It could be <Speech_Male> something where they have to make <Speech_Male> a good decision, or <Speech_Male> they're in some kind of crisis, <Speech_Male> and they always <Speech_Male> asked. It's interesting. <Speech_Male> They ask. <Speech_Male> What do I need to do? <Speech_Male> But another <Speech_Male> question, it <Speech_Male> just came to me when we're <Speech_Male> having this conversation is <Speech_Male> what if <Speech_Male> next time you don't <Speech_Male> automatically go <Speech_Male> to what <Speech_Male> do I need to do right now? <Speech_Male> But who <Speech_Male> do I need to be <Speech_Male> right now at this <Speech_Male> moment? It's incredible. <Speech_Music_Male> Just reframing <Speech_Male> that question <Speech_Male> can cause to <Speech_Music_Male> rethink <Speech_Music_Male> the entire problem, <Speech_Male> and who <Speech_Male> do I need to speak to <Speech_Music_Male> who has <Speech_Male> gone through what I'm going <Speech_Male> through right now <Speech_Male> mmediately unlocks <Speech_Male> this level of creativity <Speech_Male> where you <Speech_Male> can solve the problem <Speech_Male> with the way that <SpeakerChange> you never <Speech_Male> thought about <Speech_Male> right? And we, we <Speech_Male> know the neuroscience when <Speech_Male> somebody asks a question <Speech_Male> it directs <Speech_Male> their, their ridiculous <Speech_Male> activating system. <Speech_Male> You know there are <Speech_Male> because at any given <Speech_Male> moment, there's <Speech_Male> two billion <Speech_Male> stimulus. We could be paying <Speech_Male> attention to and <Speech_Male> primarily our brains. <Speech_Male> Are <Speech_Male> these deletion <Speech_Male> devices were trying to <Speech_Male> keep information <Speech_Male> out? And what <Speech_Male> do you pay attention to <Speech_Male> the things that you ask questions <Speech_Male> about, right? <Speech_Male> Exactly. <Speech_Male> So this is this <Speech_Male> is fascinating. I recommend <Speech_Male> everybody gets <Speech_Male> this book <Speech_Male> choose where <Speech_Male> how can people <Speech_Male> connect with <Speech_Male> you? So the best <Speech_Male> Lisek connect with me on <Speech_Male> social is just <Speech_Male> look for me. Ask <Speech_Male> Ryan Leveque. <Speech_Male> So ask talent <Speech_Male> Ryan Leveque. <Speech_Male> I'm there on Facebook. <Speech_Male> I'm there on <Speech_Male> Instagram <Speech_Male> and I'm always posting <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the crazy <Speech_Male> experiments questions <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and other advice <Speech_Music_Male> learning along <Speech_Music_Male> the way in <Speech_Music_Male> launching businesses. <Speech_Male> And, you know, I would <Speech_Male> actually challenge <Speech_Male> everybody right now to <Speech_Male> take a screen shot of this <Speech_Male> video, or take <Speech_Male> a screen shot of this <Speech_Male> podcast that you're <Speech_Male> listening to <Speech_Male> and tag, <Speech_Male> Ryan tag <Speech_Male> myself. <Speech_Male> And I would love <Speech_Male> for you to share <Speech_Male> your big <Speech_Male> or your takeaway <Speech_Male> or maybe your <Speech_Male> biggest question <Speech_Male> that you have here. <Speech_Male> And as <Speech_Male> always, I'm gonna reposed <Speech_Male> some of our favorite <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> actually for some <Speech_Male> of them will actually gift <Speech_Male> signed copies <Speech_Male> of Ryan's <Speech_Male> book. So <Speech_Male> make sure you do that. <Speech_Male> Thanks for being on <Speech_Male> facial super appreciate <Speech_Male> it. <SpeakerChange>

Ryan Leveque. Facebook.
"ryan leveque" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

08:45 min | 1 year ago

"ryan leveque" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

"For today. It's a big one. How do you make better choices? We all know that. Our life is a reflection of all the choices we made up to this point. What are we going to eat? Who are you gonna spend time with what are we going to think our routines, all of that? Have we ever given some thought on how we make these choices? Some really excited about this conversation we're up to have. I'm here with my friend Ryan Leveque, many be no Moretti. He's the best selling author of ask, and as brand new book called choose. And this is the topic we're talking about today. We're gonna go deep. So thanks for being a Ryan excited to be here. So you and I have geeked out over the power of asking powerful questions, right? Ask. And you shall receive. And so people here, they're watching the listening at home. And they're thinking, yeah, my life is a reflection of all the questions. I've asked. But I've never really thought about the metal level of asking questions myself when.

Ryan Leveque Moretti
"ryan leveque" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"ryan leveque" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Right back. And welcome back to the show again. Thank you so much for being with us very excited to introduce you to my, I guess, today his name is Ryan Leveque is the founder and CEO of the ask method company, which was named are in same brand as his very successful. First book one tons of awards hundred thousand copies sold national bestseller on the L A times USA today. Business publishers weekly a whole bunch of other places, and has just published a new book called Jews the single most important decision before starting your business is also running an Inc magazine top five hundred company in the United States. Ryan, welcome to the show. How you doing today? It's ought to be here and doing great. All right. So congratulations on the new book, I've been thinking about this for three or four hours now. The single most important decision before starting your business. I've come up with a hundred nineteen possible answers. Yeah. What is this? Most entrepreneurs and most the conventional wisdom out. There is all about focusing on answering the question of what, what should I build? What should I create what should I sell? But the reality is the question that you wanna be asking yourself is not what who, who should you serve who is your market, who is your bitch, who is your ideal customer. And the biggest mistake that people make is asking the wrong question focusing on what before they figured out to. Okay. So I have this really awesome ginger beer formula. It's the best ginger beer in the world. I love my ginger beer. I'm going to start selling it. Exactly that many people do. Right. They find something that they fall in love with, and they try to sell it. When the reality is, you don't have a business people say what, what did the first thing you need that defines whether or not you have a business. It's not a business license. It's not an office. It's not an employee if the customer, you do not have a business until you have a customer. And so that's what you want to start, you want to start with the market, you want to start with your who you wanna find out who they are. And then once you've chosen who you're going to focus on the next step is to ask. It's to ask the right questions to figure out what that market needs wants and desires that way, you can then go and build it created for selling. We will be right back with more school for startups radio in just a second. Thanks for being with us. Being a business owner or onto preneurs Kim fill lonely. Unless your friends have walked the same path they just don't understand your passion. How many times have you been asked? When are you going to get a real job? When you finally do make it big all of a sudden, the doubters till you. They always knew you would does this sound familiar, you.

Ryan Leveque United States founder and CEO business owner Inc magazine Kim four hours one tons
"ryan leveque" Discussed on The Bacon Podcast | Brian Basilico - Marketing Strategy Expert Interviews to CURE Your Marketing

The Bacon Podcast | Brian Basilico - Marketing Strategy Expert Interviews to CURE Your Marketing

09:23 min | 1 year ago

"ryan leveque" Discussed on The Bacon Podcast | Brian Basilico - Marketing Strategy Expert Interviews to CURE Your Marketing

Lincoln marketing and sales Ryan Leveque Brian basilica Ryan Levesque Ryan sec salesman CEO hundred percent
"ryan leveque" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"ryan leveque" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"And we will be right back. And welcome back to the show again. Thank you so much for being with us, very excited to introduce you to my I guess today. His name is Ryan Leveque is the founder and CEO of the ask method company, which was named are in same brand as his very successful. First book one tons of awards hundred thousand copies sold national bestseller on the L A times. USA today. Business publishers weekly, a whole bunch of other places and has just published a new book called Jews the single most important decision before. Starting your business is also running and Inc magazine top five hundred company in the United States. Ryan welcome to the show. How you doing today? Gimme often to be here and doing great. All right. So congratulations on the new book. I've been thinking about this for three or four hours. Now, the single most important decision before starting your business. I've come up with a hundred nineteen possible answers. Yeah. What is this most entrepreneurs and most of the conventional wisdom out there is all about focusing on answering the question of what what should I Bill what should I create what should I sell? But the reality is the question that you wanna be asking yourself is not what it who who should you serve. Who is your market who is your bitch who is your ideal customer? And the biggest mistake that people make is asking the wrong questions focusing on what before they figured out too. Okay. So I have this really awesome. Ginger beer formula. It's the best ginger beer in the world. I love my ginger beer. I'm going to start selling it. Exactly that many people do right. They find something that they fall in love with. And they try to sell it. When the reality is, you don't have a business. People say what what the first thing you need that defines whether or not you have a business. It's not a business license. It's not an office. It's not an employee if the customer, you do not have a business until you have a customer. So that's what you want to start. You wanna start with the market you want to start with your who you want to find out who they are. And then once you've chosen who you're going to focus on the next step is to ask it's to ask the right questions to figure out what that market needs wants and desires that way. You can then go in build it created for Sally. We will be right back with more school for startups.

Ryan Leveque founder and CEO United States Inc magazine Sally four hours one tons
"ryan leveque" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

09:57 min | 1 year ago

"ryan leveque" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"We have Ryan Leveque one of the top entrepreneur educators out there with his new book and Brad Stevens be virtual assistant super guru. Just great stuff. We're cram. So we have got to get going. Let's get started right now. We are very excited to introduce you to my. I guess his name is Brad Stevens. He is the CEO of several companies one is called the outsourcing Expos at the name of the company, Bradley virtual assistance. Brad Stevens straining my umbrella brand under which everything operates Brad Stevens. Straining international is actually my corporate entity in all different programs and speaking and everything that I do kind of all house underneath that Percocet blueprint programs probably one where most known for okay? Anyway, Brad is a local area expert here in Atlanta, everyone in Atlanta knows them. And he is also, of course, national internationally well known as well as the virtual assistant guy, he has had multiple seven figure businesses and has been a top adviser for organizations like EEO, and why peo- score visit places like that he served as on the board of the chapter of global e oh where he was the chairperson cheated partners. And they're exhilarated he's on the committee of nerve and e oh United Nations initiative and his work with big business. And small landed him in Inc magazine, octane magazine, Wall Street business network in the cover of small business magazine. And he is a winner of the top forty most good looking I'm sorry, innovative companies around. So we I saw Brad speak at an event last November. And I'm very excited to get to know more about him. Brad is this really you. Or did you send a virtual assistant to be on? The interview today jam I share in person. I appreciate that. All right. So I got to admit I've been late to the game with the whole virtual assistant thing. But in the last two or three months, I have become addicted to up work I have anywhere between three to ten things running simultaneously. So where am I on the scale of zero is neophyte ten is Brad Stevens wearing on the scale in the middle. Is part of the whole, you know, outsourcing Burchill assistant kind of ecosystem. So I'd say you're you're heading direction for sure it's a yes where I started. When I first started learning about this. You know, some of these individual platforms that exist out there, you can find these virtual virtual workers which still a lot of a lot of this is a maze. Speaking events asked to raise their hand. And that's fallen ten to fifteen percent. A really familiar with some of these platforms when it goes beyond that as much of other dimensions to it. But but yeah, that's a that's one of the parts of the ecosystem. All right what happens after the outsourcing websites, and there's lots of them. There's also five or which use for different stuff. And then there are some others as well. What do I evolve into next? Well, it's. Mental thing behind what of realized and getting into outsourcing and learn how to do it in growing last up any or we actually were at factor and distributor of lighting products. And we end up having a product challenge to get really creative about making our dollar stretch challenging times. And that's when I really kind of stumbled in before up work is actually platform, you lamps and deaths perch together to become up work an adviser and several others that are out there. And you know, basically, you have most small businesses Ochsner 's in this country just struggled to get it all done right there. Just a state of overwhelm at any given time whether it's just your Email inbox consume so much of lights on its own. And there's everything else that takes starting grow business and businesses don't have access to big cash. Big capital? Banks require you know, years and years of successful performance. And so it leaves them to stretch through time and their dollars as far as possible. And that's what I found in my business and then working with others. And so it's it's first of all just taking an inventory of what are your biggest constraint points? Whatever your goals are you're trying to doing your business. Whether you're trying to get out of the ground, you're trying to grow and scale existing business. What are your big constraints in terms of time or money or knowledge in each division? You know, marketing operations customer service, and what you've gotten handle on mount and really just take those and put those down. What are the things you're consuming all your time? And what are the things you want to be doing blue-collar wishlist actually the best starting point? And then it's about starting small right center. You're asking me, we're we're the path. It's first understanding what your total constraints are most people don't do jump in and do a little project here project. There will take the time to really analyze all your challenges are then say, okay. Which of these are the most significant that could get them off my play or get you son affordably. They can have the most impact. And then you start with those few to get. Confidence in the process. Learn how to be successful in using platforms like upward or getting your own virtual assistant, which is kind of this second stage of the process and every time I've done this. I see people they start small they find success with it. And then it kind of snowballs from there in the second. Phase is really what I call having your own virtual team architecture. So basically have VA and I worked India the Philippines. I mean, college educated for your college degree and just got back from visiting there for five actually in the Philippines, incredibly talented in percent dollars now, and she's making seven times minimum wage. So she's making more money she's ever made. And she kinda runs the quarterback over all of my virtual other resources. So like instead of us going and finding running ten projects I get virtual assistant managing my Email, manages my calendar, all my Adnan operational things that she oversees all those other people's if we need somebody to Rocher really quick for events. She goes on somebody upward for five that gets it done. So that's a two point. Oh is going from individually managing different projects and trying to vet and find people upward five or so forth to VA Dickey cost two thousand seven dollars an hour and into becoming kind of your direct right in person. And they quarterback all those other sources, and it is incredible. When you get that dial there. I mean, you can just move mountains. Entrepreneur you can do fast, you can do things, but BASF cost-effectively in what I think is the most important word for any Ochsner being today, which is just a Jilani. We have to be able to be agile respond quickly change direction in. That's kind of what it to do. All right, Brad. We'll maybe I'm a little further along than I realized because I am moving into the two point. Oh zone. Sage to there where I have picked one virtual assistant that I work with on a ongoing basis. Right. But that person is not in my Email or on my calendar. I can't conceive of turning over my Email. The somebody tell me how that works. How do they know just all of it? How does that work? I can't imagine that doing that crossing anyone that much not even my wife. Well, I'm telling you once you get on the other side of it. You will never ever ever ever go back because I don't know about you. But, you know, Email got the Place Route consuming half of my time, if not more in some cases it because depending the nature of the business that you're in your cell phone speaking about leadership, and so forth can end up being a big central command of all the activities going on your business. But for me again, it's kinda starting small growing from there. So I it starts off process we go through in our Percocet LeBron process, but basically it's kind of taking just a week audit of really would all's happening in your Email in your inbox. You know, categorizing those emails in terms of the different hat Gorey's customer related categories, you know, operational categories things that, you know, Amazon order confirmation emails, you know, really kind of auditing creating a set of five ten buckets of what Email kinda fall into and in the sage one. Kinda getting your visa within within. But with an outlook three sixty five as well as g mail, you can set up quality, a secondary kind of user. So it might be a set up. So that she has limited rights, but she can respond as herself within my inbox stuff comes into my inbox. She goes reviews it. Package. Are you in right now, Brad what packages I'm using Email g sleep basically, so g mail? Also, people are using outlook research five and most other Email platform the light set somebody else up in there. And so it will step I'll tell you. So if you have any super-sensitive he knows right? If you wanna engage in this process, it's worth that. But you know, you know, if you've got your Bank records, or you know, 4._0._1._K records, whatever they come in. So I set up a personal Email that have those things go to have those kind of isolated but ninety percent of the rest of my Email is all stuff that I don't have a problem with an an assistant seen managing organizing. So I can have my emails go to an area where the couldn't see them. Exactly, you know, everybody came about getting and so forth. Yeah. Tons of that. We will be right back with more of our C, I, fantasies and just a minute..

Brad Stevens virtual assistant Ochsner Ryan Leveque CEO United Nations EEO Bradley Inc magazine VA Atlanta Burchill octane magazine BASF Philippines Rocher Gorey Jilani Amazon India
"ryan leveque" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

08:54 min | 2 years ago

"ryan leveque" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Our great state. News Radio eight three. Oh. Leveque is our guest if you'd like to jump in. We'll take your calls at six five one nine eight nine nine two to six and toll free eight six six nine eight nine nine two two six aren't Ryan before we took the break. I asked you. The the advice that most people get when they're thinking about starting a business. They are told you're gonna start a business start a business. It's something that you know, a lot about your response to that. And I said that my response might be a little unexpected or interesting, and it's actually something I don't necessarily think is always a good thing. And here's why in every single market that we've entered I've always, and this is advice that I give aspiring business owners is you wanna walk into that market with a naive again earth mind and in markets or areas that we have a tremendous amount of expertise. I think there's a tendency to think that we know the answers we know what the market wants. That's one of the biggest mistakes that I see people make. And so, for example, one of the things that you wanna do when you're entering a market is to ask those questions that we talked about the. The questions around challenges that people are having pay close attention to that and focus in on the different categories of responses that you hear and the real opportunity here is that many businesses. Make the mistake of trying to be a one size fits all answer. Instead what you wanna do is focus on the top three to five categories of responses that you get when you ask that question around. What's the single biggest challenge you're having around this specific problem and then speak to each of those categories differently? Here's for you. You live in a community that has many restaurants. But there isn't a Chinese restaurant. And you think there's a need for a Chinese restaurant. How would you go about? Looking into starting a Chinese restaurant? By the way, and you're not Chinese. Greg with. I would think I would think that would be a check Mark against you right out of the gate. I lived in China for five years, I do speak nearly fluent Chinese. So it's funny that he take Chinese as an example food. Well, when you come to text us, I'll I'll take you to some of the best places here. How to answer that question? So I think I'm gonna phrase it slightly differently. There's a there's a great example. I like to give people when it comes to understanding what demand exist, and it has to do with the example, I love to give his matching similar scenario that you just can't imagine to walk into a school. You had to walk into a school cafeteria cafeteria with the mandate of selling as much school lunch as possible. Now, you can go about this two ways. One way is what I call the academic way, the NBA, which is you would do research on the income breakdown on demographic breakdown on all sorts of trend analysis, you put together this big report, and you present it to the school board, and you take here's what I think the school lunch. The school offset that should be served. That's one option. The other option is you walk into the cafeteria with a piece of paper and a pencil, and you just go kids to kid, and you say, hey, what are you waiting for lunch tomorrow? Which way is going to sell you more school lunch. Simple. And so I'll go back Hansen your direct question. The the I would even I would look at a different question. I wouldn't necessarily say I wanna start a Chinese restaurant are people interested in this. Instead, my approach would be what are people missing? What are people craving? What do people want to eat that doesn't exist already and then finding out and again, if you get these long detail passionate answers, if you get a story from people say, listen there used to be the Chinese restaurants it closed down years ago, and we've just been dying for something to open up, then you're onto something that if people start steering you in a different direction, they say, you know, what I could really go for really good hamburgers. Even though you're like might have been a Chinese restaurant. The hamburger stand might be a more profitable business. Now, let me let me ask you this. You started off with the scrabble jewelry. And I'm not I'm not gonna ask you to describe what exactly scrabble jewelry is. But I want to ask you this. You started off and you made some money with that. But then you've you've gone into other areas where you've made you say a significant amount of money to the tune of five million dollars annually. What were those businesses that you started up? What did they entail? Sorry. Trick questions. I talked about this in the buck and the markets that we've gone into I'll give you some examples. So we we we've gone into the dog training market. So teaching people how to train their dog. We've gone into golf instruction market. We have gone into the business funding markets up providing funding for business owners, satellite television and partner with a company that we would all know listening to this right now, we also sell high end home water filtration systems, so people who want to filter their water at home, we sell fitness education. So people who want to you've seen those programs on television to get into shape. That would be an example of something that we saw wearing the gardening market, which is arguably the largest hobby in the world, we're in the memory improvement market. So I have a my academic background is in neuroscience. That's what I actually studied at university and. Book and. It's funny enough. I have a friend my one of my best friends in college. He's actually a neurologist at the mayo clinic in Rochester and about that. I at college is wearing learn there's a difference between smart and really smart. Dr Charles is really smart. My my my friend, Charles. I wouldn't I was smart. So at an interest in the brain in psychology. So we have a business where we teach people memory techniques and how to improve your memory. So the markets are varied we're in the dentistry market for as an example of an off-line traditional brick and mortar business, and I think the big takeaway with this is no matter what it is that you sell. It doesn't matter. If you sell low priced products are high priced products are home water filtration system, sell for thousands of dollars. We also sell books for just a few dollars. It doesn't matter if you are an offline or an online business there's a place to use this ask formula in whatever business that you currently own or whatever business you're considering starting. I was under the assumption that you're businesses are all tutorials. But then you talk to you about selling water filtration systems. So so you have tangible products that you sell as well other than tutorials over or the internet. Exactly. Yup. You're absolutely right. Did you start ask dot com? The website. I wish. Isn't there? Isn't there a conflict there have they threatened to sue you or anything for using ask? Well, the answer to that is no it's a great question. I think ask is one of these words that you cannot trademark a word that is a common word in the English language. Right. It's the same thing your carpet carpeted unable to to trademark the term photocopier because it's the generic term that described that thing. Ryan, we're gonna take a break. Again. Ryan Leveque is our guest and his book is simply entitled ask..

Ryan Leveque Dr Charles NBA China Greg Rochester partner mayo clinic five million dollars five years
"ryan leveque" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

The Ziglar Show

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"ryan leveque" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

"The vet thought that too, but Ryan and Ryan the vexed and introvert and all of a sudden Ryan started realizing that it didn't take introverts will first off, you don't start on grand stages like zig Ziglar. You start on stages of ten or fifteen people in by the way, zig started on small stages to learn that today, like really small stages and had some struggles with those stages. Tom was telling me about so introverts, you don't let the reason introverts get a little bit nervous is because they're focused so much on thinking that they're going to be on these big stages. Now just go get on a stage in your backyard of twenty five people. And here's what I want you to know, get comfortable with one talk, just one talk. Now, here's the difference between stages in Sunday school zig top Sunday school every every every week I heard for many years and he had to prepare a different lesson every single week. The creative energy that goes into that is so much greater. Tom said he spent so much more time preparing for Sunday schools than he did for stages. Why? Because he had a few powerful talks at ease any probably had more than most. But for the introverts out there in the world, like what I would want you to know is that it only takes one talk. It only takes you getting comfortable with one talk and using that framework that I spoke about just a little bit ago and using one getting really getting really crafty wentzel in talk and knowing that you're not gonna start on the big stage. But like just like Ryan Leveque said Ryan, Beck said that started on a small stage and then it was like, wow, the response that the audience gave to me as an. Introverts was overwhelming. And then he went to another stage in another stage in another stage, and now he's on stages of thousands of people, and he is still an introverts. Nothing's changed, but he's so comfortable with his material that he's not as nervous as he gets on a stage and it has to do with the fact that a conversion rate and an engagement rate is so much greater and that's really important for introverts to here on the other. The other thing that I said is just the road warrior and in, here's what I want you to know spoon McLeans eyes were opened to this teaching in this one hour launch workshop. He was eyes were open to the fact that it doesn't take a lot of stages to move the needle. He's going to be on four to six stages this year. I'm gonna be on fifteen to twenty. So doesn't take a lot of stage to make a big impact in your business. Well, you, you keep mentioning these guys, so Ryan Leveque folks, if you did not catch that show, it was show five ninety three. So go check that out. You just got a testimony. I'm trying to see how quick I can be to see where my my interview with Stu is not that good. It's in there. Just scroll down folk. You'll find it well. So I do want to ask about this event and then a couple just a couple of follow up questions. So the event is the one hour launch workshop, which again, folks go to that one hour.

Ryan Leveque Tom zig Ziglar Beck Stu one hour
"ryan leveque" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

08:24 min | 2 years ago

"ryan leveque" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"You'd like to jump in. We'll take your calls at six five one nine eight nine nine two to six and toll free eight six six nine eight nine nine two to six. All right. Ryan before we took the break. I asked you. You know, the the advice that most people get when they're thinking about starting a business. They are told you're gonna start a business start a business. It's something that you know, a lot about your response to that. And I said that my response might be a little unexpected or interesting, and it's actually something I don't necessarily think is always a good thing. And here's why in every single market that we've entered I've always, and this is advice that I give aspiring business owners is you wanna walk into that market with a naive again mind and in markets or areas that we have a tremendous amount of expertise. I think there's a tendency to think that we know the answers we know what the market wants. That's one of the biggest mistakes that I see people make. And so, for example, one of the things that you wanna do when you're entering a market is to ask those questions that we talked about asking the questions around challenges that people are having pay close attention to that and focus in on the different categories of responses that you hear and the real opportunity here is that many businesses. Make the mistake of trying to be a one size fits all answer. Instead what you wanna do focus on the top three to five categories of responses that you get when you ask that question around. What's the single biggest challenge you're having around this specific problem and then speak to each of those categories differently? Here's for you. You live in a community that has many restaurants. But there isn't a Chinese restaurant. And you think there's a need for a Chinese restaurant. How would you go about? Looking into starting a Chinese restaurant? Great. By the way, and you're not Chinese. Greg with. I would think I would think that would be a check Mark against you right out of the gate. I lived in China for five years, I do speak nearly fluent Chinese. So it's funny that you take Chinese as an example by food. When you come to tax us. I'll I'll take you to some of the best places here. Secures how to answer that question. So I think I'm gonna phrase it slightly differently. There's a there's a great example. I like to give people when it comes to understanding what demand exist, and it has to do with the example, I love to give his matching similar scenario that you just can't imagine it to walk into a school. You had to walk into a school cafeteria cafeteria with the mandate of selling as much school lunch as possible. Now, you could go about this two ways. One way is what I call the academic way, the NBA, which is you do research on the income breakdown on demographic breakdown on all sorts of trend analysis, you put together this big report, and you present it to the school board, and you take here's what I think the school lunch the school that should be served. That's one option. The other option is you walk into the cafeteria with a piece of paper and a pencil, and you just go kids to kid, and you say, hey, what do you feel like eating for lunch tomorrow? Which way is going to sell you more school lunch. Simple. Right. And so I'll go back to answer your direct question. The I would even I would look at a different question. I wouldn't necessarily say I wanna start a Chinese restaurant are people interested in this. Instead, my approach would be what are people missing? What are people craving? What do people want to eat that doesn't exist already and then finding out and again, if you get these long detail passionate answers, if you get a story from people say, listen there used to be the Chinese restaurant it closed down years ago, and we've just been dying for something to open up, then you're onto something that if people start steering you in a different direction, they say, you know, what I could really go for really good hamburgers. Even though you might have been a Chinese restaurant. The hamburger stand might be a more profitable business. Now, let me let me ask you this. You started off with the scrabble jewelry. And I'm not I'm not gonna ask you to describe what exactly scrabble jewelry is. But I want to ask you this. You started off and you made some money with that. But then you've you've gone into other areas where you've made you say significant amount of money to the tune of five million dollars annually. What were those businesses that you started up? What did they entail? Shorting cigarette questions. I talked about this in the book and the markets that we've gone into. And I'll give you some examples. So we we we've gone into the dog training market. So teaching people how to train their dog we've gone into the golf instruction market. We have gone into the business funding markets up providing funding for business owners, satellite television and partner with a company that we would all know listening to this right now, we also sell high end home water filtration system, so people who wanna filter their water at home, we sell fitness education. So people who want to you've seen those programs on television to get into shape. That would be an example of something that we saw wearing the gardening market, which is arguably the largest hobby in the world, we're in the memory improvement market. So I have a my academic background is in neuroscience. That's what I actually studied at university and. Book and. It's funny enough. I have a friend that one of my best friends in college. He's actually a neurologist at the mayo clinic in Rochester and about that. I at college is wearing learn there's a difference between smart and really smart. Dr Charles is really smart. My my my friend, Charles. I wouldn't I was smart. So I had an interest in the brain in psychology. So we have a business where we teach people memory techniques and how to improve your memory. So the markets are varied we're in the dentistry market for as an example of an offline traditional brick and mortar business, and I think the big takeaway with this is no matter what it is that you sell. It doesn't matter. If you sell low priced products are high priced products are poem water filtration system, sell for thousands of dollars. We also sell books for just a few dollars. It doesn't matter if you are an offline or an online business there's a place to use this ask formula in whatever business that you currently own or whatever business you're considering starting. I was under the assumption that you're businesses are all tutorials. But then you talked about selling water filtration systems. So so you have tangible products that you sell as well other than tutorials over or the internet. Exactly. Yup. You're absolutely right. Did you start ask dot com? The website. I wish. I witnessed isn't there? Isn't there a conflict there have if they threatened to sue you or anything for using ask? Well, the answer to that is no it's a great question. I think ask is one of these words that you cannot trademark word that is a common word in the English language. Right. It's the same thing like your carpet Advani unable to to trademark the term photocard here because it's the generic term that described that thing. Right. Ryan, we're gonna take a break. Again. Ryan Leveque is our guest and his book is simply entitled ask..

Ryan Leveque Dr Charles China NBA Greg Rochester Advani partner mayo clinic five million dollars five years
"ryan leveque" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

13:16 min | 2 years ago

"ryan leveque" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Good evening. It's eleven on eight three O w c c all Elmer here. David Josephson sitting in for Chris Alston? Who is going to be up north golfing? And I don't know how good that looks. I'm David again, a feeling. Got a feeling they're going to have some slashing your weather. Unfortunately. That was that was Chris biggest concern are gases. Our name is Ryan Leveque back. No, wait armed with nothing. But a four hundred fifty dollar laptop ninety IB league background in neuroscience and insatiable curiosity to understand why people buy he left a lucrative career on Wall Street and later in Shanghai China to launch a multi-million dollar online publishing business selling information and sophomore using was now become the ask formula. Since then Ryan is used the ask formula to help build MIM Altea million dollar businesses and twenty three different industries generating over one hundred million dollars in sales in the process today. He and his team are offering training consulting and implementation services for entrepreneurs and businesses at all levels. And let's bring Ryan on Ryan good evening. Good evening. It is great to be here. This is this is a fascinating story. If you truly drew do. Where are you as we speak? Are are you in the United States or whereabouts? Are you in the United States? I'm down in Austin, Texas right now. So. Our weather is just a a wee bit warmer than it is up in your neck of the woods. Well, sure rub it in. I grew up in the northeast in New Hampshire where right now about thirty degrees. So. New Hampshire in Minnesota are somewhat similar except for ones on an ocean. The other is not. So you're in your twenties working in a cubicle, and you just got fed up with it and decided to go off on your own and done extremely well. And being a former business owner, my wife, and I had a small business. I think that the first thing that a person has to do to start a business is you have to have some guts to do it, right or wrong. I think that's absolutely right. And I will say that that is one of the things that helped me back was this crushing fear of failure. And especially for young people. I I know I can speak for myself when I was fresh out of college. And I know there's a. A hundred thousand people who are graduating in the state of Minnesota and the next couple of weeks across the entire university system. So this is so appropriate. I remember I was deathly afraid of being in the poor house. So I've read out and got a job, and I grew up in a very working class blue collar background. We didn't have a lot of money growing up. So there wasn't like there was the safety net when it came out of college. And I remember in my Bank account, there's less than thousand dollars. That's what I had to my name. And so I think you're absolutely right. You do need to have some guts. And I think the the good news is today. It's easier than ever to start a business, especially with the opportunities available online. So the the internet has created a lot of opportunity for anybody who has the courage to to jump into that into that fold. That's interesting. Absolutely. And we talk I talk about this in the book ask which is the story of how we did it how we generated a hundred million dollars in online sales literally starting with nothing but five hundred dollars in the Bank, which I think is great. And the reason why I think the world needs to know about this is it's just a testament that anybody can do it. And I came from a corporate background. I worked in a corporate job after college in a cubicle as you mentioned. And when I left my job it was in two thousand and eight which was right in the middle of the world's financial crisis. And the company I worked for and I don't know if you remember this L was AIG and AIG was one of the companies that eventually was bailed out by the US government. But I remember waking up one day walking to my desk. And picking up a copy of the Wall Street Journal, and I was living and working in Shanghai time. So with the Asia edition and the headline read AIG file for bankruptcy. And that for me was the kick in the butt that I needed to say, all right? Call my wife and say, Honey, I think today's the day. Hey, look at the paper. Let's do this. By writing your book, aren't aren't you endanger of of asking for competition in what you do. You actually bring up a really good point. And it took a while. The reason why I wrote the book, and this is a great question because the book Al reveals what I consider to be might secret family recipe. This is what I've personally used to generate all the wealth that we've generated and for a long time. This is a tightly guarded secret that I didn't reveal outside of very close circle of private clients that I was working with implement. What has come to me known as the ask formula? Which is why the book is titled ask and the reason why I was inspired to write the book was three years ago. Actually got really sick. I was born. And I started getting very sick to the point that I had to be rushed to the ER. And I spent ten days in intensive care. On life support. And I came away from that experience, basically deciding to things number one that I'm not going to be around forever. And I wanna make a massive positive impact in the world. And if I'm gonna do what I have to do it now. And so I came out of that hospital like a bullet out of the gun and basically made the decision that the world needs to know about this formula. I want to get this and as many business owners hands as possible, and I know that it might be at the expense of my personal success. But I think that this is something that's too powerful that can be held within a very small group of people. This is I find this incredibly fascinating. When when you look at the the number you mentioned, the number of young people young adults, and he graduated from college nachos to Minnesota. But we go across pretty much coast to coast across the country. So, you know, there's a potential there for a lot of young adults that are listening. You got to have the courage to do it. And you've got to ask a lot of questions, and I think more than a lot of questions. They've gotta be the right questions. Correct. Absolutely. And that's, you know, one of the, you know, there's a stop at so many people, quote, it's something like one in five businesses closes after a year. Three years, depending on where you get the tick. And so why is that why are so many businesses fairly while they're a couple of things there? Couple mistakes that I see aspiring business owners make all the time. And the best part is that once you realized that these are mistakes that you can prevent that. So the first mistake that I see is people tend to start with a product in mind, they start with a brilliant idea. But the real secret and business is to start by focusing on solving a very specific problem except for Campbell one of the first businesses that we went into. So we've talked about we've gone into twenty three different markets. The markets range from everything from dog training to satellite TV business funding, a weight loss instruction dolphin -struction tennis instruction list goes on. But one of the first markets that we went into this is going to sound crazy. But it's true with teaching people how to make jewelry made. From scrabble tiles. Now, you might wonder why go into that market of all places. Well, the reason why we went into that market is my wife is a Crafter. She was looking to learn how to make this type of jewelry, and when she tried. She struggled, and when we started searching online, there are no resources available to help. And we found that other people online were struggling with the same problem. And so that was when that first light bulb went off. And we said there might be an opportunity here who help people with this problem. Not only did have when you tell me you had less than five hundred dollars, even when you're dealing with the internet. I think that were you by yourself were you mentioned you mentioned another person. Yeah. I mean, even even even to start up anything. I mean, did you put together a prospect is business plan? Did you go to a Bank to get some funding? Did you design your own webpage or did you hire that out? How could you start a business with four hundred and fifty dollars? Well, we started our first business. We started on what was at the time. A very little website is now a very big website. But at the time was very little website and essentially EBay for handmade goods, and it's a site called FC dot com and FC is a platform that allows you to build a website a web page or web presence with virtually no money. Upfront. All you need to do. And I think there might have been a small registration fee of twenty five dollars is set up establish an SE account. Upload a few images to your website and some copy explaining what you want to sell and you're in business, and that's what's most amazing right is so different about an online business versus a traditional brick and mortar business and this was important to us. And I think it's important to so many young people it's because I can relate to this. 'cause we didn't have money in the Bank when we started we were a little bit older, I have left my corporate job. My wife was getting her PHD at Hong Kong university. And she had a. If you start getting short, simple, basic responses. There's a good question that people are not willing to pay money to solve that problem. But if you get back long detail passionate answers from people there's a really good chance that they might be willing to spend money to solve that problem. So that's that first data point that tells you you're headed in the right direction. Now when we did this online in this scrabble tile, jewelry market, we simply did this by hosting questions in forums online asking people. Hey, are you struggling to make this jewelry? And we got this flood of responses. I didn't even know people make scrambled jewelry. I know. Right. And here's the crazy thing. So I tell the story in the book at one point we took that business just teaching people how to make the type of jewelry we had a series of stories online all digital products. So we had no inventory, and we took that business to almost ten thousand dollars a month. Now, I wish I could say you were selling the tutorials or. Do you make the money on that? They'll tell you what Ryan hold on. We've got to take a break. And you've got me curious now, how did you make money on this? Selling your product if people could go, well, we'll find out. We'll find out. It was the tutorials or what exactly how you made money on that? Ryan Leveque is our guest and get ready for this title. The title of the book is ask..

Ryan Leveque Minnesota United States AIG David Josephson business owner Chris Alston New Hampshire Shanghai China Wall Street Journal O MIM Altea Austin Elmer Texas Shanghai Asia Hong Kong university
"ryan leveque" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

The Ziglar Show

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"ryan leveque" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

"Okay. Here. Then we get Ryan Leveque healthy habits. Okay, Ryan. So you make a lot happen. You got a lot going on your leading lot of people, and yet you're human that has to get up in the morning, put their pants on and make an start off right as well, but do the do the habits for success. So we're gonna go through the seven spokes on Ziglar wheel of life and see what you're doing where you're strong, where you're weak, all the good stuff. So first one is physical and I actually because I have to stock all my interviewees, you know, I looked at that kind of made a physical transformation here recently, so you must be doing a few things. Tell us what happened on the physical side. Yeah, you know, I'm someone who struggled my entire life to get into a gym like I could. I could get to the gym for like ten days in a row, and then something would happen in my life and I would fall off the wagon and three months would go by before I got myself back in. And so one of the promises I made myself after I emerged from. A tragic health situation where I came out of intensive care said, I'm going to use this. I can use this and this is going to define me in one way or the other. I can use this to define me for the rest of my life or can use this as the impetus against the best shape of my life. And I chose the latter and a decided to invest in an area. I'd never. I wasn't just willing to spend money in which was to invest in a personal trainer on I said, I knew that if I paid for an appointment that if I knew there was someone waiting there at the gym for me, I wasn't going to waste because I don't like to waste money and so fast forward five, six years later. And I've worked with a personal trainer. His name is he's just turned sixty five years old. He's incredible inspiration in the most amazing shape of your of his life..

Ryan Leveque Ziglar sixty five years three months six years ten days
"ryan leveque" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"ryan leveque" Discussed on Mixergy

"Engagement that actually the once they check out the webinar checkup, the sales call, whatever, right. They have all these beliefs where which I mentioned before, have them installed so that the sales conversation, the conversation is then wager that makes. Some the whole funnel is optimized for that. That's cool thing. That's why I work so well. Okay. With tell me more tell me more because I'm intrigued by this and I know you get into the whole description of it here on the call, but I want to be able to visualize it. Yeah. Okay. The first thing is you pick one traffic channel. Okay, one, whatever you want to choose. You sent him to a thing where you can capture restart, controlling the conversation usually control a conversation about EMA, could also be bought right? Let's say Emma, right? So we give something in return, which is the lead magnet ride lead mine. It's basically a PDF could be a blockbuster into PDF, give that away put a cover. That's it. Right. So you're on the air to the to the lead magnet, right? And then instead of just sending them automated emails, but everyone does instead of doing this, you get into raise their hand, right? You wanna ask them for permission, right? Hey, at just saw you sign up for this lead Magna what? And he told me you have this problem. You know what have the six lesson courses for free and it helps you solve the problem which. Just told me you have, right? You want to sign up right then when they say yes, raise their hand, I want to sign up. We asked him for more questions to collect some data, restore data, inactive campaign or any ESPN you have. I mean serum, and then we play out the final which is usually seventy. Most could be seven, but message same together, an Email, same seven-bout messages. But now they ins- different ones depending on what the answer. No, I think it's the same, but they're pieces there are changed based on the answers that they gave you exact. So let me put it this way. So it might be it might be a landing page for you that says, I can help you create a funnel. In that case, it seems too generic. No one's gonna feel like it's exactly for me, but if you say I can help you create a funnel. Why do you wanna funnel? And one option is I need more consultant clients. Then when the Email comes to me, it's I'm going to teach you how to create a funnel so that you can get more Email clients and then you do the same thing with the next four questions that you ask. You just take the answers and you plug them in the difference between this brush versus like. Leveque Ryan Leveque would I think, have you create different funnels for each one of those people? And that's a lot of work and many people can't even get ten twenty fifty people to come into their funnel. And now I think Iran, correct me if I'm wrong. I think his ask method says now create five different sequences based on which bucket they fall into. And what you're saying is, don't create five different sequences have one Email sequence. It's much easier to manage. Have one landing page have one sales page, but find some spots that are blank that you fill in the blanks based on what they told you my summing-up your process, right. That's right. Exactly. Per human way, we change two sentences, right? So instead of writing the whole thing, which has changed the most important parts right to talk to them and their problem, the thing what you wanted, you want to figure out the problem and they go. So you can create a funnel that bridges the problem to go and the tools they can showed me in the video that you created for me that that enable it is active campaign and you're right, you can use any other emails service provider. But the thing about active campaign that makes them special is they have these fill in the blanks. A lot of stuff that you could do in other places. They keep simple as eight. You need to fill in the blanks. We'll make it dead simple for you to do this film and then write messages the other software Brennan done software..

Ryan Leveque Emma ESPN Brennan consultant Iran
"ryan leveque" Discussed on Leverage: Optimize, Automate, Outsource: Productivity Tips, Virtual Assistant Insights, Outsourcing, Life Hacks, and More

Leverage: Optimize, Automate, Outsource: Productivity Tips, Virtual Assistant Insights, Outsourcing, Life Hacks, and More

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"ryan leveque" Discussed on Leverage: Optimize, Automate, Outsource: Productivity Tips, Virtual Assistant Insights, Outsourcing, Life Hacks, and More

"One off project it test ideas or multimillion dollar launches and in today's session he'll be talking to us about the methodology that a number of get leveraged clients have asked health with and that's the ask methodology for those of you have heard of it the asmaa phonology jamie spent the past few studying in implementing the ask methodology from self and for clients and he's even been featured on the ask method is a success story with results achieve for his clients i've asked them here today the shares some of those experiences with you and it's oakland format like usual so if you have questions please hosts them anthill answer and please thank him for waking up early he's in your new zealand right correct yep so this is what five am right now sam for you six am so for those live and for those watching the recording it was still ellie but we're here we're awake and we've had the coffee already so we're okay right all right well the floor is yours if i have some questions i'm going to interrupt but let's let's learn about the ask method great still flow thank you nick thank you for the introduction hello everyone wanted to do today is to go through the methodology with you so if you know about it than this will hopefully give you a deeper understanding if you knew nothing about it then by the end of this you will and you'll know where to go get more resources to learn about that's easy and also we're gonna try to experiments and we're going to try and keep this within an hour but we're going to do a a case study would someone on the coal nick is the first target we'll see how we go a fun when you do interactive you'll learn more as you go so asking and i say this asking instead of telling and unity this is a theme as we go through and potentially when when you understand this it's possibly the smallest and simplest way that you cannot say apply marketing any business today now this is the method so this was created by a guy called ryan leveque he's canadian and ryan spent years as a consultant implementing this declines and then he created as a blueprint created as a book created as coal and it grew from the thousands of.

ryan leveque consultant oakland ellie
"ryan leveque" Discussed on EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"ryan leveque" Discussed on EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

"Another big one c school in down here i did oh wow we did over two thousand eight hundred dollars in a recurring revenue with ask the ask method with ryan leveque that i did like ten months ago that just shows you fire nation like the recurring revenue the passive income that you can create when you make a great offer to a great audience in it's a great product service or community are total gross income brought that was at two hundred eight thousand dollars in space if we'd subtracts our total expenses which were fifty four thousand dollars that brought us to a net profit of a hundred and fifty four thousand five hundred and ninety six dollars again all the revenue that we made we listed out line by line by lineeofirecomincome fifty one also we list out all of our expenses you can see everything that we're spending money on to run a six figure a month business we show you everything that we think is important us and believe me kate is always looking to trim this list down because you know even if it's a fifteen dollars a month thing if we're not using it she's accent it it's out because every dollar does counts so you'll see exactly what we think is incredibly important running our business and there's a lot of things i will say he will see what we years and i actually do do that when i'm going for our expenses online kuwait's ronneby things can regain call it so drew so fire nation now we're gonna be moving into our is a lesson learned wish again as you mentioned prior was putting things into perspective kate once you kick this off i definitely i'm gonna kick it off before i do that i just want to acknowledge and give amazing massive props to london london is so awesome and we didn't really talk much about our time before and after you per noor summit in london but we got to do.

ryan leveque kuwait kate london london london two hundred eight thousand dol two thousand eight hundred dol fifty four thousand dollars ninety six dollars fifteen dollars ten months
"ryan leveque" Discussed on EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"ryan leveque" Discussed on EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

"Boom two thousand seventeen september income break down our product or service income brought in a hundred and twenty one thousand dollars specifically are journal's generated twenty six thousand dollars for the month the freedom journal bringing in fourteen thousand in the mass your bringing in twelve thousand five hundred so cotti's continue to be so close to each other back and forth was he looked at freedom journal just always x it out a paradise did 26 k and revenue our podcast sponsorship was sixty four thousand dollars podcasts websites dot com on our five thousand dollar salary disbursements came out as well of course ends we actually did two hundred and sixty dollars from my audio book podcast launched the highlycharged literally four years ago and that thing just keeps on paying the bills um we have a new course added to the mix kickstarter on fire so now we have five free courses free podcast course free webinar course freegoalscourse funnel on fire and kickstarter on fire all available for you at eofire dot com affiliate revenue was through the roof a thirty thousand dollars from click funnels um my um in a sign by consulting mentor ship a fifteen thousand dollars and we also did fourteen thousand dollars for create awesome online courses we did four thousand dollars for aime porter feels webinar that converts ends yeah we end this little nice little a burst from lips in which is what we recommend for our media hosts at 1600 in ninety dollars and of course as a bunch of other ones i'm skipping over here like ask with ryan leveque actually brought in five thousand seven hundred dollars but we have the whole listed eofirecom slash income on their brought a total gross the two hundred forty five thousand dollars pretty sweet right.

cotti freedom journal aime porter ryan leveque two hundred forty five thousan five thousand seven hundred do sixty four thousand dollars twenty one thousand dollars twenty six thousand dollars fourteen thousand dollars fifteen thousand dollars thirty thousand dollars four thousand dollars five thousand dollar ninety dollars sixty dollars four years 26 k