19 Burst results for "Ryan Green"

"ryan green" Discussed on Crypto Altruism Podcast

Crypto Altruism Podcast

05:51 min | 2 months ago

"ryan green" Discussed on Crypto Altruism Podcast

"Amazing. 50 million. That is no small feat by any stretch of the imagination. And it's only the beginning, of course. And so we talked about the numbers, but always find there's more power in the stories behind these impacts as well, right? So I'd love to hear about that if there's any sort of specific stories or projects launched through endowment or grants that were made that you want to speak to or share. Or we're always working on fun stuff that I just mentioned, we're really proud of the work that we put into our support, Ukrainian sovereignty fund, over 800,000 in nonprofits, was sent this year to organizations working on the ground there. We had a big push this summer with the roe versus wade ruling that came down with our protect reproductive rights fund. We collaborated with the artist collective pussy riot and created a fund called the protectory productive rights fund. We took in over $250,000 for these nonprofits that are providing access to abortions and other reproductive care folks that need it. And more recently, we just launched a project with and that's a nonprofit that provides resources and services to frontline healthcare workers in local clinics, particularly those who are in lower income communities and really do need the support right now with the pandemic. Those workers have been tremendously burnt out. And so we've collaborated with art blocks, are generative art friends over there on a project called turnout for burnout. And so not only is that a really great cause, but we're excited as endowment to be foraying and now into on chain and generative art. So these are the endowments as it were. And if you check out for burnout dot com Friends, this just started a few days back with the public mint on November 17th. The colors that heal is this beautiful project by an artist named Ryan green who has firsthand experience working in healthcare and also with this impact on his family and the healthcare industry to and knows firsthand what it can be like to be a patient and also a healthcare worker and the burnout of that environment. And so he's created this beautiful generative art project that captures that feeling of hopefulness and trying to uplift and support folks who are in situations of burnout. And so as we're recording this, 60 of those have already been minted, you can check out it turnout for burnout dot com now, kind of what that's at, maybe we're closer to selling out, I think it's going quickly. But there's probably still one or two left. .2 eth each and 50% of all the minting proceeds from these art pieces are automatically being split to systems contract address on endowment. So this is actually our first application too of these programmable composable contract addresses in V two, where it's just on the split level for the NFT. Sending funds straight to the artist and straight to this nonprofit to support healthcare workers. That's awesome. I'm a huge fan of sustainable I've had Joe the CEO on this show before actually to talk about the great work. They're doing, they've been very involved in web three with crypto philanthropy, philanthropy, and NFT campaigns.

Ryan green wade Joe
"ryan green" Discussed on Pardon My Take

Pardon My Take

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"ryan green" Discussed on Pardon My Take

"Wait what yeah. He was eating pretty valley's past week again hurricane yes. She's been stress eating. It's a real problem. Put you guys just started the mitzi experiment i know within the hurricane hit and then he's sitting worried about the hurricane which very valid. But i have a job to do. He's on the nick. Sabin digest like sitting in front of the television. Yeah eating oatmeal cream pies. Watching the weather channel. I'm not saying he shouldn't have been stressed about the hurricane but it seems like he kinda owns you because he can be like yeah. I'm stressed about this. I'm gonna eat now week. We stressed about this. He's gonna eat but when he's like in his apartment and you can hear the crinkle of the bag. You gotta go in there and steal it from him. I know but he was in the middle of hurricane. I didn't know he was yet like you know. How do you take job very seriously. That's he's back. It sounds like your breakdown. All of his cheap meals. i saw that no pat. It was long list yet. Then i added up all the calories hypothetically in now for every five hundred calories. He owes me a suicide at a local basketball court. So that's where again to all. It sounds like the mincy experiments not going well but nice try. We're going for it okay. We're we're sticking to it Cool thrown we're going with derrick henry turns out derrick. Henry has a legion of practice squad players who are basically his stiff arm dummies so there was a video that went viral about as well competence job. Last was that his job probably Will you there on these pads and you see be running past and just basically you have these squad players on their hands and knees and dare kennedy is stiff arming the as they sort of lunge at him and he's hitting them in the head Repeatedly and i just couldn't imagine being like those players next must have like seriously. I don't think i would take like an nfl player salary. I don't think i would be on an act of if you were to come to me right now say. Pf t. i will pay you two million dollars a year to be a linebacker. You'll never have to get in a game for the titans but you get to wear the uniform part of the squad. I would say no. That's what my data. That's just a man's gotta have a right. And i think that that line that i have too much pride to just get stiff arm by derek regnery through the crust of the earth. Every single day agreed. They should develop some sort of dummy to do that on it. Also cool thrown fcf schools The single-game tackle record was broken by fordham player. Ryan green hagan. Who had thirty one tackles and game against the brasher. Go how ram fem so doing cover saint stat. Thirty one tackles it's only Twenty five tackles in the nfl held by reiner lacquer lumieres reiner lacquer ryan said brian. It's bryant everyone working All right Let's get to our interviews. We've got logic the wrapper off something a little different. And then we have dion coming up after that. Pf edward for one of our sponsors. Yes we've got some very important news coming through from our great friends over at chevy. It is that time of year again. The most advanced silverado is out. You can go buy it right now. It is the strongest most vincent out. They've ever made it..

hurricane mincy derrick henry Sabin the weather channel derek regnery derrick pat basketball Ryan green hagan nfl Henry kennedy reiner titans fordham Pf edward bryant
"ryan green" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

06:43 min | 1 year ago

"ryan green" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"There are no assigned seats on a southwest airlines flight. That means your net seat mate could be chest about anyone. Hi i'm quentin jenkins i league community outreach. At southwest airlines and welcome to is this seat. Open on this podcast. We'll hear twenty stories from south west history from people like chief marketing officer ryan green. Leave it to southwest airlines to save the company by offered a bunch of free booze. Managing director of culture and engagement whitney ike inger. All of it coming together was probably the greatest piece of humor. I've ever seen it southwest and retired vice president of cargo and charter matt. Luckily i look back on it. I get goosebumps. So sit back. Relax and enjoy stories of south west fifty years of flying. Because you never know who. You'll meet the next time you hear. Is this seat open. Nicky what happened with under constant is similar to other stories. That cosby accusers. Have shared with you. The taking of the pills victims feel woozy and then an alleged sexual assault. That's a story that dozens of women have told again and again cosby by the way has always maintained. Any such encounters were consensual. There's there's so many things when you talk about enablers. There were a lot of places these hotels and restaurants and things like that where somebody was procuring. The drug for him because they were the ones who would bring it to the table and they had to have known that this wasn't just a drink totally you know and the other pattern was as i said he would go to their agents and he would say i want a mentor. Xyz that's even what happened with janice dickinson the supermodel. Yeah and he agrees to meet with her and it is just in any drugged and sexually assaulted her and she wanted to put that in her. Two thousand two memoir but judith. Regan testified about this at the second trial. They made her take it out. Because it's dude said dude. Of of course being a famous publisher. Yes cosby was known as being very litigious in the publishing industry and while you would win a lawsuit like that you'd spend millions defending it and so they made her take it out. We have to acknowledge that many accusers couldn't file criminal charges against cosby either. The police departments didn't believe the district attorney's office says and also statute of limitations. What are some of the stories of the women who did try to pursue charges. If you that did at the time they were terrified of him first of all you have to understand like the the victims he chose were not wealthy and powerful i can. He preyed on young naive women who didn't have the resources to fight this. And who didn't have the credibility if they went to the police and said america's dad did this to me. That was one of the things that was so hard for them to go to the police in the first place. And then look what happened andrea constand. She only waited year when she did. All of this happens in two thousand and five and almost as quickly forgotten then about a decade later in two thousand fourteen. Something happened that made even more women start to go public about cosby. They started right op-eds. They went on television. There was a renewed momentum and a push for justice. Yes it was like almost perfect storm. If things that happened in september two thousand fourteen mark whitaker had a new bio of cosby out called cosby. And 'cause we had cooperated with it and it was climbing the bestseller charts. But of course there wasn't one mention of the sexual assaults in that book Cosby headed comedy special. That was coming on. He was about to start a comedy tour. So that happened in hannibal burruss. This young comedian goes into philly to perform at a club there and he just doesn't did a routine he'd been doing off and on for several months and in it where he calls bill cosby a rapist and he says if you don't believe me go home and google it and what happened is the philly mag reporter was in the audience and obviously his ears perked up and he heard bill cosby and he knows bill cosby had always had this contentious relationship with young comics because he was always telling them not to swear so he just starts filling with his iphone and then the next day in philly maggie puts it online at the end of the day with short story on there and over the next few days it just exploded went viral and gawker picked it up and just a bunch of the online news organizations had sprung up and it went crazy and social media and that was the big difference between two thousand fourteen in two thousand five as far as why this case exploded there was social media in two thousand fourteen. There wasn't any in two thousand five so cosby was very good at controlling the media and he but he could not control social media and this thing just kept building and building and before too long the mainstream media was forced to cover it too. Because the new accusers start coming forward and as this is happening the statute of limitations about to expire on on your constanze case so in late. Two thousand fifteen and you pennsylvania. The files criminal charges against cosby. There's a trial. The first one ends in a mistrial but then a second one followed and all of this is happening as metoo movement starting to rise. How did me to play a role in the downfall of cosby. I think the need to move at mainly affected the public's perception of these cases just in the sense that if there's one accuser there's usually more when it's powerful person like this especially when one comes forward than another and another and other and it snowballs so i think it actually made people more likely to understand these cases and why women waited many sexual assault victims. Never go to the police and when they do. It's usually delayed. It's the most underreported violent crime. And that's that's what i think. The big difference because all the jurors were screened about the me too movement and whether or not what they knew about it and they if anyone express strong opinions either way they were dismissed. They were not allowed to sit on the jury in two thousand. Eighteen cosby was convicted on three felony counts of aggravated indecent assault against andrea constand. In two thousand and four now in two thousand twenty one it was all overturned the pennsylvania. Supreme court said cosby cannot be retried on the same charges so nicky even today cosby has supporters. Who believe he's innocent. This includes felicia rashad who played his. Tv wife claire huxtable on the cosby show and is now adina howard university in dc. How powerful men like cosby. Who have long been accused of sexual misconduct. How do they keep their support for so long. Look what happens to you when you do go up against bill cosby cosby. Could control everybody around the in. It's just the power that they have is really unbelievable and even with the media because you know his agency also represents other celebrities. So if you don't behave and ask the questions they want you to ask a hand then. You don't get access to all the other celebrities that this agency has. And like i said and then there were modeling agencies.

cosby quentin jenkins ryan green whitney ike inger south west bill cosby andrea constand southwest airlines janice dickinson hannibal burruss Nicky philly maggie Regan judith matt Cosby america pennsylvania google
"ryan green" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

07:52 min | 1 year ago

"ryan green" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Get it for hawks. Get it for date nights for live. Music home games and haircuts. Get it for eating at your favorite restaurant for grandma's birthday for graduations. Get it for your loved. Ones and the essential workers. Get it for all of us when it's available to you. Blue shield of california encourages you to get the cove in nineteen vaccination. Get it for california. The world is built on relationships from building wealth to building a business. It takes a dedicated team working together. And the only difference between success and failure is who you have in your corner when the going gets tough at city national bank. We aim to be the people you rely on when it really counts. That's why your relationship manager will take the time to get to know you after all it's only by knowing your goals that we can help you achieve them see what personal can do for you at c. n. b. dot com city national bank member. Fdic excuse me. Is this seat open. There are no assigned seats on a southwest airlines flight. That means your net seat. Seat-mate could be chest about anyone. Hi i'm quentin jenkins. I li community outreach. At southwest airlines and welcome to. It's this seat. Open on this podcast. We'll hear twenty stories from south west history from people like chief marketing officer ryan green. Leave it to southwest airlines to save the company by offering a bunch of free booze managing director of culture and engagement. Whitney achinger all of it. Coming together was probably the greatest piece of humor. I've ever seen at southwest and retired vice president of cargo and charter matt. Luckily i look back on it. I get goosebumps. Sit back relax and enjoy stories of south west fifty years of flying. Because you never know who. You'll meet the next time you hear. Is this seat open for doing. And we're back. Pick up our conversation with actor. Kate winslet and my podcast colleague. Got the envelope. Yvonne yvonne winslett how she adopted a very specific american accent for her role in the hbo series mayor of east town. Well we must talk about the accent. Eve done many accents in your career. But how did nailing down the delco accent compared because i wonder how mayors mindset of this idea of being lost in broken. How does that figure into you. Finding that voice for her and how that weighs into her voice or influences it. It's interesting because i realized that as i was learning the dialects it was definitely affecting the emotional register of the voice. I was kind of finding for matt. I'm actually how register is a bit deeper. The my own you know. My voice is quite bright. And spiky. And i go up and down lot. I guess sort of like a bouncy tone to my voice and quite clip. I think to an american air. That's how english people speak and we kind of is sort of like a snappy tippy way of talking whereas the delco is much more like that and it's like down and flutter and it sort of much more than that of a voice that exists really inside the body. I know that sounds crazy. But you know some voices can be right up in in the head you know quite nasal for example but with the delco dialect. The there's something about the you know the quality of it that's just way lower and you know kind of you know just it's still sort of in entrenched in houma was you know. Sort of embedded emotionally into her. Because she did she was born there. She was raised there. I had to pretty darn pretty done well and it was. It was suppose little crazy making you know. I'm not going to pretend it wasn't but for me. The thing the reason it was crazy making actually is because there are sounds that are made within the delaware county the delco dialect that are very strong and could easily be pushed into a sort of a caricature. Uri voice and i did want to create a voice. I wanted to create a person. I had lots of dialect samples of local people and there was one woman named trish. Loria highs trish loria. I used to listen to every single day on the way to work every single morning in the call and on the way home. Same thing so her voice would set me up. Love that trish loria yeah. It's all dedicated. Trish loria. I also need to hear more about walk. 'cause i know brad. The show's creator. Really encourage you to visit it to get a sense of the vibe when you first got to town chocolate. A bit about what that did for you like how you absorb that into your character before. I started filming. I was preparing researching doing my stuff. That i always do for probably about five or six months beforehand and i thought how do i even connect with where i'm going. So why subscribe to the delco times so it would read this newspaper every day so to me it kind of became this it almost felt like mythical place wa wa but by the time i got that i was like it was like lapland onto to sort of finally walk through the door of a wa wa. I don't know i felt like how. Yes i'm one of the things. I really enjoyed in the series. Are your characters interactions with her mother. Who is played by. Jean smart the to balance each other in such an interesting way. You know the way they speak to. Each other is so real and genuine like the conversations and frustrations between mothers and daughters. How was gene as a scene partner. Oh jane was just she was just terrific. I mean she the comic timing you know is she can turn huma into punctuation by just doing an inhalation of breasts. In a certain way. And a flicker of an eye on i would just be in fits. Sometimes we couldn't really look at each other too much because we would just crack up laughing the great thing about the relationship that we have on screen had an in math is that they love each other so much but they get stuck with how supposed to kind of express that or show that must not really great with huge displays of love and affection particularly in a family way. She's always like hey you know. Just don't be like don't do that. Like sort of issues with things like that so so. Yeah maron helen. You know well how list with her what we were saying. So you know to matriarchs in the one house. We'll that's tricky. That's tricky thing. Very tricky thing. I just don't always get along. Didn't always see eye to eye. You know but they have this sort of honesty gene where they just can't help. They just can't resist being brutally honest with one another sometimes to the point of being so tactless that it's just rude. You know typical mother and daughter spots that would often result in the slinging of like caustic verbal grenades and sometimes food as well. Thanks but it was great and we we would improvise law and look out for each other. You know she'd often saves me honey. I should try. This should i. Shall he just try. Hey i wanna try something. I just try that. Maybe no well that work. Let's say yeah. Give the gauche go okay. Okay okay. i'll try. I'll try and then she'd do something awfully brilliant. A through line of the series is the trauma and abuse of women. And i i wondered if playing a detective who is so close to those experiences sort of changed or shaped your understanding.

trish loria national bank quentin jenkins ryan green Whitney achinger Yvonne yvonne winslett east town california matt southwest airlines Loria hawks Trish loria Kate winslet Fdic grandma south west hbo houma southwest
"ryan green" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"ryan green" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"For eating at your favorite restaurant for grandma's birthday for graduations. Get it for your loved. Ones and the essential workers. Get it for all of us when it's available to you. Blue shield of california encourages you to get the cove in nineteen vaccination get it for california. Excuse me is this seat open. There are no assigned seats on a southwest airlines flight. That means you're next mate. Could be chest about anyone. Hi i'm quentin jenkins. I li community outreach. At southwest airlines and welcome to. It's this seat. Open on this podcast. We'll hear twenty stories from south west history from people like chief marketing officer ryan green. Leave it to southwest airlines to save the company by offered a bunch of free booze. Managing director of culture and engagement whitney ike inger. All of it coming together was probably the greatest piece of humor. I've ever seen at southwest and retired vice president of cargo and charter matt. Luckily i look back on it. I get goosebumps. So sit back. Relax and enjoy stories of south west fifty years of flying. Because you never know who. You'll meet the next time you hear. Is this seat. Open the moment we land you. Have these soldiers come in and just frantically empty the plane of all supplies right while supplies right. We quickly get people in there. Shut the door and the pilot just immediately moves. He just he just punches. The throttle play moves quickly. And then as we pick up speed he jack knives up into the air and at the same time. Then you hear basically to forty s again letting rip all. In the meantime the soldiers we picked up where like frantically like like losing your minds. I mean there were like really. They were really afraid. Their faces were agonized and full of fear they were pointing towards a like a certain direction for the gunners to shoot at and like you know they will hurt. They were tired at one of them was even like he looked clearly dehydrated and was asking for water. And you know there wasn't any water aboard. I remember like even during the landing leg. Maybe i think you were sitting down. But i was like trying to stand up into helicopter like i was trying to stand on two feet and at some point i just fell to my knees because like it was just too much of a name. Mind you this is an everyday thing. This isn't just an acceptable situation. I mean these pilots are running five missions day and at this point most of them involved that kind of danger just because the.

"ryan green" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"ryan green" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"For eating at your favorite restaurant for grandma's birthday for graduations. Get it for your loved. Ones and the essential workers. Get it for all of us when it's available to you. Blue shield of california encourages you to get the cove in nineteen vaccination get it for california. Excuse me is this seat open. There are no assigned seats on a southwest airlines flight. That means you're next mate. Could be chest about anyone. Hi i'm quentin jenkins. I li community outreach. At southwest airlines and welcome to. It's this seat. Open on this podcast. We'll hear twenty stories from south west history from people like chief marketing officer ryan green. Leave it to southwest airlines to save the company by offered a bunch of free booze. Managing director of culture and engagement whitney ike inger. All of it coming together was probably the greatest piece of humor. I've ever seen at southwest and retired vice president of cargo and charter matt. Luckily i look back on it. I get goosebumps. So sit back. Relax and enjoy stories of south west fifty years of flying. Because you never know who. You'll meet the next time you hear. Is this seat. Open the moment we land you. Have these soldiers come in and just frantically empty the plane of all supplies right while supplies right. We quickly get people in there. Shut the door and the pilot just immediately moves. He just he just punches. The throttle play moves quickly. And then as we pick up speed he jack knives up into the air and at the same time. Then you hear basically to forty s again letting rip all. In the meantime the soldiers we picked up where like frantically like like losing your minds. I mean there were like really. They were really afraid. Their faces were agonized and full of fear they were pointing towards a like a certain direction for the gunners to shoot at and like you know they will hurt. They were tired at one of them was even like he looked clearly dehydrated and was asking for water. And you know there wasn't any water aboard. I remember like even during the landing leg. Maybe i think you were sitting down. But i was like trying to stand up into helicopter like i was trying to stand on two feet and at some point i just fell to my knees because like it was just too much of a name. Mind you this is an everyday thing. This isn't just an acceptable situation. I mean these pilots are running five missions day and at this point most of them involved that kind of danger just because the.

quentin jenkins ryan green whitney ike inger south west california southwest airlines grandma southwest matt
"ryan green" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"ryan green" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"There are no assigned seats on a southwest airlines flight. That means your net. Seat-mate could be chest about anyone. Hi i'm quentin jenkins i league community outreach it. Southwest airlines and welcome to. Is this seat. Open on this podcast. We'll hear twenty stories from south west history from people like chief marketing officer ryan green to southwest airlines to save the company by offered a bunch of free booze. Managing director of culture and engagement whitney ike inger. All of it coming together was probably the greatest piece of humor. I've ever seen at southwest and retired vice president of cargo and charter matt. Luckily i look back on get goosebumps. Sit back relax and enjoy stories of south west fifty years of flying. Because you never know who. You'll meet the next time you hear. Is this seat us. I'm back with my colleague belly times. James quilliam we're talking about the critics of la county district attorney. George gascon so james. What are his supporters saying about his tenure so far. They're very happy with his decision to remove sentencing enhancements. Many critics are furious at the idea that people will not automatically be facing life without parole even for the worst possible crimes or more commonly enhancements are used to add years two sentences and charges filed against gang members off a lot of his supporters are happy to see those things though away because most of his supporters do believe that mass incarceration is a serious problem in the state. So they're very happy to see people being basically penalties for the crimes as charged and not with these multipliers on top of it. Gascon gone is just one of a lot of high profile district attorney's across the country in big cities Chesa boat in san francisco. Larry krassner in philadelphia. How would you rank him. Among them in terms of implementing so far they have promised six months in done a lot of what he said he would do now. The question is going to be how effective it's actually going to be as you mentioned. The union representing deputy attorney sued him to block large portions of the enhancement policy and a judge greater than they basically. He had exceeded his own legal authority in ordering Ordering these days to strike enhancements from the record in cases that will already active that had been filed before he took office He did announce the hiring of a special prosecutor to review for controversial cases. One of them being the shooting. Brendan glenn in venice. Twenty fifteen that stirred a lot of anger in la. He announced he would want to seek those charges potentially on us special prosecutor however as most people now murder charges are very rarely filed against the police officer. The most common charge you will see in a fatal on-duty shooting manslaughter. guest going did not get special prosecutor hired in time to bring manslaughter charges. In three of those four cases he promised to review on the campaign trail as a lot of questions as to whether or not. There's any viability to that promised. So i don't know if it's fair to really rank against people who've been in office for two to four years. I think it's fair to say. He has made attempts to do a lot of what he promised on. The campaign trail Whether or not those things are going to have lasting effects varies on the topic. The district attorney's office has largest indie united states. If his efforts exceed here. How's that going to influence district attorney's offices across the united states. This movement has already claimed a lot of big castles. Obviously chicago philadelphia. San francisco saint louis few other places. And you're seeing this movement. Play out now in manhattan. You know the large field runnings replace. Cyrus vance's is the district attorney. There is almost entirely comprised of reformers or candidates who have above defense background. So the idea that it is happening in the second largest city in the us in could be very well poised to happen. If nothing else there is an appetite among electorates for this and people are running on this believing it can win. And i think s cones victory in and of itself probably was just another sign that that movement is a serious political force to be reckoned with if gascon in fact does get recalled and right now it's just a petitions being signed. There's nothing on the ballot yet. If that happens what would that do to. The progressive movement across the united states is also a difference between the two right if if the recall petition gets enough signatures to force him into a a race basically where he has to defend his positions and he's going to be under constant attack again. Like you mentioned earlier from police unions from his own prosecutors. Every case he files his to be under scrutiny. Maybe does produce a backlash or at least ammunition for critics of the progressive prostitute movement nationally. And obviously if he were to lose a recall election in relatively safely blue los angeles. It'd be a pretty big surprise. I imagine shock to that movement. Be realities of that. Potentially happening are not huge. I'm not saying the recall is has no chance at at my interesting immagination but there definitely a heavy underdogs in this fight. You know so. We are a ways away from their being. Implausible recall.

Brendan glenn George gascon Larry krassner san francisco philadelphia six months ryan green James quilliam manhattan Gascon two three Cyrus vance San francisco Twenty fifteen four years fifty years four cases twenty stories united states
"ryan green" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"ryan green" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"If your school aged child brought home a c. minus on a report card you'd likely be concerned and when you want to do something to help him or her do better to get those grades up right now. The infrastructure in southern california rates a c. minus on the american infrastructure report card from. Ascap we all have the opportunity right now to help. Raise that report card grade. That's why it's critical to invest in our water sources. Internet roads bridges ports energy solutions and transportation infrastructure is critical for everything we do every day. We can't keep delaying the effort any longer. Other states and countries are succeeding. And we're getting left behind. We must take steps to build back better and get to work. Join the rebuild so cow partnership as we celebrate infrastructure week you can learn more when you listen to our podcast. The rebuild socal zone at rebuild so-called dot org slash podcast. or wherever. You find your podcasts. Excuse me is this seat open. There are no seats on a southwest airlines flight. And that means you're next seat-mate could be just about anyone. Hi i'm courtney jenkins i league community outreach. At southwest airlines and welcome to is this seat. Open on this podcast. We'll hear twenty stories from south west history from people like chief marketing officer ryan greene. Leave it to southwest airlines to save the company by offered a bunch of free booze managing director of culture and engagement whitney finger. All of it coming together was probably the greatest piece of humor. I've ever seen at southwest and retired vice president of cargo and charter matt. Luckily i look back on it. I get goosebumps. So sit back. Relax and enjoy stories of south west fifty years of flying. Because you never know who. You'll meet the next time you hear. Is this seat open for join us. And that's it for this episode of the times daily news from the la times tomorrow. A black family had their beach property taken from them by the government over a century ago in southern california now the county of los angeles trying to actually give them the land back. Our show is produced by shannon lynn steven cuevas and denise are executive producers abby swanson our engineers. Mario de is our editors shawny hilton. Our intern is brown and our theme. Music is by andrea. I'm we'll be back tomorrow with all the news. This mother gracieuse. Excuse me. is this seat open. There are no assigned seats on a southwest airlines flight. And that means you're next. Seat-mate could be chest about anyone. Hi i'm quentin jenkins i league community outreach. At southwest airlines and welcome to is this seat. Open on this podcast. We'll hear twenty stories from south west history from people like chief marketing officer ryan green. Leave it to southwest airlines to save the company by offered a bunch of free booze. Managing director of culture and engagement. Whitney eichenberger together was probably the greatest piece of humor. I've ever seen at southwest and retired vice president of cargo and charter matt. Luckily i look back on it. I get goosebumps. So sit back. Relax and enjoy stories of south west fifty years of flying. Because you never know who. You'll meet the next time you hear. Is this seat open for joins..

ryan greene abby swanson shawny hilton ryan green Whitney eichenberger andrea Mario de southern california twenty stories courtney jenkins southwest fifty years tomorrow shannon lynn steven cuevas over a century ago southwest airlines org los angeles south west denise
"ryan green" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"ryan green" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Be back tomorrow with all the news. This mother gracia's excuse me. Is this seat open. There are no assigned seats on a southwest airlines flight. And that means you're next. Seat-mate could be chest about anyone. Hi i'm quentin jenkins i league community outreach. At southwest airlines and welcome to is this seat. Open on this podcast. We'll hear twenty stories from south west history from people like chief marketing officer ryan green. Leave it to southwest airlines to save the company by offered a bunch of free booze. Managing director of culture and engagement whitney ike inger. All of it coming together was probably the greatest piece of humor. I've ever seen at southwest and retired vice president of cargo and charter matt. Luckily i look back on coming. Get goosebumps relax and enjoy stories of south west fifty years of flying. Because you never know who. You'll meet the next time you hear. Is this seat open for..

ryan green tomorrow twenty stories southwest fifty years whitney ike inger southwest airlines south west quentin jenkins
"ryan green" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"ryan green" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"When it's something you've actually written down for yourself as opposed to just something you come up with in your head and some of those. I never work and you go. Oh you're probably right because you're not having committed it to give them thought about it enough and committed to to writing I wonder what would have happened if you're coach at said Yeah you know what these are home runs. This is definitely going to happen. Maybe you would have taken it all taken off. You know you would have been like. Oh well maybe. I wouldn't have worked so hard. Yeah yeah. I guess we'll never know but it was a Is definitely i it. It probably helped. He did doubt me. So i think doubt that. Yeah it sounds like a cause you to dig in and so when you when you I don't know what the right term is. We were approached. Recruited whatever by the naval academy was. That was that something that was on your radar or were you looking for rethinking august. Recruited to some you know non military school where that didn't come with a commitment to you know that to to serve afterwards what what was happening there. Yeah i'd always had interests in the military and probably part of that came from My dad's being in the military. And just i think just. I'd always been interested in like watching the navy seal shows on discovery channel things of that sort but i but i wasn't but at the same time i wasn't optimizing for that i wasn't saying like hey i i wanna go to west point or air force academy and naval academy. I was I knew i wanted to play football. And there were times in my life. Where i did see his like. Hey the military would be. That would be an interesting route or really liked the idea of marine or navy seals or things of. That always intrigued me. But at during that time i was i was in. I was being recruited by Looking assessing Potentially going to the university of kentucky university of south florida and and the naval academy as a as a had come into that conversation started. After i was looking at those other schools Where i was talking to the coaches there in terms of where there actually more of an offer that was put on the table but what actually helped there was as the naval kennedy came across sir research that talk to talk to family talk to others in kind of start to realize how good of an opportunity that was in in what more naval academy brought than just going in playing football somewhere and and that was that intrigued me. It was interesting. I was just thinking about like i do i do. I want to play professional football. Have the chance. Yes i do but but also is like it's not i'm not one hundred percent sold on that and there's there's other opportunities in their life after after football as well as i wasn't just completely consumed by it so i was so thing is really just i i saw Just get collect more. Data points Related to that opportunity and it just ended up. I think my heart me to go that direction in made a lot of sense to go that route and did you when you. You mentioned several times About flight school. In pensacola are you. Did you become a pilot would have what. What was the outcome of that. Yes when happening is i was about. Schools typically.

university of kentucky naval kennedy one hundred percent naval academy academy pensacola air force academy university of south florida west point
"ryan green" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"ryan green" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"And that's why you moved around. That's not what i heard so now. I'm was going on that that caused you to move so frequently and did you feel like that was helpful to you because it exposed you to all kinds of new people and things are. Did you think like gosh. Another move i just got. I just got my buddy selling jolly ranchers. You know i mean come on. Yeah so it was Before the the medical device sales job that my dad had he was actually in the marines. So we he was. He was actually in the military and we. We moved a around a bit from him being in the military but we also moved around a bit from him. Being and medical device sales is he took roles in different companies. Different times says a combination of of multiple multiple things. There that really tight into into those moves in terms of you know in in the moment especially when you're young. Is i remember the first big big move i i felt pretty distraught about was when i we moved from oklahoma to atlanta and i lived in oklahoma from kindergarten to fifth grade and that was That was tough. It wasn't an easy thing to do in your head. So many good friends and i built relationships with and as we moved to georgia and we moved to hold these other states. I think looking back in hindsight it was. It was really you know i i had gone to. I was always a new kid at school. I was. I went to three different high schools middle schools but it was looking back. I wouldn't regret any of it. I think what it taught me was how to enter a new environments and adapt very quickly in how to put also just be exposed to so many different types of people in different Who have different perspectives and ways of thinking that really helped me to learn how to relate to different people or be empathetic to people Who all come from different different different backgrounds in life for sure and then the goal. When you were talking about goals certainly fixated on that. Because you mentioned something that i thought was very interesting. Which is the football or sports being..

oklahoma atlanta georgia fifth grade three different high schools first big big
"ryan green" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"ryan green" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"Hey i just found out about this. New service. And i are using it a week. Two weeks ago in last week helped me make three hundred hundred dollars more. So i was i was i am a driver but i was kind of pretending that i use this product and it really helped me And to drive traffic to the page and so as people landed on the page. I just wanted to see kind of what the funnel metrics looked like an kind of tests in the experiment that set up and what that experiment was was a landing page where people would come. They would sign up then they would be sent to. Ab tested pricing page to pay for certain set of features and then after On the success page it would say hey sorry on unfortunately were actually Actually underdevelopment but if you're committed driver fill out this survey and the survey was really a play Within a week five hundred drivers signed up over one hundred of them filled out the survey and just rope essays about their problems. Their proposed solutions their strategies. They're getting free market research from all the from all the drivers right there exactly and so it was. It was extremely validating and there are so many hypotheses that i had that were where i found out that i was either on the right direction. My thinking there but others were. I was completely off base and that experiment just really set a strong foundation for helping me understand is like hey monty something here but here's where my arrows was pointing now. I kind of have a more refined direction of where to how to think about this platform to build. And so that's where that is Kind of how good wise came to be. Was that initial kind of experiment. And then over time we i ended up. I knew i had to. I was kind of the the business person i needed to balance. Find a co-founder technical co founder. Who would balance out. My skill sets As were would go in in endeavoring to building offer company which i had never done before and so i was just trying to talk to everybody. I was new to pittsburgh. I had no network there so i needed to make sure that everyone knew that ryan greene was looking for technical co founder. And that was what i was doing and so in my class specifically did you do that. How did you get the word out. Because that's something that i think would be very helpful for people to know how you did. Yeah you know. It was the risk quite a bit of any type of startup event. That was happening. I was most likely. They're what i what i also did as i hired. I contacted a virtual assistant to curate events for.

last week Two weeks ago pittsburgh three hundred hundred dollars ryan greene five hundred drivers a week over one hundred
"ryan green" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"ryan green" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"Out and drive. But i also but then i started like host. Ask myself like a good time to drive. If i go out and my going to just be sitting around forever. I started to find myself trying to find information or search for information about events or airport traffic or weather changes or anything. I could get my hands on to where i should be. That kind of thing where like win win win. And where should i be driving and as making those decisions like how am i doing overtime like am i making the right decisions making inadequate dollar for our here. That's like worth justifying the time. Go out and spend on the road and and have really gave me the perspective of what it was like to be a big driver And so as you fast forward as i get out again of the military going to go into banking and i actually go into a trading job related to currency trading in pittsburgh so that was what what's movement what movement to pittsburgh and as i was working there is still an active driver from time to time i would. I would go do rides again. It was very interesting concept for me but also working through that list of ideas that i had to figure out what's the next venture that i want to jump into. I wanted to be successful in the job. I was endeavour going into In banking. But i knew that in three years my goal was to have an idea first year was to have a new idea validated demand for that validated into start to get that off the ground. And get into place. You're three. I could go full-time into that but also in parallel support my family because i had a newborn who was actually on the way and he actually was. After a few months of starting that job he was born. And as i as i got into the trading job i was. He wasn't everything. I really envisioned it being from you..

pittsburgh three three years first year few months
"ryan green" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"ryan green" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"When help you apply that knowledge in tokyo across different competencies over time in that was Starting that company really was Was definitely an experience of drinking through a fire. Hose i starting it out. I didn't even know how to buy domain unless there wasn't a lot of no code platforms out there. To build websites were press was was kind of a to what year was this rhyme. That was That was two thousand late. Two thousand eleven or to get two thousand eleven going into two thousand twelve okay. I just wanted to get some perspective on on the date on that so we know where we were. Okay sorry to interrupt yes. No worries worries So that was two thousand two thousand eleven going in two thousand twelve and and that was So really start to get that off the ground. I stopped going out as much. I got really passionate about getting building this platform and learning everything. I could to do so and was spinning weekends. Staying up till four. Am in the computer labs. Were this in. Just learning everything i could. But building this platform with my partner and others who had ended up joining but through through that experience In parallel graduated nave academy went into a be an active duty military officer On the track of aviation But was still running this company in parallel and you had a long distance relationship in bulgaria. Which i was managing Start running trying to get a company off the ground grow that and then and the being active military all serves not not the best balancing. Act you like you like a full plate. Yeah you could say that. In so i As i was a win in the military is in flight school. In pensacola that was two thousand thirteen and was continuing to going through. Pretty pretty tough Regimen of just flight training and learning how to fly while My off any off hours. I had was working on. Fx connection well ended up happening. After two years of running that company we grew it to generate revenue. We're making a couple of thousand dollars a month and it wasn't anything we grew it to to monetize and and then we were had also built out. a team and brought on some engineer contracting engineers things about for but really it made so many different mistakes but ended up not that we couldn't course correct or iterating off of those learn as we continue to learn from those is a just became operationally. Dysfunctional is all of my partners. Were active duty military on planes and boats around the world so it's trying to operate the business was very weird. Got to be very difficult. But was really i would say it definitely ignited the entrepreneurial flame in really just had me itching at going through that i was just next thing i did was started a google doc of ideas Those ideas new ideas popped up kept running list of the types of types of just experiencing or encountering different problems in where there could be solutions for those in so all of that led to me starting or can experiencing are encountering this new as i was stationed pensacola ceiling flight. School encountered this new technology. service had just had launched in Pensacola it was called uber. And uber was as a new innovative company that Someone sat me down on the couch and showed me. They're like look whenever i take flights. I request uber. And i tried using the first time was like this thing doesn't work. Like what is this and i..

bulgaria uber Pensacola two thousand nave academy two thousand twelve first time pensacola two thousand eleven Two thousand eleven google doc couple of thousand dollars two thousand thirteen After two years four month
"ryan green" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"ryan green" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"Annapolis Really was introduced to a whole different type of regimen where i was Hey which was the military regiment going through the initial boot camps there and just going through i think could be an entire podcast episode her few Series of episodes dedicated to what we went through there But really. I really started to take on that regiment. In addition to playing at a different level of classic football there in going through academic regiment and so it really Shape started to shake me in a in a more in a different way where it came much more disciplined. I became very Strict on on time and time management things vassar and while still persisting kind of interest and maybe goal oriented regiments that i had Before we're that ended up leading was for me. In i was continuing some side hustles in school of selling t shirts and As i as a as i mentioned before it as i ended up a dating a girl who is from bulgaria which led me to to to Exposing myself travelling to this country. From time to time and i was actually to fund a lot of the trips to travel here. I was selling t shirts and trying to come up with shirt ideas. We'll go to all the students to our dorm rooms and sell sell t-shirts news that to buy. Tickets are to travel europe. My vacation days and And so all those experiences kinda lead up to The second i think has in my last year at the naval academy. I ended up. Having all these different side hustles. I had been involved in then ended up with my last year. Starting my first formal company which was called fx connection It was i really got into trading stocks and then later currencies and i saw that there so much information out in the world about you know how to understand the markets but it was really difficult to find the right type information at the most fundamental level and so what affects connection focused on was actually trading a lot of that content creating n- educational curriculum to help you understand. I was focused on actually currency trading. Help you understand the currency markets but take it a step further than just giving you information but more so giving you are helping you. Connect with what we are platform. Do is connect you with coaches. Who were vetted and traded successfully for a living..

bulgaria europe last year first naval academy Shape second Annapolis
"ryan green" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"ryan green" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"And were i. I would work with my grandfather. Starting at i think i remember five five years old navy first grade and we'd help him with his business and help them whole things around and he would We always give him a hard time about this because he would he would pay us. He wouldn't pay cash he'd pay us in candy and i was like i don't know that may cross some lines there but we But also just i think seeing exposure to to his business in seeing him operate that is a is a small business owner with in how he grew that. I think all those things i didn't realize in the moment Had really led to a were pretty substantial events that kind of shaped my mind into thinking about a lot about business a lot about sales over time in a fairly informal way is that grew up and i remember is. I got into about sixth grade. That's where i would say my first real entrepreneurial experience happen where my best. My my lifelong best friend and i ended up starting a We ended up going out to sam's club buying this In bulk a huge bag of lollipops jolly rancher lollipops at every. Everyone of the school wanted. But there wasn't a place to just go buy them Not the most innovative idea anybody's ever thought of here. But but what we do is we buy them in bulk and sell them for fifty cents each and we'd make a couple of hundred dollars a month in sixth grade which was a lot of money back. Then we go we every day after After school would be on the bus together. And we'd count the money and we'd split and that was i can remember since then i've always had some some sort of side hustle or business that has been going on to where i'm i'm selling something. I'm starting something identifying a gap in in a market or school and trying to fill that with some sort of side hustle. And and that led i think as i i was i was really deepening. Sports quite a bit. I ended up You're kind of fast forward to me going into To high school i was i was kind of started to focus more and more and football and running track and as i I think sports really taught me to be fairly goal oriented but also know i think sports teaches you so many life lessons early on around just how to deal with adversity to work with other people how to overcome so many challenges or obstacles that are putting your way in but at the same time is helping you but it gives you like the fastest. The quickest feedback loop early on your life to be able to see. Hey if i work. I can see that i can and be able to If i put in extra work they extra time towards something how that actually comes back in and actually helps me improve or helps me do something or accomplish something in seeing what accomplishing goals actually did for me. So i became fairly goal oriented in high school and was really always kind of setting myself out setting myself up As i my goal i think going my junior year was like i. I wanna hit all these certain numbers for running and running certain times and lifting weights but also Wanted to do all these things to get to be a d. one football player and that was my goal in so as i said set out that goal ended up accomplishing that and going to the naval academy was recruited Recruited to play football. They are accepted into the school and i Into.

fifty cents first five five years old first grade sixth grade naval academy navy about sixth grade sam one football each couple of hundred dollars a mo club
"ryan green" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"ryan green" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"Ryan cover a ton of great stuff in this episode. Like being an exciting kid watching his dad. On sales calls arriving at the naval academy campus in annapolis to play football. Running a side hustle. He was an active duty military officer and flight. School being intrigued about the launch of over and deciding to be an uber driver to understand how it worked joining startup accelerator to get initial investment to start his own software company and much more. What can we create to get something into user's hands and get feedback and build a traction story that enables us to get this off the ground and get some preliminary funding to actually scale the business. The first product was an e mail in a text. Message service what we did was curate. All this information about events in airport traffic and weather transit schedules on any type of information. We get her hands on and created into like email that we would send out drivers to help them understand. What's happening but at the same time that traction without having a mobile product which i.

annapolis Ryan uber first product naval academy
COVID-19 highlights Alaska Native water and sanitation needs

Native America Calling

02:33 min | 2 years ago

COVID-19 highlights Alaska Native water and sanitation needs

"This is national native news. I'm antonio gonzales. The pandemic has highlighted. Water and sanitation needs in alaska. Native communities where lack of infrastructure has already had significant health impacts according to a health official alaska. Native tribal health consortium interim president. Valerie davidson testified. Virtually this week before. The senate committee on indian affairs on water infrastructure needs davidson says. Many families in rural communities do not have running water to help prevent the spread of covid nineteen constant hand washing and cleaning davidson says more than forty percent of alaska native homes lack running water. Many communities typically have a washer area building. It's one building that combines water-treatment laundromat twelve and showers at the entire community uses and what that means from a practical perspective is that Those communities hall their water from the washington area in a five gallon clean bucket and we hall are raw sewage from our home in a different five gallon bucket and unfortunately Our communities continued to be unserved simply because of the high construction costs among recommendations davidson. Says they desperately need at least one billion dollars for sanitation construction in future legislation and resources to preserve what infrastructure is already in place. Wisconsin governor. Tony evers has signed off on the ho chunk. Nations plans to build a casino just north of the illinois border danielle creating reports. Federal law gives governors the power to block or approve off reservation casinos. The tribes plans include one of the largest casinos in the state. Along with the convention center indoor waterpark and a three hundred room hotel. The complex is expected to create more than fifteen hundred permanent jobs and more than two thousand construction jobs. Ho chunk nation public relations officer ryan green. Dear says jobs are central focus as many tribal communities. Shut down their casinos for months last year due to cove in nineteen. This is gonna be the cornerstone of the economic recovery from the pandemic. the complex will be built in the city of beloit beloit city council president. Regina dunkin says the project has been a longtime coming and is a game changer. Fully in terms of jobs created shared revenues and increased arisen. The project now faces final approval from the department of interior once approved wisconsin's governor and the whole chunk nation would amend the tribes gaming compact to include revenues from the new casino. I'm daniel catering

Antonio Gonzales Alaska Davidson Valerie Davidson Senate Committee On Indian Aff Tony Evers Ho Chunk Ryan Green Washington Wisconsin Beloit City Council Illinois Regina Dunkin Beloit Department Of Interior Daniel Catering
Why we need to rethink the human factor

Cyber Work

04:06 min | 2 years ago

Why we need to rethink the human factor

"Let's kick things off. I think maybe a good way would be to talk a little bit about the security journey. That brought you to where you are today and a little bit about. What prompted you to kick off the the research you did about rethinking. The human factor. Okay so Very briefly on in by joining the industry are quite a different group to majority. So i think you originally trained in lieu on marketing and offer about ten years. I a chemical some judy. Let me joining the industry. I not been here for over twenty years now. So i'd like to think of getting something bright or maybe baby just people too big skins anyway. So i think the next tonight keeping me really helped me Working with meyer would have direct set find. Also all kinds is a because my legal training because my mom confronting because my finance training i was able to have conversations with honest straight through the marketing director and the the company lawyer actor Unrelated why information security or something they should be and this was a really powerful tool tool the i team designers today speaking because he was a language that they to be trained in so i want them to be would understand what it meant monarchy in perspective i would help translate the into a meaningful benefits to jewel. Been some business. That health of his majority might were will looking years with ran. Jonas plants are held. The risk is too that Was into this. And the one with dixon catalan possibility. And and we would then look a little bit different psycho that they would say that one hockey and then gave the people. I was at no great love. Who responsible controls. Give them something. So they like controls and design in policies procedures. And he's not interested in. That was the first point. Why side you realize the importance of the human aspect really here because we would ryan green policies will say. This is our expectation that we'd have employees use a alessi or safai policy. Whatever some weaknesses. Technically i a fair amount that we we really relying on people who do as we also and regularly week would see that people wouldn't necessarily do we also very restrained because then the geneva thinking on We invested all this in having around chiens bringing so maybe also elements of security various vendors. And yet we're still having this reoccurring problem we sorted. The problem still exists at as a finance Try and says no thinking the return on investment on that stop shop and okay so i thought realize when you start the question devalue what it is and and really focus my mind on ruled work. I doing devon's risking. It really comes down. Whether or not people choose to behave policy and seven years kicked on a research paw which i told the reason he became a lethal pretty much every aspect of what i do information security including that we cool at the convention less

Dixon Catalan Ryan Green Meyer Jonas Hockey Geneva Devon