40 Burst results for "Ryan"

Fresh update on "ryan" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:37 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ryan" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Money news at 25 and 55 years and Kate's. This is a Bloomberg money minute. Company retreats are being updated in the remote work era. Bloomberg reporter Ryan caviro says organizations are looking for unusual ways to foster camaraderie and reinforce corporate culture among employees who don't get to the office on a regular basis. They're going four to 5 night excursion to interesting locales, either domestically or internationally. And then they are the kind of they are circling the event there to go over some business matters, but largely just to have fun. Calvin Terrell asked out while staff getaways can be expensive, most firms think that it is well worth the cost. It is largely a remote thing. They have all been specifically going on retreat like this, but not all companies are doing it, of course, but the companies that do these types of annual big retreats really like them. And then they also use them as a tool for recruitment. The founder of corporate event planner moniker partner says he has seen inquiries for fun company trips increased 5 fold from before the pandemic, even though the cost can reach $1000 per night per person. From the Bloomberg newsroom, I'm Ann cates on WTO. Coming up, the Marshalls of the Supreme Court asked officials in Maryland and Virginia to direct police to enforce provisions, prohibiting picketing outside of the homes of the justices. It's one 26. The DMV download podcast is a more complete look at the news stories impacting our region. From high gas prices, is this seriously the highest gas has ever been? It could be worse if it could be California. To the hunt for a fairfax murderer. You've been looking for him for two months. I mean, where is he? We suspect we know

Bloomberg Ryan Caviro Calvin Terrell Kate Ann Cates WTO Supreme Court Maryland Virginia Fairfax California
Hernández and Espinal HR, Kikuchi fans 8, Jays beat Rays 4-1

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 2 d ago

Hernández and Espinal HR, Kikuchi fans 8, Jays beat Rays 4-1

"A pair of two run home runs all the Blue Jays needed in Dowling the Tampa Bay Rays four one at roger center The Oscar Hernandez hit a two run shot in the second of Ryan yarbrough while San Diego has been all launched a two run Homer in the 7th for his 6th of the season And I bought into and you know getting the W it was more important but ready to go for tomorrow You seek a was a control on the mount for Toronto going 6 and striking out 8 Isaac Perez provided the only offense for Tampa with a solo home run his 11th of the season John leatherbee

Roger Center Oscar Hernandez Ryan Yarbrough Tampa Bay Rays Dowling Blue Jays Homer San Diego Isaac Perez Toronto Tampa John Leatherbee
Fresh "Ryan" from Bloomberg Opinion

Bloomberg Opinion

00:50 sec | 9 hrs ago

Fresh "Ryan" from Bloomberg Opinion

". Now, a global news update. Buying all the foods for that 4th of July cookout will cost you about 17% more this year. Julie Ryan has details. That's according to the annual survey done by the farm bureau, Gary Joyner with the Texas farm bureau says this is all caused by high gas prices and inflation, which is driving up the cost of just about everything. The average cost of a summer cookout for ten people is just over 69 bucks. I'm Julie Ryan. Flight delays and cancellations are mounting over the 4th of July holiday weekend, according to flight aware over 3300 flights were delayed within into or out of the U.S. on Saturday. Over 600 flights were also canceled, the airport facing the most travel hiccups is Dallas Fort Worth, staffing shortages and severe weather on the east coast are to blame for many of the issues. A tropical storm is dumping heavy rain along the coast of South Carolina, the latest update from the national hurricane

Julie Ryan Gary Joyner Texas Farm Bureau Fort Worth U.S. Dallas East Coast South Carolina
Reagan Library Chair Fred Ryan Hates Trump & Hates You

Mark Levin

01:03 min | 2 d ago

Reagan Library Chair Fred Ryan Hates Trump & Hates You

"Liz Cheney last night was at the Reagan library The Reagan library has been taken over by hostile forces the chairman of the Reagan library is the CEO of The Washington Post His name is Fred Ryan Fred Ryan hates Donald Trump In other words Fred Ryan hates you Many of us who served with and for Ronald dragon And a door Ronald Reagan need to know That the Reagan library now has been taken over By a never trumper and a rhino That's why he runs The Washington Post And runs the Reagan library His name is Fred Ryan And as long as Fred Ryan is chairman unfortunately I will not be able to attend the Reagan library Liz Cheney was there yesterday Using Ronald Reagan's name to attack Donald Trump Liz Cheney is a serial liar

Fred Ryan Liz Cheney Reagan Library The Reagan Libr Reagan Library Fred Ryan Fred Ryan Ronald Dragon The Washington Post Donald Trump Ronald Reagan Reagan
Fresh update on "ryan" discussed on Trivia With Budds

Trivia With Budds

02:35 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ryan" discussed on Trivia With Budds

"What it be and welcome to another episode of the trivia with buds, podcast, I'm your host, Ryan buds. Thanks for checking out the show and having some fun with me on 4th of July weekend. I hope that you are having a great time and you're listening and watching some amazing fireworks. I am slowly getting less sick, which is good, like that. That's of course a good thing. In my life to not be as sick as I was a couple days ago, but still a little nasally. So bear with me on another episode here. As we go into a new week and a new year of independence here coming up in 2022, if you're listening to the future, I hope things are fantastic. And I hope you're ready to guess who I am before we start today's episode on dog movie titles. Right now, we're going to guess who am I? Here are your clues. I'm a male, I'm a well-known writer. I lived about 600 BC. I was a Greek slave, I wrote brief stories that had a message or moral. My stories called fables were often about animals, they were passed down orally through the centuries. Greek and Roman poets then rewrote them in verse. My most famous fable was the tortoise and the hare. Who am I with the initial a, the answer there is aesop of aesop's fables ASAP for your guessing game, which will be the last guessing game until I find a new batch of those type of cards, but we've gone through all of them, and like I mentioned, if you missed pop culture party cards that we used to do, or you have to name 5 Tom Cruise movies, and I just give you some little challenges to do at the beginning of each episode. Those are coming back. Starting Monday and Monday we'll have a I was gonna say star studded but that sounds like celebrities are on it and there's no celebrities. It just me as usual. But it'll have some stars and stripes. How about that? Stars and stripes trivia. We'll have some USA trivia for 4th of July on Monday. So if you like Independence Day, it's just going to be an episode on Independence Day. It's going to be an ID forever. The sequel that nobody saw. Now we'll whip up some good questions. It'll be fun. And we'll celebrate the independence here in the U.S. of a but right now let's do some dog, movies, fill in the missing words, let's do it..

Ryan Buds Tom Cruise U.S.
Karl Frisch Discusses Biden's Approval Ratings

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:48 min | 2 d ago

Karl Frisch Discusses Biden's Approval Ratings

"Political consultant cap on because I get what everybody's saying that Biden's approval ratings are not good, which I'm sorry. I put directly at the media's feet because he has an extraordinary list of accomplishments, best economy in 50 years. Michael mcfaul just said, it was not inevitable that NATO would be more united and expand as a result of Putin's invasion of Ukraine. Potus played a leading historic role in producing this new NATO bravo mister president. You don't see him get credit for that anywhere. Along with anything else that he is, I mean, he is, as we always said, he inherited a Civil War, essentially, the insurrection, right? One of my thinking of Spanish flu whatever COVID was. And The Great Depression. He inherited all of that from Trump. And I just, I guess I'm not surprised at his approval ratings call, but I guess what it's showing in state by state is it's not affecting fetterman was looking great, obviously Warnock is looking great now. I think you know what's interesting. Tim Ryan's real chance. It doesn't look like that. Something similar with Biden that there was with Trump, although Biden is more popular than Trump was. You know, we all scratched our heads when Trump lost but Republicans did okay in the congressional races. Or in a lot of the congressional races. And I think people can separate their views of different people. I think what Biden has going against him is not that he's unpopular. It's that there are some Democrats who are disappointed that more hasn't been done, right? Because they wanted not only a departure from Trump, they wanted everything they've been waiting for. And then reality it's with what Congress can get accomplished with the margins that it

Biden Michael Mcfaul Nato Donald Trump Fetterman Putin Ukraine Tim Ryan Warnock FLU Depression Congress
Fresh "Ryan" from WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:52 sec | 11 hrs ago

Fresh "Ryan" from WTOP 24 Hour News

"More. Shana still in WTO P news, WTO P has reached out to governor youngkin's office as well as to the leaders of fairfax and Montgomery counties. It caused headaches for drivers for weeks, but now it's fixed. Repairs on that large sinkhole that's been causing problems for drivers along I two 70 in Gaithersburg were completed yesterday. It was a 20 by 15 foot hole under the road caused by a failed train pipe. Now two lanes near I three 70 were closed for about two weeks as road crews got to work. The repairs were expected to stretch into the holiday weekend, but wrapped up early, while the shoulder will remain closed for additional work officials say there shouldn't be any impact for folks hitting the road. Melissa Howell WTO penis. 6 O 5 in investigations happening at a local jail after a teenage suspect was let out by accident hours after his arrest, WTO's Kate Ryan tells us what local leaders are saying about the case. Montgomery county executive Mark el rich said he was upset to learn that one of three

WTO Governor Youngkin Shana Fairfax Gaithersburg Montgomery Headaches Melissa Howell Kate Ryan Mark El Rich Montgomery County
García's homer in 9th lifts Marlins past Cardinals 4-3

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 3 d ago

García's homer in 9th lifts Marlins past Cardinals 4-3

"Ever say you'll Garcia and sandy Alcantara led the Marlins to a four three win over the Cardinals The red birds were one out from victory until Garcia belted a two run blast off Ryan helsley Right now and I thank God that I focus on the fast one Our contra is 8 and three after tossing a 7 hitter Working around two runners in the 9th Dylan Carlson drove in two runs for St. Louis which is a game and a half behind the first place brewers in the NL central It was the cardinal's first laws to the Marlins in St. Louis since June 20th 2019 I'm Dave ferry

Sandy Alcantara Garcia Ryan Helsley Marlins Dylan Carlson Cardinals St. Louis Brewers Dave Ferry
Fresh update on "ryan" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:54 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ryan" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Hours after his arrest, WTO's Kate Ryan tells us what local leaders are saying about the case. Montgomery county executive Mark el rich said he was upset to learn that one of three 16 year old suspects that led police on a chase that ended in gunfire had been released by corrections officials by mistake on Thursday, elrich said he'd expect to get a full report on what could be done to prevent it from happening again. The teenager was found in taken into custody Friday morning, county council president gay bob or nos. I have a high degree of confidence in director tally and her team that they will do an exhaustive investigation. He was referring to Angela tally, director of the department of correction and rehabilitation, but albertos said he wanted to check into whether staffing shortages may have played a role in the mistaken release. Kate Ryan. WTO news. We're learning more about why fairfax county police were looking for a rest in man who officers shot and killed Thursday. 37 year old Christian Parker was cornered by police in the Springfield town center parking lot. Police say they were acting on a complaint from a relative that Parker, who has a record stole a gun, pointed it at a relative and discharged it after surrounding his car, police officers say they commanded Parker to show his hands. And when he subsequently reached for a firearm and ignored calls to drop the weapon, two police officers fired. The officers are now on restrictive duty, a criminal investigation into the use of forces underway. The department says it plans to release body camera footage. Something to keep in mind ahead of the fourth not only are most fireworks illegal in this region, they're also extremely dangerous in doctors are trying to get the word out about what they've seen. This time of year is one of the busiest for hand surgeons says med stars doctor Ryan Zimmerman. If you are injured, cool, burned areas immediately keep a hose or some water nearby. Some explosions can easily result in the loss of fingers, even a sparkler can burn hot enough to nearly melt gold in an eye surgeon says very little

Kate Ryan Mark El Rich Elrich Gay Bob WTO Department Of Correction And R Albertos Christian Parker Springfield Town Center Montgomery County Parker Fairfax County Angela Ryan Zimmerman
Chase Elliott needs nearly 7 hours to win at Nashville

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 6 d ago

Chase Elliott needs nearly 7 hours to win at Nashville

"Following a two hour delay due to rain at Nashville superspeedway chase Elliott took a gamble on a late race caution staying out when several other drivers pitted for tires The bet paid off as Elliot was able to hold off Kurt Busch and Ryan Blaney for the win As bad as we were at the beginning of the race to be able to adjust on it take advantage of the opportunities we had to try to fix it and then to hit on it and to be able to execute after we hit on it to finish the event strong is not an easy thing to do Elliott led the final 34 laps to pick up a second NASCAR Cup Series victory of the season Bush admitted to making a mistake that likely cost him a shot at the win and finished second I just needed to start throwing fenders and starting to move people around and I didn't get after it Blaney was third I'm Jerry

Ryan Blaney Elliott Kurt Busch Nashville Elliot Bush Blaney Jerry
Herrera's 8th inning sac fly helps Cardinals beat Cubs 5-3

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | Last week

Herrera's 8th inning sac fly helps Cardinals beat Cubs 5-3

"The cardinal scored two times in the 8th they need to step a three three tie and they down the cubs 5 to three at Busch stadium The teams have split the first two games of a three game series a Bon Herrera's first major league RBI comes on a sacrifice fly and gives St. Louis the lead That's one thing that I won't forget and my first RBI is help the team win and I think I can forget Britain Darwin contributes two runs batted in for the red birds Chicago center Fielder Raphael Ortega's two run home run had tied the game in the top of the 8th Ryan helsley pitches one and two third innings of shutout relief to pick up the win I'm Mike Reeves

Bon Herrera Busch Stadium Britain Darwin Cubs Red Birds Chicago Center Raphael Ortega St. Louis Ryan Helsley Mike Reeves
Astros' Javier, bullpen combine to no-hit Yanks in 3-0 win

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last week

Astros' Javier, bullpen combine to no-hit Yanks in 3-0 win

"Three pitchers led by Stewart Christian Javier combined for a no hitter as the Astros playing the Yankees on the road three zero Javier was dominant throwing 115 pitches over 7 frames striking out 13 Yankee batters and allowing just one walk We'll leave your Hector and Harris pitch a hitless 8th while Ryan Presley closed out the night to secure the 14th no hitter in franchise history It's exciting you know I just like I said I just wanted to go out there and make quality bitches and see what happens and you know just think they hit it right through somebody and we got the same grade on the field And justice third career game first baseman JJ Mattis Chevy provided the game winning run with a solo Homer in the 7th That was the only tally a letter by Yang started Garrett Cole who scattered just four hits striking out 8 but was tagged with his second defeat of the year Mike Moriarty New

Stewart Christian Javier Ryan Presley Astros Javier Yankees Hector Harris Jj Mattis Chevy Garrett Cole Yang Mike Moriarty
Payday: Judge wins it for Yanks on eve of arbo showdown

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last week

Payday: Judge wins it for Yanks on eve of arbo showdown

"The Yankees pulled off another dramatic victory scoring four times in the bottom of the 9th to beat the Astros 7 to 6 the yangs trailed 6 to three and had only two hits none since the first inning entering the 9th against Houston closer Ryan Presley who walked the first two batters Aaron hicks then blasted a three run Homer to tie the score at 6 Then with two out Aaron judge single tome the winning run for the yanks 9th walk off win of the season The word is never out of the game You know no matter the score even if we get down early if we have a lead and blow it you know it doesn't matter you know as long as we still got a chance to hit you know this team has a chance to win the ball game Before judges said all the scoring came on three run homers the Astros Alex Bregman and Jordan Alvarez and the angstrom Carlos Stanton Tom Arian New York

Yangs Ryan Presley Aaron Hicks Astros Yankees Homer Houston Yanks Aaron Alex Bregman Jordan Alvarez Carlos Stanton Tom Arian New York
Alvarez belts 2 homers as Astros get 5-3 win to sweep Mets

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last week

Alvarez belts 2 homers as Astros get 5-3 win to sweep Mets

"Gordon Alvarez homeward in his first two at bats as the Houston Astros beat the New York mets 5 to three Alvarez kept an Astros for a knitting with a solo blast in the first and then he notched his fourth multi Homer game of the season with another solo shot in the third He has now hit 21 homers this season and Astros manager dusty baker says he's locked in at the plate He's swinging a bad grade and it affects his speed means anything I mean he is at the top of the world and exit speed This summer of Mexico and over the fence Alex Bregman finished two for three with a two run Homer for the Astros and the bullpen Quartet of Ryan stanek pectoris Rafael Montero and Ryan Presley tossed four scoreless frames to preserve a two run lead Adam spole in

Houston Astros Gordon Alvarez New York Mets Alvarez Homer Dusty Baker Alex Bregman Ryan Stanek Rafael Montero Mexico Ryan Presley Adam Spole
Moms for Liberty's Tina Descovich Describes Targeting by the Feds

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:52 min | 2 weeks ago

Moms for Liberty's Tina Descovich Describes Targeting by the Feds

"In an extraordinary story, many of you probably heard it was just about a month ago, moms for liberty, great organization, moms for liberty dot org was targeted by the Department of Justice by use of the Patriot Act, and we have with us the cofounder of moms for liberty, who does an amazing job Tina deskovic. I think I said that right. And welcome to the program. Thanks. You did better than most with my laugh. I grew up with a bunch of Serbs, so I'm guessing it's Serbian. It could be Croatian or something else. But Tina, welcome to the program and tell us about the what happened, mom's for liberty, targeted by our federal government and will go from there. Yeah, sure. I mean, most people are familiar by now what's gone on over the past year. We were founded January 1st of 2021 immediately our chapter started showing up at school board meetings all over the country. And by the fall of 2021, there was remarkably this letter from the national school board association that was exposed that Merrick Garland put out that he was going to use the Patriot Act to start investigating parents for domestic terrorism. And I think America was shocked. I know our organization was shocked. We felt like it was a direct attack. And we knew it was a direct attack on us and the work that we were doing and how successful we were being at changing what was going on in school districts. What's happened recently is I think it hasn't been covered nearly enough. Jim Jordan representative Jim Jordan came out and they put out a whistleblower letter that somebody from in the FBI because Merrick Garland said under oath that, oh, we're not targeting parents, you know, that that's not what's happening at all. But the FBI whistleblower came out and said, oh, absolutely. They're targeting parents, and we were named moms for everybody was named having parents that have been contacted and investigated for showing up at school board meetings.

Tina Deskovic Merrick Garland National School Board Associat Department Of Justice Jim Jordan Tina FBI America
Dr. Ryan Cole on Monkeypox and What It Means for All of Us

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Dr. Ryan Cole on Monkeypox and What It Means for All of Us

"Doctor Cole tell us, what is monkeypox? What is the threat that it poses to most Americans? Monkeypox is a orthopoxvirus. It's in it's an epox family camelpox cowpox, monkey pox, smallpox is the one people think of. So again, this is a fear campaign trying to make everybody afraid. They modeled this at the nuclear threat initiative, which has founded and co owned by the cofounder of Facebook. Just like they projected COVID with event two O one, monkeypox is we've known about it since 1958. There's two strains West Africa strain and a Central African strain. The West Africa strain is what circulating right now. If you don't engage in homosexual sex, your risk of monkeypox is about zero. So it spread at a rave in the Canary Islands off Portugal and some big raves in Europe. It's really the gay bisexual population that it's sticking to. It is not very transmissible. It is very treatable. There was actually a patient in Dallas that had it last year. We get outbreaks of monkeypox around the world every year. They're just scare mongering with it. And it's really staying in that gay homosexual bisexual population. And it's not aerosolized virus. Is this strange slightly different from earlier strains, the 2018 strain that went around, Singapore, Israel, UK. It has about 50 mutations, which was highly unusual. We know Wuhan was actually synthesizing monkeypox so they could come up with a test for monkeypox, the lab in Wuhan, ironically. But monkeypox is low risk. And this is the West Africa strain. This is the less deadly strain. The irony too is that it looks a lot like chickenpox and shingles, which obviously there are a lot of people getting chickenpox and shingles because of their immune suppression from their COVID

Monkeypox Doctor Cole West Africa Smallpox Canary Islands Portugal Facebook Wuhan Europe Dallas Singapore Israel UK Chickenpox
Dr. Ryan Cole on the FDA's Push for COVID Shots for Kids

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:40 min | 2 weeks ago

Dr. Ryan Cole on the FDA's Push for COVID Shots for Kids

"We are not going to take our eye off the ball. We are living in a biomedical fascist moment. And I'm afraid that if we focus too much just on the politics of the day, the bad guys are going to get some things into permanent policy that will make our country less free and hurt your children and grandchildren. With us right now is doctor Cole had the great opportunity getting to know him on a couple episodes of the Charlie Kirk show. Really enjoy his commentary very wise individual and doctor Ryan Cole is with us. Doctor, welcome back to the program. Charlie, great to be with you again. Thank you. So I want to ask you, you know, as we're talking right now, the FDA is on the cusp of approving vaccines for babies and toddlers 6 months through four years old. They might have already approved it, but for my understanding, they haven't yet. If the FDA was on lunch break, tuning into our show, which is highly unlikely, but what would your message be to them and more broadly, what would the message be to our audience when it comes to the FDA's seemingly inevitable approval of vaccines 6 month or four years old? My message would be stop it. This is nothing short of a criminal act. There's no evidence that these children need this shot. This shot is experimental. This shot is a gene based product. It's not a vaccine. We have sufficient data to show that it's unsafe and humanity, the world council for health, Tesla Lowry's group out of bath, the United Kingdom has shown through pharmacovigilance data that these shots are harmful and should be withdrawn from the market. There has not been a single child in the United States since omicron came along in the age groups they're looking at today that has died from

Charlie Kirk Ryan Cole FDA Cole Charlie World Council For Health Tesla Lowry United Kingdom United States
A Birthday Message to Trump From Compton

The Dan Bongino Show

01:59 min | 2 weeks ago

A Birthday Message to Trump From Compton

"I got my name's James kluge has a YouTube channel I'm not sure if he's on rumble but he's funny He had this video again I can't vouch for the authenticity of it I wasn't there but this is pretty hilarious Just a little bit of comic relief for you So Donald Trump's birthday yesterday President Trump So he did this video and he said listen he's out of now I don't know where it is Somewhere it looks like Donald Trump's birthday You want to say something to people And he gets his couple This older couple They just lose it He should be in jail Orange jumpsuit lock them up Leg irons Peter Navarro style Now the couple happens to be white and this guy you'll see comes up in the middle of this This is about a minute long this segment It's a longer thing but I had to cut a minute of it And this guy comes up and he's like I love Donald Trump man I'm from Compton and the people these older would appear to be white liberals They're so stunned You can see that this young black man is a Donald Trump's brother They're like you voted for Donald Trump I hope I got this is the left summed up in one clip You check this out That's pretty gnarly We're going to double down on that Bad man He's a bad guy Man he's caused untold harm to our country He needs to go away and go to prison where he belongs I can't wait to see him in an orange jumpsuit What does he need to go to prison for For all the crimes that he's committed Like what Like oh trying to overthrow our country Hello Where have you been dude Did you Ryan No Did he tell him to go do that Yeah he did tell him to go do that did you watch the rally I did I can literally memorize the quotes You're hopeless If you don't see it you're hoping What are you telling them to go do that Exactly Like what part of it the speech Where did he say Let's fight If you don't fight we're not going to have a country You mean the quote fight like hell oh yeah Bernie Sanders said that a lot of other Democrats said that and then when Trump say that then it's bad right Dude you're a Trump fan Oh yes I am Oh yeah and I'm from cops And guess what And I'm from Compton California

Donald Trump James Kluge President Trump Peter Navarro Youtube Compton Ryan Bernie Sanders California
Wiggins delivers on both ends, Warriors lead NBA Finals 3-2

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 weeks ago

Wiggins delivers on both ends, Warriors lead NBA Finals 3-2

"Andrew Wiggins scored 26 points and pulled down 13 rebounds as the warriors beat the Celtics one O four 94 So I came in here and just you know you know I'm playing basketball and I'm playing hard you know and I feel like people respect that And I'm just trying to win At the end of the day you know no matter where it takes whatever they need from me I'm just I'm here to help win Klay Thompson added 21 points making 5 threes Stephen Curry had 16 points and 8 assists Golden State is now one went away from its fourth NBA title in 8 seasons The Celtics came back down 12 points at the half to take a 5 point lead in the third quarter But the warriors bounced back in the fourth to go up by 16 in the lost Jason Tatum had 27 points and Marcus smart had 20 Ryan leong San Francisco

Andrew Wiggins Celtics Warriors Klay Thompson Stephen Curry Basketball Golden State NBA Jason Tatum Marcus Smart Ryan Leong San Francisco
Rodón goes 6 strong, Giants complete sweep of Dodgers 2-0

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 weeks ago

Rodón goes 6 strong, Giants complete sweep of Dodgers 2-0

"Carlos rodon helped Julio Reyes as the giant swept the Dodgers beating LA to nothing It was the first three game sweep of the Dodgers since the final homestand in 2016 Austin slater got the offense started with a leadoff Homer Mike you strem ski also went deep in the bottom of the first Rodon pitched 6 scoreless innings allowed only two hits and had 8 strikeouts to get the win Marias gave up only three hits and two runs but took the loss The Dodgers were zero for ten with runners and scoring position leaving 9 on base Ryan leong San Francisco

Carlos Rodon Julio Reyes Dodgers Austin Slater Homer Mike Rodon LA Marias Ryan Leong San Francisco
Dodgers' Kershaw loses to Giants in return from month out

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 3 weeks ago

Dodgers' Kershaw loses to Giants in return from month out

"The Giants got a rare win against Clayton Kershaw beating the Dodgers three to two Kershaw only pitched four innings giving up three hits and two runs because he was just activated off the injured list and on a limited pitch count Luis Gonzalez with an RBI single It gives us a lot of us confidence of the team that we have and what we're capable of and it's a really good baseball club over there So get those two wins and get to serious dub I mean it means a lot Tyro Estrada also with a solo Homer A wild pitch with the bases loaded in the bottom of the 8th scored an insurance run The Dodgers got 13 hits but were just two for ten with runners in scoring position leaving 14 on base Ryan leong San

Clayton Kershaw Dodgers Kershaw Luis Gonzalez Giants Tyro Estrada Baseball Ryan Leong SAN
A highlight from Let's Talk About Forgiveness

Live Behind The Veil

11:28 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from Let's Talk About Forgiveness

"Welcome to live behind the veil and atmosphere where men and women of God speak his word to this age and bring his kingdom to this earth. Do you have ears to hear and eyes to see what God is doing in this hour? Let us join our host and the family's conversation as the Holy Spirit is unfolding. The word behind the veil. Hello, everyone. I'm Ryan your host, and on this podcast, we will be talking about one of the greatest principles of God's kingdom. Forgiveness. Let's open our hearts to receive the importation of this beautiful gift so that we can truly forgive one another from the heart. There is forgiveness and there is being forgive. We had something in the news here just a few years ago, I think was our shaking. A guy went into an Amish church school. And shot the place up. There were a lot of kids killed. And within a couple weeks of that tragedy, that the families, that church and that school issued. The statement they said we forgive that man who did it. Yep. That wasn't politics. The Amish people are not politicians. It's true. They weren't trying to do something to add a feather to their cap they were trying to do something. Out of their love for the lord and out of their love for that man and out of the love that they wanted to participate in changing this world. How many of the times do you read in the news? Justice. We got to get justice for that person. You want justice for that person forgive them. What I'm saying is that the forgiveness, if it's going to be effective, is going to come because you realize that Christ gave his life for you. And that's where forgiveness begins. It's really interesting because forgiveness is tied together with repentance. If you imagine if you have somebody that comes up to you and let's just say they slap you on the face. And then they say, oh, I'm sorry. The question is, do you forgive them? If they have not been repentant in their approach in asking forgiveness. If some one is approaching us from their side of it, right? You mentioned, you know, the two different types, whether you're forgiven or you're forgiving, I guess, is what it was. Yeah. There is that side when someone comes to you and asks forgiveness, are they honestly looking for forgiveness, or just to smooth things over? A lot of people do that. You think you can get away with things because you're just, oh, please forgive me. I'm sorry I did that. Well, are you really sorry for that? Usually you forgiven you forgive somebody. Get it off your chest, I don't want to be mad at you. I don't want to be angry. I love our relationship. I don't want to lose that. So I'm going to yield, and I'm going to forgive you. I'm going to become reticent, false humility, I forgive you. That's not what Christ did. There is a feeling with forgiveness. When some one comes up to you and asks you for your forgiveness, usually you can sense when they asking you where they're coming from. Are they really repentant in their hearts? Or are they just trying to smooth over the relationship? I mean, there's a difference in feeling of that. And it doesn't take too much of discernment to be able to see that. If a guy took advantage of me and money wise and hurt me financially, hurt me emotionally. I have to look at what he did, not against me. But against God. Yes. And that's the truth. She that's the truth that Christ realized. Now, if I go to forgive somebody, I can't do it with an arrogance or anything other than I realized that I'm going in the name of the lord and saying, I forgive you. My forgiveness opens the door for him. God has stirred my heart. The center of forgiveness and being forgiven is about God. Exactly. The two people involved, both, no matter which way it flows, both people are going to profit from letting God be the one. Few have been forgiven by the lord much, you know what forgiveness means and you know how it feels. You've had an experience that has been written on your heart. To know the depth of forgiveness, because I think if I know the depth of forgiveness, then I will also be a really good forgiver. That's absolutely right. If you could go talk to those parents. Of those Amish children. To the brothers and sisters in the the very tight knit people that they are. They went through a lot to be able to say I forgive you. Yep. That's the experience you're talking about and to forgive somebody, it breaks your heart. Yeah. There has to be a broken spirit. Contrite heart. God will deal with you and what he's doing is he's cleaning out any of fence that you had. You can't forgive somebody without a right spirit in you. Because then the forgiveness is tainted. Right, exactly. The times we're living in, there is no political solution. No. There is no financial solution. They only solution is to forgive. It comes from his love, his love for another, if you love someone, it is from God because God is love. So forgiveness comes based on because you love someone with God's love that you're willing as Christ did on the cross. To forgive. So Alan, what you're saying, basically, is on a human level forgiveness does not really exist. No, good. I mean, true forgiveness. Correct. People say they forgive one another, but it's not effective. It doesn't change the heart. Of either one of them, so there is no answer in human relationships, except for, if you bring God into the situation, in other words, as a relationship with God, because that is we're all forgiveness, true forgiveness, is absolutely. And true forgiveness you can't earn. It has to come from the father. We can all be agents of grace and we can all be agents of forgiveness. And we can also be recipients of grace and we can all be recipients of forgiveness. The beautiful thing is, is that it goes all back to the father, what kind of God he is, how do I forgive, I can only forgive if I was first forgiven. And Christ did that on the cross, when he dived for my sins. He died and I was forgiven, so I can pass that along. I think that's a major step for Christianity to tear down the walls of division. Forgive one another. Bury all the differences and let God's grace bear fruit in all of us. When he said that I was just thinking myself, what unbelievable air against a believer carries, when he can not forgive, his fellow believer just because that fellow believer, thinks different, believes different, that has got to be a front to the father. If Christ did what he did, you know, went to the cross after everything that he went through, how in the world are we still retaining in our hearts unforgiveness for the little things or maybe even the big things that we've experienced? Exactly. He forgave. But he's expecting you to forgive your fellow man, and of course we just already talked about this, how are you going to do that? In reality, you can't we all fall short, and we're aware that we don't have necessarily what it takes, but as we forgive our brother, who also fails to be adequate in his dealings and relationships with me, then we look to God to forgive us where we failed. You were talking about Christ forgave our sins. Yep, you know how and why? In a very simple thing, Christ died for our sins. That's why he can forgive us. There is that element that we die. So we can forgive. Let's each one of us daily reach in to the heart of our father to receive from him. The ability to truly forgive each other from our hearts. Experiencing the impartation of God's word through his family is life. As this time in his presence blessed you, then please subscribe to our podcast at live behind the veil dot com. If you would like to contact the family with questions or topics that you would like to discuss, you can email them to living epistles at live behind a veil dot com. Stay connected, tuned in and grow with the family as the lord unveils his word to us live. Behind the veil.

Forgiveness Family GOD Christ Love Amish Church School Ryan Alan
Julie Kelly: There Is No Bombshell Takeaway From Jan. 6 Committee

Mark Levin

01:52 min | 3 weeks ago

Julie Kelly: There Is No Bombshell Takeaway From Jan. 6 Committee

"What's the great takeaway from this Julie Kelly that is a bombshell that we were supposed to learn Well there is no bombshell The bombshell is this is a continuation of russiagate the same interests who brought us the greatest fraud perpetuated on the American people between the Department of Justice House Democrats and the media did it again this week Mark you had two indictments this week to bolster what this committee was doing last night You had Monday the grand jury indictment announced by Matthew graves to D.C. U.S. attorney handling 800 plus cases Bringing forward seditious conspiracy charges the rarest of crimes against 5 Proud Boys and then that was sort of the focus of last night's hearing Then you also have the arrest of Ryan Kelly Republican candidate for Michigan governor Mark they've had information about his whereabouts at the capitol protest since the day it happened Nothing new there But yet they waited until the day of the hearing to raid his house the FBI raid his house and announce misdemeanor charges against him This is the same collaboration We have seen for years And because none of them have been held accountable it has all been accelerated and now you see the media going along with it giving airtime Unprecedented airtime to this show performance that we saw last night that did nothing to move the needle except justify I think forthcoming charges against Donald Trump and just try to put a stake in the heart of the maga movement

Julie Kelly Department Of Justice House Matthew Graves Mark Ryan Kelly D.C. U.S. Michigan FBI Donald Trump
"ryan" Discussed on On Air with Ryan Seacrest: The Post Show

On Air with Ryan Seacrest: The Post Show

04:23 min | 11 months ago

"ryan" Discussed on On Air with Ryan Seacrest: The Post Show

"One or two point seven kiss. Fm that is harry styles and golden. It is ryan seacrest here. Joining star of free guide in theaters august. Thirteenth is ryan reynolds ryan. How are you man. I'm pretty good ryan very nice to chat with you know. I feel like this job if you've ever played the role of a dj like this is a job that you would be great at. I think it'd be a job. I would enjoy actually because you get to probably talk to all kinds of different interesting people. And i you know. I'm pretty good at holding my tongue. If i feel differently. I right now. You're dying. You're gonna have to talk to ryan reynolds again. Oh my god. I beat minus ryan so sorry. Hardly hardly no. I met you..

ryan reynolds ryan ryan seacrest harry ryan ryan reynolds
"ryan" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"ryan" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"You're not the wolves bro. I'm not GonNa lie actually got a post from a former church member that it said it was like opener is people. People don't be sheep and at the moment I see that tagline. Just in case you want to send me anything at least changed the title, so it's like you know. Baby Bunny goes through a field, and then I'll be like. Oh, you got me I got rid crawled into a conspiracy theory, but rob Rick Ashley released a cover of ever long by the FOO fighters. It's incredible like you just. A mole. Youtube Channel. I've been so out of like three weeks ago. It was amazing. You need to try, and if you're listening to this unique, listen to stop what you're doing and listen to it. Welcome back welcome back was. Everything's been crazy and there's been a lot of posts especially with just everything being so politically and kind of. Just just Ashley. Charge. It's it tends to a lot of tension. Yup It's a very tense environment, not that it's bad or good. But it's just tents like everything has more weight win. There's tension in the room and I I. WanNa know I would understand engine as I just I, I went and got a massage today and within. A second of putting of the masseuse putting their hand like on my back, they their literal words were. Oh I've got job security like that. was that was their literal words I I'm not exaggerating. The the woman was like Oh honey. I dropped security dude, I don't know how you don't get a massage everyday like honestly like I I. Remember 'cause. You're having back problems forever ago. In, yeah, this is my life. We're very glad that you're starting on your rodier recovery, but yeah that you get that that. Thank you, you're my name is Daniel. Hi, Ryan! My my my psychotherapist in. Massage Therapists Yeah, no, but I mean there's been. There's been a ton of post that all happened some good. Some have been bad We're GONNA talk about some of the bad ones. in that like so what we want to talk about accountability. The idea of what does what does holding people or institutions accountable for what they do or say a cow. Should that be done? What does what does that framework looked like what are some good examples? What are some bad examples? And and what are some principles for us to follow I think that the absurd thing that we're talking about really is is. The absurd, the absurdity that is the fact that we don't know how to hold people accountable in many cases, or there is just a lack of accountability in general, especially from from. Like your willingness to be held. Accountable should exist prior to the need to be held accountable. Yeah, and the lack of accountability and the lack of a willingness to accept accountability speaks to the fact that most of those we need to hold accountable or never open to it to begin with. We'll end this. Part of the reason why I started to think about this I was listening to absorb one thirty eight with their good friend just goes in who? Talked about First Amendment loss as I was listening to that I. Just I just remember. It just hitting me like man, because I was listening to it right. As a bunch of these different posts were coming out, I thought like people were getting so offended. You know that hall.

rob Rick Ashley Youtube wolves FOO Ryan Daniel
"ryan" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"ryan" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"Tony and Ryan of course joining you live from the live. Say what's this is ally. Always do the latest. Lead in, but but we are joining you and we are live. He has the time that were recorded. You're and you're joining us, but in the future and the future. This is making me think of that scene from space balls. Where where they're watching themselves on the screen. When will then be now soon? Amazing it's such a great are there's there's so many great loops of that guys. We are so excited to be with you. of course. we hope that you guys have been checking out our website. ABSURD NETWORK DOT COM and we are really hoping that you guys have been checking out to. The new podcast that are popping up the new schedules that have been going on. we recording for a little while since the hiatus now in it's, it's been going really well actually like I've. The burnout is is gone. I was a little worried that it was going to pop up again, but I'm I'm excited about it, and you're not the one making youtube videos every week now true. This is true that story that you're in a lower risk than I am yeah. A lot quicker at it I mean other than the scripting processes, honestly the hardest part. The editing is tedious because he found like. How were the the things can said and. Editing was the editing is actually the easy part? It's time consuming which is annoying, but other than that and eventually I hope to have an editor but I. Mean I'm to the point now. Where once the video.

Tony youtube Ryan editor
"ryan" Discussed on Bob Ryan & Jeff Goodman NBA Podcast

Bob Ryan & Jeff Goodman NBA Podcast

05:27 min | 2 years ago

"ryan" Discussed on Bob Ryan & Jeff Goodman NBA Podcast

"Has popped up and. Put it in that one I think we need. We need another. Another Bob riot book would be by the next time we talked. I might ups. I might have breaking news I don't know maybe made. Like breaking news year on the Ryan Newman podcast. I don't mind. I would break it right here. If. There's any degrade, but. Oh the other book and I'll Scott Muster. Here that I really enjoy was forty eight minutes with Terry Pluto and Don't know that was a book in which we kindly used. The word appropriated rather than stole reappropriated a Daniel Och Rinse nine innings book that he wrote in Nineteen. Eighty three about one orioles. Brewers game at the end of the near the end of the season, in which they went play by play by play, and with all the back stories of the people involved you know and everything and a baseball game from different angles and I got a phone call from an all. Time Terry Pluto who I know, known rhetoric legal, and and he said he was now a new guy on the beat with the cavaliers eighty six eighty seven season, he switched over for baseball basketball, and he was, and he had this idea of do same idea for basketball. And I said well. It's a more fluid game. Plays and you've got exchanges and possessions, but it's not quite the millennial. Congressional. But yeah, maybe we could well long story short we did. I'll give him credit for his idea. And we. We had we opportunities. We had to be the cavaliers in Celtic defending champion that year, and he had ears, and they had grabbed already remarked Christ. Rod Harper Hot Rod Williams they had young dynamic team on the move and and Lenny Wilkens his first year coaching them, and they were going to be in Boston, once in Harvard once, and we decided we wanted to gain to be boss not Cleveland. Well January sixteenth, nineteen ninety-seven Friday night. You're come to cavaliers. And, that's going to, and we're going to see how the game goes. If the game does it if it sucks, in is not. Into and no drama. There's no anything I will take another shot. You know later the year. That's not come in well that night. Hit the Jackpot and M Jackpot of first of all. The. Terry was plugged in with the team, but I point and cavs, how to make a transition that day transaction at day and the transportation? Side Craig Hilo sure. I and he was in with Wayne embry about how came about then he was flagged the trainer and the trainer was so funny. He hated the Celtics. He hated garden. He swore that they turn the heat up in a shower off the medical, a bought all that stuff you know and any was spewing venom, because when he was part of the story right okay. The my part, I got the defending champion Celtics bird at his peak I got Mikhail of his greatest cease got hurt is absolute greatest season. Kicking Button January of.

cavaliers Terry Pluto Celtics Bob Wayne embry Ryan Newman Scott Muster Rod Harper Lenny Wilkens Craig Hilo Daniel Och Brewers basketball baseball Rod Williams reappropriated Mikhail Cleveland Boston Harvard
"ryan" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"ryan" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"Had been mistakenly pronouncing for his entire life Ah Yeah I agree with that is like like it's one hundred percent agree with that. Yeah and I think instead of idea of so sometimes people apologize to either get closure or to like make make right feelings like. I don't like this awkwardness. So I'm going to do this thing to to make things not awkward anymore and it's like no that's not it and I don't think are malicious. I think some people do inappropriate apologies. Oh Jeez for reasons. That aren't malicious just. Don't understand what the purpose of an apologies for Other people do it you know because they on closure they feel guilty like oh man. I don't like this guilty thing so it it's about it becomes solely about them and their feelings and it's not about the other person and I. I really want to be clear here to that in apology. And and I think this was intentional whether we realize it in the moment or not but our definitions of apology excluded. The forgiveness side of it like policy is not based on or should not be nice expectation. Tation an expectation of forgiveness. Yeah an apology is done because you did something wrong and now you're you're making you're attempting to make things right. But in of forgiveness. Business is an entirely separate side of this coin. That is the responsibility of then the other party. But it is not something but it's not what you you can't control that so honestly and honestly there are times when an apology. You have to you know so you can apologize for something that you're not even Needing forgiveness for it's simply a you know what my actions caused her. Yup and I you know that's what I'm apologizing for him. Sorry that this hurts you. Even though I truly did not hurt you know I it. There was no reason for you to need to forgive me But I was a part of this. You know and I'm sorry for that we've been like you know if I were to apologize for my ancestors ancestors you know. I don't need forgiveness Ryan sisters but I do need to apologize for for their bad actions sometimes And in that way you know I am truly so you know. I have a family where well I won't get into necessarily that much. But you know they they might own slaves back in the day and it's like man you know that I I truly am sorry about that because it's terrible it's horrible. It's something that never should have happened. I did not do anything and so it becomes difficult because there are times when you don't even need you to be forgiven but you might still need to apologize and that that is where you need to understand. It truly is not about. It's not about getting something out of it and people who make an appropriate apology. They don't understand that they always are trying to get something out of it. Yup absolutely and to be fair. There are natural byproducts that you do get out of apologizing right like it's not this. This isn't like a a zero benefit game or a lose lose for you but it's understanding that you no longer like you don't in in order to in order to keep up with our nerdy sells like you no longer have the high ground here. You Talk You you don't get to you don't get to dictate the terms anymore out. Underestimate my power packer. You were the Chosen One Don't do it Dan again. So her brother to me Becker. If you're not with me you're my enemy the no no but you don't have you don't dictate the terms anymore and whether you did before you certainly don't now and so I think it is really important to to make that distinction action but I WanNa talk about I do want I do want to talk about the some of the the absurd reasons that we actually do make an appropriate appropriate apologies. And I think over those. Yeah so I think that's good. I think one of the first ones is is using them as an attempt for quick closure closure Or just as a way to make myself feel better because I feel bad that I hurt you instead of you. Know what the definition finish.

Becker Ryan Dan
"ryan" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"ryan" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"A lot of us aren't used to like strong criticism or harsh rebuke or even difficult conversations with people? Because we're so used to like. I got good grades and I went to college. My teachers guest me up and all that stuff so like not getting employed right away in the seventh avenue. This church was pretty pretty. What was what was like the one of the first time where things didn't play out the way I wanted it? I've had an. I've had few experiences in my life. Where things that didn't play out the way I wanted it so even imagine that there's probably a lot of personal ego? That was at the root of yeah of why I had such a difficult time after graduation so once I sort it all that ego stuff out I was able to take a step back and realize that was in a tremendously blessed opportunity and they had no reason for me to complain. A Wonderful Church community that I'm a part of a lot out of amazing friends like Ryan Becker among is a loser so like I have a wife. I've I am stable. I don't have a lot of a student. Loan debt like there's so much blessing in my life that the particular details of the way that my money is coming to. My pocket doesn't really he matter anymore because I've recognized that yes I am called to Minister But that doesn't always have to look like lake. I've been told that should look like and that. That's okay and again nothing. Mind blowing there. That's not a revolutionary condo wanting to state the fact is of it and it's a whole nother thing to internalize the the the reality of it. Well I think too. There's.

Ryan Becker
"ryan" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

Absurdity with Ryan Becker

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"ryan" Discussed on Absurdity with Ryan Becker

"Be helpful to just give them some of the ways in which that can add to the painter confusion infusion so oftentimes people don't speak about. Did you get a job offer. They'll ask you. Did you get a call and when you say it in that way what it it does to young impressionable men and women is that it makes you feel like oh either God called me or not. But it's not really that it's a job offer because for for those of us like Ryan and I who have a commitment and a calling to edifying and helping spiritual growth happen my status as an employees of a denomination or is it doesn't change that. Yeah and I say that knowing that it's true but my gut still gets. Because it's there's something about out being able to be fully associated identified with the denomination that for someone like me does something it provides a sense of validity and in the end and a communal support. That means something and I know that it's abstract and maybe should it mean as much as it does but it does and it's just the reality so those are some of the ways in which you kind of grow into understanding what it means to work for the seventh. They haven't his church urge. And you have this language like calling. Did you get a call versus. Did you get a job. Offer then can become confusing and painful when you don't get a quote unquote call which is just the job offer. Well and then you've got you've also got the structure side of it because hiring for us is a little bit more centralized than further denominations. Because it's it's not a local church. You're not a local church higher. In most cases you are a conference higher so conference wolf anything. Literature tires are maybe looked down upon. Yeah absolutely there are or less opportunities for them unfortunately.

Ryan
"ryan" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

The Kevin and Ryan Show

10:42 min | 2 years ago

"ryan" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

"The intention for the rest of the day for me because like it doesn't matter how crazy the next in twenty twenty three hours. are that one hour cronica. And it's GonNa everything is going to descend from there. Yeah it you know it's funny I find a lot of time through in. You mentioned this near book through saying no. Yeah can you give a I think saying no is. It's always been a really difficult thing for me to do. Do I like new novel experiences. That type of star so you know when somebody invites you to something. That sounds kind of cool. I always sign up for it later. I typically the end up regretting signing up for too many things like how do you approach saying no because that does free applauded time. Yeah there's this sports psychologist. Jonathan Fater Cert- briefly in the book but is a friend of mine and I I asked this question a couple years ago. He gave me a bunch of really good advice and then he sent me this picture of Oliver Sacks ax in his office. The you know the doctor and writer and and Oliver Sacks is on the phone and then behind them. There's this giant yellow piece of paper APOR and just says no exclamation point and that was assigning hanging in his office. And so when I look at this picture I imagine him his telling the person on the phone like no. I can't do that. You know and so I actually have like a physical reminder in my office to say no because book when you're early on in your career like you have to say yes to everything and there's not that much stuff to say yes to but then as you achieve some things and you have some success that the privilege and the The reward for all your work. Is that now. Lots of people want you to do things they want to do things for you you know and the thing that made you successful. Oh you're you're driving your hard work and your ability to say yes now has like suddenly working against you because now it's not in. Are there any opportunities. It's it's like. What is the best opportunity and Dr Failures analogy because he works with lots of baseball players? who were the mets and Major League baseball and stuff? He was like you become a good baseball player by swinging pitches. That's how you get noticed right like it's the high school kid that hits a three hundred foot home. Run the people. Whoa that kids got you know power right but the problem is then as you work your way up in the levels the pitching gets harder and the stakes get higher and and now it actually becomes your plate discipline that separates the guys who have long careers and the guys who don't and it is true and I think in all sports right like in football thought thought forcing the this other quarterbacks who force the passes it's the quarterbacks who have the patience and the fearlessness to stay in the pocket a little bit longer and wait for the right receiver at the right time and so it just becomes I just reminders of over and over again? Like if you're saying yes to everything if you're saying yes to the first thing that it comes up there's a huge cost to this and and kids I would say having kids has been the most powerful thing for me in that regard because you know before I felt like I had an unlimited capacity to say yes and if I said yes to too much stuff like I bore the consequences and I got married Arne ensure my wife kind of for some of the consequences but ultimately like she's her own person living her own life. If I decided to if I went to a dinner instead instead of being home she would go have dinner with friends or you know do some other things but when you have kids in a totally dependent on you you realize like Oh. I stole all this time from you and I gave it to this total stranger for no reason you know yes or even even this has been helpful for me like in terms of the rates that I charge whether it's for speaking or you know if I'm going out with a new book it's like it's not free to do this and so if because I'm afraid afraid of being mean or I don't want to seem greedy I you know let's say I accept half my normal speaking fee because that's their budget shit instead of saying no sorry This is this is what I have to do it for. I've taken that time from my. I might choose sons. You know what I mean like I took it from a defenseless baby is how I I say to myself. And that motivates me and be less afraid to be the bad. I've got. Yeah and I mean that can be stealing from anything to for people. That don't have kids. It can be stealing from your workout. Time your meditation time. You're you know anything. Your happiness awesome. Well all I know I've had you for a while. I do want to ask you one one last question. I'm not going anywhere okay sweet. I'm curious you know you've you've I'm I'm sure. He sent out a handful of these copies to people. That have have read it and Early on were you. What do you think you know? At the end of say someone completes your book they picked the this op de read it all the way through you know three six months from now. What are they get out of the book? What are they implement in? What does this leave them? Well my my hope is is and I try to do at least these three books in the trilogy with you. Go in obstacle In this book I tried to write something that like. Even if you forget everything inside decide that book that even just like title could be a mantra that provide some value. So in this case I I feel like I could have just called the book stillness like if if all I do. The book is just introduced stillness into the lexicon exa Kahn. Or the the the mind of a handful of people I feel like I will have succeeded because that word has come to mean a great deal to me like just the idea that like. Oh this experience where you know. You're just sitting at the dinner table and you're just talking with your family and no one's on their phones and you're laughing and you're experiencing the moment like oh that's still it's just as you know a walk through. The Woods is still miss. It's just as you know a moment of flow state where you're like doing your absolute best work. Just as meditation is still the that this is a very special special thin that is way too fleeting and Rare in our lives and that we would be happier and better and think wiser and nicer to each other and able to accomplish more things and solve complex problems if we had more stillness in our lives in the vast array of manifestations we would be better for more stillness and so obviously I hope people pick up the habits people start walking walking. I hope people you know. Take a hobby. I hope people you know explore the idea of a higher power. I hope they clear. They work on emptying their minds. I hope they cultivate cultivate silence and solitude I do all those things but if they find their own way to just be conscious of the idea of stillness to me. That's what I've got. It's not a philosophy and that's why I tried to pay for it in the book. Yeah I love IT I. I thought it was a great book and I agree with you wholeheartedly. I think that this idea and In it doesn't always happen I'm not perfect but when I can just sit there and just be a not wanna be anywhere else the just sit there and and You know whether it be at the dinner table and during a conversation with my wife and not thinking about my emails or you know just having a little bit of of Grounding being you know just feeling grounded and not feeling I'm a have to rush off. Oh Gosh just like this. The it's like relaxed so relaxing and so oh peaceful I need more of that my life so I'm glad you're you wrote this book because there's there's certainly a ton I mean. I'm looking at the book you sent. Let me and have all these Pages folded over at a special highlighter. Just because I didn't have a proper highlighter. And I was underlining stuff and it was going through the other page judge Because it was like a felt tip. Anyway he didn't you know they don't know that's the thing that you can say to an author I mean like I people are like When people show me book and it's like all Christine Gallegos he didn't really read it when someone shows you and it's got like food on it and it fell right. I'm like Oh you like live at this thing thing. You know that's awesome. Yeah that means a lot. No it's great to go to that. Yes so I think it's important to that people realize that still this is not just just this sort of privilege. Nice moments with your family or when you're not doing like you're also needs us when you're programming or when you're giving a speech or when you're playing in the super bowl like that that that all almost every moment in life including the really high stakes one you will perform learn better if you're actually there and you're grateful to be there even if it sucks and it's really hard and it's not going the way that you wanted to go and if you're not trying to rush rush off to some other thing and if you're not wasting time wishing it was was otherwise you know like the the I think stillness is is a is is both about a personal happiness and fulfilment but I also think it's a key to elite performance and I think that there's not a clear line it begins and the other the other ends that's right. Yeah and I think that was so apparent in your your profile of Tiger Woods in the book you know how you can have have absolute focus in one area of your life but if you don't look at this and in a holistic way you know falls apart and that was just a really fascinating You know chapter that that you you delve into his inner workings totem which I thought was great as well awesome. Well Ryan thank you so much for being on the show Where Working People Obviously you can pick it up on Amazon. An Amazon still misses the key but Wins the release date and there's audible as well so release. Lee says October wine. Ob Everywhere Independent Bookstores Amazon. And then if you're you're interested more in the western side of stuff you can check out Daily STOIC six dot com where we do an email about stoicism every morning awesome. Thanks Ryan. Thanks Rob me all right. That's it for this episode hop on over to Instagram. I am at Got Kevin. Rose follow me up there and appreciate it and if you have a little extra free time head over to the I tuned store and issue would give a five star review that will get US recommended more people and in turn gets even better guests on the show. Thanks so much and have a great day..

Oliver Sacks Tiger Woods baseball Amazon Ryan Jonathan Fater writer US Arne exa Kahn mets football Lee Rob Christine Gallegos Rose Major League swinging
"ryan" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

The Kevin and Ryan Show

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"ryan" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

"Know everyone is right on top of each other and the truth. There's like most of the big picture decisions or creations or or or work that we do when you think about where it came from. It wasn't like in in a busy coffee shop. It was quietly i. I came up for the book. I'm GonNa Right next. I came up with on the beach vacation right like I was not totally alone own but I was alone and away from the vast majority of distractions that usually would would prevent me from thinking about this and so people have to have in some ways the confidence in the strength to go like no I know you probably think I should spend the next week at the office but actually the best investment I can make myself in this business. Business is still a hunting trip or go on a week bike ride or you know just just stay at home for a few days like if if the leader of an organization is not taking time to sit quietly by themselves to think big picture. WHO's doing it? You know the janitors not doing it. Yeah I thought that was. It was pretty telling that Bill Gates goes out there and he doesn't I mean I guess he does do some of the mostly reads as well as that. What you found out is is reading and he reads? Books is a lot of academic papers and he. He's not white affirmative. She's sending emails in his writing. Memos like he's very engage but he's just doing it in a fundamentally different context than you could from even the CEO's office or even from the founders office how how would you recommend someone find time for solitude when they're like listen Ryan like love you but I'm just trying to pay the bills you know I'm like you know I've got a Oh you know forty plus our job kids like wh where does one find you know no. We can't take a certainly. I can't take seven days off. My wife would kill me. Brian Court Cabin for seven days. No definitely would you recommend Ivan the easiest place to get solitude and silence is is in the mornings like just wake up a little bit earlier I again again as someone who has young kids. Okay I will give it six fifteen this morning because that's when my son woke up but thankfully I have a job. Result is a little bit easier and I can afford help and he does the daycare but I could have gotten up at five thirty and had you know forty five minutes to stink or pray or work out or do any of those things and so you you like. Let's say you already work out an hour a day With your someone who goes to the gym every day. Reorient your schedule so instead of doing it from five five to six PM where the work is ongoing. You're getting emails other people are around. It's busy it's bright outside to it from five to six. AM It might change when you go to bed. You're going to be much more present for that experience. You're going to get more out of it because your phone's not going would be going off. You won't have already started your day. You don't like the morning is the easiest place before everyone wakes up before the amounts have come in before the schedule. Oh has started. I think that's the best place to get solitude and silence. Yeah Kalemie. I love sleep so much I just like I have to wake up at seven every morning to take care of my my little girl and Kinda get the routine going and I'm just like every morning on Mike Is. Let's take one more hour. I mean what what I what I do. It's not like so. I take the mentioned this earlier but we go for this long. So this morning we buy We did like eight miles per hour. We CBS last the House votes still a little bit. Dark Karma got back. It was bright outs. So I'm not technically in complete solitude but I was riding up and down at dirt road road It's just me. It was just him. We watched the sun come up like that. That was like a profoundly meditative. immersive experience ends that Sen.

Bill Gates Brian Court Cabin Sen Ivan CEO CBS Ryan
"ryan" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

The Kevin and Ryan Show

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"ryan" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

"Know everyone is right on top of each other and the truth. There's like most of the big picture decisions or creations or or or work that we do when you think about where it came from. It wasn't like in in a busy coffee shop. It was quietly i. I came up for the book. I'm GonNa Right next. I came up with on the beach vacation right like I was not totally alone own but I was alone and away from the vast majority of distractions that usually would would prevent me from thinking about this and so people have to have in some ways the confidence in the strength to go like no I know you probably think I should spend the next week at the office but actually the best investment I can make myself in this business. Business is still a hunting trip or go on a week bike ride or you know just just stay at home for a few days like if if the leader of an organization is not taking time to sit quietly by themselves to think big picture. WHO's doing it? You know the janitors not doing it. Yeah I thought that was. It was pretty telling that Bill Gates goes out there and he doesn't I mean I guess he does do some of the mostly reads as well as that. What you found out is is reading and he reads? Books is a lot of academic papers and he. He's not white affirmative. She's sending emails in his writing. Memos like he's very engage but he's just doing it in a fundamentally different context than you could from even the CEO's office or even from the founders office how how would you recommend someone find time for solitude when they're like listen Ryan like love you but I'm just trying to pay the bills you know I'm like you know I've got a Oh you know forty plus our job kids like wh where does one find you know no. We can't take a certainly. I can't take seven days off. My wife would kill me. Brian Court Cabin for seven days. No definitely would you recommend Ivan the easiest place to get solitude and silence is is in the mornings like just wake up a little bit earlier I again again as someone who has young kids. Okay I will give it six fifteen this morning because that's when my son woke up but thankfully I have a job. Result is a little bit easier and I can afford help and he does the daycare but I could have gotten up at five thirty and had you know forty five minutes to stink or pray or work out or do any of those things and so you you like. Let's say you already work out an hour a day With your someone who goes to the gym every day. Reorient your schedule so instead of doing it from five five to six PM where the work is ongoing. You're getting emails other people are around. It's busy it's bright outside to it from five to six. AM It might change when you go to bed. You're going to be much more present for that experience. You're going to get more out of it because your phone's not going would be going off. You won't have already started your day. You don't like the morning is the easiest place before everyone wakes up before the amounts have come in before the schedule. Oh has started. I think that's the best place to get solitude and silence. Yeah Kalemie. I love sleep so much I just like I have to wake up at seven every morning to take care of my my little girl and Kinda get the routine going and I'm just like every morning on Mike Is. Let's take one more hour. I mean what what I what I do. It's not like so. I take the mentioned this earlier but we go for this long. So this morning we buy We did like eight miles per hour. We CBS last the House votes still a little bit. Dark Karma got back. It was bright outs. So I'm not technically in complete solitude but I was riding up and down at dirt road road It's just me. It was just him. We watched the sun come up like that. That was like a profoundly meditative. immersive experience ends that Sen.

Bill Gates Brian Court Cabin Sen Ivan CEO CBS Ryan
"ryan" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

The Kevin and Ryan Show

12:53 min | 2 years ago

"ryan" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

"The complete spiritual bankruptcy of their lives for their complete disorganization disorder of their lives. When would make that at meditation? Sort of just a drop in the bucket anyway so I tried to. I tried to write a book about all the things we can do. Sort of up to and before Meditation Tation. Yes and I don't know I just felt like that was my contribution. No I and I think it's great because there is just I find that a lot OUGHTA people. I've talked to people about meditation process of of doing my own APP around it and one of the things that is a recurring theme. Is that people. They just don't seem like they're ready for that type of commitment and I feel like they need to be a little bit more still even to get to the point where they want to have a meditation practice and I think a lot of the tools and things that you mentioned the book would help them get to a point where they can say okay now. I've cultivated a little bit of stillness. I'm ready to introduce a real practice and you know in talking to most people if you ask them if they meditate the well. I've tried it. You know yeah did the head space thing for a little bit of the Com. I think for a little bit and feel that It's it's really. It's sad and that that in my mind is Not giving them a chance to really feel the true benefits of meditation. I think that you know just like with anything that goes mainstream. There's always like a McDonald's version of it and then a really kinda deeper truer am version of it and I feel that if you really want to take a meditation seriously. It has to be something that you commit to for at least three months and more than just five minutes ten minutes Dan. A lot of the APPs out there they kind a push you to we have five minute. Meditations it's like. How can I check that box as quickly as possible? When that shouldn't really be the goal should be? How can I deep deep in my practice and actually give this a real shot and I think that Sam Harris in my mind has the best kind of course for that he does a fifty day? Course that is is quite good at giving you a real taste of what. It's like to go deep in meditation. But I think that you're absolutely right like You know that that's been talked about so much and there's so many other things you can bring that meditation really isn't your your ideal way to to get started or you need something well. One medication hasn't holistic. Like what you're doing here with with mind spirit and body and I think there's a lot of things that we can introduce before we get to the point where we're ready to meditate. Yeah and and I think it's a cultural thing that that's probably like look. It's what capitalism is good at But it has Some corrosive effects is that we we have this instinct when we find something that works or worked for one person we go like. How do I package market and sell this? And how can I present this as like the solution to any and all problems avalons so I didn't understand that similar thing happened with psychedelics. Right where people are having these experiences that are really meaningful really powerful in changing them and so instead instead of going like well. This is wonderful. I'm keep doing this and I'm going to be better. There's also this element that has to be like. I got to get everyone to do that. And so it becomes this process. This is where you're trying to use it to make an argument right. You're like they're like now to do this and now I have to get other people to do it in. Oh you're separating like I saw this we we do these challenges for daily STOIC and like they sort of thirty days of challenges inspired by stoicism and and there was wine about something I was looking at the the comments in this woman was like. Oh you know. The today's was good I was I was feeling really depressed. This is helpful in this person. Total strangers like. Oh what you gotTa do you gotTa go do Wasco like just do it in a fix this you know and I was like I was just like Whoa. WHOA like like one? have no idea like what this woman is life is. We've no India which has gone through. We have no idea how severe or mild depression is. We have no idea. What resources are we have no idea what her reaction to this medicine is is going to play? I just I was really turned off by this. Like it. Almost reminded me of like what we're now reeling from with the OPIOID crisis. Where it's like when people think there's is a magical solution to a complicated problem it never ends well and so I think so much of what we're seeing right now across all different parts of our life is is is either people doing it again or people waking up to? Oh wait this is actually really complicated. And there is no easy solution in that enlightenment and stone tone this end you know happiness. It's something that you earn. And you get there by interests you know. And I don't know this is sort of a tangent but like I don't like this idea of like Oh this is the magical solution all your problems whether it's technology or a medicine or spiritual practice now. I agree with you one hundred percent and this it's actually something that I WanNa talk about because you mentioned in your body section in the book and this is like I have an. I'm sure you have the same. So many friends friends that are like you gotta come do I WASPA- and you gotta go and I've I've dabbled with these different compounds and I've always come to the same conclusion that there's some insights to be gathered there and it's nice because it shows you kind of a different perspective on a whole slew of different things that You may be stuck on but it's not the hard work I mean. It's hard work for the few hours that you're doing it but it's hard like lasting work in time and effort that you need to put in to have kind of of a a permanent thing you know like it sticks around and you have this great. You know euphoria and afterglow. They can last for months but you still got to climb the mountain at the end the day even if you get a a quick glimpse of the peak you know so I worry that so many of my friends are now like you know. Oh I just want to try that I wasco wants then all of a sudden you know I reconnect with someone in there like. Oh Yeah. I've done it about thirty to forty times now. I'm just like God man like that. That's a little bit of escaping right right. That's not really putting in the effort to get there in a in a real lasting way of what is it say like if it was so magical why would you have to do it over and over over again or is it. Is that not like sort of the fundamental definition of what drug is sort of a temporary experience that you can have on demand i. I'm worried about that too and what I step back and think is like the people of Wi- admire do have really true spiritual all in Lightman. Historically there. There was none of this. They worked for earned. It and I think it's always striking to me when I talk to. People have had these experiences his and sort of describing them in very heartfelt and clearly a profound impact. And it's like I almost want to go like you know there's like some wonderful books that talk about this exact thing and at at at profound length and existed for thousands of years and I think I think what the experiences are really great for is opening up people's eyes to things they were previously closed off two for one way or another and this why I definitely have no no criticism for someone someone. For instance with like profoundly treatment resistant depression. Oh yeah PTA SD yeah. You're already experimenting with really heavy medication. So the lake. The the idea that you would try this other option were natural option to me makes total sense. And you've had some life altering experience or trauma again makes sense but I think for those of us who are a bit more privileged in the in the ride or the the you know the the hand we've been dealt by fate I think You know crack open one of these books like say. Why don't you start starting there don't you know don't go for the the steroids or whatever you WANNA call him in the analogy? Well the one thing that I will say a will. There's two things that I think psychedelic helped me out with. I did a really high does mushroom experience that I've talked about on the podcast a couple of times but it helped me. My father had passed away and it helped me really go back and almost like a real conversation with an address. Those those feelings M release a lot of that stuff so I think in terms of like your mention a few seconds ago about there being one really kind of you the thing that you want to go in whether it be. PTSD type moment or or something that you wanna go in and really do focused. You know that. Make you kind of like set your intentions ahead of time before before you go in and do sure guided experiences and I was able to get a lot of therapeutic benefit out of that particular session but the other piece that I loved was that it opened opened up my kind of Spiritual side a little bit and I feel that I got the sense there being something kind of bigger than myself and a little a bit more connectedness and once I did that when I went back and started reading a lot of these books You know with our be on Johnson or whatever it may be a lot of it started make a lot more sense to me And I felt as though It just kind of opened that door at crack that door open to wear now. Oh reading something like that was like oh I get what they're trying to tell me here Which I hadn't hadn't previously? Yeah I think that makes sense and and you know there's this idea in in stoicism Comes from Herrick. Latest is served mystic poet that that the stokes really like we talked about this idea that he he says no man's steps in the same river twice meaning that like George. Changing in the river is constantly changing and so- psychedelics might have been what opens your mind to be able to see these things that might have been other experiences that you had. It might have been the mere passage of time. Sure but I think just the idea that like you're not just supposed to read his book's one time and then it's all magically clear to you that the idea that that philosophy is a practice. Is something that academically. We've we've we've not been taught and it goes overhead so to go back to the idea of journaling when you read. Marcus Aurelius Meditations. And and this has been my experience. I'm working on a a series of biographies about the early stokes right now and as I reread about a lot of these really obscure lesser-known stokes it totally changed my experience of reading. Marcus realize because I realized Oh this brilliant line or this brilliant analogy that he made here or even this the sentence. It wasn't an original sentence. This is a quotation. This is an unattributed quotation Or this is a a sort of a an. There's A. There's an allusion here that you would only get if you really understood the philosophy and that he's not naming sources but his sources say so and so and what I realized Oh. His journaling. Elon wasn't just him venting that he was stressed. It's him actually like practicing the philosophy almost like flash flash cards right like he's he's like writing the quotes down over and over again in different ways on different days so he can feel that wisdom like coming through his body and so the idea like philosophy. Isn't this thing that you read one time. It's why like in Judaism. I'm forgetting the word for it. But like there's this system of white breaking out the Torres you re like one section per week and then every fifty the two weeks you go all the way through it and then there's like page like this if you go to church long enough you realize that. They're just cycling through the Bible over and over again and it's like Oh this is a thing you do over the course of your life. You don't read. You know Alan Watts one time and now you have a philosophy awesome degree. You know it's that this is an ongoing practice and pursued the reading and the writing and the thinking in the talking. Yeah Ellen wants a good example sample of someone that I've read over and over and every time there's a new insight to be gained there because you're different you know like you you've in the intervening time time you've experienced things and you've grown you've changed and like the words of the same but somehow you notice them differently or interpret them totally differently. It's just one. Yeah I feel like when you when you there's a insight that you then you kind of go away from it you have some time to kind of almost subconsciously. Churn on it a little bit and accepted to deeper level and then when that opens you up to other things it's it's county. It's a beautiful thing I I did want to continue down to your your body section because this is This is probably my favorite section of the was the end of the book..

Marcus Aurelius India Wasco Alan Watts McDonald Sam Harris mild depression PTSD Dan Torres Wi stokes Ellen Herrick Johnson George Elon Lightman
"ryan" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

The Kevin and Ryan Show

12:02 min | 2 years ago

"ryan" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

"I already said that in all ready complained blamed about that. And you know like having fresh prompts you to put something in I think is a pretty powerful thing. Go to your point about devout devices Obviously not to diss the the opposite sound interesting. One of the reasons I use paper journals and I made a journal for days call. So that has the prompts but one of the reasons I'm really bullish about a paper journals is the tactile experience great. But what I've tried to do in my part of my daily routine is pushed back. Whatever my first interaction with with with my phone is and so? I don't use the phone as an alarm clock. I go for a walk and I don't take it with me. Even though there might be cool photos to take you know then I go up and journal. I WANNA use that when I check my calendar for the first time I wanted to be on the desktop because I've sat sat down to work not on my phone at breakfast so I like I think I do have a somewhat old school argument and now of like just because your phone can do. It doesn't mean you should to it under phone. No I agree. Yeah this is this is actually what I do. is I- quarantine-off. Certain things like I don't have even those. Jor The journal. APP works on my phone. I don't have it on my phone. Only have it on my ipad that has a keyboard And then on my IPAD. I don't have anything else. Turn off almost everything. All the notifications are turned off. Like everything is off of that. There's no calendar under in like that is. Were my drawing APPS. Are you know 'cause I can use the pencil and so if I want like to. Sketch Ideas For one journal. So it's very very much a device for creativity and not one for distraction email and everything else but Yeah that's kind of by design but I'm one hundred percent with you like if you it's so easy if you have an APP like that on your phone you'd be like okay. I'm done with that now off instagram or off to her. Whatever so it's mm-hmm it's like once you have that devise open? It can lead to all different types of temptation. So I'm I'm very I. I tried to like you know firewall. That stuff low bit totally in in the mind section. You have a whole topic round cultivating silence. Can you talk about that a bit. Yeah I one of the reasons I don't live in your city. Aside is that I just couldn't stand how noisy was like. Sometimes I wake up in the middle of the night like jarred because I hate those trucks where it's like a dumpster on the back of the truck you know and they go through an intersection in the sort of the dumpster comes up that smacks down like the all the noise like in my chest cavity comedy and and now when I go back to New York having like now I live out in the country and then I just realized what the fact that the sensory overload I was experiencing so I think generally people live lives. That are waging Totally unnatural environment. But then I think we're also just generally afraid of silence so people are like yeah. I wake up put on headphones and I start listening to podcasts on two x speed and And then go straight like you're like wow you never had like any moments of silence throughout the day like you you you had noise been injured body at every the available a second and then of course you don't make great decisions and of course you feel on edge and of course you have less patients than then you you otherwise might and of course you miss a lot of the wonderful things that are happening. Because you're just you've to tune them all out and gave a talk in Helsinki a couple couple years ago when I was walking around. There's this weird building and I walked into it and I'm forgetting the name of it but it's basically a a nondenominational almost nonreligious church and it's like completely silent. That's it's called the Church of silence and everything in it is about muting. Sounds so like the door. War doesn't make any noise and no one's allowed to talk and there's no it's just like this wonderful building that you just walk in and it's like completely silent island what you find when you have that. Silence is what John Cage found The the experimental composer is that when you remove all these external noises you start to share noises. That you didn't even know existed in Yorkshire you're GONNA share your own body and you realize that you've the keeping that at a distance. Yeah in in you know. What's funny is I find that once? You can quiet the mind in that way. So many people think I think that It will make them less productive and I find it to be the absolute opposite and that you are more creative and clearheaded. When you you can get into that you know have a little bit of a break in a little bit of peace you know? I think you said it in your book but there was something about you know. There's a reason why so. Many great ideas happened in the shower our yeah. Do you WanNa talk about that a bit. Yes I am my my routine sort of goes along these lines like what I do. Is I take a long walk doc. In the morning before I start my day I take my son or sometimes. We'd do a bike riding bikes to ride a bike trailer. But the point is we go outside. We're not listening to music music. Only thing I hear is him talking and then when I start my day I work and You know I try to keep things mostly silent. I turn off alert say I I like to work in the dark often but then in the afternoon I do some form of exercise that God runner I swim and I find. It's Austin that the really good ideas come when I'm like actively trying not tour and it's sort of humbling me realize like oh the mind is one of its own thin. When you're trying China's sort of consciously control all the time maybe you get eighty percent of what it's capable of and then oftentimes it's when you're not thinking about it at all When you've completely let go your present that you get these gifts of inciter inspiration or connection that you never would have considered an and I I got his like each one of my books are very specific words that I remember just just popping into my head? I don't know where I wasn't working. And they became an but the intro to the obstacles away came to me as I was running up the east side of Manhattan along the along the river at at like eleven o'clock at night and so it's it's just it's not about. What can you should squeeze out of your minds of nuns? It's what what what is allowed to happen. Yeah you go into a few routines in the book. Cover Fred Rogers of Mister Rogers like routine eighteen. which I thought was fascinating? He makes an hour available every morning for silence are he did you know which was I guess he was. He was devoted. US doing prayer at at the same time right. That was kind of his own little meditation the morning. I think people should start to think of prayer as a more Western form of meditation. Like it wasn't GonNa go apprai- because it's good for me but it that there when you read the routines of really religious people or or holy people you you find if they had these long periods of silence and solitude and sort of meditative exploration and obviously they believe. I believe there was a a you know a sort of a deeper spiritual part of that but I think that the Schuman state that they are getting in is very similar to what all all of the philosophical schools are pursuant. You know. I'm really really curious about that. I have never done the research but I'm curious have you have you looked into what prayer historically was like when you think about you know like the biblical sense in the Lord's prayer and there was a mention of Jesus going often in kind of like you know praying into the night like yeah. It was that more of a meditative kind of repetition like Some type of You know thinking that they would say over again or was it a juno. What the contents of those types of prayers were back then? Historically I think there's a there's a Awadh variation because it was up to the individual but you do see there's there's the some people who would just repeat the hill Mary over and over again or they just go through a Their Rosary you had other people who might have sort of almost long dialogues and then there are other people who were they say. They spent an hour in prayer. They meant you know sort of sitting there quietly reading their Bible so I think it's all and then obviously there's orders of monks that would do chance. There's obviously singing for some in different phase. So I think it's all over the place but when it it it's about sort of it's about practice right not in the like the sports since it's about practice in Mike ritual and repetition and and and giving oneself over to a kind of a pursuit that's just fundamentally different than the state of mind were in when we are working or Trying to make money or relaxing axeing or or or sleeping. Just it's its own sort of state and I think one of the sad parts of the decline of religion obviously see there. I am not a particularly religious person. Mostly agnostic so. I'm not like you know bemoaning the decline of organized religion but I think that was adding some structure and that experience into a lot of people's lives and has some people feel adrift risk. Having lost that can see how especially some of the. The repetition is almost like very eastern in a sense of. It's almost like a mantra based meditation. Tation away right. It's going to your brain into that place. I I had taken transcendental meditation courses and after doing some research. I'm not a big Fan on the organization his Asia but I will say the the technique of Mantra based meditation. I found to be some of the most powerful out there was especially when when done for at length. You Know Our plus Really really puts you into a deep state pretty quickly have you. Have you experimented with mantra base. Meditation I've done a little bit of meditation here or there is probably seems weird for someone to write a book about stillness not to be a sort of a big fan of meditation but is actually deliberate in the book. I wanted to write a book about Tis idea and not. Just give the same solution that I feel like everyone gives and like the research shows that like people just most people just don't seem to want to meditate right like even as overwhelming as the. Ask the pros us into be. It seems to be asking something. If people that they're they're not super inclined to give and so one of the things I served taken from this as a marketer and as a thinker. It's like okay. Well we'll don't just continue to to sort a beat the same drum and so what I what I wanted to do in the book was go okay. What are other ways to get stillness? Because you know it's it's lake if you were talking to a really really unhealthy obese person and you could give them all sorts of weightlifting techniques and you could tell l. them about their macro nutrition and their micro nutrition and you can tell them all these different things that they they should be doing if they want it to be healthy or you could be like look. Why don't we? Why don't we go from one whole bag of Oreos till it back like? Why don't we just like? Why don't we just start by not eating candy for breakfast? And so I think there's a lot of people who would benefit from meditation but like even if they were meditating.

Mister Rogers John Cage Manhattan China Helsinki New York Yorkshire The journal l. Austin Asia US Mary Mike
"ryan" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

The Kevin and Ryan Show

12:02 min | 2 years ago

"ryan" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

"I already said that in all ready complained blamed about that. And you know like having fresh prompts you to put something in I think is a pretty powerful thing. Go to your point about devout devices Obviously not to diss the the opposite sound interesting. One of the reasons I use paper journals and I made a journal for days call. So that has the prompts but one of the reasons I'm really bullish about a paper journals is the tactile experience great. But what I've tried to do in my part of my daily routine is pushed back. Whatever my first interaction with with with my phone is and so? I don't use the phone as an alarm clock. I go for a walk and I don't take it with me. Even though there might be cool photos to take you know then I go up and journal. I WANNA use that when I check my calendar for the first time I wanted to be on the desktop because I've sat sat down to work not on my phone at breakfast so I like I think I do have a somewhat old school argument and now of like just because your phone can do. It doesn't mean you should to it under phone. No I agree. Yeah this is this is actually what I do. is I- quarantine-off. Certain things like I don't have even those. Jor The journal. APP works on my phone. I don't have it on my phone. Only have it on my ipad that has a keyboard And then on my IPAD. I don't have anything else. Turn off almost everything. All the notifications are turned off. Like everything is off of that. There's no calendar under in like that is. Were my drawing APPS. Are you know 'cause I can use the pencil and so if I want like to. Sketch Ideas For one journal. So it's very very much a device for creativity and not one for distraction email and everything else but Yeah that's kind of by design but I'm one hundred percent with you like if you it's so easy if you have an APP like that on your phone you'd be like okay. I'm done with that now off instagram or off to her. Whatever so it's mm-hmm it's like once you have that devise open? It can lead to all different types of temptation. So I'm I'm very I. I tried to like you know firewall. That stuff low bit totally in in the mind section. You have a whole topic round cultivating silence. Can you talk about that a bit. Yeah I one of the reasons I don't live in your city. Aside is that I just couldn't stand how noisy was like. Sometimes I wake up in the middle of the night like jarred because I hate those trucks where it's like a dumpster on the back of the truck you know and they go through an intersection in the sort of the dumpster comes up that smacks down like the all the noise like in my chest cavity comedy and and now when I go back to New York having like now I live out in the country and then I just realized what the fact that the sensory overload I was experiencing so I think generally people live lives. That are waging Totally unnatural environment. But then I think we're also just generally afraid of silence so people are like yeah. I wake up put on headphones and I start listening to podcasts on two x speed and And then go straight like you're like wow you never had like any moments of silence throughout the day like you you you had noise been injured body at every the available a second and then of course you don't make great decisions and of course you feel on edge and of course you have less patients than then you you otherwise might and of course you miss a lot of the wonderful things that are happening. Because you're just you've to tune them all out and gave a talk in Helsinki a couple couple years ago when I was walking around. There's this weird building and I walked into it and I'm forgetting the name of it but it's basically a a nondenominational almost nonreligious church and it's like completely silent. That's it's called the Church of silence and everything in it is about muting. Sounds so like the door. War doesn't make any noise and no one's allowed to talk and there's no it's just like this wonderful building that you just walk in and it's like completely silent island what you find when you have that. Silence is what John Cage found The the experimental composer is that when you remove all these external noises you start to share noises. That you didn't even know existed in Yorkshire you're GONNA share your own body and you realize that you've the keeping that at a distance. Yeah in in you know. What's funny is I find that once? You can quiet the mind in that way. So many people think I think that It will make them less productive and I find it to be the absolute opposite and that you are more creative and clearheaded. When you you can get into that you know have a little bit of a break in a little bit of peace you know? I think you said it in your book but there was something about you know. There's a reason why so. Many great ideas happened in the shower our yeah. Do you WanNa talk about that a bit. Yes I am my my routine sort of goes along these lines like what I do. Is I take a long walk doc. In the morning before I start my day I take my son or sometimes. We'd do a bike riding bikes to ride a bike trailer. But the point is we go outside. We're not listening to music music. Only thing I hear is him talking and then when I start my day I work and You know I try to keep things mostly silent. I turn off alert say I I like to work in the dark often but then in the afternoon I do some form of exercise that God runner I swim and I find. It's Austin that the really good ideas come when I'm like actively trying not tour and it's sort of humbling me realize like oh the mind is one of its own thin. When you're trying China's sort of consciously control all the time maybe you get eighty percent of what it's capable of and then oftentimes it's when you're not thinking about it at all When you've completely let go your present that you get these gifts of inciter inspiration or connection that you never would have considered an and I I got his like each one of my books are very specific words that I remember just just popping into my head? I don't know where I wasn't working. And they became an but the intro to the obstacles away came to me as I was running up the east side of Manhattan along the along the river at at like eleven o'clock at night and so it's it's just it's not about. What can you should squeeze out of your minds of nuns? It's what what what is allowed to happen. Yeah you go into a few routines in the book. Cover Fred Rogers of Mister Rogers like routine eighteen. which I thought was fascinating? He makes an hour available every morning for silence are he did you know which was I guess he was. He was devoted. US doing prayer at at the same time right. That was kind of his own little meditation the morning. I think people should start to think of prayer as a more Western form of meditation. Like it wasn't GonNa go apprai- because it's good for me but it that there when you read the routines of really religious people or or holy people you you find if they had these long periods of silence and solitude and sort of meditative exploration and obviously they believe. I believe there was a a you know a sort of a deeper spiritual part of that but I think that the Schuman state that they are getting in is very similar to what all all of the philosophical schools are pursuant. You know. I'm really really curious about that. I have never done the research but I'm curious have you have you looked into what prayer historically was like when you think about you know like the biblical sense in the Lord's prayer and there was a mention of Jesus going often in kind of like you know praying into the night like yeah. It was that more of a meditative kind of repetition like Some type of You know thinking that they would say over again or was it a juno. What the contents of those types of prayers were back then? Historically I think there's a there's a Awadh variation because it was up to the individual but you do see there's there's the some people who would just repeat the hill Mary over and over again or they just go through a Their Rosary you had other people who might have sort of almost long dialogues and then there are other people who were they say. They spent an hour in prayer. They meant you know sort of sitting there quietly reading their Bible so I think it's all and then obviously there's orders of monks that would do chance. There's obviously singing for some in different phase. So I think it's all over the place but when it it it's about sort of it's about practice right not in the like the sports since it's about practice in Mike ritual and repetition and and and giving oneself over to a kind of a pursuit that's just fundamentally different than the state of mind were in when we are working or Trying to make money or relaxing axeing or or or sleeping. Just it's its own sort of state and I think one of the sad parts of the decline of religion obviously see there. I am not a particularly religious person. Mostly agnostic so. I'm not like you know bemoaning the decline of organized religion but I think that was adding some structure and that experience into a lot of people's lives and has some people feel adrift risk. Having lost that can see how especially some of the. The repetition is almost like very eastern in a sense of. It's almost like a mantra based meditation. Tation away right. It's going to your brain into that place. I I had taken transcendental meditation courses and after doing some research. I'm not a big Fan on the organization his Asia but I will say the the technique of Mantra based meditation. I found to be some of the most powerful out there was especially when when done for at length. You Know Our plus Really really puts you into a deep state pretty quickly have you. Have you experimented with mantra base. Meditation I've done a little bit of meditation here or there is probably seems weird for someone to write a book about stillness not to be a sort of a big fan of meditation but is actually deliberate in the book. I wanted to write a book about Tis idea and not. Just give the same solution that I feel like everyone gives and like the research shows that like people just most people just don't seem to want to meditate right like even as overwhelming as the. Ask the pros us into be. It seems to be asking something. If people that they're they're not super inclined to give and so one of the things I served taken from this as a marketer and as a thinker. It's like okay. Well we'll don't just continue to to sort a beat the same drum and so what I what I wanted to do in the book was go okay. What are other ways to get stillness? Because you know it's it's lake if you were talking to a really really unhealthy obese person and you could give them all sorts of weightlifting techniques and you could tell l. them about their macro nutrition and their micro nutrition and you can tell them all these different things that they they should be doing if they want it to be healthy or you could be like look. Why don't we? Why don't we go from one whole bag of Oreos till it back like? Why don't we just like? Why don't we just start by not eating candy for breakfast? And so I think there's a lot of people who would benefit from meditation but like even if they were meditating.

Mister Rogers John Cage Manhattan China Helsinki New York Yorkshire The journal l. Austin Asia US Mary Mike
"ryan" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

The Kevin and Ryan Show

11:30 min | 2 years ago

"ryan" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

"Crazy right and and and and to have but enterpise and mental clarity you you had to work for it then. I think you have to work harder for for it today. As you know. Seneca Construction in Roma's loud but at least there were jackhammers and you know trucks that beep when they back up like it's heavy have louder now and there's definitely more temptations and things of that nature but adding. It's always been hard so I just don't know if we went wrong so much as like we you. We let some of the muscles required to fight against us. We just let that atrophy like people don't have faith and you go back a couple of hundred years ago. There was one day a week when you weren't supposed to work for you. Know in in most of the Western world and you would have to go to this really beautiful old stone building link and sit quietly inside of it for like an hour or more and engage in the sort of prayer for prayerful Meditative Act so so I think we just lost some of that practice and I think we're we're seeing and feeling some of the effects of of of that absence did is it devices. That are interfering with us more than anything else these days like. I'm I'm trying to think about when you know when you did. Start the book off there and you talked about the bustling city and how crazy night You know I lived in Europe for a few years and I know the first time that we came out to the woods in Oregon. Dario was like it is so quiet out here but then you know that space just gets filled up with like while I still have my cell phone on still connected and cell phones of a big one for you is at like a public enemy number one in your book or sure yeah. The devices are huge parts. I mean obviously not only is the device designed to sort of keep you not still because you. You can't use it if you're being still but then the absence side of it are designed to do that. So it's like you know it's not apples fall. And it's not just the asphalt APPs fault it's like layers and layers of sort of incentives that are contrary to what you probably want as a person And so I think I think that is a huge part of it but like I also think it's it's a muscle right and we just let that muscle atrophy so with the phone does is prevent you from ever having to be quietly quiet and alone with your thoughts so then you you have the strength to put the phone aside or breaks breaks or the battery dies and now you don't know what to do with yourself you know. And so so you feel that. I think people go use my phone that much. But it's like you you walk to their office and they have CNN running on you you know on a TV screen on their wall. Right or to go. I you know I don't use my phone that much and then can you find out that like their schedule is like you know scheduled down to the minute. I had a phone call with some of the other day and there the call was scheduled for like four fifty the DP APP you know they were scheduling down in ten minute increments. And this wasn't like wasn't this wasn't a a phone call with a head of state is is just like a like someone I'd probably consider a peer right and so I think the the phones are just a symptom of this overall sort of Inability we have which is like to be to like simply being and and so people seek out lives as you said you live in the in the woods in Oregon. I live on a I spend most form outside Austin like the amount of freedom I have just by having made that choice. I is underestimated. There's just I'm asked to do less stuff you know. I can't go out to lunch. You know like a like there's just less stuff to do so it forces me to strengthen that muscle and come up with you know I think ways to be still or active but to be present while being acted. Yeah that's a great way to put it. I think that everyone everyone is trying to fill up their calendar to prevent themselves from from just being just sitting there. You know just like just actually being able to sit I. It's it's it's difficult to do and you know it's funny. Someone wants mentioned me. They were talking about This is somewhat related. But they were talking about the ability to go to a party and interact with people in this person was had a very tough time. You know with social interactions with New People. I'm certainly someone that's like that. And when you go into a room and you the first thing to do is turn for a drink and you have a couple of drinks. Then you're able to kind of you know. Loosen up a little bit and have their time. You're never actually a building that muscle right has your always just leaning on the alcohol as a substitute for that and in kind of your point right like you have to allow yourself off to sit there and build up muscle like just the act of doing nothing is building the muscle being comfortable of doing with doing nothing right totally and as someone who doesn't drink I'm very aware of the analogy. You just may cause yeah like I. I went to dinner the other night and I got there like a little bit earlier like I was on time but that was early. There's no one there and I was like I designed to kill thirty minutes in somebody else's house and I couldn't I don't drink. There's no you're forced to sort of. Actually you have a decision you are you going to be here with your own. Thoughts are going to watch the sunset over the water. was there or am I gonna read articles on my phone right. The worst part is like if they were if I was going to sit there and read a book I'd be like Oh this is great but actually I'm just going to read news. That's going to make me unhappy and made me feel bad about the world and simultaneously accomplished absolutely nothing. And so it's it's it's not as if we're doing this strategy were engaging these graduates and it's like working out out for us right like people watch way too much news and then you ask them what they think of the news. I hate it and they're like well. Why don't we solve for that equation? It doesn't seem that -CCOMPLISH one of the things I want to talk about that. I thought was really cool about your book speaking of the mind. And how to control as you book it you a broken into three big chunks. Like the mind. Spirit embody embody kind of as as the SSI holistic way to achieve this stillness. And I'd love to go through each of those shirt and and get your take on on kind of those main in you know headers for for what to do and how people can apply some techniques that are there in your book starting with mine because that's where you start journaling pulling that's that's a huge one for me I'd love to hear about your thoughts on journaling and what your practice looks like. Yeah I think it's probably other than let's say meditation itself probably the one of the most meditative sort of stilling things. You can do like sort of mental things you can do. I think everyone knows what journaling is white meditation though very few people do it. It's like one of those things. We wish that we did. And I think ultimately you just have to commit to doing it one of the places that I I recommend you will starting I I this journal about four years ago three years ago. But it's called one line a day and I just write one sentence about the day that just passed so like Don't couple bureau. Let's say two weeks ago I was like Oh. This is the day that I found found out My wife was pregnant with our second child. That's cool and then it was like and the day before that I've finished you know this chapter in this book that I was right like it's just like what but but it's just so so it's five lines on for each day and so for five years you keep this journal and anyways the point is like if you're trying talk a habit sometimes the best way to start is just like with a really easy version of the habit so like don't don't go to start writing five pages a day of everything that happened and you know you're not GonNa do that so you can start with this and it's it's a really easy way to start the habit so I picked up journal write in that one and then I just pick up another journal. That's just just like a blank journal and I just right in that and I try to. I try to talk to myself about how I'm feeling and how I think I'm doing so you know it's like I feel really really tired. I don't know why if you commit into this stuff or fuel really great yesterday was wonderful like I really feel like. I've squeezed everything out of that or like I'm proud of myself. Oh four X or disappointed myself for why or I can't understand why this is happening and it's a it's a way Leinna to create some distance between you and your thoughts and reflect on an and and sometimes it's just really liberated. I didn't put something down that stuck in your head. You feel guilty about or angry about and put it on paper and then you just feel like it just dissipates. Soon as you've written it down it's it's a way of starting. The day with a refresh said like a a burden release right like you get it out. There are and you feel a little bit of lightness. Come to you after. You've you've said those things or express those things. Yeah and I think I'd never read Anne Frank's diary until I was researching the book but I was going to thing on journaling or read. This and I read that. I read a biography of her. And I guess because it's called Anne Frank's diary. I just thought it was like a list like I thought it was like today. We had you know Dumplings for dinner and then I swept the floor. I thought it was like a minutia about her. Private that lines. I didn't really understand what the Journal was doing. Now she was partly recording journal. doing the Germany. because she'd heard a radio uh-huh broadcast from the the the government that was in exile. That was like look. We want to know what experiences are like when a historical record out of this horrible thing but it was also the fact that she was a thirteen fourteen. Fifteen year old girl trapped in a tiny room with her parents another family and some random guy that was also there and that that she was using this journal to Lake Vent and to work on herself into like the here. She was undergoing this horrific experience that no one should ever have to go through and she he was like working on herself to be a better person through it. I mean like I don't even know any teenagers that do that. Let alone like teenagers. That were you know fearing for their life but that it that it was this spiritual and mental process. She was doing and just how much you got. Out of it. it's it's probably I think. The most compelling argument you can hear about journaling is just to watch this fifteen year old girl you know get so much out of it. Yeah I I invested in an APP called George jail you are and it's a it's a journaling APP and one of the things that I one of the reasons why I I back. The founder was because He does this guided journaling where he gives you. Prompt prompts that get you started and the the idea is is like you said originally where it's just like. Just get a little bit down and saved and it's all encrypted locally and I just thought that was Really powerful because for me. I always have the issue where you buy journal. And there's like cold start problem. Where like you know after a couple of days you're like well?.

Journal muscle atrophy Oregon Seneca Construction Anne Frank CNN Europe Roma Dario Austin founder George Lake Vent Germany.
"ryan" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

The Kevin and Ryan Show

11:30 min | 2 years ago

"ryan" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

"Crazy right and and and and to have but enterpise and mental clarity you you had to work for it then. I think you have to work harder for for it today. As you know. Seneca Construction in Roma's loud but at least there were jackhammers and you know trucks that beep when they back up like it's heavy have louder now and there's definitely more temptations and things of that nature but adding. It's always been hard so I just don't know if we went wrong so much as like we you. We let some of the muscles required to fight against us. We just let that atrophy like people don't have faith and you go back a couple of hundred years ago. There was one day a week when you weren't supposed to work for you. Know in in most of the Western world and you would have to go to this really beautiful old stone building link and sit quietly inside of it for like an hour or more and engage in the sort of prayer for prayerful Meditative Act so so I think we just lost some of that practice and I think we're we're seeing and feeling some of the effects of of of that absence did is it devices. That are interfering with us more than anything else these days like. I'm I'm trying to think about when you know when you did. Start the book off there and you talked about the bustling city and how crazy night You know I lived in Europe for a few years and I know the first time that we came out to the woods in Oregon. Dario was like it is so quiet out here but then you know that space just gets filled up with like while I still have my cell phone on still connected and cell phones of a big one for you is at like a public enemy number one in your book or sure yeah. The devices are huge parts. I mean obviously not only is the device designed to sort of keep you not still because you. You can't use it if you're being still but then the absence side of it are designed to do that. So it's like you know it's not apples fall. And it's not just the asphalt APPs fault it's like layers and layers of sort of incentives that are contrary to what you probably want as a person And so I think I think that is a huge part of it but like I also think it's it's a muscle right and we just let that muscle atrophy so with the phone does is prevent you from ever having to be quietly quiet and alone with your thoughts so then you you have the strength to put the phone aside or breaks breaks or the battery dies and now you don't know what to do with yourself you know. And so so you feel that. I think people go use my phone that much. But it's like you you walk to their office and they have CNN running on you you know on a TV screen on their wall. Right or to go. I you know I don't use my phone that much and then can you find out that like their schedule is like you know scheduled down to the minute. I had a phone call with some of the other day and there the call was scheduled for like four fifty the DP APP you know they were scheduling down in ten minute increments. And this wasn't like wasn't this wasn't a a phone call with a head of state is is just like a like someone I'd probably consider a peer right and so I think the the phones are just a symptom of this overall sort of Inability we have which is like to be to like simply being and and so people seek out lives as you said you live in the in the woods in Oregon. I live on a I spend most form outside Austin like the amount of freedom I have just by having made that choice. I is underestimated. There's just I'm asked to do less stuff you know. I can't go out to lunch. You know like a like there's just less stuff to do so it forces me to strengthen that muscle and come up with you know I think ways to be still or active but to be present while being acted. Yeah that's a great way to put it. I think that everyone everyone is trying to fill up their calendar to prevent themselves from from just being just sitting there. You know just like just actually being able to sit I. It's it's it's difficult to do and you know it's funny. Someone wants mentioned me. They were talking about This is somewhat related. But they were talking about the ability to go to a party and interact with people in this person was had a very tough time. You know with social interactions with New People. I'm certainly someone that's like that. And when you go into a room and you the first thing to do is turn for a drink and you have a couple of drinks. Then you're able to kind of you know. Loosen up a little bit and have their time. You're never actually a building that muscle right has your always just leaning on the alcohol as a substitute for that and in kind of your point right like you have to allow yourself off to sit there and build up muscle like just the act of doing nothing is building the muscle being comfortable of doing with doing nothing right totally and as someone who doesn't drink I'm very aware of the analogy. You just may cause yeah like I. I went to dinner the other night and I got there like a little bit earlier like I was on time but that was early. There's no one there and I was like I designed to kill thirty minutes in somebody else's house and I couldn't I don't drink. There's no you're forced to sort of. Actually you have a decision you are you going to be here with your own. Thoughts are going to watch the sunset over the water. was there or am I gonna read articles on my phone right. The worst part is like if they were if I was going to sit there and read a book I'd be like Oh this is great but actually I'm just going to read news. That's going to make me unhappy and made me feel bad about the world and simultaneously accomplished absolutely nothing. And so it's it's it's not as if we're doing this strategy were engaging these graduates and it's like working out out for us right like people watch way too much news and then you ask them what they think of the news. I hate it and they're like well. Why don't we solve for that equation? It doesn't seem that -CCOMPLISH one of the things I want to talk about that. I thought was really cool about your book speaking of the mind. And how to control as you book it you a broken into three big chunks. Like the mind. Spirit embody embody kind of as as the SSI holistic way to achieve this stillness. And I'd love to go through each of those shirt and and get your take on on kind of those main in you know headers for for what to do and how people can apply some techniques that are there in your book starting with mine because that's where you start journaling pulling that's that's a huge one for me I'd love to hear about your thoughts on journaling and what your practice looks like. Yeah I think it's probably other than let's say meditation itself probably the one of the most meditative sort of stilling things. You can do like sort of mental things you can do. I think everyone knows what journaling is white meditation though very few people do it. It's like one of those things. We wish that we did. And I think ultimately you just have to commit to doing it one of the places that I I recommend you will starting I I this journal about four years ago three years ago. But it's called one line a day and I just write one sentence about the day that just passed so like Don't couple bureau. Let's say two weeks ago I was like Oh. This is the day that I found found out My wife was pregnant with our second child. That's cool and then it was like and the day before that I've finished you know this chapter in this book that I was right like it's just like what but but it's just so so it's five lines on for each day and so for five years you keep this journal and anyways the point is like if you're trying talk a habit sometimes the best way to start is just like with a really easy version of the habit so like don't don't go to start writing five pages a day of everything that happened and you know you're not GonNa do that so you can start with this and it's it's a really easy way to start the habit so I picked up journal write in that one and then I just pick up another journal. That's just just like a blank journal and I just right in that and I try to. I try to talk to myself about how I'm feeling and how I think I'm doing so you know it's like I feel really really tired. I don't know why if you commit into this stuff or fuel really great yesterday was wonderful like I really feel like. I've squeezed everything out of that or like I'm proud of myself. Oh four X or disappointed myself for why or I can't understand why this is happening and it's a it's a way Leinna to create some distance between you and your thoughts and reflect on an and and sometimes it's just really liberated. I didn't put something down that stuck in your head. You feel guilty about or angry about and put it on paper and then you just feel like it just dissipates. Soon as you've written it down it's it's a way of starting. The day with a refresh said like a a burden release right like you get it out. There are and you feel a little bit of lightness. Come to you after. You've you've said those things or express those things. Yeah and I think I'd never read Anne Frank's diary until I was researching the book but I was going to thing on journaling or read. This and I read that. I read a biography of her. And I guess because it's called Anne Frank's diary. I just thought it was like a list like I thought it was like today. We had you know Dumplings for dinner and then I swept the floor. I thought it was like a minutia about her. Private that lines. I didn't really understand what the Journal was doing. Now she was partly recording journal. doing the Germany. because she'd heard a radio uh-huh broadcast from the the the government that was in exile. That was like look. We want to know what experiences are like when a historical record out of this horrible thing but it was also the fact that she was a thirteen fourteen. Fifteen year old girl trapped in a tiny room with her parents another family and some random guy that was also there and that that she was using this journal to Lake Vent and to work on herself into like the here. She was undergoing this horrific experience that no one should ever have to go through and she he was like working on herself to be a better person through it. I mean like I don't even know any teenagers that do that. Let alone like teenagers. That were you know fearing for their life but that it that it was this spiritual and mental process. She was doing and just how much you got. Out of it. it's it's probably I think. The most compelling argument you can hear about journaling is just to watch this fifteen year old girl you know get so much out of it. Yeah I I invested in an APP called George jail you are and it's a it's a journaling APP and one of the things that I one of the reasons why I I back. The founder was because He does this guided journaling where he gives you. Prompt prompts that get you started and the the idea is is like you said originally where it's just like. Just get a little bit down and saved and it's all encrypted locally and I just thought that was Really powerful because for me. I always have the issue where you buy journal. And there's like cold start problem. Where like you know after a couple of days you're like well?.

Journal muscle atrophy Oregon Seneca Construction Anne Frank CNN Europe Roma Dario Austin founder George Lake Vent Germany.
"ryan" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

The Kevin and Ryan Show

07:57 min | 2 years ago

"ryan" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

"Everybody Kevin Rose here. Welcome back to another episode of the Kevin. Rochelle follow me up on Instagram at Kevin rose. I'm really excited to have Ryan holiday back on the PODCAST. He was on on. Probably ten. Or fifteen episodes ago He's the author of several amazing books. He goes the enemy is probably my personal favorite but he also put out obstacles away which is another great book and now his new book which we're talking about today is called stillness. Is the key in this book. We talk about combining mind spirit embodied in a very kind of ballistic way to create the sense of inner personal stillness We cover journaling cover. How to cultivate silence we we also talked about the personal habits of the Winston Churchill? Talk about John. F. Kennedy a little Bit Tiger Woods He really is good incorporating these stories piece of other really famous people on how they were able to create the silence into his his writings. Still Philosophy as well is in the book In the moving onto the body we talked about saying no Taking a walk in the forest and forest bathing which I'm a big fan of Seeking solitude and the importance of getting great sleep so we cover a whole gamut of different topics here. A lot of really good insights are in this book. So I know you're going to enjoy this podcast This is Ryan holiday. Thanks for being on the show Ryan I appreciate it. Jeff course thanks for having me. I'm glad the at the bus. This is awesome. Yeah yeah it was I was one of those things. Where when you're a dad is always hard to find time so I got you know almost halfway through the book and then thank you for sending audio files because I was able to multitask and juggle? You know an almost two year old with listening to audio. So that's always nice. It's funny because I think when people saying you know obviously the books about stillness but when they think about these sort of philosophical ideas I think they think about them in the Mr to bury abstract or they think think about him as like becoming a monk or whatever to me it's like how do you manage having two euro 'cause I so having either three year your old and a like a four months old and so like all the ideas in the book At most of my writing. Now that's the primary Lens through which I'm looking at things eggs like. How do you manage to do anything of? It's the complete chaos and uncertainty that is having a small tyrant. Live with you. Yeah it's it's so true. It's funny as building a meditation APP called Oak. And we've been working on it for the last couple of years and the idea was just to have a free alternative to a lot of the stuff stuff that was out there and we started adding more complexity in internally. We're testing out. Doing you know like a live video version where you'd have like a live instructor. ONSCREEN and build the Greek people's are coming in and we never launched it because the feedback. We guys that people are just like the average person is like I don't even have ten minutes. I don't have time to be still bill. I don't need the added complexity of having to schedule a meditation and figure out how to make sure it's buffering the right way and you know so shirts it you forget That people are you know with kids and everything else going on that. They're really crunched for time. But you know the the way I wanNA start off with this interview is. I'm always curious. Yes you know. I Love Your books and I've been obviously you know obstacles away. Ego's the enemy had been a big fan of everything that you've been writing What insights did you have? Have this time around. That brought you to writing this book like what was that a ha moment. You're like okay. I've I've figured out something new that I gotta put it down and actually produce something thing. I think the big connection or light bulb that the created the book. Was this idea that still. This appears here is in both Western and eastern philosophy far enough back that we can be pretty confident that they came to independently when we think of Western philosophy. We think of it as the antithesis of eastern philosophy in a lot of ways particularly the sort of creek and Roman philosophy because they're so active and it's almost militaristic and and it was used by. You know these people that we think are very differently than we think of Buddha or or you know someone that we would describe as then and so the the idea that there was a connection sort of set off this complete sort of re understanding ending or new understanding of Stoicism for me. I mean even just the word stillness like an appears in Marcus realistic over and over again. And I'd read the Book Probably Thirty or forty forty times and I just never noticed it because I wasn't looking for it. And so that the big breakthrough in the book is the idea that pretty much not just the eastern and Western philosophies but even the religions and all the traditions sort of hold this idea of stillness up as like the primary. Sorry in of what we're trying to accomplish. It's it's a millions Annan end but like if you were to sort of describe like your stereotypical wise man from from east. Your stereotypical wise men from the West. If you're a described Jesus and socrates and you realize you're just like describing the same person with like slightly different close right. Yeah that is like the the foundation that I think that they would all certainly agree on. You know it's just that idea that stillness and the connection action evolutionary. I was like. Oh there's all these different species that do really similar things but they don't share a common ancestor but it. It shows the responding to some fundamental part of their environment. And I think that's the conclusion that I came to philosophically as the like they just involved volved. The schools evolved to the same the same truth by from from different circumstances. In when you think about your urea that's I'm GONNA pick up this book and you think about how you know. Some of US have certainly lost our way. I mean I I I feel like the stimulation and everything that we have in our lives. These days is is just even so much different than when I was a kid. Where did we go wrong? Like what. What is what they have figured out that we don't today? Yeah it is is weird. 'cause I I have a quote from Blaise Pascal. At the beginning of the book and he says all of humanity's problems stem from our inability to sit quietly in a room room alone and now he's said that like six hundred years ago or five hundred years ago so I'm not sure if I we definitely have gone wrong but I think it's also interesting when you look backwards you like. Oh wait blink. People always been struggling with this. And and there's a there's one letter from Seneca which I opened. Open the INTRO. The book with where Senecas like in this. Basically this apartment in Rome. And he's trying to write and he's talking about all the distractions now. His distractions distractions are not digital. You know he's not like and then. I have instagram posts and I have text messages. You know but he's he's like it's noisy outside and this vendor won't stop shouting and there's Hope someone's getting arrested and and I can hear my neighbors moving and and and this there's this construction and he's like it's so so hard I can't focus and and you're like oh like it. What looking backwards? Rome wasn't dislike or Greece Greece. 'cause I obviously we see Rome as being a bit more modern but like the ancient world. Wasn't this magical peaceful place where no one no one was ever bothered. You know no one ever like no. There were gossips and there was breaking news and there was there were mobs and and there was you know so annoying neighbors and there were people who scraped their teeth on four. You know. There's all the things that drives.

Ryan Kevin Rose Rome Greece instagram Rochelle Blaise Pascal F. Kennedy instructor Jeff John US Annan Jesus Senecas Seneca socrates
"ryan" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

The Kevin and Ryan Show

07:57 min | 2 years ago

"ryan" Discussed on The Kevin and Ryan Show

"Everybody Kevin Rose here. Welcome back to another episode of the Kevin. Rochelle follow me up on Instagram at Kevin rose. I'm really excited to have Ryan holiday back on the PODCAST. He was on on. Probably ten. Or fifteen episodes ago He's the author of several amazing books. He goes the enemy is probably my personal favorite but he also put out obstacles away which is another great book and now his new book which we're talking about today is called stillness. Is the key in this book. We talk about combining mind spirit embodied in a very kind of ballistic way to create the sense of inner personal stillness We cover journaling cover. How to cultivate silence we we also talked about the personal habits of the Winston Churchill? Talk about John. F. Kennedy a little Bit Tiger Woods He really is good incorporating these stories piece of other really famous people on how they were able to create the silence into his his writings. Still Philosophy as well is in the book In the moving onto the body we talked about saying no Taking a walk in the forest and forest bathing which I'm a big fan of Seeking solitude and the importance of getting great sleep so we cover a whole gamut of different topics here. A lot of really good insights are in this book. So I know you're going to enjoy this podcast This is Ryan holiday. Thanks for being on the show Ryan I appreciate it. Jeff course thanks for having me. I'm glad the at the bus. This is awesome. Yeah yeah it was I was one of those things. Where when you're a dad is always hard to find time so I got you know almost halfway through the book and then thank you for sending audio files because I was able to multitask and juggle? You know an almost two year old with listening to audio. So that's always nice. It's funny because I think when people saying you know obviously the books about stillness but when they think about these sort of philosophical ideas I think they think about them in the Mr to bury abstract or they think think about him as like becoming a monk or whatever to me it's like how do you manage having two euro 'cause I so having either three year your old and a like a four months old and so like all the ideas in the book At most of my writing. Now that's the primary Lens through which I'm looking at things eggs like. How do you manage to do anything of? It's the complete chaos and uncertainty that is having a small tyrant. Live with you. Yeah it's it's so true. It's funny as building a meditation APP called Oak. And we've been working on it for the last couple of years and the idea was just to have a free alternative to a lot of the stuff stuff that was out there and we started adding more complexity in internally. We're testing out. Doing you know like a live video version where you'd have like a live instructor. ONSCREEN and build the Greek people's are coming in and we never launched it because the feedback. We guys that people are just like the average person is like I don't even have ten minutes. I don't have time to be still bill. I don't need the added complexity of having to schedule a meditation and figure out how to make sure it's buffering the right way and you know so shirts it you forget That people are you know with kids and everything else going on that. They're really crunched for time. But you know the the way I wanNA start off with this interview is. I'm always curious. Yes you know. I Love Your books and I've been obviously you know obstacles away. Ego's the enemy had been a big fan of everything that you've been writing What insights did you have? Have this time around. That brought you to writing this book like what was that a ha moment. You're like okay. I've I've figured out something new that I gotta put it down and actually produce something thing. I think the big connection or light bulb that the created the book. Was this idea that still. This appears here is in both Western and eastern philosophy far enough back that we can be pretty confident that they came to independently when we think of Western philosophy. We think of it as the antithesis of eastern philosophy in a lot of ways particularly the sort of creek and Roman philosophy because they're so active and it's almost militaristic and and it was used by. You know these people that we think are very differently than we think of Buddha or or you know someone that we would describe as then and so the the idea that there was a connection sort of set off this complete sort of re understanding ending or new understanding of Stoicism for me. I mean even just the word stillness like an appears in Marcus realistic over and over again. And I'd read the Book Probably Thirty or forty forty times and I just never noticed it because I wasn't looking for it. And so that the big breakthrough in the book is the idea that pretty much not just the eastern and Western philosophies but even the religions and all the traditions sort of hold this idea of stillness up as like the primary. Sorry in of what we're trying to accomplish. It's it's a millions Annan end but like if you were to sort of describe like your stereotypical wise man from from east. Your stereotypical wise men from the West. If you're a described Jesus and socrates and you realize you're just like describing the same person with like slightly different close right. Yeah that is like the the foundation that I think that they would all certainly agree on. You know it's just that idea that stillness and the connection action evolutionary. I was like. Oh there's all these different species that do really similar things but they don't share a common ancestor but it. It shows the responding to some fundamental part of their environment. And I think that's the conclusion that I came to philosophically as the like they just involved volved. The schools evolved to the same the same truth by from from different circumstances. In when you think about your urea that's I'm GONNA pick up this book and you think about how you know. Some of US have certainly lost our way. I mean I I I feel like the stimulation and everything that we have in our lives. These days is is just even so much different than when I was a kid. Where did we go wrong? Like what. What is what they have figured out that we don't today? Yeah it is is weird. 'cause I I have a quote from Blaise Pascal. At the beginning of the book and he says all of humanity's problems stem from our inability to sit quietly in a room room alone and now he's said that like six hundred years ago or five hundred years ago so I'm not sure if I we definitely have gone wrong but I think it's also interesting when you look backwards you like. Oh wait blink. People always been struggling with this. And and there's a there's one letter from Seneca which I opened. Open the INTRO. The book with where Senecas like in this. Basically this apartment in Rome. And he's trying to write and he's talking about all the distractions now. His distractions distractions are not digital. You know he's not like and then. I have instagram posts and I have text messages. You know but he's he's like it's noisy outside and this vendor won't stop shouting and there's Hope someone's getting arrested and and I can hear my neighbors moving and and and this there's this construction and he's like it's so so hard I can't focus and and you're like oh like it. What looking backwards? Rome wasn't dislike or Greece Greece. 'cause I obviously we see Rome as being a bit more modern but like the ancient world. Wasn't this magical peaceful place where no one no one was ever bothered. You know no one ever like no. There were gossips and there was breaking news and there was there were mobs and and there was you know so annoying neighbors and there were people who scraped their teeth on four. You know. There's all the things that drives.

Ryan Kevin Rose Rome Greece instagram Rochelle Blaise Pascal F. Kennedy instructor Jeff John US Annan Jesus Senecas Seneca socrates