35 Burst results for "Rwanda"

"rwanda" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:47 min | 3 months ago

"rwanda" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"In the context of recent weeks, flight from UK airport canceled does not seem much of a headline. Indeed, such is the shambles that has beset British airports of late that you would more likely hear a yelped demand from some sweating editor to stop the presses if an aircraft departed on time. But one particular canceled flight is newsworthy. On Tuesday night, a Boeing 7 6 7 operated by Spanish charter outfit privileged style was supposed to take off from the Ministry of Defense airfield at down bound for Kigali. Aboard were to have been the first asylum seekers to be relocated from the UK to Rwanda. In the days before departure, the number of passengers was whittled down from a 130 or so by legal challenges. Barry Tuesday evening, it was expected that only 7 people would be making the trip, and then an intervention by the European court of human rights grounded the plane entirely. The UK's Home Secretary Priti Patel has nevertheless insisted that this is not the end of the Rwanda escapade, and that preparations for the next flight are afoot. I want to make something absolutely clear today, imagine that the speaker. The European court of human rights did not rule that the policy or relocations were unlawful. But they prohibited the removal of three of those on last night's fright. Those prohibitions last but different time periods, but are not an absolute bar on their transfer to Rwanda. Anyone who's been ordered to be released by the courts will be tagged while we continue to progress their relocation. The thing is basically this. The UK's government is vexed by recent arrivals of large ish numbers of people making unauthorized arrival on Britain's shores by boat across the English Channel. This is to establish first principles a fair enough thing to be vexed by. More than 10,000 people have made the crossing so far this year following at least 28,000 500 last year, and it is not entirely clear who all of them were, where they were from or where they have gone, which, however, liberal your views on immigration is a suboptimal state of affairs. There is also the basic humanitarian consideration of the risk these people are taking. Though most crossings are attempted when the channel is reasonably calm, it is the world's busiest shipping line, navigated every day by 600 or so vessels, many of them enormous and every one a potentially lethal hazard to a small inflatable craft of uncertain seaworthiness steered by a dubiously qualified skipper. The precise figure is unclear, but it is believed that more than 300 people have drowned attempting the crossing this century. Last November, 27 perished in a single incident. So everybody agrees that there is a problem, and even if a great many people vastly overestimate grand scheme of things, how serious the problem is, the optics of it are terrible, especially for the UK's current government, elected as it was on thunderous promises of controlling the nation's borders, something the UK's current government could not manage, even when a pandemic gave it not merely an excuse, but an actual reason. A decisive policy to deal with the boats was called for. This UK government as is its habit instead chose a dramatic gesture. Rwanda not noted as a haven for huddled masses yearning to breathe free and so forth was paid a 120 million quid with further payments to come based on numbers to take those who attempt to settle in the UK outside regular processes. One can only imagine the height to which this has arched the eyebrows of the 2229 rwandans who, in 2020 alone, applied for asylum in other countries, 17 of them in the UK. If the policy looks cruel and draconian, there are two reasons for that. One is that it is cruel and draconian, the other is that it is supposed to look cruel and draconian. And two crowds are being played to here. One is prospective migrants who the government hopes will be deterred, and the other is the Conservative Party's core voter base who the government hopes will enjoy this dismal spectacle. Well, I think we're getting too many people coming in. Definitely. And I think there's a fear as well that one day England won't be English people here. It's about foreigners. On both those scores, it might work, though it is almost certainly the case that the 500,000 pounds at the ground and charter flight cost would do Britain vastly more good in the long run if divided as startup seed capital among the next boatload to splash ashore on McIntyre beach. But the depressing reality is that while the thwarting of the Rwanda plan for the time being at least may look like a humiliating defeat for the UK's government, this is a game which the UK's government can not lose. If the plane had taken off and if any subsequent plane does take off, the UK's government would be able to claim that they were taking bold action to protect the nation's borders. The grounding of this flight and of any subsequent flights will enable the UK's government to claim that they tried to take bold action to protect the nation's borders, but were prevented by lati slurping lefty metropolitan lawyers and more treacherously still the European court of human rights. The fact that the ECHR has little to do with the EU and is a body of the Council of Europe, of which the UK has been a member since its foundation in 1949, or that the European convention on human rights was drafted substantially by British lawyer David Maxwell fyfe later a notably hardcore conservative Home Secretary at the encouragement of Winston Churchill, no introduction necessary are not distinctions that any current conservative politician or their media cheerleaders will hasten to point out. These are people who, on this and all other issues, want the fight, not the victory. The adjective, European, will do for monocle 24. I'm Andrew Muller.

UK Rwanda European court of human rights Priti Patel Ministry of Defense Kigali Boeing Britain Barry McIntyre beach Conservative Party European convention on human r David Maxwell fyfe Council of Europe EU Winston Churchill Andrew Muller
Cruz home run short of cycle, Pirates beat Cardinals 8-2

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 3 months ago

Cruz home run short of cycle, Pirates beat Cardinals 8-2

"O'Neil Cruz finished a home run short of the cycle as the pirates pounded out 15 hits and mashed the Cardinals a two Cruz raked in three runs and fellow rookie Rwanda Contreras allowed just one run over 5 and a third for Derek Shelton's young team You know especially those two guys who we feel are going to be a big part of what we're doing not only throughout the last 25 games but into the multiple years coming forward It's a really important sign and I think it's really it's a thing our fans can jump on board and really kind of embrace Tommy Edmond drove in a run and had two hits for the NL central leading Cardinals Josh Valtteri Pittsburgh

Neil Cruz Rwanda Contreras Derek Shelton Cardinals Pirates Cruz Tommy Edmond NL Josh Valtteri Pittsburgh
Sri Lankans missing; Thompson-Herah wins Commonwealth gold

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 4 months ago

Sri Lankans missing; Thompson-Herah wins Commonwealth gold

"The nation which is experiencing a major economic crisis has confirmed a wrestler a judoka and a judo coach have disappeared from one of the game's villages housing athletes and officials and our police are investigating their absence at the 2018 games on Australia's Gulf Coast almost one third of the Cameroon team went missing after the event and Rwanda's weightlifting coach also fled during a toilet break at the host's stadium Charles De Ledesma London

Gulf Coast Cameroon Australia Rwanda Charles De Ledesma London
"rwanda" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

04:31 min | 5 months ago

"rwanda" Discussed on Between The Lines

"I mean, the Commonwealth head of government meeting is supposed to be just that. The heads of government. Now in fact, that means not necessarily actual prime ministers. It could include heads of state. So for republics that would be a president and in the case of Australia, of course, our head of state is still the British monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, who's being represented this week by Prince Charles. But I do think that albanese's absence is a missed opportunity. I think that there is a different level of seriousness that's conveyed when a country's prime minister attends toham as opposed to the deputy leader. As you mentioned, of course, Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall are now in Rwanda. Is there messaging there from the royal family that even beyond Queen Elizabeth? The royal family is invested in and present in the future of the Commonwealth. Absolutely. I mean, we need to remember that Charles isn't just representing the queen in a sense of the next British monarch representing his mother. But he's representing the queen as head of Commonwealth as we know is the next will be the next head of the Commonwealth once Queen Elizabeth passes on. So he is in a sense already kind of rehearsing for his formal role as an ex head of the Commonwealth. But this is a very complicated situation because of course Charles has been outspoken, at least in a private capacity about his apparent disquiet over the British government's plan to send asylum seekers to Rwanda and that is a policy, of course, that British officials have acknowledged is actually borrows much from Australia's own offshore processing of asylum seekers. And Charles is said to be privately at least very unhappy with that. That raises all kinds of issues because of course as once Charles becomes the next monarch the next head of state of Britain and of course estrellas head of state. That he is not supposed to be commenting in any way, shape or form on British or indeed Australian or any other country's politics. So this discussion is quite fraught with danger for Charles ability to appear in the future as a sovereign who is supposedly politically neutral. At the same time, the British royal family has had quite a long tradition of speaking up.

Prince Charles toham Queen Elizabeth Charles albanese Rwanda Queen Elizabeth II Camilla Australia Duchess Cornwall British government Britain
"rwanda" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

05:26 min | 5 months ago

"rwanda" Discussed on Between The Lines

"The decision that made abortion legal in America. I think that's going to be a much more motivating factor for democratic voters than these hearings. And I don't get a sense that, frankly, that Republicans are tuning in these hearings at all. So I guess every little bit counts the last election was decided by a fairly small number of voters in a handful of states. So I don't want to discount it completely, but voters are focused on other things. And then there are more significant events coming that I think will have more of a political impact than this did. Olivia, you said that you don't get the sense that it's cutting through potentially with Republican supporters or Republicans themselves outside of D.C.. But what's the atmosphere in D.C. itself? You and I were speaking, it's a company town. Are these hearings the talk of every bar of school pick up of cues at Starbucks is the latest character, the latest testimony on everyone's lips? Well, I would say that the people who live in the company town part of Washington, D.C., certainly talk about these issues more than others. And of course, reporters most of all, right? A lot of the most remarkable things have come to light about the months, the weeks and months before and after January 6th. So we are, of course, riveted by a lot of this. But the short answer is no. While a lot of more people are likely to talk about this in D.C., the people in D.C. have some of the same concerns as those elsewhere, which is to say, life has gotten a lot more expensive, filling up your cars, become a lot more expensive. Those cut across party lines. And so they're pretty potent. Olivia, thanks so much for joining us today. My pleasure. That's Olivia Knox, who hosts the daily tour too at The Washington Post. On our end, this is between the lines. I'm Kylie Morris and up next, the Commonwealth heads of government meeting in Rwanda. What's the purpose and place of chugging in the modern world?.

D.C. Olivia America Starbucks Washington Olivia Knox Kylie Morris Commonwealth heads of governme The Washington Post Rwanda
"rwanda" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

05:24 min | 5 months ago

"rwanda" Discussed on Between The Lines

"It has been said to be pursuing investigations into January 6th as well. So while the committee itself will have will not be bringing any kind of charges it can't, and it's not what it does. They could certainly shape a case against Donald Trump. What if the Republicans on the committee, Olivier, Liz Cheney and Adam kinzinger? Is this likely the last act of their political careers? Is this kind of Republican suicide to be seen sitting adjacent to Democrats raising questions over president Trump's behavior? In K in the case of congressman kinzinger, he's announced that he's retiring. So he will not be coming back to the House of Representatives, at least not in this cycle. You know, I don't know that it's the end of his political career. He certainly wouldn't want to be in a position where he had to compete in a house primary against another Republican. Because the way to run against him would be rather obvious. So in that sense, it's the end of his house career. We'll see whether he gets the next act in public policy or in politics. For Liz Cheney, things are a bit more complicated because Donald Trump has endorsed a primary opponent against her. And so now it's a question of whether she can put together on the ground campaign that defeats a challenger endorsed by Donald Trump. And it's still, I mean, this is a tedious cliche at this point, but it still is very much Donald Trump's party. He's still its leader. And so she has a real fight on her hands. Last time I looked, she wasn't pulling that well, but it really depends who turns out in November. What about the dangers for Congress's reach and reputation? I mean, these hearings, they've gone big with these hearings. If this all amounts to nought, does that effectively then damage their ability or their reputation for holding power to account? Well, I have joked a little darkly in past comments that Protestantism might be the most popular religion in America, but the national religion is actually elite impunity. I don't think so. And I don't think so for the following reason, you know, there have been high stakes, hearings before that didn't end up in any kind of a prosecution. You can say there was the impeachment of Bill Clinton. Did Congress's reputation falter after that a little bit a little bit, voters certainly punished Republicans. But if you go back farther, you know, Iran contra didn't the wrong contra hearings didn't lead to any kind of significant legal jeopardy for the president for others it did, but not for the president. So we've done this before. We've done sort of high profile hearings before. It is in a time of incredible political polarization in America..

Liz Cheney Donald Trump Adam kinzinger congressman kinzinger Olivier Trump House of Representatives Congress Bill Clinton America Iran
"rwanda" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

03:36 min | 5 months ago

"rwanda" Discussed on Between The Lines

"But as you describe, the kind of earth shaking testimony that's emerging is coming from these stalwart Republican figures. Including former attorney general Bill Barr. I mean, he was a pretty interesting witness. He didn't appear in person. They showed snippets of his videotaped deposition. But he said that there was no evidence of the kind of voter fraud that Donald Trump was alleging. He said that he felt the former president had gone off the rails with these accusations. Now, he has shown what I will call charitably personal flexibility because he spent most of 2020 making the same kinds of false allegations of fraud. But it was still really telling to hear Bill Barr under oath. Say that the former president's charges were nonsense. Dangerous nonsense at that. And so it's been, I mean, it's been amazing. I understand why fox is doing what they're doing. But again, one of the most notable parts of this is that the Republicans vastly outnumber the other folks when it comes to witnesses before the January 6th committee. Olivier, when this congressional series of congressional hearings was announced, it was focused. It seemed on the January 6th riots. But the past week, it's been more about rather than about the damage to the capital injuries to those protecting it. It's really moved on to this administrative attempt by president Trump to bend the election results to his will. Is there much more to come along those lines? Yes, I think they're going to stick to that to that pattern. I mean, if you have to look at this, I think, as January 6th being seen as the culmination of a months long, public and private campaign by president Trump to cast out on the election if he lost and to subvert it when he lost. And so the fact that he is still remaining very much front and center, you know, they want to talk about how he was personally involved. They want to talk about the lengths to which he would go. So we expect them to stay on this theme. There's a hearing an upcoming hearing on Thursday that's going to feature several former senior Justice Department officials. Jeff Rosen former acting attorney general, Richard donohue former acting Deputy Attorney General and Stephen engel, another senior official in Donald Trump's Justice Department. And part of this, I suspect is going to focus on all the pressure that Donald Trump put on the Justice Department and on Bill Barr to find this nonexistent evidence of considerable voter fraud. So it's going to stay focused on him. What's the endgame for this committee? Are they are they looking to build a criminal case against president Trump? They will have nothing to do with the criminal case other than gathering the thread for it. They've gathered all these witness statements. They've got all these depositions they've had all this testimony. One useful way of thinking about these hearings is as the Senate impeachment trial that Donald Trump never got. You'll remember that the House representatives impeached Donald Trump about a week after the January 6th insurrection. In fact, that was the charge incitement of insurrection. That moved over to the Senate for the trial. The Republicans blocked calling witnesses. And so you had a very speedy process in which he was acquitted along party lives basically along party lines. So this is actually looks a lot like the impeachment trial that he never got over January 6th. That said, one of their audiences is rather clearly, in addition to the court of public opinion, one of their other audiences is rather clearly attorney general Merrick Garland..

Bill Barr president Trump Donald Trump Jeff Rosen Richard donohue Stephen engel Donald Trump's Justice Departm Justice Department Olivier fox Senate House court of public opinion Merrick Garland
"rwanda" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

01:58 min | 6 months ago

"rwanda" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"On <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <SpeakerChange> both <Speech_Male> those scores, <Speech_Male> it might work, <Speech_Music_Male> though it is <Speech_Music_Male> almost certainly the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> case that the 500,000 <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> pounds <Speech_Male> at the ground and charter <Speech_Male> flight cost <Speech_Male> would do Britain <Speech_Male> vastly more good in <Speech_Male> the long run if <Speech_Male> divided as startup <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> seed capital <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> among the next <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> boatload to splash ashore <Speech_Music_Male> on McIntyre <Music> beach. <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> But the depressing <Speech_Male> reality is that while <Speech_Male> the thwarting of the <Speech_Male> Rwanda plan <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for the time being <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> at least may look <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> like a humiliating <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> defeat for the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> UK's government, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> this is a game <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> which the UK's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> government can not <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> lose. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> If the plane <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> had taken off <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and if any subsequent <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> plane does take off, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the UK's <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> government would be <Speech_Male> able to claim that they <Speech_Male> were taking bold <Speech_Male> action to protect <Speech_Male> the nation's borders. <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Male> grounding of this <Speech_Male> flight and of any <Speech_Male> subsequent flights <Speech_Male> will enable the <Speech_Male> UK's government to <Speech_Male> claim that they tried <Speech_Male> to take bold action <Speech_Male> to protect the nation's <Speech_Male> borders, <Speech_Male> but were prevented <Speech_Male> by lati <Speech_Male> slurping lefty <Speech_Male> metropolitan lawyers <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> more treacherously <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> still the <Speech_Male> European court <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of human rights. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> The fact <Speech_Male> that the ECHR <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> has little to do with <Speech_Male> the EU and <Speech_Male> is a body of <Speech_Male> the Council of Europe, <Speech_Male> of which the UK <Speech_Male> has been a member <Speech_Male> since its foundation in <Speech_Male> 1949, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> or that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the European convention <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on human rights <Speech_Male> was drafted substantially <Speech_Male> by British <Speech_Male> lawyer David Maxwell <Speech_Male> fyfe later <Speech_Male> a notably hardcore <Speech_Male> conservative <Speech_Male> Home Secretary <Speech_Male> at the encouragement <Speech_Male> of Winston Churchill, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> no introduction <Speech_Male> necessary <Speech_Male> are not distinctions <Speech_Male> that any current <Speech_Male> conservative politician <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> or their <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> media cheerleaders <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> will hasten to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> point out. <Speech_Male> These are people <Speech_Male> who, on this <Speech_Male> and all other <Speech_Male> issues, want <Speech_Male> the fight, not <Speech_Male> the victory. <Speech_Male> The adjective, <Speech_Male> European, <Speech_Music_Male> will do <Speech_Music_Male> for monocle 24.

UK cancels first flight to deport asylum seekers to Rwanda

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 6 months ago

UK cancels first flight to deport asylum seekers to Rwanda

"Britain late Tuesday canceled a flight that was scheduled to deport asylum seekers to Rwanda after the European court of human rights intervened saying the plan carried a real risk of irreversible harm The decision to scrap the flight capped three days of frantic cult challenges as immigration rights advocates and labor unions sought to stop the deportations lawyers had launched a flurry of case by case appeals seeking to block the deportation of everyone on the government's list and leaders of the Church of England had joined the opposition calling the government's policy immoral despite the outcry prime minister Boris Johnson has emphatically defended Britain's plan Charles De Ledesma London

European Court Of Human Rights Rwanda Britain Church Of England Government Boris Johnson Charles De Ledesma London
"rwanda" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:48 min | 6 months ago

"rwanda" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Some sunshine out there this morning amid all those clouds we are headed to a partly sunny day with a high near 82 Tonight mostly clear in 67 and then tomorrow almost a repeat of today It's 5 52 This is morning edition from NPR news I'm a Martinez I'm Rachel Martin And I'm leyla faulted The United Kingdom plans to fly a group of asylum seekers out of the UK and two Rwanda today It's the first deportation flight to remove some asylum seekers who arrived in the UK illegally by boat more are expected next week The policy has been widely criticized as cruel and barbaric British Home Secretary Priti Patel defended it after it was announced in April She says the goal is to disrupt gangs trafficking refugees Criminals are exploiting the hopes and fears of migrants pushing them to making dangerous journeys to the UK And this has devastating consequences for the countless men women and children who have tragically lost their lives or loved ones on perilous journeys Karen Doyle then national organizer for movement for justice and immigrant rights organization in the UK says this policy it's a distraction This is a government that is failing that has been risen with corruption and scandal And they've even called this policy of attacking immigrants that are red meat policy They throw some red meat to their racist base and hope it distracts from their own corruption and failures Yesterday London's high court did not grant an injunction to stop the flight Among those who will be deported are Iranian Iraqi Afghan and Syrian refugees I asked Doyle if the policy will stop people from taking the risky journey to the UK It is not because what is driving people to leave their homes and seek sanctuary still exists It's just obfuscation and lies to say that it's about saving lives because the reality is that these asylum seekers we expect multiple suicide attempts in the coming 24 hours Because they have to leave Because they're being told they're being sent thousands of miles away to a country that they have no connection to the reality is this decision signals an end to any notion of British commitment to human rights That's why we are putting everything into calling on all the components parts of this people trafficking because that's what it is It's offering Rwanda cash to take people This is people trafficking This is the government trafficking in refugees because if Britain gets away with it other countries are going to try as well You mentioned obviously they're being sent to a country that they're not from Rwanda If you could just break down why Rwanda why are people who have fled from their countries being sent to a country that they're not from Rwanda has been selling itself for a number of years as the destination of choice for nation looking to get rid of their refugees In 2014 they did a deal with Israel Israel sent hundreds of refugees to Rwanda in a deal that was a carbon copy of this one And long-term research over the course of that pact showed that everyone left to remember everyone ended up either back in Europe or track of the game through an enslaved in Libya because anyone who's coming through the African route to Europe they get caught in Livia and they get enslaved in camps and forced to work and beaten and tortured And Rwanda is a democratic nation This is a dictatorship They've already fired on refugee protesters who are protesting the appalling conditions in the camps in Rwanda They shot at refugees like this is the reality of Rwanda aside from the spin that's been sold by the British government The UN refugee chief describes this policy as catastrophic And you said that there's no time to wait because so many people could be deported What should happen then in the meantime in your view We're calling on mass pressure on the Rwandan government to pull out of this deal We're calling on all the Commonwealth nations to say no No we should not be a part of this We're calling on the African Union to say no we will not be a dumping ground for Britain's refugees who've written should be taking responsibility for We will not engage in people trafficking The pilots the airline workers the guards the escorts all of them should look at their conscience and they should refuse the trade unions need to back them up and say no we will not have anything to do with this Karen Doyle is the national organizer for movement for justice Thank you so much Okay thank you Scientists have recorded a song made by a volcano NPR's Jeff bromfield says it could help predict future eruptions There's a big volcano in Hawaii called kilauea In 2008 there started an eruptive episode where there was an active lava Lake at the summit That's leaf carlstrom a Professor of volcanology at the university of Oregon As the volcano's crater filled with lava rocks from the wall began falling into it These are big rockfalls like bust sized These giant boulders would plunge into the lava Lake several times a week for the next ten years and scientists were listening to the splashes they.

Rwanda UK Karen Doyle NPR news Rachel Martin Priti Patel movement for justice and immig leyla Martinez United Kingdom Doyle Israel Britain Rwandan government Europe Livia London Libya Commonwealth nations British government
 UK's deportation plan attacks 'basic dignity,' lawyers say

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 6 months ago

UK's deportation plan attacks 'basic dignity,' lawyers say

"A senior lawyer says Britain's Rwanda deportation plan attacks a key element of human rights A lawyer for migrants says illegal decision not to issue an injunction against the deportations can not rationally be sustained because of concerns about the protection of migrant rights in the country around her During an appeal court hearing aimed at blocking implementation of the policy rather Hussein says the process undermines the basic dignity of people who escaping war and oppression separately activists are challenging the deportations on a person by person basis seeking to ensure that no migrants will be eligible for deportation even if the flights are allowed to go ahead Charles De Ledesma

Rwanda Britain Hussein Charles De Ledesma
"rwanda" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

05:56 min | 6 months ago

"rwanda" Discussed on Today, Explained

"I've spoken to a few migrants and I spoke to one man, a Afghan man, and he told me that he would rather kill himself. Then go for Rwanda. For them, there's no hope in Rwanda. They want to come to Britain and listen Britain has extensive family support. For a lot of these people, if you are lonely person, you're on the run from a repressive regime. You destitute. You will go to your family networks, and this is what some of these people are doing. Why Rwanda is their question. And they're not deterred. The migrants that I've spoken to say, they're not deterred.

Rwanda Britain
"rwanda" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

01:35 min | 6 months ago

"rwanda" Discussed on Today, Explained

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"rwanda" Discussed on CLEANING UP THE MENTAL MESS with Dr. Caroline Leaf

CLEANING UP THE MENTAL MESS with Dr. Caroline Leaf

01:54 min | 7 months ago

"rwanda" Discussed on CLEANING UP THE MENTAL MESS with Dr. Caroline Leaf

"So I sing all the socioeconomic trauma the racism trauma and I worked in that three days a week in those environments with terrible poverty and whatever and I worked in water on Rwanda and I worked with the wealthiest of the wealthy hits of CEOs of corporations, schools everywhere that I my laboratory was the world to try and understand humans and mind and get away from this scientific concept that consciousness is the hard question and no one is really doing anything. We just talking about it as being as a seleucid philosophical thing that we will push aside and one day promissory science will do it one day and I thought that I couldn't do this because I am mind you all mind. So if I don't manage it, I mean you can go three weeks without food three days without water three minutes without oxygen, but you don't even go through seconds without using your mind. So my underlying premise was okay, well, if that's the case, what is it? And how do we manage it? And if I don't manage it, what I did for my research, you can learn to manage that mind is malleable. You can direct the neuroplasticity your brain under some of the first neuroplasticity research in my field in the late 80s, early 90s before it was accepted by the mid 90s neuroplasticity was well that's it. And I showed that my underlying argument with thesis was even mind is always changing, which it is. So you wake up, your experiencing everything, conversations that emails support life, politics, you're immediately most in life, and you processing that through your mind, you're growing it into your brain and you're doing this every moment of the day. So if I don't control it it's a mess, but if I do control it, then it isn't a mace. Now I know we can't control your brains in circumstances. We all agree with that. So I'm not into this whole law but I'm not talking about law of attraction and saying 15 positive affirmations and that's going to fix your story. No, I'm not talking about that at all..

Rwanda
"rwanda" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

03:44 min | 8 months ago

"rwanda" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Do these.

"rwanda" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:28 min | 8 months ago

"rwanda" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"To claim asylum. And then people would just get on ferries, which is much cheaper and much safer than trying to get in a dinghy. All right, Joel, thanks so much for joining us today. Thank you. Hi, I'm Kimberly Jenkins. Host of a new podcast about the unsung people behind iconic looks. I thought okay, she's a southern Belle, but she's a black woman. So how do I define that? In each episode of the invisible seam, we open up the archive of American fashion and celebrate its black contributions. The invisible seam is available now from Tommy Hilfiger's people's place program and the fashion and race database. This intelligence podcast is sponsored by crowd street, 98% of the investors crowd street surveyed in 2021 said they will invest in real estate this year. Will you? From state of the art labs fueling medical discoveries to apartments in the heart of Austin. Crowd street gives investors like you the ability to invest in real estate, simply by clicking invest now. Join a leading online real estate investing platform and learn more at crowd street dot com. Over the quarter century, prior to the pandemic. Manufacturing was transformed by the emergence of complex global supply chains. Firms have used them to efficiently produce all sorts of goods at low cost and enormous scale. Common wisdom might suggest that COVID-19 has exposed their vulnerabilities. The pandemic created shortages of everything from vehicles to electronic goods to garden furniture. Some governments have suggested pulling back from globalization. Instead, boosting domestic manufacturing to protect their economies. This is called reshoring. But the International Monetary Fund has come up with an alternative interpretation of the resilience of those supply chains and a different prescription for what should happen next. Reassuring production is not actually the way to prevent damage from supply shocks and actually the conclusion of the IMS research is that a policy of reassuring could in fact leave economies more vulnerable to such shocks. Ryan avent is a senior editor at The Economist and writes the free exchange column. The pandemic really did a number on global supply chains. It put them through the ringer. You had this enormous blow to economies that provided a huge shock to demand, which tumbled in the spring of 2020 and then it bounced back with a vengeance. The consequence has been an enormous surge in shipping times and delays a cost have risen. There have been shortages of critical components like computer chips and other inputs to electronics. It's really encouraged governments to think more about how they can encourage domestic productions, but the work that the IMF has just published suggests that that may in fact leave them more vulnerable to troubles like this in the future. And why is that? What's the IMF think is the right thing to do? Well, the IMF thinks that actually what you want to aim for is diversification of your supply chains, which means importing critical components from a broader array of countries. And also that you're making your supply chains more flexible. So if that's certain components aren't available, you can easily switch to substitutes. So the way the IMF makes the case for diversification is in part by looking at how concentrated production is across the global economy as a whole. If you're looking at a given product produced by different countries, the concentration of that production or the average market share that a country has in production of that product is about 31%. But if you look at specific individual economies and their production strategies, they tend to draw about 70 to 80% of the components they use in production from the home economy, from their domestic economy. And so what that means is that if you increase the share of critical inputs that you're taking from the domestic economy, you're making your supply chains less diversified. In this ends up being hugely important in the IMF estimates, it spills a model, which it uses to kind of assess different trade shocks. And so if it hits this model with a massive trade shock, like if we say that China gets a quarter of its production knocked out. The average economy in that case can expect to see GDP fall by a full percentage point in a world where trades become much more diversified. The cost of that kind of shock is halved, which is just an enormous improvement in the resilience of the global economy. I want to talk about resilience and diversification in a bit. What do we know about the economic impact of the pandemic broadly? Trade fell by about 12% in the second quarter of 2020 relative to late 2019. That's a similar drop in trade to what happened during the global financial crisis, but it happened much more quickly. But then it also rebounded far more quickly than has typically been the case in other recessions. And so you just had this extreme volatility in global trade. And that shows up in this model that the IMF has developed, if they plug in the fall and spending that was observed, the effects that it predicts for trade are not what we actually saw. And so it's clear that this is not just your sort of garden variety recession. It was very strange period that was not just about economic weakness, but also about things like lockdowns that affected trade and really strange ways. What are some of those strange ways? I mean, how did reality differ from what the IMS model predicted? Part of what we observed was strangeness within economies themselves. And so you saw a big shift in spending away from services and toward goods. People are spending much more on home electronics, either to amuse themselves or so they were able to work from home. And then also because domestic economies couldn't produce all the things they normally produced. Some places had to import goods from elsewhere. So the pandemic distorted domestic economies presumably, there was also an effect on countries trading partners and on trade more broadly, right? They're definitely was, yes. What the IMF shows is that through the first half of 2020, about 60% of the decline in a country's imports could be explained by lockdowns in its trading partners. But importantly, these effects got smaller over time. And that's partly because there was a lot of telework that developed and so places which were able to do more remote work, saw smaller effects on trade from lockdowns. But also the IMF finds that there's this improvement over time in the effect of a given lockdown on trade and they chalk this up to the adaptability of supply chains learning to get around mobility restrictions better, but also shifts in production. And so places that left lockdowns earlier see this increase in market share, which is a sign that firms are moving production around to places that are dealing with the virus better. And this really reflects well, I think, on supply chains as a way of handling production and trade. Now, Ryan, you and I are both in the United States and it may feel to us like the pandemic is in some sense over, but it's not the world is still in the middle of it, China. A huge manufacturing center is imposing new lockdowns. Russia has invaded Ukraine, which has prompted fears of supply chain shortages in grains and fertilizer. How.

IMF Kimberly Jenkins Ryan avent free exchange column Tommy Hilfiger Joel IMS Austin China Ryan United States Russia Ukraine
"rwanda" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:25 min | 8 months ago

"rwanda" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Policy from a political farce, but Britain's conservative government is pressing ahead with a controversial new way of dealing with refugees. Under this partnership, those who travel to the UK by illegal and dangerous routes, including by small boats across the channel, may be relocated to Rwanda where they will have their asylum claims considered. The plan, set out by the Home Secretary Priti Patel, is a straightforward one. Try to enter the country illegally, and you could be flown 6500 kilometers to Rwanda. No matter where you've come from. Opposition has come from all sides, predictably from the leader of the Labor Party, Keir Starmer. You know, they're unworkable. They're extortionate, they're going to cost taxpayers billions of pounds. I think it's a desperate announcement. The Archbishop of Canterbury said the policy did not stand the judgment of God. There have even been critics within the Conservative Party itself. Among them, former prime minister, Theresa May. I do not support the removal to Rwanda policy on the grounds of legality, practicality, and efficacy. There's been a lot of focus on reasons why the plan won't work. But the bigger concern might be the impact if it does. In Britain, Rwanda, and beyond. It's a really big step. Joel Budd is The Economist social policy editor. Britain has for many years tried to be unwelcoming to asylum seekers. It has cut their per week subsidies, it has banned them from working for very long periods of time, it's forced them to wait months and months and months before their claims are heard. But this is something entirely new. And Joel, can you flesh it out a bit more? When could this go into effect and what is the plan do? It only goes into effect once the government has passed a kind of enabling law in parliament. And that's being argued over at the moment. But I imagine that will pass within a couple of months. In theory it could start sending people to Rwanda pretty quickly. People in Downing Street have suggested that they can start doing so within a few weeks. I think that's fairly unlikely because there will be legal challenges. And what's the rationale behind it? Why are they doing this? There's a kind of ostensible rationale. And then I think there's a more sort of realistic rationale. The ostensible rationale is that asylum seekers trying to get to Britain in little inflatable dinghies with the help of people smugglers is a very, very dangerous way of going about things. It's really undesirable. It puts money into the hands of criminals, people drown, and so forth. And we just can't have such a kind of hazardous criminal system operating. I think though a more realistic reading of it is that it's being done in order to deter people from trying to make the journey at all. And have other countries try to approach it like this? Yes, they have. As soon as COVID struck, America started to simply sort of push people back over at southern border under guidance from the Centers for Disease Control, which argued that they were a COVID risk. And for the last few years, the European Union has kind of relocated people mostly Syrians who cross from turkey into Greece, who sent them back to turkey. And so as a result, turkey now has an enormous population of Syria and asylum seekers. Denmark did a deal with Rwanda last year, but it's pretty theoretical. So this would be a new thing because it would send people regardless of where they come from. It will send people sort of 6500 kilometers away. I'm curious, why is Britain and why did Denmark choose Rwanda and what is Rwanda get out of it? Well, Rwanda gets money out of it, they also get a bit of respect and immunity from criticism. It's an autocracy, but it's a funny, it's a funny kind of autocracy. It's not a sort of thuggish regime. The police in Rwanda do not go around beating people up. Instead, it's a country where ordinary people are just sort of too scared to alarmed to criticize the government. The government exercise is a kind of a sort of a kind of control over their minds really, asking somebody in Rwanda about politics, the look of terror that comes across their phases is quite something. So this deal means in fact that Britain has to stop asking whether Rwanda is sticking to kind of human rights obligations. And this policy has come in for a lot of criticism though, hasn't it? Yes, it's coming for criticism, but the criticisms are I think a bit odd, one very common criticism is that it will be super expensive to do this. Another one is that it just won't work. Lawyers will attack it. It's going to be very hard to send lots and lots of people to Rwanda, just sort of practically, and so as a result, it's not really going to be very much of a deterrent. I think those criticisms are not really quite the right ones. Having an expensive asylum system is sort of maybe desirable. It's not clear that a science system or to be cheap. And if not many people are sent to Rwanda, well then sort of so what? I think a much more worrying possibility is that in fact, it is effective. Effective in that it works as a deterrent? Yes, definitely. Denmark has already said that it's going back into talks with Rwanda to send asylum seekers who reached Denmark and I think, yes, if Britain does manage to send lots of asylum seekers in other words, kind of thousands per year, people will get the message, I think, and stop trying to come to Britain and once it becomes clear that that has happened. But I think you would indeed see a cascading effect of other countries deciding that they want to do pretty much the same thing. Joel, what's the risk if other rich countries start doing this? I think the risk is that they're just becomes a sort of kind of copycat situation where rich countries simply buy their way out of having to hear a silent claims at all. And what that would lead us to is a world where the countries that are most able to accommodate asylum seekers are kind of end up doing by far the least. Now rich countries already host fewer refugees than poor countries in many cases. The huge populations of refugees are in countries like turkey, Kenya, Bangladesh, with its rohingyas and so on. But if other rich countries start to follow Britain, then we would just end up with a sort of extreme version of that where sort of all refugees are in the countries that can't afford to shook them somewhere else. It's not easy to balance, you know, controlling the borders toward compassion with people who need a place for safety. Setting aside this policy for a minute, do you think that Johnson's government is getting it wrong more broadly? It is just enormously difficult. I think the British government needs to be clear and honest about what it really wants to achieve. If it wants to prevent deaths in the channel and prevent chaos in the channel, there are actually quite easy ways of doing that. The easy way is simply to allow asylum seekers in northern France to apply for asylum in the UK. So Britain would kind of move its border onto French territory. The French are up for this, so they have said. And so people would be allowed to try to claim asylum in Britain from northern France. And that would mean that essentially nobody I would think would try to cross the channel in a dinghy ever again. Or Britain could issue some kind of humanitarian Visa, you know, essentially we give you permission to come to Britain in order.

Rwanda Britain Priti Patel Keir Starmer Joel Budd Denmark turkey Theresa May Labor Party Conservative Party Joel Canterbury Centers for Disease Control UK parliament European Union Syria Greece America
BioNTech plans modular vaccine factories in Africa

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 10 months ago

BioNTech plans modular vaccine factories in Africa

"German vaccine maker by on tech has unveiled plans to establish manufacturing facilities in Africa that would boost the availability of much needed medicines on the continent the modular design of the coal facility consists of shipping containers fitted with the equipment necessary to make the company's M. RNA based vaccines from start to finish save the final step the filling doses in the bottles the first facility will be shipped to Senegal Rwanda in the second half of this year by on tech aims to stop production of up to fifty million doses of vaccines a year that within twelve months pending approval from local regulators by on tech developed the first widely approved shot against Kevin nineteen together with FISA I'm Charles de Ledesma

Africa Senegal Rwanda Kevin Nineteen Charles De Ledesma
"rwanda" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"rwanda" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"With nearly all votes counted, Russia's ruling party is heading for a comprehensive victory in parliamentary elections. Supporters of United Russia, which backs President Vladimir Putin celebrated his results for returned. But it wasn't a straightforward election. Many opposition candidates were barred from standing. Opposition leader Alexei Navalny is in jail and his allies were declared extremists. Kremlin critics are also alleging widespread fraud. In London. Simon Owen Fox News, The man who inspired the movie Hotel Rwanda is found guilty of terrorism charges They're accused of being in a group that launched deadly attacks and want in 2018 and 19 Paul recess. A beginner called the trial a sham and says he was kidnapped from Belgium, where he lives and taken to Rwanda against as well. He saved hundreds of people during a genocide by hiding them in his hotel. September's childhood obesity awareness Month. This is House call for health. Approximately one in five Children has obesity. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention calls the disease complaint. It's with many contributing factors, but they also suggest several things parents and caregivers can do to help on the journey to good health. Step. One. Eat the rainbow, a mixture of fruits, veggies whole grains, lean proteins and lower fat free dairy to move more. Get exercising. Three. Slow down on both eating sugar and drinking sugary drinks for reduced screen time and finally get better Sleep. For more health news, fox news, health dot com House Call for Health and Lisa Brady Fox News Sunday night FOOTBALL. Baltimore Back. Lamar Jackson rushed for two touchdowns, including the game winner with a minute left in the game third and goal..

Lamar Jackson Alexei Navalny Rwanda Lisa Brady Belgium London 2018 Sunday night Simon Owen two touchdowns Hotel Rwanda September 19 hundreds of people Centers for Disease Control an fox news Fox News both Three President Vladimir Putin
Hotel Rwanda Hero Paul Rusesabagina Convicted on Terror Charges

Garret Lewis

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

Hotel Rwanda Hero Paul Rusesabagina Convicted on Terror Charges

"Who inspired the movie Hotel Rwanda is found guilty of terrorism charges They're accused of being in a group that launched deadly attacks and want in 2018 and 19 Paul recess. A beginner called the trial a sham and says he was kidnapped from Belgium, where he lives and taken to Rwanda against as well. He saved hundreds of people during a genocide by hiding them in his hotel.

Rwanda Paul Belgium
"rwanda" Discussed on Your Own Magic

Your Own Magic

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"rwanda" Discussed on Your Own Magic

"I happen to in colorado. We are communicating and to know that the pinnacle and other entities. I mean they are so far evolved that they're able to telepathically deliver all these messages. And that's something that we do. We do have the ability to access as long as we continue to want to not evolve. Like because i'm a spiritual being a human experience but like no. Actually of all in our spirituality have the experiences so we really can't continue to find more information understand this experience even more exactly exactly exactly and you and i were totally brought together. Because i remember when i listen to your podcast the i like the very beginning like when it first came out i was driving. And as i'm gonna talk to that girl one day raquel. And i always said i remember. I sent you a couple of emails. Like i just really want to be on your show. 'cause i wanna talk to you and then you didn't get my emails but then you reach technique. And unlike i the way. I see time as we see time receive selves age. We see the sun. Come up we see it. Go down like we see time as linear on the physical and that's how it is but Every other dimension like outside of the physical happy at the same time and right now. I like completely experiencing hearing your podcast for the first time driving down the road that i was driving. Like i'm gonna talk like rwanda like this was happening at that. Yes i wish you could see. But i have my hands cute. Gosh so okay to activate this line now curious if there's something to give.

colorado raquel rwanda
Victor Davis Hanson Says We're in Decline

Mark Levin

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Victor Davis Hanson Says We're in Decline

"You know, the fall of Rome is actually relatively complicated. Nobody knows exactly when it happened. Historians debate But it did fall. And so Victor Davis Hanson. I want to ask you a question. Are we in decline because it sure feels that way to me. Yeah, we're in decline Market and the the main question is whether it's a decline. That's uh, permanent. Or were such an adaptive fluid society with this wonderful constitution? That we can react to it, make the necessary adjustments and go on. But this this this challenge is a little bit different than the ones we've seen before. Because It's Wokeness is insidious. It appeals to the most tribal instincts of people to identify by superficial appearance, and it's a narcotic that really destroys societies. We saw that in the Balkans and Rwanda. That's the ultimate trajectory we're on if we keep it

Victor Davis Hanson Rome Balkans Rwanda
American Media and Schools Are Trying to Demonize White Men

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:00 min | 1 year ago

American Media and Schools Are Trying to Demonize White Men

"Right now. What we're doing is trying to make. Everything is toxic as possible so that we can demonize white men the way. The hutus demonize the footsie's in rwanda campaign against whites against men against christians against western civilization. That we're seeing from armenia is coordinated and his hateful as that which the hutu extremists used in rwanda to dehumanize tootsie cockroaches who needed to be exterminated. That's why they're teaching children in school. That america was founded as a haven for slavery when in fact slavery was everywhere in the world in sixteen nineteen except for western europe and it will be it would be the west soon be britain and shortly after the united states that abolished slavery and then had to force the muslim world at the point of british gunboats to stop selling black slaves in the late nineteenth

Rwanda Hutu Armenia United States Europe Britain
Thousands Evacuate Congo's Goma After More Volcanic Activity

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Thousands Evacuate Congo's Goma After More Volcanic Activity

"Tens of thousands of people are evacuating the city of Goma in eastern Congo for fear of another volcanic corruption by mountaineering going good people fled in panic from their homes cycles well thought this walking two vehicles provided by local authorities they've been advised to carry very little and that they may be able to retire and I say say ten out of eighteen neighborhoods have been ordered to evacuate as authorities warn an eruption could occur at any time well the main city of Goma was previously spad it's now under threats with activity being reported under the open area and they keep an eruption under the lake could lead to the explosion of gas in the lake which in turn could destroy parts of go Mangus said the neighboring Rwanda I'm Karen Thomas

Goma Congo Mangus Rwanda Karen Thomas
World Kidlines: Biden Wants to Restart Nuclear Talks With Iran

Little News Ears

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

World Kidlines: Biden Wants to Restart Nuclear Talks With Iran

"The joe biden administration wants to restart nuclear talks with iran. What does that mean exactly. Europe and the us wants to make sure that iran has limited nuclear abilities. So it can't make a lot of nuclear weapons iran once the freedom to use nuclear power which can also be used to heat homes. Joe biden's administration wants to get iran. More feed them to develop nuclear power with the understanding that it will need to be checked by outside agencies

Joe Biden Administration Iran Europe Joe Biden United States
New York state legislature passes bill to legalize recreational marijuana

NPR News Now

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

New York state legislature passes bill to legalize recreational marijuana

"New york's legislature has voted to allow recreational marijuana use and governor andrew. Cuomo says he'll sign the bill. As npr's brian man reports york stands to become the fifteenth state to take the step. New york's rwanda. Legalization law aims to help more people of color. Play a part. In the new legal pot industry it also funnels forty percent of marijuana tax revenues into neighborhoods. Hit hard by addiction and by high numbers of drug arrests assemblywoman crystal peoples stokes who co-authored the measure said communities of color have been crippled by marijuana. Criminalization aren't is crafted in a manner that is designed to help rebuild those lives those lives and those communities studies show black and brown new yorkers were targeted disproportionately by marijuana arrests. Tens of thousands of people are expected to have their felony drug convictions. Expunged

Governor Andrew Brian Man New York Cuomo Legislature NPR Rwanda Stokes
this African COVID success is a big wake-up call for the West

Science Friction

02:21 min | 1 year ago

this African COVID success is a big wake-up call for the West

"Scenes from wuhan in china and the tesha mitchell joining you for science fiction. Welcome videos emerge on social media of authorities using increasingly drastic measures. I remember when this chilling footage i vs four corners program last february. A woman in a pink tracksuit is being dragged kicking and screaming from an apartment block by police in black suits. And what now. Six back then a bit over twelve months ago. It was hard to believe this heavy handed response to a virus. We knew almost nothing about around. China residents post scenes claiming officials a welding. The doors of apartment buildings shot so people can't get out even as infectious disease. Specialist started to sound alarm bells outside of china. Most countries were slow to act. Some seem to be in denial preferring to feed conspiracy theories about the origins of the virus. But not the country you'll hear about on science friction today and it might surprise you to hear what country that ease. Shocking news breaks that the man who would i warned. The outbreak has died of coronavirus. We've known that if a country as serious as china today that be careful. It wasn't their website the magnitude of the problem the speed of the problem and the spread of the virus so we took action because we knew that was the level of travel with having tourists coming here. We were at risk so every country should have done that as early as january last year. Rwanda stop plane. Distant for china pediatrician and global health. Later dr onions been guajillo is rwanda's former minister of health. And we start screening all the beeper entering in rhonda for covid sign and take the information in case. There were fine coveyed a positive during their stay in runner so that we can do easily contact tracing

Tesha Mitchell China Wuhan Infectious Disease Rwanda Dr Onions Rhonda
France Has ‘Overwhelming’ Responsibility for Rwanda Genocide

The World

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

France Has ‘Overwhelming’ Responsibility for Rwanda Genocide

"French failures, saying it was blind to the preparation of the massacres but has cleared it of complicity in the killings. Commission of experts said France poor overwhelming responsibilities in relation to the killing in 1994 off 800,000 ethnic Tutsis and moderate who two's Monsanto. Claire is the historian who led the commission. The majority for says woman in politic it in politics. The French authorities pursued a policy that was totally disconnected from reality, a policy that bore the stigma of colonization and ultra ethicist policy that did not actually see that Rwanda could get out of it and basically accentuated the ethnic crisis aligned itself with the regime of president Habria manner. Which was a racist regime that did not succeed in extricating Habaniya manner from the extremists. United Nations says it has for the first time managed to reach to refugee camps

Commission Of Experts Monsanto Claire France President Habria Rwanda United Nations
"rwanda" Discussed on The Know Show

The Know Show

26:14 min | 1 year ago

"rwanda" Discussed on The Know Show

Nasdaq Recoups Heavy Losses as Tech Stocks Roar Back

BTV Simulcast

01:43 min | 1 year ago

Nasdaq Recoups Heavy Losses as Tech Stocks Roar Back

"The NASDAQ would show rule back almost in the roaring twenties up nearly 4% yesterday, so everybody loves a little bit of growth. That is the comeback kid. If the violence of these swings dine 11% up nearly 4%. The question is, can there be some kind of co existence between growth and value? Or must one always be resplendent? NASDAQ futures don't intensive 1% this morning. By the way, Mr Gundlach is on the tape on his monthly called, he says, you could drop Like you did in the 2000 and 2003 on the NASDAQ, so wary, warning their Bitcoin made up to $55,000 and off the highest She came. Of course, there are calls that we could have another assault on the highs of 58,350. According to Pepe Stone, But Jimmy Morgan, they're filing issue notes Backed by Kryptos. Yes, so so Credibility is minding in the Bitcoin Storm. Yeah, if you bought detective, but you sure looked very smart in the last few hours, but let's see whether that sticks up US tens. On focus. 1 53 68 were coming off on the yield a little bit. Wall Street is on a one way street right now, and it is going whichever way the Treasury market takes it. According to Rwanda, they're moving. Tech stocks coincides with the rally and treasury. So many traders gonna be skeptical that this is going to hold Steven in its remarks. He told me earlier that he sees a grind towards 2% Mark. We have a closely watch sale. Off debt $38 billion of 10 year notes. And then on Thursday, you have the $24 billion off 30 year. Bonds very important lookout for Bloomberg Dollar indexed gets a lift this wider risk averse for environment that we're in this Asian session and we're getting closer than 200 day moving average in terms of the technicals, Let's get

Mr Gundlach Pepe Stone Jimmy Morgan Treasury Rwanda Steven United States Mark
"rwanda" Discussed on Many Roads Travelled :  (Solo Female) Travel Podcast

Many Roads Travelled : (Solo Female) Travel Podcast

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"rwanda" Discussed on Many Roads Travelled : (Solo Female) Travel Podcast

"In traveled sir overseas straight on youtube. Okay see you there and enjoy the show cheers. So it's episode thirty five and today's episode going to be talking about. We leave the bring a national park where i saw the guerrillas a day before which was amazed balls and traveling through the democratic republic of congo. Used to be known as zaire to goma. And then also we have a very lovely unexpected day in rwanda out and we will be covering a boat tuned and thirty miles on this leg of the journey taking us up to fifteen thousand nine hundred forty miles covered so far so picking up where we left off on day. Two hundred and twenty three. We're up early about six in the morning because we wanted to get the bus from near the park to to go now. The annoying brazilian who we'd met the day before called jock. Who otherwise known as nov head. Basically the typical young arrogant sexist. Traveling do this is so annoying. Yeah so he said oh. We have to be at the market. Get the bus at like seven or seven thirty or something like that so we supposed to all three of us. Some traveling with my friend. Claire who i'd met in nairobi. We've been together for almost two months now. The three of us associated go together to the market to get the bus. But of course jacques had decided to leave at six in the morning before we were up. So which is fine by me. I said he was super annoying to basically packed up. And you had you had to hire local boys as porters from the park. Either to the border began to or to market the bus which is fine because it's a little bit of money for them so we picked our boys. I couldn't find john. My guy awesome little. Did carry my bag of the way there as levy this overland truck someone from the overland trucks who again were kinda my nemesis. They're these big tour groups that are in his humongous overland. Trucks shattered out. Look at those two backpacking. Around with porter's i must lost. It was just like this is only the second time we've used a porter and we had to once was going there once going back and i seriously wanted just to say. Oh yeah look at you buy a little group of mostly white westerners in your little bubble thinking. You're seeing africa. You don't do anything for yourself. You sit in this truck and and sleep usually. Yeah so just a little annoying thing anyway so we took off so it took us about an hour and a half is eight to nightclub walk to the market and claire was a little bit stress. Because i think we're gonna miss the bus. But i was like listed after seven months in africa. I know that transport never ever leaves on time. So i was not that stressed better basically so we got to the market paid. Our boys became a big tip about eight. Thirty and jacques was there. But i guess healing about fifty minutes before us and he left an hour before so girl. Power and of course. The bus wasn't even there so you know when you're right you're right. What can i say. Claire just pop down and we did it out. We bought some bread and avocados..

Claire thirty miles nairobi youtube today africa three second time rwanda john jacques goma claire Two hundred and twenty three Thirty congo about an hour and a half an hour before up to fifteen thousand nine hu two backpacking
Genocide, why won't world leaders call it what it is?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:29 min | 1 year ago

Genocide, why won't world leaders call it what it is?

"Sounds like term from antiquity. The kind of thing that there might have been an eleventh commandment forbidding it is not the word dates from as recently as nineteen forty four when it was coined by the polish lawyer raphael lampkin to define the holocaust he survived and which dozens of his family did not genocide is also a relatively modern crime though. Humans have fought clan clan tribe on faith on faith and nation or nation for as long as they have been humans. The ambition of completely wiping out an entire bunch of people was substantially thwarted for most of history by the limits of technology. They are arguably cases to be made for rome's destruction of coffee in one hundred and forty six bc and athens conquest of mills to hundred and seventy years before that but the industrialization of extermination is in general and as raffaelle lincoln recognized name modern blights pilot. And i think that's the spirit. The unanimous bill family the biscuit behind by all allstate ratified mile parliaments at the earliest date inaudible advised acumen rights. Forgive given the protection of international law for the sake of progress and international. Lincoln's legacy is the un's nineteen forty eight convention on the prevention and punishment of the crime of genocide and the row continuing unto the present day over what genocide means who is entitled to accuse him of committing it. And what should be done about it if someone has this week. Canada became the second country to officially describe china's repressions of it's largely muslim week minority as genocide. Well after a fashion though the motion passed parliament. Two hundred and sixty six votes to zip canada's prime minister justin trudeau and most of his cabinet sat out. The motion was put forward by the conservatives. Who called on the liberals to send a united message about human rights. The vote was non-binding although it was backed by all opposition parties and some members of trudeau's own liberal party with the pragmatism or cowardice or a bit from column a and a bit from column be this abstention highlights the reason that governments are often pretty reticent about accusing anybody else of genocide. The convention on genocide does not merely oblige signatories to not commit genocide. It obliges them to act if someone else does. It's right there in article one. The contracting parties confirmed that genocide where the committed in time of peace or in time of war is a crime under international law which they undertake to prevent and to punish the trouble with invoking. The g word is that it implicitly summons an assumption of accompanying action which puts into context the motivations of the first country to accused china genocide against the week as the united states in the very lost hours of president. Donald trump's term so possibly laissez noble statement of principle and more the diplomatic equivalent of sewing prunes into the curtains vixen incoming tenant although intriguingly president joe biden's administration has thus far stood by the declaration. We're going to stop the chinese from their actions. We should be gone to the un immediately and so at sanctions against them in the united nations. For what they did. We have to be firm. We don't have to go to war but we have to make it clear. This is as far as you go. China the difficulty is that stopping the genocide very often necessitates confronting the people committing it and this can be risky expensive and difficult to sell to voters whose interest in the travails of people in place. They couldn't point to on globe cannot be taken for granted. This is the conundrum that to site. One inglorious example lead to the us administration of president bill clinton wintering squeamishly about act of genocide in rwanda in nineteen ninety-four had the us formally called the acts of genocide. An actual genocide questions might have been asked about why words were not being accompanied by the eighty second airborne

Raphael Lampkin Raffaelle Lincoln Motion Passed Parliament Justin Trudeau Canada Athens UN Mills Rome China Trudeau Lincoln Liberal Party Cabinet Donald Trump United Joe Biden United States United Nations Bill Clinton
Emerging Opportunities and Exciting Business Lessons with John-Paul Iwuoha

Entrepreneur on FIRE

08:10 min | 1 year ago

Emerging Opportunities and Exciting Business Lessons with John-Paul Iwuoha

"Now. We are talking about africa. I wanna know john paul. Why why do we need to keep africa on our radar very interesting question. So one one thing that keeps me. Loyal to entrepreneurs on fire is the quality of stories and experiences of ultra preneurs. Who've made it that's one big reason. Why listen and. I'm also sure that's why many people listen to the show but interesting is what being on entrepreneur means that you're able to live in the now and also prepare for future so it's almost impossible to think about the future and nothing about and here's why when you look at the population of the world. Africa correctly has the youngest population of people. Right now sixty percents of people on the continent of the age of twenty five. So this is more or less looking at china. Before china became china up to date china more or less the second biggest economy in the world the factory of the world and all of that so you can imagine that people who saw china. The china became china. Actually the ones who got in on the meat of the game. So that's exactly what africa represents but more importantly there have been events in the past couple of years that have put africa in the centerpiece. The very most the most recent one which is very interesting is covid now all the time most companies have built their supply chains around china and south east asia but then when it hits it was obvious that supply chains with very vulnerable. And if you're going to diversify your supply chain. It's impossible not to look at africa if you're looking at affordable label if you look at them. The truck symmetry of the continental either north america or europe. And what are the means. Most countries on the continent either speak english or french and these are more or less global line. Which is you're going to penetrate any of the big markets and. It's really now happening. Because what the chinese are doing is the chinese. Market is starting to specialize in advanced high-tech stuff. I most of those low cost production that brought business the whole of storing from america. When are beginning to see going to places like vietnam. Bangladesh and other countries in southeast asia. But then you cannot forgo a population of one point three billion people which is what africa presents and what we're seeing is some companies setup accretions within the african continent places like rwanda at the opium ghana senegal. And what they're doing is they are preparing. These guys are digging for the future and one interesting. That's happened in the last four years in america. Is the people in africa. So in america when you think about africa the image that comes to mind is charity and philanthropy. Africa needs. Needs help and help and help. So the approach of the americans this time and even europe has been to help africa give africa aid. Give them all of that. What the chinese are doing is they're coming with more or less trade and business and things. What africa needs really because you have this population of very young people enterprising people. I mentioned that sixty percent of the world's uncle beats at arable. Land is in africa so in most parts of the world with maxed out the land space. Yes we're doing. We're using technology and other means to increase the yield on the land. But when we're talking about virgin space. Federal land arable land. Most of it is still in africa. Still cultivated and we're looking at a global population that is set to double back at least by the time we reach two hundred fifty or more according to the un and if we do not keep pace with globe with population growth would amount of food were producing then the world is going to be faced with serious threat of hunger so these are just a few examples of why africa needs to be on your rita. Yes so thinking about now. It's great but you're thinking about the future you need to remember that even before could hit five of the top. The top ten fastest growing economies in the world when africa. These are not really things. We've seen the mainstream media. Why i'm happy that chain. Is that the approach of the chinese in africa. Doo controversial is a big difference. This guy's coming here boots on the ground and they're dealing with the market. The previous relationship with africa has been to deal with africa's governments give african governments money for age and they develop africa unfulfilled years. It's never happened instead. It's helped enhance corruption. A sense of entitlement and dependency so most of the problems never get so because that's free money free money fluent in from europe money flowing in from north america so what people like us exist to do is to show that the people we should be voting. For with our money is the entrepreneur's they're the ones who have the incentive and the motivation to really solve africa's problems and guess what's global money starting to call me and i'm sure many ago minova listeners. On on on entrepreneur no stripe the big global player in in payments strike just acquired an african company. Niger company for two hundred million dollars. That's a major exit and it's stories like this that are starting to prove that africa is not a charity case. Africa is opportunity. The programs are trying to solve through eight. Actually need to be solved through entrepreneurship and the process. We create more jobs more wealth and greeted big happier world john. Let's talk about what you see as the most interesting opportunities that exist right now. I mean you talked about a lot of opportunities. I love how you really are hammering home. The fact that entrepreneurship is what is going to turn africa around and really bring that continents into the as we move forward into twenty twenty one and beyond but specifically what are the one or two most interesting and fascinating opportunities in the business world that you're seeing right now. The first interesting one is more or less. I talked about it earlier. In terms of africa's potential to produce food because right now we're looking for the next food basket of the world and one interesting that africa offers is the or what's we've we now know as superfoods so for example there's a grain that's grown in west africa. It's a green code for new now. This green is so rich in cultural significance for example when the tombs of ancient in jim ships are more or less opel excavated amongst other materials. Like honey. and things like that four new for new f- who is one of the greens that it that the ancient egyptians actually put in the the pyramids in the borough chambers of dead feroz. That's tell you how important it was back. Then this is like one of the longest growth one of the greens has been grown the longest in history almost five thousand years now. The reason why new is important is when you look at the american market and european market more or less developed world and you see how important health and wellness is this all about eighteen. Organic food. Gluten free food and things like that you announced that to see if like for new is actually superfood but in africa is grown by people in africa eating by people that i start to see what america has done with them a green assira like we know what which is more or less breakfast zero before quinoa became like a blockbuster serial in america it had the same profile as phone. You in south america. So what we're beginning to see. Is they celebrate to ship in. New york is named spear pm. He's now taken for neo his packaged. It's not just in its physical formats but in the narrative that used salads and last year. I think it's early this year. It got the national distribution across the united states in whole foods. You know to distribute this kind of food and new just one. I know listeners may be familiar with moringa which is another superfood. it grows in the wild in africa. We really take you for granted over yet. But then we've sent entrepreneurs coming here and repackage it into something that selling like a lot because it resonates resonates with the health and wellness movements the big trend going on in the

Africa China United States Europe John Paul North America South East Asia Senegal Rwanda Bangladesh Ghana Vietnam Asia Rita UN Niger
The fight for the Central African Republic

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:26 min | 2 years ago

The fight for the Central African Republic

"Earlier. This week. Results were announced of the presidential election held in the central african republic on december twenty seventh. It was won by the incumbent. President faustin comes to our dera. Election results must still be officially validated by the constitutional court but were welcomed my supporters and even by some members of the opposition. It remains an open question. However how much of the central republic. He's really going to get to be president of the world's least imaginatively named country is also one of its most troubled examine any global index pertaining development prosperity transparency freedom and general ease of living. And you'll find the somewhere near the bottom. The c a r is also exemplar of the cruel irony that the countries which appear least worth fighting over are often the most viciously contested in the days between the presidential election and the results. Being announced rebels attacked the southern city of banga sue on the blue river which comprises the border with the democratic republic of congo. And the town of damara a bit further west by some estimations. Roughly two thirds of the country is now controlled by militias hostile to the national government and not infrequently as is the way of these things to each other ominously however several of these groups entered into a formal alliance just before the election and now prefer inquiries to be addressed to the coalition of patriots for change or pc. They don't appear to have a website yet but early days. The did announce a ceasefire ahead of the election but then unannounced it. They may also be having chain of command issues. Blame for the. Most recent uptick in rebel. Activity is being generally cast. In the direction of former central african republic president francois bazei the mana of both bozize's as coming and going illustrate the chronic problems. He seized power in a coup tar in two thousand and three and lost in two thousand thirteen when militias made it all the way to the capital bongi compelling him to skip the country further underpinning. The present intrigue is the fact that for much of aziz as time as president his prime minister walls and listeners. With a keen sense of shakespeare and psycho drama will already have guessed current president to our dera. Catch me if you can former president possibilities eight touting authorities at a campaign rally last week busey's a returned in two thousand and nineteen in the hope of getting his old job back via the ballot box but was disbarred. from standing in december's election. The constitutional court ruled the requirement that candidates be of good. Morality was tricky to square with an outstanding international arrest warrant accusing disease of crimes against humanity and incitement to genocide to say nothing of sanctions imposed by the un security council on a personally for arming and encouraging militia groups. Say it should be noted if not necessarily believed denies everything so faustin are twelve dera remains president though it would be unsurprising to discover that he keeps a bag packed. Bongi his capital is probably safe ish. Aside from the central african republic's own military it is defended by miniskirt a un peacekeeping mission of roughly eleven thousand troops. Doing one of the more difficult and dangerous jobs currently being undertaken by the blue helmeted three peacekeepers from burundi. Were killed on christmas day in fighting with militias. Nia dakota desire besides being us your brothers and sisters that we see so that our brothers and sisters can also enjoy these other than that you and mission has been joined in recent weeks by an extra deployment of troops from rwanda already a major contributor to manisco.

African Republic President Faustin Constitutional Court Dera Banga Damara Francois Bazei Bozize Blue River Democratic Republic Of Congo National Government Patriots Aziz Busey Faustin Bongi Shakespeare Un Security Council Central African Republic Nia Dakota
A crowded mountain can make silverback gorillas more violent

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

A crowded mountain can make silverback gorillas more violent

"Researchers looked at fifty years of data from gorillas in Rwanda found that is the number of family groups living in a habitat increased so did the number of violent clashes among them mountain gorillas spend most of their time sleeping eating and grooming each other's first behavioral ecologist who published the study in the journal science advances found encounters between groups can become violent some guerrillas especially intense parish which slowed population growth they found the frequency of family feud was not determined by the number of individuals but by the number of family groups in a region co author and primatologist Taris doing ski says everyone wants to know how many guerrillas can live inside a protected habitat area it turns out the answer depends partly on how they organize themselves socially she says they still don't understand all the factors that go into determining leadership qualities in guerrillas I'm Jennifer king

Rwanda Taris Jennifer King