35 Burst results for "Rwanda"

Rwanda's president says 'Hotel Rwanda' hero must stand trial

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 2 weeks ago

Rwanda's president says 'Hotel Rwanda' hero must stand trial

"Five, the man portrayed as a hero in the film Hotel, Rwanda will stand trial for allegedly supporting rebel violence. That's according to Rwanda's president, Paul Kagami, who hasn't said how Paul Recess of Bengal. Was brought to Rwanda, where he has been held in custody for more than a week. He's credited with saving 1200 lives during Rwanda's 1994 genocide by letting people shelter in the hotel he was managing during the mass killings. Now he's accused of supporting rebel violence in Rwanda and his family says that they haven't heard from him and lawyers haven't been able to talk to him

Rwanda Paul Recess Paul Kagami Bengal President Trump
Rwanda Arrests The Man Who Inspired The Hollywood Film 'Hotel Rwanda'

All Things Considered

01:56 min | 2 weeks ago

Rwanda Arrests The Man Who Inspired The Hollywood Film 'Hotel Rwanda'

Rwanda Arrests The Man Who Inspired The Hollywood Film 'Hotel Rwanda'

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:37 sec | 2 weeks ago

Rwanda Arrests The Man Who Inspired The Hollywood Film 'Hotel Rwanda'

"Man whose story was told on the big screen is under arrest in the film Hotel Rwanda. The Rhea life character portrayed by actor Don Sheetal is a hero. I don't need my money. Let's take them with me. Just not safe here. Paul Rusesabagina is credited with saving 1200 lives during Rwanda's 1990 for genocide. Now he's been arrested by the government. He is long criticized to face terror charges. His daughter says he was kidnapped by authorities while in Dubai. Human rights activists say it's the latest example of the Rwandan government targeting dissidents beyond its borders. Steve

Hotel Rwanda Paul Rusesabagina Don Sheetal Dubai Steve
'Hotel Rwanda' hero arrested on terror charges, say police

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 3 weeks ago

'Hotel Rwanda' hero arrested on terror charges, say police

"Figure that inspired the movie Hotel. Rwanda has been arrested on terror related charges in that country. Paul Rusesabagina saved hundreds of Rwandans during the genocide there by sheltering them in the hotel he managed in 2005. He was awarded the US presidential Medal of Freedom. Today, the country's Bert Bureau of Investigation tweeted that the 66 year old was arrested on an international warrant. The agency didn't say where country was looking for him on Ly that he's accused of being quote the founder, leader and sponsor of violent

Paul Rusesabagina Rwanda Bert Bureau Of Investigation United States LY Founder
Interview with Rough Translation host Gregory Warner

Inside Podcasting

04:57 min | Last month

Interview with Rough Translation host Gregory Warner

"Hi and welcome to the PODCAST Brench Club podcast. My name is Adela and I'm the founder of PBC today. I'm so happy to be joined by Gregory Warner host of NPR's report translation a podcast about the things that we're talking about in the United States are being talked about in some other parts of the World Hi Gregory thank you so much for joining us today. So rough translation is a favourite among many podcast ranch club listeners, and we've actually included episode in a listening less. We did last year called looking for love but for those who aren't familiar with their show, can you just give us a little bit of an overview? Sure sure. We'll. Our tagline is. Stories from far of places that hit close to home. Our original tagline and season one folks have listened back that far was things we're talking about how they're being talked about in other places but both those ideas are. Sort of around the the idea of we're going to tell stories that. Take place in some other. Maybe, some other countries, some other culture that's but but it's GonNa feel close to home. It's GonNa. It's GonNa hit you in some way it's it's not that we're specifically telling non-american stories or it's them and us but just we're gonNA take you places but it's going to feel that it's GonNa hit you personally got it. Yeah. It feels familiar but it's a from like maybe a different perspective. Yeah. So I'm curious about your background and how the idea for the show came about. Sure. So well, let's see so. Terms of my radio background. So I went to Salt Salt Institute for Documentary. Studies that was my. First taste of radio I worked in some local worked at a local station called North country public radio. Up in very northern New York and then after that, I went to Afghanistan So which was not as much of a leap as you think because I went from one very rural area to another very rural area and the stories of actually quite similar in terms of the story of the economy as well as the story of. Loneliness and and and all that. So I spent I ended up spending about two years on and off in Afghanistan. Let's see that was from. Two thousand. Six to two thousand eight. And then I left for a number of reasons. But also because that period two dozen sixty, thousand eight was was you could do a lot of reporting then. That that you just couldn't that was a lot harder to do after two, thousand, eight kidnappings it started in a massive way and then I was based after that in in Rwanda, and also some in Kenya, an eastern Congo. So we spent some time in in Africa again as freelancer and then came back to the US started working for marketplace as a staff reporter kind of learned. Later the art of grabbing tape and making a same day story, which is when I ended up getting the job at NPR's the international correspondent in in Nairobi. Sort of it is a you have to use fast twitch muscles but. What's Nice about that job is that there was also a lot of potential for storytelling feature work. and so he was in in Nairobi actually actually in Ethiopia that I came up with the idea for this podcast country that you've lived in. And it. It came about I mean came up through a number. Probably the simplest story is that I had done a story for for radio lab on their on their episode call translation and it was it was an episode about an incident that I watched that I I was I was actually following the secretary of state then John Kerry he gave a speech and this Ethiopian reporter in the room stood up and asked the question. I remember that episode yeah and Yeah it was. It was like this very brief I mean honestly the whole incident really the question and the answer which was at the end of this conference which I mean in the story we talk about how this there were all vetted questions until this one guy got up because carry decided to be generous in this one moment anyway. So this guy asked this question but. It was it was such a mistranslation around this one word and because of this one word. Secretary Kerry seemingly. Totally. Misunderstood the question answered it. In this way that was very unsatisfying and the guy ended up taking a quite a great risk to to ask this question on Ethiopian state TV. For nothing but it was this opportunity to learn about this one word serious, which has such a different meaning in east Africa.

Gregory Warner Nairobi John Kerry United States Reporter Adela Afghanistan NPR Salt Salt Institute For Docume PBC Africa Secretary Founder Rwanda East Africa Ethiopia New York
World Surpasses 20 Million Coronavirus Cases

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:44 sec | Last month

World Surpasses 20 Million Coronavirus Cases

"John. With Kovar. 19 cases still rising globally, The World Health Organization announced today that the number of coronavirus cases Set the past 20 million cases worldwide. But director general Dr Ted Rose at Gabriel says the green shoots of hope are being seen in countries like the U. K Rwanda and France. In France president Macro introduced compulsory masking in busy outdoor spaces off parties in response to an increase in cases. Strong and precise measures like this, in combination with utilizing every tool at our disposal are key to preventing any resurgence in disease and allowing societies.

France Dr Ted Rose World Health Organization U. K Rwanda Director General President Trump Gabriel John.
"rwanda" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

03:26 min | 2 months ago

"rwanda" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> Several <Speech_Music_Male> years of will <Speech_Music_Male> they or won't they drama? <Speech_Music_Male> Shaima <Speech_Music_Male> and butter Morita <Speech_Music_Male> finally <Speech_Music_Male> get married. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Rwandans <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> got so excited <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> about the wedding <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> about a forbidden love <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> between these two villages. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> But they wanted to witness <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> an actual <SpeakerChange> wedding. <Speech_Male> They demanded <Speech_Male> that the producers <Speech_Male> of the radio show <Speech_Male> hold a wedding <Speech_Male> in the national <Speech_Male> stadium so <Speech_Male> that the whole country <Speech_Male> show up to watch. <Speech_Male> Here's <Speech_Male> the director <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Andreas Gera. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> SHIMAA <Speech_Male> UNDER <Speech_Male> Way <Speech_Male> To take place at <Speech_Male> the. <Speech_Male> Because, they <Speech_Male> have many <Speech_Male> friends. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> So <Speech_Male> if you <Speech_Male> want to <Speech_Music_Male> take. <Speech_Male> In the <Speech_Male> they're. <Speech_Male> We <Speech_Male> wanted <SpeakerChange> to do. <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Male> dress <Speech_Music_Male> very <SpeakerChange> very <Speech_Music_Male> well. <Speech_Music_Male> And <Speech_Male> you go to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> someone wyckoff. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Side. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> the vast <Speech_Male> how? 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Natasha <Speech_Male> and Alex <Speech_Male> pitched in when we were having <Speech_Male> some challenges with <Speech_Male> our audio for this <Speech_Male> week show. <Speech_Male> They helped us troubleshoot <Speech_Male> the problems <Speech_Male> and did so with <Speech_Male> calm and good cheer. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Thank you so much for the help, <Silence> Natasha and Alex. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You can find more hidden <Speech_Male> brain on <SpeakerChange> facebook <Speech_Male> and twitter. <Speech_Male> If you like this episode, <Speech_Male> please <Speech_Male> be sure <Silence> to share it with a friend. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I'm Sean Covey Danton <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> and this <Silence> <Advertisement> is NPR. <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Whenever <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you face, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a choice <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> did helps to think <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> like an economist <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and this week on Planet <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Lenny Summer School. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We'll start off our course <Speech_Music_Male> economics within <Speech_Music_Male> workout for your <Speech_Music_Male> brain. How did <Speech_Music_Male> decide what's something <Speech_Music_Male> truly costs? Money from NPR.

"rwanda" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

03:08 min | 2 months ago

"rwanda" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Once the social norm about gay marriage changed it emboldened supporters, and it prompted many dissenters to shrug their shoulders and accept a new normal. The same principle works all sorts of places. Take bullying for example. Betsy has found that norms player powerful role in encouraging bullying and discourage it I've been studying bullying in conflict as it plays out in Americans public schools, and what kept hitting me was that at some point certain types of conflict and prejudice become normal to the people who are living there. The central inside of this research is that people go along with the flow. Rather than their own beliefs. Betsy found the same Rwanda people who listened to Masseka. Weah began supporting into marriage even if they didn't personally think that into marriage was a good thing. It all comes back to this idea that what it means to be human is to belongs socially to a group, and so we're all trying to figure out the rules of those groups Betsy realized that one unintended way. The soap opera had a big effect was that people had listened together? The thought they were just listening to the show, but they were also taking in the reactions of friends and neighbors, when other people expressed dismay, as Rutta venire got in the way of the star-crossed lovers. That sent a message. My fellow Rwandans don't like people like would again era. After the year of testing was over betsy. Is Team gave each group a portable stereo and fourteen cassette tapes of the radio program? was extensively a reward for volunteering. With? What's actually part of the experiment to? Alter presenting the Stereo. Research, assistant suggested that the group could decide how best to share it. In the communities that had been listening to this reconciliation radio program. It was a little bit counterintuitive at first, but they fought more over their common resources that we gave them and the reason why that was exciting to us. Is that one of the messages of this radio program was? You should descend against authority. You should make your voice heard in the communities that had not been listening in a dedicated to these reconciliation soap operas, basically one person proposed we give it to the local authority. They will decide for us. Everyone said good and moved on. Among the Muslim group, the discussion was much more lively. Usually, someone would would make the same proposal. This is what is customary to do in Rwandan communities, but then someone would raise their hand and say. I don't know. The local authority hasn't been coming. The listen to all these shows with us. Should we sign it over to him? And maybe someone else would raise their hand and say I should give it to a woman. They are way more responsible than men, and there would be a healthy debate about that and. And then people would decide on on what to do. So I went back and I said look. We caused healthy debate. This is something.

Betsy Rwanda Rutta venire Weah Masseka
"rwanda" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

02:47 min | 2 months ago

"rwanda" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Learn the lessons..

Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

Between The Lines

28:17 min | 2 months ago

Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

"Tom Switzer, he and welcome to another episode off between the lines now today on the program will be commemorating the twenty fifth anniversary of Europe's worst massacre since the Holocaust in ninety, ninety, five more than eight thousand people died in Shrimp Nitsa. The town was supposed to be a U N protected safe haven in the vicious civil war that tore Yugoslav apart instead the civilians ended up being massacred by Bosnian Serbs. Were lightning fast with their superior weapons. They easily overran the lightly. I'm Bosnian government troops and the token full civilian peacekeepers. The UN's Valley to protect the civilians inspired Washington to launch unilateral action against Serbia and end the civil war. Would things be the same today now? That's later in the program, but first defense. Last week the Morrison. Government launched a defence strategy and force structure review now the move signals a major shift away from the strategy outlined in the last defence white paper. Remember that just four years ago in two thousand sixteen. It plotted out Australia's strategic costs for the next decade. But that White Paper has as we know been rapidly overtaken by Vince covert China or that now the new review has promised two hundred and seventy billion dollars over the next decade to enhance Australia's defence capabilities with renewed focus on areas like Saba and spice capabilities and the possible development of hop sonic weapons will be fitting aircraft with long-range anti-ship missiles, increasing underwater surveillance and boosting fuel ammunitions reserves. Now, underscoring the seriousness of the shift, the Prime Minister even drew comparisons to the nineteen thirties and the lead up to world. War Two that period of the nineteen thirties. Is Been Something I've been revisiting on a very regular basis and when you connect by the economic challenges and the global uncertainty. It can be very haunting, but is the money too much or not enough is going to all the right places, and we'll do enough to safeguard Australia from China's increasing assertiveness and is rapidly growing military capabilities. What's the role of Australia's diplomacy? And all of this will joining me to discuss this at three distinguished guests. By skill is professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University Holiday Bites. Thank you good to be here Melissa Conley. Tar is a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. Hi There Melissa could to speak again Tom. And Pay. The Jennings is executive director of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute. Tom No. Can you talk us through the top of scenarios and potential conflicts that the defense review is preparing us for the scenario that the review is focusing on is one involving a high end conventional conflict, so I've gone to the days of stabilization operations in t more Counterterrorism operations in Afghanistan This document is preparing foresight on onsite conflict. Involving countries that have sophisticated military forces. And, of course, the document doesn't say. I don't think it would be reasonable to expect it to say. That China is the problem. But let me tell you China is the problem that is the now neoplasia competitive that way of thinking about when we think about what's adequate in terms of the topic of military capability we need to have. and to does reflect to change. From past years Tom I recall when I started by defense career, we were thinking much more about the risks presented by Indonesia, and the so called low level in cushions in the northwest. Of course, that's no longer features in anyone's strategic thinking. Really it's about China and the risks that the People's Republic is presenting to all of its neighbors in abroad since in the Indo Pacific region and beyond I cabinet crudely putting it some sites laying the groundwork for fortress Australia US sign. This is preparing us to join a potential use LID. Containment slash war against China for example to protect Taiwan Peter Jennings. I think that is it covers a spectrum of possibilities. One possibility which I think is Epson you were in terms of language of the document is that we might conceivably end up having to face military conflict without being able to rely on the direct combat support of the United States, and that's what leads to discussions around extra stockpiling munitions and fuel insightful. But I think in general terms. Yes, the expectation is that Australia. Through its history has been a country that forms coalitions usually have like minded partners, the share the same types of objectives. And the the plan will design the Defense Force. Really gives us the capacity to do that with Rachel Ellis lecture, example, Japan but also with our traditional ally the United States okay bates skill. You've recently completed a review of China's defense capabilities and its recent military modernization, specifically looking at the implications for Australia Wind you expect the Peo- The People's Liberation Army and its navy. When do you expect them to have the capability to project power as far as Australia annual Pacific knives, well in many respects Tom, they already can I mean they have the long range missile capabilities to do that? Know as a from a standoff position launched from their own from their own homeland against hours. But what I think, the the new strategy is looking at is really the development of capability over the next ten fifteen twenty years, and that's by the Chinese own own acknowledged calendar that they would be able to by that time of mass, a large enough capability, both in terms of its long range strike, you know striking from their own homeland, but also bill to project. Project Power passed the so-called first and second island change and being a position to more directly threatened through those platforms Australian security. So you know we're talking ten or fifteen year window here and I think given the time it does take to try and respond to develop the the deterrent and defense capabilities for Australia. That's that's you know that's in some ways a short window. for Australia to be mobilizing in reaction Melissa Tali. What's the role of a strong diplomacy and all these well I think it needs to be growl. And one of the concerns when we look at the deteriorating strategic environment is we think all that's a defense problem? And so when the prime minister launches the strategic update with those comparisons with the nineteen thirties. It pushes US toward seeing in purely military terms but we don't just want to say things in that security lands, we want to think about all of the parts about national power projection, so that's diplomacy and development as well as defense I think if if people thought about it I think what we invest in all three strongly, but that's not where it is if you look at federal budget fifty. Fifty nine billion to defense and less than seven billion to diplomacy and development together the lowest point with ahead in our history and I think we missing that opportunity. If we don't take US seriously, the way that diplomacy and development can shape things in the world so I was struck. Today was a defendant looking at the latest poll on what are the major concerns that Australians have at the moment of the top threats in the world and the first five, a role nontraditional that drought, environment, disaster, climate change, pandemics, and downtown, global economy, and those places where you know military spending isn't going to help shape that environment. So we need to have an effect on those. We need to be thinking much more about what we can do in the diplomacy and development to mind Peter Jennings. What would you say in to Melissa's observations? Because they reflect a certain mindset that that perhaps we should be focused more on non state actors rather than say China for instance well, I think all of these you know threats that have to be taken seriously. I'm and simply because we're living in the middle of a pandemic for example, doesn't the climate change is gone away in this no longer going to present a problem to us. I guess what I'd say. Is that the you know the five things Melissa listed? That were in the featured in the low e Poland terms of popular concerns. Are also the things which could. In different ways late to the risks of conflict escalating in the Indo Pacific region generally so You know my my view, please while I would like to see spending on diplomacy increased. While I. Say Development Assistance is being something which is effectively the United soft in of Australian power, and the military is the hot end of Australian power. I think. The message against all of these areas is that we have just been underinvesting for decades underinvesting for decades, so we're we're all. High fiving ourselves at just reaching about two percent of gross national product, being spent on defense, but that is compared to what we spending in cold or years, which was sometimes between three and a half percent in four percent of rustic product. So what we have grown used to Tom I would say is. Free written on the United. States code tiles of security for for decades. We've dramatically under. Invested in the things that we need to do to strengthen Australia's position, not just militarily, but also diplomat. A now. We're rather surprised to hear the news that Gosh the bill is a lot more expensive than we really thought. It was only if you've got that confidence in the US. and. In fact, the whole trump stories, the story of the Americans really big being fed up with the rest of the world, thinking that the US can fund the bill for their security, so we're going to have to do more and I think we're going to have to do it against multiplicity of areas not. Justin sought the defense organization. We'll some scholars such as you want and James Current from the University of Sydney. They say that this document sounds a lot like an acknowledgement that the US might not always be there to help us out. By are we starting to plan for more independent Australian defense posture I think it would be a wise move to keep that option open when you think of the capabilities that the Chinese developing in which do have a direct pose a direct threat to Australia or could do so. In many respects, the I think the types of threats that you might not expect an immediate or even timely response on the part of the United States what I'm thinking here. Cyber capabilities is a huge priority for the Chinese. We already know what they see the sort of capability. They can wield against Australia and that's not the sort of thing you can expect a kind of cavalry to. Lead the charge from from Washington to come to Australia's defence slowly long range strike capability on the part of the Chinese capability. They already have in which are going to continue to develop. which could threaten Australia down the road now? These are capabilities that I think that Australia's going to have to develop their own defenses for. They can certainly do that with United States, but again it's not necessarily the sort of threat that we would expect some sort of traditional ally joint response not to make it well. Some of are in listeners will email me and they'll say that if Uncle Sam struggles to police. It's own CDs. Melissa. How on Earth Can Uncle Sam Police? The Asia Pacific region in the face of a rising China. What's your sense about us staying power in the next decade or two in look? It's difficult One of the things that strategic update looks at is more threats to the global rules order, and unfortunately the you know, the US is part of that. the US is not along with the strategies interest on things like global trading system, and a number of international issues like global health where we would say you need to be supporting. A Global Response that said I don't think the strategic update will be read negatively in. Washington, it's my guess. it very clearly couched in terms that I think the US will lock about Australia contributing more and having more self. that could be seen as a statement that we think that the US might not have outback, but can also be seen as something that the US has been for for a long time. I particularly liked a few elements of the update things like making sure that we have. You know material ammunition You know that aren't going to be disrupted. Buckle supply trying having more capability eight industrial cut suffering capability here antiques fuel reserves, which is not as long sane as an issue for us, so I mean those are things that are worth investing in. Regardless of US resolve because as we've seen from COVID, we know that supply chain can be disrupted very quickly and easily, and it's worth having eligibilities. Cepeda Jennings bite skill and Melissa Conley Toilet and Melissa. The Pacific step up last year. That realigned Australia's development budget to deal with some of the strategic challenges posed by China in the Pacific Do you think it goes far enough? The step up was followed recently by strategies new International Development Policy Partnerships for recovery, and that's made it very clear that strategies focus should be on the Pacific and also southeast. Asia including. Indonesia and team August. I think that has a very clear statement about what we want. In the region of being entrusted trusted development partner and influencing those societies that we think positive for four region. Again you're going to. You're going to say you. Hear this from me all the time, but again the problem is that we not really making much invasive lunch, so partnerships for recovery head no new money it talked about the massive challenges that covered as as creating for for the for the Pacific, and for for our region broadly, and the only funding announcement was that we're going to repurpose the money. We would have spent on sending Australian. Volunteers in scholarship holders. And we're GONNA use that so I I suppose I. Feel a little bit with all the areas, not actually include district update in that as well that what we've seen through the foreign policy, White Paper and International Development Policy through to to the defense. Strategic Updike is. We talk about how. how? What a time! These these frosty leaving a contested difficult awful environment that we've now got to leave in and the Dow L. Easy Times over, and then we say, and we're not gonNA. Give any new money so I mean the defense announcement is essentially just that we're going to continue to you know, extrapolate out the money that was planned to be spent in the twenty twenty six, and we're going to extrapolate that out to twenty thirty terabytes skill. Do we risk getting into a bidding war for influence in the Pacific? I don't know if it's a risk. If it is a risk worth worth taking. I mean obviously the Pacific region is so extremely important Australia's future. Both for for defense reasons for regional engagement for diplomatic reasons, developing reasons and the like. so It's quite possible that we're entering in a more competitive phase with China in this. SITES WRIST BYTES I'm talking about more the budgetary concerns he because in the wake of the Corona Virus Crosses. There'll be serious limits on how we can spend on these things scholley. Yes, there is and party left to be be developed for that, but you know when you're talking about your own backyard. I mean I I. I don't think it's the kind of country that can simply. Pretended it's by itself getting back pay to Jennings to the region, generally in the rise of what. Angus Campbell is of the Defence Force he's talked about the rise of political warfare, the idea of grey zone warfare things like cyber attacks, economic coercion influence operations that fall below the traditional threshold of war. He says we need a whole of government response to it. I, you seeing that whole of government approach happening in Campbell, or is this Manley focus on defense and the spy agency so far Peter Jennings. It probably is focused on the national security agency's Tom. That's not too surprising because you'd expect them to sort of pick up on the risks I. But General Campbell is right. It does need to be all government is. There's a whole lot of things happening there that simply cannot and should not be done by defense organizations. and. I think that realization is slowly dawning. Along as both of the speakers have said that actually ladyship comes with cost of infrastructure is going to play that role, but you know, give you a small example of this we. We have lost the ability to broadcast into the South Pacific and Southeast Asia. In a way that we used to very successfully over over decades to give us the capacity to do that. We're probably talking about you know that. He million a year forty million a year, which sounds a lot of defend. It's nothing if you're in the Defense Department. Let me tell you. But you need to be able to do things like that. To be the truth teller in the region to actually tell the region that there are alternatives to Chinese Communist Party authoritarianism I think that's what's needed with responding to this grey zone on threat. Is Actually to be the truth teller. In this part of the will and getting our system in Cambridge used to that reality to understanding what needs to be done. To starting at different type of conversation with our region. With our own people for that matter that that is a sort of a psychological change which I can see happening, but we're not quite yet. There's a bit of work still to be done to get to that point Melissa. Conley Tyler. Is, just responding on that. I agree entirely with what pitcher saying on on broadcasting. It's a small investment, such a an increasing influence. It should be Brian and I hope that did that's being seen. I think having defense voices. I will help a lot in a banks, seriously I'm but just went. When you ask Tom Balaton host government and what's happening there? There are some really good examples, so for example win. This Pacific step pop started an office of the Pacific was established in that apartment and tried and each job. He's to be that coordinating body, and it's bringing together the. The defense, the development and the diplomacy in a way that he's gone to maximize our influence. and I've noticed this a lot more discussion about that that three. How do you bring defense development diplomacy communities together? I'm involved in initiate the Pacific. Four Day and I think a lot of people not talking about what more we can do for that that joined up coordination to make the most about national instruments by skill. You're an expert on China. The elephant in the room of course is China doing need to be careful not to overestimate China's military strength. What about the weaknesses? Exactly right I mean you have to know your enemy's weakness as well as their strengths in the case of China, they are undertaking enormous reforming organization effort. They're pouring billions of dollars into new capabilities, but there's a lot of things we need to recognize I. Mean One is that the Chinese have not fought a shooting war and more than forty years. They are have no. They have zero experience in high end combat against a serious. Adversary, scenario, so that's not to downplay them, but to understand that they've got enormous obstacles to overcome that day. Themselves acknowledge that they themselves. No, they have to overcome, and that's why we had this window that we've been talking about. A fifteen to twenty years. to try and develop capabilities to get in front of the kinds of things that the Chinese want to bring to bear around. Around, twenty thirty or twenty, thirty, five, twenty, forty, paid-up Melissa to be continued. Thanks so much for being on our in. Thank you, tell my pleasure. Thank you, Tom. That was paid jennings. He's executive director of the Australian strategic pulsing suit by skill professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University and Melissa Commonly Tyler. She's a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. These between the lines with Tom Switzer. Coming next, we're going to replay a version of a segment from between the lines. I 'cause commemorating the massacre of Bosnian Muslims at shredded Nitsa on the eleventh of July nodding ninety. Five twenty five years ago this week. More than eight thousand people were killed by Serb forces. It was the worst massacre. Europe had seen since the Holocaust. Serve softening up Trevor Nature for the army's final push into the town. Town of course was supposed to be a safe haven protected by the United Nations, but the civilians ended up being sitting ducks as I woke Larry. Hollingsworth Remembers I. Myself Feel Devastated and ashamed I was there with them? When we told them that it was a safe haven I watched. Many of these people walk in with the minimal possessions into shreds, knowing that it was a safe haven, and now they're fleeing out because we've let them down, let them down to the extent that within dies. About Twenty three thousand women and children were deported, and about eight thousand Muslim men and boys left behind where executed and buried in mass graves. Now, reports from the time described, frightening scenes stiffen overawed from medicines on frontier. Speaking he. Loading some of the children and women into buses, but there's no indication as to where it was buses, going with seen some horrifying streaming, going on women and children going into the buses being taken away from their family This was going on with a lot of crying a lot of panicking. The slaughter had been planned carefully and executed with precision. All the wall Dutch. Pace is literally stood by, and did nothing indeed even when the Serb assault on Srebrenica was imminent. in-command is still rejected Kohl's racetracks. Positions. Pope John Paul. The second declared ribbon Nitsa a defeat for civilization as media reports begins to reveal the scale of the unfolding tragedy. The UN says nine hundred thousand people are still unaccounted for. About some became clear as government soldiers emerging from the forest in central Bosnia, told of horrific massacres at the hands of the Serbs one young. People executing them on spot, but this didn't come out of the blue. By the time this massacre took place the civil war that tore the former Yugoslavia. Repot was heading into its fourth year. More than a million people have been displaced, and the world became familiar with a new term ethnic cleansing. So? Who is to blame for these well? Let's start with the United. Nations from ninety two to ninety, five shrivel Nitsa was the world's first union declared civilian syphon. It was supposed to to her aggression. It was supposed to aggression and set the scene for political negotiations to end hostilities between the Bosnian Serbs, and Muslims, but the UN soldiers in the SIPHONS. They were bedeviled by problems. If you declare an area safe haven in the name of the United Nations. Nations if you tell the people if they are safe in the name of the United Nations you have got to put the troops on the ground, and it's no good for politicians say yes, we go for safe havens, but we're not gonNA put the troops meanwhile the Europeans vacillated and equivocated failing miserably to cope with across at its own back door. America was also reluctant to get involved as then President George Bush senior explained in Nani Nani to. I? Something because I learned something from Vietnam. I am not going to commit US forces until I know what the mission is to the military. Tell me that it can be completed until I know how they can come out. You have ancient rivalries that have cropped up as as Yugoslavia's dissolved or getting dissolved, and it isn't going to be solved by sending in the eighty second airborne, and although on the campaign trail that Ye Bill Clinton pledged to reverse the appeasement of that bushes of Belgrade as President Clinton allowed the Balkans to bleed for three more years. French President Jacques Chirac was moved to declare quote, the position of the leader of the free world vacant. Trinite Sur changed all that having done nothing the before during the mass killings in Rwanda Clinton was galvanized into action, and crucially he cut the United Nations out of the Decision Chine on August thirty Washington led a night bombing campaign against the Serbs the NATO action began early this morning. The harsh light of fires and explosions coloring the night sky. Some people watched the bombardment from their houses, but after more than ten thousand deaths here in the last three years, most Sarajevans had given up any hope of outside intervention. Last night it came on a scale which could yet change the course of this war by the end of not ninety five sixty thousand nine hundred troops, including twenty thousand Americans were on the ground in Bosnia. Pace was declared. The BOEKEN's wars ended only because the US finally acted. He's President Clinton in November ninety five my fellow Americans in this new era there are still times when America and America alone can and should make the difference for peace. The terrible war in Bosnia is such a case nowhere. Today is the need for American leadership. More stark are more immediate than in. In Bosnia in the years since the Mexica Europe inaction was heavily criticised, and the US was held up for its global leadership in particular for its unilateral humanitarian intervention. This is when the US secretary. Of State. Madeleine Albright said America was the indispensable nation, and that idea would fade into the justification of the Iraq invasion in two thousand and three as a war of liberation, but he's a question with the US intervene. If the shrivel Nitsa massacre happened today from the standpoint of twenty twenty, we might ask if the era of US unilateral humanitarian intervention is well and truly over. Well, that's it for this week. Show remember if you'd like to hear the episode again or download segments since two thousand fourteen. Just go to ABC. Dot Net dot US slash aren and follow the prompts to between the lines, or you can listen via the ABC. Listen APP, or wherever you get your podcast. You can even subscribe, so you never miss an episode. I'm Tom Switzer continue next week.

Australia China United States Melissa Peter Jennings Pacific Tom Switzer Washington TOM Bosnia UN United Nations Prime Minister Europe Melissa Conley Professor Of Asia Pacific Secu Indonesia Asia Institute
Why Do Ladybugs Have Spots? Do Dragonflies Bite?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

05:38 min | 2 months ago

Why Do Ladybugs Have Spots? Do Dragonflies Bite?

"We're talking about dragonflies and ladybugs. And we're going to be joined by someone. We've talked to before on an episode. We did about moths. I'm kept McFarland with a Remote Center Frigo Studies Research Biologist and I like to study insects and all kinds of other flying things. Why in the world do you like to study insects of all the creatures you could study? Well you know. I've studied birds and I've studied mammals, but insects to in my world. Everything you can think of. That's in the movies insects do it. They do strange things that we'd never imagined possible, and and it just excites me to go out there and find out what they're doing. Strange things like what lift something that would be like US lifting a car or leap tall buildings that kind of thing. Yeah. They're like the Superman the animal world, they can do all of things that we couldn't dream of Fahd of the sky for hundreds of feet. Fly Long distances. Long distances like three thousand mile sometimes longer than we never imagined swim underwater for long periods of time. I mean you name it. They do it so. The water and walk on the ceilings. Yeah, so it's just crazy things they do. There are so many kinds of insects estimates range between two million and thirty million different types of insects. If you count up the total number of these animals themselves, scientists think there are ten Quintillo individual insects on our planet. But we can't do an episode about all of them. Just think how long that would be. We're going to focus on to cool types of insects. You have sent us questions about dragonflies and ladybugs, but even those are categories of insects with lots of different species within them, as we'll find out more about later, but first. Let's dive into some of your questions. My Name's illegal. I live in Seattle Washington in my question is. Why do ladybugs have spots? Claire. I am six years old. I live in rent. Would Missouri and My question is how do ladybugs get their spots I Aria that result I live grateful or Kaleida it by question is how to ladybugs have spots well. Here's the interesting thing about ladybugs. There's a lot of different kinds of ladybugs and the ones that we usually think of are the ones that are red with black spots or sometimes a little white spots on them. And that represents maybe you. A quarter of the species of ladybugs, there's a whole bunch of other ladybugs that are black, Brown, red white, even some kind of other colors mixed in like yellows, and so the traditional thing we think of the ladybugs of the ones that are black and red, but there's all kinds of others that have all kinds of other patterns and colors associated with them how they get their spots. I'm not really sure how they exactly get their spouse, but one of the things is spots. Spots are the patterns are probably on them, so that is a warning to other insects or even birds that they might not want to eat them, because they might taste poorly, and so it's a way to defend themselves against being eaten by birds or other insects to some types of ladybugs have a certain number of spots and others have a different number, or could you know the same kind of lady bug lined up ten different individual bugs. You'd get ten different spot patterns. The answer is yes. It happens, both so there are lady bugs that have certain number of spots in evac through even named after that, so there's a native lady bug in North America called. The nine spotted lady bug, and it has nine actually, and there's the seven spotted lady bug, and it usually has seven spots. There's a twenty spotted lady bug, and you get the picture. There's different kinds of ladybugs that have different amount of spots, but sometimes within those groups they can have a variety of spots, so there's one. One kind of Lady Bug comes from Asia called the Asian ladybugs that's been introduced. It's been brought here in an outlives. North America and sometimes it can have almost no spots, and sometimes it can have maybe a dozen or more spots on it, so it's really variable. Compared to say, the nine spotted lady bug, which almost always has nine spots, and we have listeners and I think every continent. EXCEPT ANTARCTICA, we haven't gotten a question from Antarctica and do ladybugs also live on every continent except Antarctica. I'm pretty sure they are on every continent, except Antarctica. Yes, and that brings us to this question. Hello, my name is Hallelujah I live in. Rwanda CA golly. My question is. How many different types of ladybugs are there? There are over five thousand different species or types of ladybugs in the world. And as Kent said, it's not just the spots that vary, their colors can vary, too, but those colors are basically always there to warn predators that the lady bug will taste terrible now. Some of you are probably wondering why they're called ladybugs. Anyway or maybe you aren't even sure what insect were actually talking about. Not everyone calls them ladybugs for example. If you live in the United Kingdom you might call them, lady, birds or Ladybird Beetles and Kent says he actually doesn't like the name Lady Bug because they're Beatles, not

Antarctica North America Remote Center Frigo Studies Re Mcfarland Kent United States Seattle Fahd Beatles Rwanda United Kingdom Asia Claire Missouri Washington
Why Do Ladybugs Have Spots? Do Dragonflies Bite?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

05:46 min | 2 months ago

Why Do Ladybugs Have Spots? Do Dragonflies Bite?

"This week, we're getting out our bug nets to look at something considerably smaller than us. We're talking about dragonflies and ladybugs. And we're going to be joined by someone. We've talked to before on an episode. We did about moths. I'm kept McFarland with a Remote Center Frigo Studies Research Biologist and I like to study insects and all kinds of other flying things. Why in the world do you like to study insects of all the creatures you could study? Well you know. I've studied birds and I've studied mammals, but insects to in my world. Everything you can think of. That's in the movies insects do it. They do strange things that we'd never imagined possible, and and it just excites me to go out there and find out what they're doing. Strange things like what lift something that would be like US lifting a car or leap tall buildings that kind of thing. Yeah. They're like the Superman the animal world, they can do all of things that we couldn't dream of Fahd of the sky for hundreds of feet. Fly Long distances. Long distances like three thousand mile sometimes longer than we never imagined swim underwater for long periods of time. I mean you name it. They do it so. The water and walk on the ceilings. Yeah, so it's just crazy things they do. There are so many kinds of insects estimates range between two million and thirty million different types of insects. If you count up the total number of these animals themselves, scientists think there are ten Quintillo individual insects on our planet. But we can't do an episode about all of them. Just think how long that would be. We're going to focus on to cool types of insects. You have sent us questions about dragonflies and ladybugs, but even those are categories of insects with lots of different species within them, as we'll find out more about later, but first. Let's dive into some of your questions. My Name's illegal. I live in Seattle Washington in my question is. Why do ladybugs have spots? Claire. I am six years old. I live in rent. Would Missouri and My question is how do ladybugs get their spots I Aria that result I live grateful or Kaleida it by question is how to ladybugs have spots well. Here's the interesting thing about ladybugs. There's a lot of different kinds of ladybugs and the ones that we usually think of are the ones that are red with black spots or sometimes a little white spots on them. And that represents maybe you. A quarter of the species of ladybugs, there's a whole bunch of other ladybugs that are black, Brown, red white, even some kind of other colors mixed in like yellows, and so the traditional thing we think of the ladybugs of the ones that are black and red, but there's all kinds of others that have all kinds of other patterns and colors associated with them how they get their spots. I'm not really sure how they exactly get their spouse, but one of the things is spots. Spots are the patterns are probably on them, so that is a warning to other insects or even birds that they might not want to eat them, because they might taste poorly, and so it's a way to defend themselves against being eaten by birds or other insects to some types of ladybugs have a certain number of spots and others have a different number, or could you know the same kind of lady bug lined up ten different individual bugs. You'd get ten different spot patterns. The answer is yes. It happens, both so there are lady bugs that have certain number of spots in evac through even named after that, so there's a native lady bug in North America called. The nine spotted lady bug, and it has nine actually, and there's the seven spotted lady bug, and it usually has seven spots. There's a twenty spotted lady bug, and you get the picture. There's different kinds of ladybugs that have different amount of spots, but sometimes within those groups they can have a variety of spots, so there's one. One kind of Lady Bug comes from Asia called the Asian ladybugs that's been introduced. It's been brought here in an outlives. North America and sometimes it can have almost no spots, and sometimes it can have maybe a dozen or more spots on it, so it's really variable. Compared to say, the nine spotted lady bug, which almost always has nine spots, and we have listeners and I think every continent. EXCEPT ANTARCTICA, we haven't gotten a question from Antarctica and do ladybugs also live on every continent except Antarctica. I'm pretty sure they are on every continent, except Antarctica. Yes, and that brings us to this question. Hello, my name is Hallelujah I live in. Rwanda CA golly. My question is. How many different types of ladybugs are there? There are over five thousand different species or types of ladybugs in the world. And as Kent said, it's not just the spots that vary, their colors can vary, too, but those colors are basically always there to warn predators that the lady bug will taste terrible now. Some of you are probably wondering why they're called ladybugs. Anyway or maybe you aren't even sure what insect were actually talking about. Not everyone calls them ladybugs for example. If you live in the United Kingdom you might call them, lady, birds or Ladybird Beetles and Kent says he actually doesn't like the name Lady Bug because they're Beatles, not bugs, so that's right now and they're not all ladies.

Antarctica North America Remote Center Frigo Studies Re Mcfarland United States Kent Seattle Fahd Beatles Rwanda United Kingdom Asia Claire Missouri Washington
The Assistance Urban Refugees Need

UN News

01:14 min | 4 months ago

The Assistance Urban Refugees Need

"Of thousands of refugees living in urban settings across the East Horn and Great Lakes regions of Africa are struggling to meet even basic needs as the economic impact of Covid nineteen takes hold the UN refugee agency. Unhcr has said on Tuesday. It appealed for MORE REFUGEES TO BE INCLUDED IN GOVERNMENT RESPONSE. Plans to the pandemic over and above the preventative. Health measures already taken. Unhcr fears that without further support. Many oven refugees could become extremely vulnerable to exploitation. They risk falling into major debt and could be forced into transactional sex or child labor to survive. Spokesperson Charlie actually said we do see different circumstances in different areas than in some places. Refugees are strongly affected by some of the measures that have been put in place as well as host communities because lockdown curfews implemented in this is daily restricting refugees abilities to sustain that sources of income and other places restrictions elusive a across the board businesses and economies have been affected by this in Rwanda. Most of the country's twelve thousand refugees have seen the family wage-earners lose their jobs. Misty actually said as businesses have closed after border restrictions

Unhcr Covid Rwanda UN East Horn Africa Misty Great Lakes Charlie
A top Rwanda genocide suspect died years ago, DNA test shows

Morning Edition

00:28 sec | 4 months ago

A top Rwanda genocide suspect died years ago, DNA test shows

"Elsewhere a United Nations war crimes prosecutor has confirmed the death of a major suspect in the Rwandan genocide custom busy man I was the minister of defense at the time of the nineteen ninety four genocide four years later he was indicted by the international criminal tribunal for Rwanda he was alleged to be responsible for the murders of the former prime minister I got to within G. Amano ten Belgian U. N. peacekeepers and he was accused of organizing the killing of many Tutsi civilians across the country will

Prosecutor International Criminal Tribuna Rwanda Prime Minister G. Amano United Nations
Colin Finlay

The Candid Frame

05:58 min | 4 months ago

Colin Finlay

"I'm excited I sit down and talk with here you man. I'm disappointed you can't see me dressed in my finest and freshly shaved respect for you. Yeah and doing looking at work and seeing some of the presentations you've done and just getting a a really good understanding of what your career has look like. I was really inspired. Not just by the work which I think is exceptional but I thought that you were one of the few photographers who focuses on the things that you that you do in terms of the environment cultural impact of socio economic issues around the world and one of the things that you really adept at is providing a sense of connectedness between all these what normally would be disparate things in the minds of many of our of Westerners tend to have such a topic and self absorbed obsession with the world revolving around us that we tend to sort of exclude things that we don't feel have a direct impact on us even though it does and I don't think that at least for for for Western people that that something that awareness that you have it comes naturally. I think it's something that at least for me has been sort of a learned. I've had to unlearn that kind of way of thinking and open myself up and I'm wondering for you. How did that sense of that connectedness? You know that I see in your work. How did you come to have that yourself? It's kind of interesting here just to kind of explore this topic right out of the out of the out of the gate here but it's just an overall feeling that we are all one connected human being we are all one connected earth country. There's no difference between myself. And someone number Wanda a first nations person in Canada. A polar bear were all part of this great mother nature all part of this earth and I see it. All is our earth our collective future art collective history that belongs to each and every one of us and all of us have a vital role to play in this world so for me. It's I see that connection point. I've seen the difference between a billionaire and someone who's on the streets having a tough time in their life were all these powerful magnetic souls that are all on our journey in this world. I respect an extraordinary operation for really each and every one of us who are on this path. Was that something you always had or? Did you have a moment of epiphany when you were younger? That sort of allowed you to see the world in that particular way is definitely something that was important to me from the streets of Belfast from my times experiences in Sarajevo some of those really powerful experiences in Haiti in the early nineties. When you're just experiencing something that is so powerful and so beyond anything that you could even imagine you'd be confronting in your life and the humility that is absorbed through every cell and fiber in my body as I photograph and spend time with extraordinarily powerful people. That frankly have the power have strengthened. Have courage that I do not possess. I am simply an observer a witness in that sense and I am a part of this journey that they are on in the experience of their life than you know. Ultimate humility to me comes from there in the eyes of the people that I've photographs from really understanding the depths. What their day to day realities like and then how I come back to this first world. It's it's a difficult thing. It was brutal that coming back in landing at LAX. In coming back into this world leading. When I just left behind That Internet itself is extraordinarily difficult to the least. I remember crying literally walking down the aisles of a grocery store and looking at their Sushi in all these meets and everything it's like my God and I'm in Saudi bullets. They're dependent on what food they can scrounge. They're taking their lives in their hands. Trying to get water for their family and Sarajevo not being shot and killed and he does understand life and such a different matter that it really comes down to a pitcher of water feeding your family for that day or providing one meal and then coming back here to realize you know what we have at our at our fingertips some so it starts to really bend and the beginning years of breaking May to a completely different understanding of other majority are. Have you know a lot of other people around the world on? That's an interesting term. You said breaking you in as if you had Basically Foundation that you basically emptied sort of destroy in order to build a a a new one with being way of describing. Yeah I also think that for me I had an extraordinary powerful desire within me to witness first hand the history as it unfolds being an apartheid South Africa before Nelson Mandela. Send it to presidency a lot of the different war-zones in and out of the genocide in Rwanda Darfur wars in the Middle East. A lot of fees experiences really changed me immensely and really broke down the nature of what I thought reality was for me and for my family and what that word means to me and how it's manifested within me and how it is indeed. You know change the way that I view the world. How did how did you see your work or hope for your work to be used during those those early years of your career and how change what was really interesting. Is that one of the first major magazines that I work with was magazine that you might have depending on where you're at school was called scholastic so that was the magazine. Went out to students I received when I was a student so lineup really establishing a great relationship where the editor they're Lee buyer and I really started to take on a lot of these projects around the world on children.

Sarajevo Middle East Nelson Mandela Wanda Haiti Editor Canada LAX South Africa Belfast
Félicien Kabuga, Who Financed Rwanda Genocide, Captured in France

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:18 sec | 4 months ago

Félicien Kabuga, Who Financed Rwanda Genocide, Captured in France

"One of the most wanted fugitives in Rwanda's nineteen ninety four genocide been arrested outside of Paris French authorities say Felicien Kuga had a five million dollar bounty on his head when he was detained over the weekend the eighty four year old wanted for his role in the genocide that killed nearly a million people in that

Rwanda Felicien Kuga Paris French
Félicien Kabuga arrested near Paris for role in Rwandan genocide

Freakonomics Radio

00:54 sec | 4 months ago

Félicien Kabuga arrested near Paris for role in Rwandan genocide

"The man accused of being a major funder of Rwanda's genocide in the nineteen nineties is now under arrest Felicien cougar allegedly financed the militias that massacred some eight hundred thousand people the BBC's Willbros reports Phyllis young computer a businessman from the Hutu ethnic group is accused of being one of the main financiers of the Rwandan genocide paying for the militias that carried out the massacres he also founded and funded the notorious Reggio Emelia Colleen the Rwandan state broadcaster that actively encouraged people to search out and kill anyone who is from the Tutsi ethnic group the fact that he's being found on the outskirts of Paris living under a false name is surprising for many years Phyllis Jakob that was thought to be living in Kenya where powerful politicians were accused of thwarting efforts to get him arrested more than a quarter of a century after the genocide Mr cougar will go on trial at an international

Rwanda Felicien Cougar BBC Paris Kenya Phyllis Young Reggio Emelia Phyllis Jakob
Top fugitive in Rwanda's genocide arrested outside Paris

Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me!

00:49 sec | 4 months ago

Top fugitive in Rwanda's genocide arrested outside Paris

"A Rwandan genocide suspect who authorities have been trying to track down for more than twenty five years was arrested today near Paris NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports the now eighty four year old was living under a false identity the who do business man is accused of creating and funding the malicious that led the massacre of some eight hundred thousand Tutsis and moderate Hutus over a span of a hundred days in nineteen ninety four Google was found living in an apartment in the Paris suburb of and yet are still send under a false identity he was indicted by the U. N. international tribunal for Rwanda in nineteen ninety seven sage abroad March the head of the tribunal said Google was arrested in a sophisticated and coordinated operation Brammertz says it's a warning to those who take part in genocide that they will be pursued even twenty six years after their

Eleanor Beardsley Google U. N. International Tribunal Rwanda Brammertz Paris
Rwanda finds genocide grave that could contain 30,000 bodies

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 6 months ago

Rwanda finds genocide grave that could contain 30,000 bodies

"The discovery is being called the most significant in the years and fifty bodies have been exhumed so far in efforts that are challenged by the East African nations coronavirus related lockdown will of the valley dam on the bodies it held the merge as many people convicted in the genocide being released from prison after serving their sentences I'm offering you information on mass graves will handle on Tuesday marks the twenty sixth anniversary of the genocide because of the lockdown the country will follow events on television and social media as gatherings all bound I'm Charles

Charles
Monet's Gardens at Giverny

Travel with Rick Steves

06:23 min | 7 months ago

Monet's Gardens at Giverny

"Start with a look at the intimate gardens. That impressionist painter Claude Monet created around the end of the nineteenth century at his house. In Javanese Elizabeth Murray is a gardener in an artist from the Monterey Bay area in California. She volunteered nearly a year of her life to help restore the gardens in nineteen eighty five. She's updated and re released. The beautiful photo filled book. She compiled to convey how. Mornay created his gardens as a work of art in themselves. It's also where you can experience his famous water. Lilies in-person her book is called Monet's passion ideas inspiration and insights from the painters gardens. Elizabeth thanks for being here. My pleasure thank you for inviting me. Anybody who loves ART KNOWS IMPRESSIONISM? And when you say impressionism you think Claude Monet. Set up the garden. What is it with the great painter? Having his own garden to help inspire his art his garden was both a sanctuary for him and his family and a place that became his biggest inspiration and he lived there and she bernie a little village for forty three years and he's heard to create this garden for his own pleasure and delight and then realized it had everything he needed to paint. He didn't have to travel outside of it any longer as he was aging. And all these other political things in wars were happening so here is the garden of great beauty that nourished him inspired him and he organized the colors implants than reflections said that it was something he could be inspired to paint each day so he spent his last forty three years there. He died in nineteen twenty six today nearly one hundred years after his death we can go there and enjoy the gardening wizardry of this great painter because he painted and he planted and it comes together. Now you've visited back in Nineteen eighty-four reading your book. It's just an amazing story. Tell us how you first met Jeff Rene and then why that changed your life. Well I've always been a painter and a gardener and when I went there I literally got a lump in my throat. I had fallen in love. I thought more than anything I want to know. This garden intimately and the best way to know a garden is to work in it so I had a French friend with me and I didn't speak French and she helped me meet one of the gardeners who said Oh you must go and speak to monsieur vendor camp and ask if you can work here and I thought you know what I live in Carmel. California. I have a great house in nine people working for me as a professional gardener. But I'm willing to give that up in order to work for free and it has been something that has enriched my life but wait a minute about thirty years ago you were traveling around and you were visiting gardens all over Europe teen a lot of gardens your professional gardener with your own staff. You went to Germany two hours west of Paris and you were so impacted by that that you went home. Quit your job and moved to France and volunteered for nearly a year. Yes that's right and I didn't speak French. Learn some Don Don. Does she need Let me soon to Clinton. I'm not a gardener. I go to these Great Gardens in Europe and I love them. They just are delights How was a step above? All of those will. It was a step into my heart. That was it. It wasn't that it was grander by any means. But I love Monet asa artist and so this is like a living painting and I felt like many people who visit the spirit of Monet. So when you feel the spirit of someone you love and admire and then you get to see some of the ideas and where he lived. You really feel his presence. And that's really what I fell in love with. And so you have a great painter. Who New Light? His whole his biggest emphasis was painting light and all the shades of color so instead of just organizing a bouquet or organizing a still life. He organized a whole garden. That would have the colors that sang for him with his kind of color sensitivity and rules of collar. Now this is interesting Elizabeth. You're talking about late. And you know the whole rallying cry of the impressionist movement was for the artists to get out of the studio and into the light and they would satisfy easels out in nature and then they will grab the light and and these are dislike. Monet would famously paint the facade of a church at different times of day in for them. It wasn't the same subject. It was completely different subject because the late in the shadow would play on the physical object differently at different times of day. And this is sort of the essence of impressionism. Isn't it it's capturing the light and the reflections in the shadows exactly the impression of that moment gave its name impressionism. His one thing to have it on a building. In which money did they incredible ones of the Cathedral in Rwanda but then you have living texture of plants that are going to change with the light and they have their own vibration as an artist and a gardener? Elizabeth you could sit in Monet's garden and would you appreciate the different times of Day. Would you insulate dimension of it? So as a sightseer we can go in the morning and we can go out for lunch and take a walk and come back in the afternoon and artistically. It's a different garden absolutely and then it might rain. You might have pouring rain. Bring an umbrella and then the rain will break and you'll have gray clouds and everything will be all shiny and sparkly or you might be there for early. Do or you might be there for little frost. The seasons completely changed the cars. Just it's carbonated the whole experience by appreciating this extra dimension. I'm Rick Steves and our guest. Elizabeth Murray is an artist photographer and gardening expert. She helped with the restoration of Claude. Monet's famous gardens at Scheffer name after time and the Second World War had left them in ruins. She's published a book called Monet's passion with photos. Observations and tips on the plants Monet us to convey a vocabulary of color in his gardens.

Claude Monet Elizabeth Murray Europe California Monterey Bay Mornay Rick Steves Don Don Jeff Rene Bernie Germany Rwanda Paris Carmel Clinton France Scheffer
Social Justice and Israel/Palestine with Mira Sucharov and Aaron Hahn Tapper

Jewish History Matters

10:11 min | 8 months ago

Social Justice and Israel/Palestine with Mira Sucharov and Aaron Hahn Tapper

"Hope that you'll enjoy our conversation as we dive into the connection between scarlet work and the social justice issues of Israel and Palestine. A major major way in which history matters because through history we can better understand pressing issues of the day and as I think it'll come through clearly in our a conversation that as historians and experts we have something to contribute to these conversations to thanks for listening. I'm your hi Erin. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you Jason Thank you. I'm really glad that you guys are here to talk about this book which I was really excited to see and to read through I wanna I wanNA start off by asking. What do you mean by Social Justice and Israel-palestine when you look at the title itself? What is the connection there? And why do you think that it's important to integrate. These two realms in the discussion of social justice on the one hand and the broad set of issues around Israel and Palestine part of our idea was that Israel Palestine conflict is taught as is an informational explanatory lands right through prescriptive questions in what happened in terms of what we mean. By a lens of social justice we we mean an inter our disciplinary perspective places concepts like rights justice and oppression at the forefront and that aims to Dick sexualize Israel-palestine Israel-palestine especially for those who think of this as some sort of Auger. That's been going on forever and we'll go on forever but it it's a conflict that will end. I just like the troubles in Northern Ireland and the horrific stuff in Rwanda in apartheid in South Africa and other conflicts in the world the people in Israel Palestinian or not onto logically different In terms of their humanness than other people conflict. That will end also our goal in terms of approaching this was social justice. Justice is this notion of introducing power to the conversation if we had only included voices of people with particular social identities and now other voices. I don't think that necessarily would have been just. But our attempt is to bring in a variety of voices and introduced concepts jobs related to power dynamics which is goes down the rabbit hole of privileged status access oppression etcetera so it also means bringing in the grassroots spotlighting hot-listing minority identities as rusty Israelis essay. Anat there's an essay on Bedouin. BS courses a grassroots in many ways a grassroots treats movement and really. Were trying to broaden the discussion from what is typically explanatory questions to more prescriptive questions saying what should happen in order for. Israeli people have Palestinian people in the region to experience a sense of justice and the social part is just that we wanted to flag that. It isn't simply a book about illegal intricacies. I have a little bit of a vested interest in the term because during the twenty eleven ten protests in Israel that started on Rothschild Boulevard in Tel Levine. Is released were protesting high cost of living biceps cottage cheese of the price of housing. And they were talking in terms of social justice. Senate Clinical Lt and it became very clear early on that to maintain a broad based movement. It would be bracketing. The question of Palestinians and social justice in purely early economic terms. And we know that here when social justice movements more broadly progressive movement's about social justice thinking not only economically editor of racial justice ethnic justice religious justice justice for every individual and collective. And so we're really trying lick the conversation back towards saying how. How can Israel and the Palestinians live their lives and we as editors have a singular answer to that but we brought together scholars and activists that have very specific the the actors for that very important question and they're engaging with one another on that question? We just had the episode Rachel Harris where we talked about her book about teaching about Israel and Palestine. And there it's very clearly a book about pedagogy a book that is directed at professors teachers. Thinking about how they can teach about the subject and here you're dealing much much more conceptually much more about getting into the issues themselves as opposed to how we teach them when you think about a book like this. Who Do you see as the person who you want to pick it up what you want them to get out of it? I think we intended this book per use in classrooms where the Israel Palestinian dynamic is being taught whether it's Israeli Israeli Palestinian conflict glasser history class or the social dynamics of how Israelis and Palestinians relate with one another so it's really meant for students and the professors who teach awesome. We also seems to make it as readable as possible as accessible as possible to a wide audience. Who aren't necessarily subject specialists and to that end really took care to write very concise intro pieces to each of the eight conceptual chapters showing the reader? What's at stake? AAC each of these major debates. I have an essay that appears Rachel's Book as well in the essay that I wrote in her book is really a precursor to this project which I engaged with Aaron and really. It's a short essay about my own personal struggle of how I had been seeking to keep politics out of the classroom and had been even feeling a little bit frightened of students. What if they brought the a word? I would say appears the night before a particularly contentious topic topic where I was worried. That apartheid come. What do I do in my the the foil for the students do? I need to debate the students that they see the other side. Whatever the other side is depending on what perspective is student is raising and I realized it wasn't really very healthier constructive approach so I think what we really wanted to? The book was to enable a wave for politics it should be able to seep into the classroom in a way that doesn't put the professor on the hot seat but enables the professor to shepherd students through the debates enabling students succeed as many perspectives as they can in contrast to mirror. I was coming up this project from perhaps not in context given that was a precursor newark yet that stage but in any event for about ten years I was part of a not for profit educational organization where we worked with muscles views Israelis Palestinians and everything we did was co taught. CO-DEVELOPED CO design. So I ran the organization with the Muslim Palestinian woman are high school programs with Jews. Muslims awesome were run developed design fifty fifty by twos Muslims etcetera. And so I was coming at this project from a number of years back back so to speak from the vantage point that regardless of attempts by some people to engage in objectivity or neutrality perhaps closer to objectivity than they might otherwise present. Things that it's impossible. I think to teach each about things in the humanities frankly without offering perspectives. Even if you said all right. Here's our issue. And here's three vantage vantage points on the issue. Great probably ten others twenty thirty others so I was already at that place because that was is how I been socialized in. That's my experiences regardless. Yeah I mean I think that what you both have brought up really is a critical issue. You look at this book wishes to say as I read it and as I was thinking about it. It seems to me that the central issue that you're engaging with this fundamental idea and and the way I think about this is that even though this is a book with many authors many contributors are pushing this fundamental central thesis that the politics the issues should be a part of how we engage with Israel and Palestine scholars in a way that some people say I want to avoid the politics I want to avoid the touchy issues and try to achieve some kind of noble dream of objectivity of neutrality etc.. I think part of what. This book is arguing in this ties into to mirror. What you were saying in your essay and Rachel Harris Book as well you have to do with the idea about what is the role of the scholar and how we interact with these issues? Yeah to that. I would add one more specific thing especially in the case the way I've been teaching the courses in my field. Political Science and international relations and in many areas of social science. Generally professors tend to focus on. Why questions or we could call explanatory questions? So why did Israel extended extended olive branch to the PLO nineteen ninety-three. Why did Camp David Two thousand fail and instead of keeping prescriptive questions the questions what should be what shall be? Why should it be this way? Instead of keeping those questions that Bay we wanted to invite space for students to see how scholars activists make those prescriptive arguments particularly as the book has become available for use in my own courses finding consigning op. Ed Science for students to write much more frequently and I'm encouraging students to take the various topics that we covered in the course I which is really pretty united eight until present day and make a prescriptive argument should be. DSP Out Lodge should be various political parties depending on what case they're looking at encountered the US embrace a different view of Palestine within their platforms. I should trump have proved the the embassy to Jerusalem or not and make an argument that necessitates taking into account the arguments of another point of view and really taking those arguments seriously in making a good case whereas in some years I might have read a student paper like that. Oh this is too ideological. This is too opinionated. I no longer separate informed. Well argued opinion. That is derived from a scholarly understanding of the situation. I no longer divorce that argumentation from a more detached explanatory Brian Tori type of

Israel Palestine Professor Rachel Harris Erin Rachel United States Newark Anat Rwanda Senate Ed Science Editor Brian Tori Dick Sexualize Jerusalem BAY
"rwanda" Discussed on Survival

Survival

10:26 min | 11 months ago

"rwanda" Discussed on Survival

"Her last role of money hoping it would be enough to buy her safe passage to the border for a short time later the high ranking military chief returned he had struck a deal with driver Marie Louise would be put into a sack loaded into a vehicle and driven into the forest near the border with Burundi from there she would be on her own needless to say Marie Louise wasn't exactly satisfied with Monsieur Florian's plan the nation of Burundi had been taking in refugees from Rwanda since about nineteen sixty but without her neighbors help shopkeeper doubted that she could reach the border alive using the sharp bargaining skills she had developed over the years of running her shop Marie Louise proposed a deal she told Miss your floor Yang on that she owned two villas in the Rwandan capital of Kigali she would sign the deeds over to him if he agreed to accompany her to Lundie in his book SAS survival handbook the ultimate guide to surviving anywhere former British Special Forces Forces Agent John Wiseman discusses the advantages of knowing the locals he states the more detailed your knowledge of the way people live the more survival survival knowledge you will have if you come to need it after decades of running a shop next door to flurry on Marie Louise knew that he was motivated by influence influence and the promise of enrichment she shrewdly saved this knowledge until the moment she needed it most the tactic worked Florian revised lies his plan to have the shopkeeper dropped off in the forest instead he hired a driver to take Marie Louise and himself to his home in Geico Geico a military camp about thirty miles north from there they would eventually make their way to Burundi lying on the floor of the van between the driver and her who to neighbor Marie Louise had to force herself to stay quiet and perfectly still hill road blocks were set up at regular intervals requiring the driver to stop and show Identification Monsieur Florian's high rank helped speed speed them through the checkpoints but even so Marie Louise was petrified she knew that the slightest movement could catch someone's attention and because she was a Tuzi discovery meant instant death finally after what must have been the most harrowing journey of her life. Marie Louise Louise felt the van come to a halt monsieur Florian opened the door and told her to get out stiff and disoriented Marie Louise hurried after her old neighbor across the muddy plot and into a long low house this was Florian's home in the camp camp he assured the shopkeeper that she would be safe at least for now but Marie Louise wasn't so sure as she followed him into the back of the house she saw something that made her blood freeze all along the hallway in piles ready for distribution were hundreds of brand new axes and machetes the same types of weapons used to slaughter her family weeks before mm-hmm Monsieur Florian was providing a refuge from marie-luise but he was also an important part of the system that had created created this appalling tragedy she wondered how her neighbor and protector could also be responsible for wiping her people off the earth in in the years to come historians would propose many answers to this question some would say intertribal jealousy others would point to the power of dehumanizing is it propaganda such as the radio broadcasts that referred to the Tuzi people as Cockroaches as Marie Louise she would have plenty of time to come up with her own theory as she found herself locked in a back room in the house of a murderer coming up we'll see how the beleaguered few manage to survive the remaining days of the genocide and how they were saved at last asked hi it's Tim have you heard the park has limited series political scandals yet it's hosted by two fantastic Dick Storytellers Kate and Richard from the dark side of and I have to say the stories they cover are all true all wild and absolutely shocking at times guys can you tell us a little bit more yes absolutely in a world of fake news controversy feels more contemporary than ever but in politics it's trail as old as time every Tuesday leading up to the twenty twenty election political scandals countdown the fifty two most controversial events in American history each episode dives into a different rise and fall uncovering the ugly truth behind some of our most infamous elected officials. We'll dig deeper into the stories you knew thought you knew or had no idea changed the face of politics follow the limited series the political scandals Freon spotify or wherever you get your podcasts now back to the story it was may nineteen ninety four a few weeks after after the Hutu government had ordered its people to start exterminating toots as thirty nine year old shopkeeper Marie Louise had just discovered this was not just an open directive representatives of the government were stockpiling weapons and distributing them to Hutus with instructions to kill oh every they could having unknowingly taken refuge in one of these very distribution centers. Marie Louise was further than than ever from safety she had hoped to escape to Burundi only a couple of hours on foot from her old home but now she was trapped on a military base more than thirty miles north of the border in the home of a man who is handing out weapons to slaughter her people as the shopkeeper I struggled to overlook the stockpiles of machetes thirty miles south nineteen year old friends seen the tag couldn't get them out of her mind mind during the first two weeks of genocide francine had survive five to sharp blows to the head she had lived for days in mosquito infested swamp water she had no choice but to watch and listen as others including her own child were murdered all around her now as the number of survivors grew even fewer francine gene was forced to admit that she would probably be caught again although she no longer feared death she had developed a debilitating fear of machetes he's she'd heard thousands of people screaming agony as they were hacked to pieces she was terrified of meeting the same fate even so francine decided to stay in the marsh injured as she was she felt her best bet was to stay near her fiance and remaining neighbors that way although she faced the daily threat of being found and killed she still had the benefit of companionship every night consciously or not francine was employing another survival strategy by choosing her partners in the struggle survival is is John Wiseman points out in his book that in disaster scenarios a careful selection of companions can save ones life mentally and physically fit people people can help the distraught and wounded more importantly a social group prevents feelings of isolation depression both of which pose extreme threats threats to human survival sadly for many companionship wasn't enough to stave off life-threatening despair and some such just thirty two year old innocent releaser considered another way out after learning that his wife had been killed killed in the church in the Meta innocent sank into a deep depression physically exhausted suffering from hunger and dehydration he he decided that he no longer wanted to continue the fight to live like many other to tease who experienced the horrors of massacre he began making plans to commit suicide. The grieving teacher heard rumors that some titties had succeeded in drowning themselves in the Enya Berango River after a brief time of contemplation innocent decided that he would do the same the largest river in Rwanda the annual Berango passed about a mile from the eucalyptus forest where innocent was taking shelter ironically the mile long journey to its banks required considerable survival skills I he had to make his way through the forest without being seen by the Inter Holloway then he had to navigate an overgrown path that led down to the water finally upon reaching the river he had to jump in where the current ran fast enough to pull him under the day of his attempt innocent dodged killers and scrambled through the brush to make it down to the river just before he reached the water he heard a noise.

"rwanda" Discussed on Survival

Survival

01:55 min | 11 months ago

"rwanda" Discussed on Survival

"This episode features discussion of extreme violence and genocide that some people may find offensive listener discretion is advised especially for children under thirteen eighteen thirty nine year old Tuzi shopkeeper Marie Louise Lay hidden on the floor of Van and as it bounce down a Rwandan highway to her left was a higher driver to her right sat her former neighbor Mr floor a high ranking thinking who to military chief who had promised to escort her to safety to Marie Louise He's considered flurry on to be a man of his word but it's van slow to a halt at a military checkpoint she began to feel sick with fear she heard soldiers surrounding vehicle they could decide to search it at any moment if they found her they would kill her immediately soon after what felt like an eternity the soldiers told the driver to go ahead Maria Louise he's let out a breath of relief is the van rolled forward but she wasn't out of danger yet in fact she was being driven straight into it onto the Hutu run GEICO military camp not only where the Hutus a centuries old rival of people they had also just been ordered by the government to exterminate every Tuzi in the country it was may nineteen ninety four the third week of the Wanda genocide and for Marie Louise This journey into enemy territory was her last desperate hope for survival.

"rwanda" Discussed on Survival

Survival

10:07 min | 11 months ago

"rwanda" Discussed on Survival

"Story it was April sixth nineteen ninety four after the assassination of Hutu dictator Juvenal Habyarimana hundred ends of thousands of footsie's all over Rwanda hurried into hiding in the region of Yomata thirty nine year old shopkeeper Marie Louise and her husband Leonare gathered their neighbors behind the wall surrounding their home as the day wore on more and more frightened to TSE's came to the House and begged for shelter Leonare told the youngest and strongest sneak away to the forest where they might be able to outrun their attackers as for the rest they hunkered down in the courtyard with nothing to do but wait and pray on the morning of April seventh after a sleepless night Marie Louise was startled by the sound of several men clan summering outside the gate realizing the attackers were upon them she immediately looked to her husband Leonare appeared to have seen this coming with almost no hesitation he took out a set of keys and walk toward the gate by now the aging shopkeeper had witnessed more violent this than he could bear he had saved himself in the past by running away this time however he was determined not to run things cnet perhaps the men would just kill him and leave the others in peace Leonare unlocked the gate by offering to sacrifice himself for the group Leonardo was acting contrary to his natural survival instinct this is known both in philosophy and science as altruism and for biologists such behavior represents conundrum according to the principles of natural selection it should be impossible for a person to act sanely and knowingly in a manner that will lead his death however Evolutionary Biologist William Donald Hamilton posited that self preservation may be super preceded by the needs of the species he devised a mathematical formula now known as Hamilton's rule that defines a point at which self sacrifice ace becomes a viable means of species survival perhaps if the were facing a mere matter of natural selection Leonardo di breath would have helped save them but as the terrified victims would soon learn the process they were facing with something else entirely immediately after the shopkeepers husband opened the gate a soldier shot him dead then literally stepping over Leonardo's dead body the Inter homeway pushed into the courtyard they grabbed children I laid them out in a line on the ground. and began hacking them to pieces with machetes this horrific act caused Marie Louise to realize once and for all the this was different from the violent attacks she'd witnessed before it was a systematic determined efforts to annihilate her entire people genocide happening right before her eyes according to Dr Gregory Stanton of the international organization Genocide Watch genocide develops in multiple stages the first stage is classification for example dividing the nation up into Hutus and to TSE's later comes humanization which occurred in Rwanda when Hutus began referring to two zero on the radio as cockroaches then comes organization polarization and preparation all of which went on throughout the Rwandan civil war and now Marie Louise was witnessing the sevens stage extermination when faced with an organized onslaught of such magnitude there's little one can do to survive other than flee That's exactly what Marie Louise did with no time to mourn her husband's or the children's death she ran with her mother-in-law around the backside the house there they found hiding place behind a pile of tires where they waited in terror and silence. for brief time it seemed that the rest of the Hor- Mike Pass them by Marie Louise could hear the men getting distracted they began looting the house perhaps if she and her mother-in-law chess waited long enough the killers forget about them and go on their way but the older woman soon tired of waiting overcome with sorrow her son's death and shattered by the violence she had witnessed Marie Louise's mother-in-law left their hiding place she walked around in front of the tires sat down on the ground and waited in exile Austin to meet her fate. This fatal decision may indicate that Marie Louise's mother-in-law was having an acute stress reaction this is severe psychological response to extreme trauma such as the women had just experienced and it may cause the afflicted to feel emotional numbness into engaged in reckless or self destructive behavior tragically for Marie Louise's mother-in-law the decision to leave her hiding place did turn out to be destructive a short time later a couple of lueders saw her sitting in front of the pile of tires without ceremony they slaughtered here with machetes unaware that her daughter-in-law was hiding a few feet away if the elderly woman had only managed to hold out a little longer she would have seen that the danger did in fact pass at least temporarily the looters left the house around nightfall giving Marie Louise and Opportunity get up and take stock of what had happened. The sight that met the thirty nine year olds is was almost indescribable every person who had taken refuge in her home the day before was dead looking ally and she was surrounded by people who would kill her the moment they saw her face still the shopkeeper did all she could to sure that she and the child would not meet that fate she hit the young tootsie nearby woodshed then she sneaked into the backyard of a Hutu neighbor's house where she hid in an empty dog house for the next three days fight the ferocity of the attack in Marie Louise's home there were still worse terrors in store for the region of Yarmulke over the next few days mobilize S. Two paramilitary soldiers continued to pour into the region they marked all houses that belonged to seize killed those they found in the streets and even murdered any Hutus known to sympathize with them the Nyamasheke extermination campaign began in full force no law anger would murder be spurred by an outburst of rage now simply part of the process the procedure began in the town of Yamagata just before noon that day nineteen year old francine the Tiga heard it start from inside the church where she was crammed with nearly two thousand other refugees she listened as outside the sanctuary a group of men coached whistling and singing she wondered were these men really coming to kill them if so why did they sound so content the young mother had little time to wonder because shortly after the men arrived the walls of the church exploded spears and clubs they swung and stabbed at their unarmed victims crushing skulls and hacking off limbs francine watched in holdover wilder meant as the men butchered her neighbors as they did they continue to sing and chant saying here we are here we are and this is how we prepare tootsie meet separated from her fiance and family in the chaos she could barely clear her mind off to figure out what to do and just like Marie Louise a few days earlier francine realized that her only hope for survival was to run for her life the church was in pandemonium thousands of people shoving trampling screaming as the loved ones were slaughtered before their eyes through the chaos francine saw that the back door of the building was relatively unguarded with no idea what he become of Teo Phil or her family francine had no choice but to make a run for it she turned preparing to traverse the Malay in hopes of reaching and the exit but before she can take a step she was struck on the back of the head the horrific sights and sounds faded as friends scene fell to the ground unconscious.

Marie Louise francine acute stress reaction murder Yamagata Yarmulke wilder Teo Phil thirty nine year nineteen year three days
"rwanda" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"rwanda" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"Are keeping them dry. When drains the challenge here is that even the directors of these companies city in a in office summer in city may not even be there. How their own two guides are treating Portis in the maintenance, even they don't company may have monitoring their own rations. Still end because of the we have come to big convinced. The only way to really issue is if there is an independent voted now Kimmage our is the is really good example because they're facing merely. Good the monitoring scheme run, by the assistance pressure. And what they do is to have an independent anonymous investigative porter on every climbing off their own Papa companies who comes back to them in enormous reports. How the be only deeply boss now. Rwanda is applies. It certainly turned it self rammed is is it on you'll ride hours as applies that stewing something about I think we'll travel. Yes. Definitely end. The wrong wrongly vary at once over roles in commun-, interesting, sustainable, sustainability not having trouble. They're very dance. For example. It's one of the few countries globally defend last effects. Doing a lot of things. I had the short on our the secular Newsom hit fourteen debating by to participate in conference that will some host the IT C, which is a joint venture between the U N at the WTO undergrowth run that the cold sheet rights joy to bring the could feel Rosen entertainers, enter the global economy and the head of specific program involvement end of tourism nurse. If I was invited to participate in one or two years ago ends I haven't there amid with a lot of FEMA tourism enterpreneurs. In the one faintly brought up extent when family actually, it wasn't even exist yet. He was still having a old maid Gillygate in we presented our ideas. We'll see oriented in our is on companies obtained Burke Roche, and he said that one of our criterias Susan companies said there is an independent response to travel certification scheme base and back then said, I'm really sorry. Because in Romblon saying was a dream for Ganda. That is no that was no such scheme race yet on that. I really know how to screen count for companies and who to work with. And then one thing happened that was truly amazing relief. Fascinating said all the people in the room. All women. Follow of local tourism stakeholders from different associations like the two Agata cessation hotel association. So they all came together in this year day. And said, yes, we want to each use a responsible Travis occasions team into the and so they initiated conversations move, the global responsible, travelers schema mentioned earlier trivialize and Ana working with travelling is to start.

Susan companies Rwanda Gillygate Portis Kimmage porter FEMA WTO Travis Newsom Romblon Ana Rosen Burke Roche two years
"rwanda" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"rwanda" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"No problem. We have everything we need water speak it there and Rwanda's rainy season. It's been tentative the rains start to come and go starting. In in October November, and they're really unpredictable. It will be sunny one minute and then down for the next minute. And our lock it was obstinately whoring on our drive there, which we were grateful had let up by the time. We usually campsite but hadn't really thought that. Oh, the camp the fire. Would that would be there would no longer be in its prime condition? We're making a fire, and as we can to the campsite we look around what ways the camp the firewood. And then there are these huge huge trees full full logs of trees uncut with an accident next with not stuff like firewood. Beauty would like that. Is it warms you up twice once when you chopping it? And once when you Bernie. Absolutely. Yeah. Here we are three girls. I thought I was opting camping and acts that we can hardly lift. And entire cheese that we are supposed to fire. It takes a long time to hack away pieces. We also realize that this point that we have a lighter. But we forgot any sort of fire starters with us. And I honestly don't how we ended up chopping the firewood into viable pieces gathered some bark twigs in anything. We can find a pizza paper in the car died after about an hour. Finally, coaxed the fire to start. And of course, melted. The pasta candle on the the pot as we are cooking our dinner. But residents and vegetables poured, some wine, and we're very grateful. We had a you had the magic ingredient a bottle of wine. Yes, of course of clearance. We had the wine. If I looked at the logs, the one would have come out straight away. Well, since the ultimate goals trip to be honest. Yeah, absolutely fantastic. And you can't do anything without one or at least icon, and no KOMO unleash apparently wherever she goes. She has a gloss of one in a hand historian shy nights. But what's travel news? All the case. We have to talk about the grounding of the buying 737 MAC site and nine eight aircraft following that horrible. Second facial aicraft accident the the coals of those is yet to be determined. So as when we got to win. Now, we still don't know what you may be listening to this later on when you we've found out what it is. But the two seven three seven crashes these year means that are being five fatal aircraft crashes this year, climbing one hundred ninety lives that's compared to the five year average of in the same period of three creches and one hundred and five eighths, so it's a bit above the five year average. But it's worth keeping this in perspective in twenty. Eighteen they with thirty eight million individual flights of commercial airliners and fifteen Feitell accidents entitles that makes an accident right of one final accident put two point five million flights. So it's very unlikely but still it has happened in. That's very sad..

Rwanda Bernie KOMO five year one minute
"rwanda" Discussed on Ellen on the Go

Ellen on the Go

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"rwanda" Discussed on Ellen on the Go

"So it was an incredible experience. I mean, I just couldn't believe. Leave the feeling of gratitude. Which was really overwhelming for me. Just not just from people that are going to directly benefit, but just the the entire area the fifteen hundred jobs that'll be created millions of dollars go into the economy because of your campus, and it was it was a really special pretty overwhelming moment. Yeah. It was amazing. Because you know, I the reason she gave me this. This gift is because I've always loved what Dian Fossey did when I was growing up. I knew who she was what she did. And I love animals and mountain gorillas are just incredible intelligent creatures. But then we went to Rwanda, and we fell in love with the people of the canal because the people are happy and in friendly, and it's it's a beautiful country. That is that is what Diane Fossey has now. And then what we're building. That's what we're building. That's what we're building. Which is the. Yeah. The permanent. So. I was very jealous. Because obviously, I'm working, and I couldn't go. So I had to send you and appreciate it very much. And you just you didn't miss a lot. I I went to Jim hardy party out. That was not and things all you had some folks over to head some people at the house. But anyway, I I was partying the well. I was there. Yeah. Fine. No xactly. Holy fine. Thank you. All right. You know, I've been to Rwanda the mountain gorillas. Also, I have been there. What did you do that before you started, you know, three years ago? Yeah. Yet, it's not something that I had anywhere -ness of. And then a friend of mine had just gotten back from seeing the guerrillas and had like pictures on his phone of. He's like this is me, and this is a grill and right next to one another, and I love gorillas, and monkeys and it was like I have to do this. It was before my daughter was born we had like a year before we were gonna lose our freedom. So we went to we went to Africans the guerrillas really life changing. But it's also something that like, I feel like most people don't realize you could actually do this and the thing that outside of donating to Ellen fund supports the guerrillas is going and pain to visit them in the in the jungle in Rwanda. So if you have the means to actually go there and go and see. Gorillas? You should do it. That's incredible. That Jason amazing pants. I go surfing. I like water. We'll see in a couple of days. But in the meantime, subscribe to our lovely podcast Ellen on the go.

Rwanda Dian Fossey Ellen Jim hardy Jason Africans three years
"rwanda" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"rwanda" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"It's not just the keys west hollywood has also named may the twenty third as stormy daniels day supporters of us know football club will know that team has a new coach and really devoted fans would have heard about a new sponsorship deal with rwanda for next season visit rwanda tourist board logo will be blazoned on the left sleeve of all the players the move is being criticized by some human rights activists who accused the ruined in government of restricting freedoms and many potential tourists have been put off visiting the country by its dark past the echoes of the hundred ninety four genocide so will this new marketing tactic bringing visitors my colleague andrew paychecks matt phillips lonely planet's destination editor for sub saharan africa about rwanda's expanding tourism industry doing a lot of promoter actually this year in january twenty teen they've to slide visa upon arrival for all destinations try to make the process a lot easier to visit it's incredibly rich country from curzon perspective i mean i still remember my one hour with the mountain gorillas is one of the best hours of my life so it's got incredible while life one of three countries in the world with mountain gorillas but it's also now got the big five in the eastern part of the country national park they have been importing rhino and restocking it with wildlife that you stick this there to kind of rejuvenate the tourism ministry roy mountain gorillas top of the list one on you'll any top five things to rwanda.

hollywood rwanda editor daniels football andrew matt phillips one hour
"rwanda" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"rwanda" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Troops which were there become aware i have to ask you numerous warnings from people on the ground in rwanda you must have received at least ten warnings for example general romeo dallaire headed the un peacekeeping mission in rwanda in november nineteen ninetythree alerted you to the possibility of what might happen and yet you got no response i of fall amir delays is a good friend in a very good officer romeo delay when he sent that message to my military advice up indicated that it is also possible that it is a trap that they could walk into a trap with this morning not only that soon after that ten belgian suggests were also killed the member states we're not ready to send in troops and in this situation when you said the un failed which you and utah marking you really because i mean in in january received a cable from general romeo dallaire who said he wanted approval to use force against what he described as crimes against humanity also jack rocher boo boo the un special envoy to rwanda also said that he was he said in view of rwanda's long and tragic history of ethnic conflict the possibility of ethnically motivated incidents is a constant threat there were these things that were coming to you.

rwanda romeo dallaire un officer utah
"rwanda" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"rwanda" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"It's not a big country quite a small country landlocked with our bardot sofa ongoal and uh beat on d and danica so that is quite a small countries who can get at on pretty quickly well and you say pretty quickly i'm assuming that while it may look a fast on my map that some of those roads are gonna take a little longer than they would for the same distance here yeah yes absolutely because the results like he said he legion most of the basis and that so it'll take a little longer by for example a bit his us a hundred kilometers leading meal do it in say about three or four us yes or anybody's we've never driven more than safe poor are set a stretch no head you've been to other subsaharan african countries before rwanda no actually this odds my po introduction to africa o'callaghan so i had all this preconceived notions of africa of it and our laura how do i am i do bear dear preconceived notions you mentioned getting often seeing it was a cleaner city aback and kill gauley what else surprised you about africa of course the usual tang's i'll fabric that is a life apart from that what i dearly loud laws the guy enough for sustainable tourism that is being dragged eased interro are now and one of the things i would like to mention here is they have this unique event i'll beach takes place every ford saturday of the month and best bet in it's the community then diet common it be bill dick up while look for the community which includes cleaning the country so everyone woke storage site and shorting that ronda is a neat and clean country.

rwanda ronda danica africa hundred kilometers
"rwanda" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"rwanda" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"The while kano's national bok why aboard this is not something uh generally people would do about it we wondered why expediency the lake and a cruise on that so he went for a grows and reached the national park all the play and the port and let me state that thing the crews so the league is called a limb nikolic admin in eta's brought to eliminate it options cell and promised little i know horror i've led about geology what it means is that eyeballs panic grade does beneath the lake oca which can erupt at any time but it hasn't and the league he's a very place at drake won the wonderful begnaud ramaz so we had a good it was a small houseboat kind of a crews with an upward back where you can have amazing views of the leaks that sort of you did and we enjoyed it deadlocked nail this lake is the lake as queues me if i get this wrong this is on the western border of rwanda yes and you can actually a wide you are a bruising on the lake guy the artist unsighting began see on the borders of the congo the democratic republic of congo yeah interesting when we didn't say i'm were doing a smaller itinerary in rwanda we didn't say that rwanda is but less than one hundred miles across we're not talking about a very big country so you saw not all the countries certainly but a decent amount of it in just about a week yes yes absolutely because if i look at dump map the ended up said come navigating the country almost.

kano lake oca congo rwanda
"rwanda" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"rwanda" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Gatt bags bags on a roll now they're damn red its go through real good game a vast board dow temperature traveler episode five hundred and ninety one today the amateur traveler talks about mountain gorillas and chimpanzees volcanoes and lakes and rainforests and the big five and yes genocide as we go to rwanda welcome to the amateur traveler i'm your host chris christenson not a lot of news today so let's just get right in and start talking about rwanda i like to welcome the show pj from the voyager blog at i am a voyager dot com who's come to talk to us about rwanda vj welcome to the show tanka chris it's a pleasure being with you so why rwanda what brought you to rwanda to be honest up before i landed in the rwanda high knew very little about rwanda in fact venue tank africa you normally tank of south africa tanzania uganda but not teranda but i landed up there about six months back and what i saw blew my mind off and why people should go to rwanda if you want to go to a place where nature is still restrain their incredible landscapes which vary from rain forests and grasslands steep plantations while kannik mountains and lakes then you need to get to rwanda at with that divided life committed synonymous with africa you'll find that innovative pristine environment and of course the mountain gorrillas off rwanda the prime attraction will and i should say that when vidrie pitched me the show we had done a show talking about going to see the mountain gorillas in rwanda and uganda but i think it is getting upon nine or ten years old by this point in so was a fairly easy pitch to revisit this beautiful african country so i do have to ask i know you're a travel blogger baotou usually go to places that you don't know anything about sometimes yes but not all of it.

rwanda uganda kannik mountains vidrie Gatt chris christenson south africa tanzania africa six months ten years
"rwanda" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"rwanda" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Delivery of blood in rwanda in this case so why is that of such interest he excites here bella delighted when uber became a big success everybody said well we're going to be the uber of this or the uber there will be uber of food delivery will be the uber of dry cleaning will be over of parking and they were all trivia all ideas and what i've loved about this company called zip line is that they looked for a really a hard problem that needs solving and they realized that this new technology would let them solve that problem when they put together the ondemand model and drones to deliver blood and medicine in a country with undeveloped hospital infrastructure bad roads turns out the leading cause of of uh of death of women in your in rwanda is postpartum hemorrhage and they were oh with drones with ondemand we can get blood anywhere in the country in fifteen to twenty minutes that's like seeking out the possibilities of the future and they're leapfrogging over the way we do things today so zip line is just one of many examples of somebody say wait a minute technology with let us do this differently why don't we timmy riley plays in that question at the end and another issue that comes up in the book a little skill and boddington is the idea of machine intelligence and minutes of takeover odd jobs will they be i need you opening was your thoughts on that but i think to be honest i am with him i in ah his key statement in the last section of the book his it is up to yes yeah and it's up to us what we decide that happens or not i am they match and in the camp of the enhancing of our sows through machine technology three way i three working alongside complementing us and yes we know the economy to come into play and we now the jobs they shifting but i think cam i liked very much lower section of the book where he's saying don't replace people open temp meant them so let's go without mentioning of people and expanding what we can day on the space going into an autonomous vehicle economy that still will involve know changing all of the roads creating new systems in.

rwanda bella postpartum hemorrhage timmy riley twenty minutes
"rwanda" Discussed on The Sheepdog Project

The Sheepdog Project

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"rwanda" Discussed on The Sheepdog Project

"Like that's the whole goal who were where we don't have to work at this for referenda lives in alert seen it where the guys i've train trained other guys now these congress here with hill on sale uh can be done to rwanda uganda and burundi and they've trained other teams of woke drillers um that now the through ten water cancun interest deke five wells and archives withdrew but if i counted up you know that were you know horrible other teams being trained burner teams i've always large coming up in the military's we always talk about train the trainer know it's not enough just to teach somebody had to do something make sure that they know how to pass that on and and you never will you don't wanna make yourself to valuable right itself you know i liked i love your philosophy work in yourself out of a job and uh providing such a basic necessity not do it you know most people look at places like that and they go oh we need to we need to give him books and schools it's a you know what if you don't have the basic necessities of life it doesn't matter if you have a if you're learning how to to write the alphabet it it it it does not so priorities people taghlibi priorities justin where where can people listening right now where can they find out more about five for the gun where can they support you in this great endeavour who are work for you aren't who earned her forgotten got work.

congress uganda rwanda burundi
"rwanda" Discussed on View From the Gutters Comic Book Club

View From the Gutters Comic Book Club

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"rwanda" Discussed on View From the Gutters Comic Book Club

"The one thing i was curious about a based on a couple of the costumes as was like you africa's a relatively large con it is weather patterns are not contiguous i was kinda like and i get hot some of that shit if it was hot air but maybe it's not a hot there well i think a lot of that stuff is like lenin and we look this up actually because at one point they show a map but it is actually and off of the western shore of lake victoria in a modern day tenzin ee or real world tenzin lia in any kind of in between uganda and rwanda which is it's basically it's equitorial aanzania uganda gets like right next to the equator yeah so yeah would be pretty fucking tropical their president well i assume that as a super advanced super science nation of a common quick universe they have good air conditioning no there are incredibly ecoconscious and they know that yeah they they have super science airconditioners there are ways of cooling air that deny surely he certainly for a man who's who's only intellectual peers are read richards hank pam air conditioning is the least of the concerns of the modern rural were khandan although you know what's interesting is that i think some of the some of what was being explored here although wasn't as explicitly talked about his like you have miners were like kinda like traditionally mining for rai bringing him even though they live in a place where like the cities are futuristic and i think that's an interesting thing too i kind of illustrate in it's kind talked about as far as like the pubic tell the difference in how the people were represented in whether or not they feel like abused by the way that the world is kind works for them.

lenin lake victoria tenzin lia uganda president africa rwanda