20 Episode results for "Ruth Bader"

EPISODE 24:  COMING SOON - In Memoriam:  Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

The STATECRAFT OBSERVER Podcast

04:22 min | 9 months ago

EPISODE 24: COMING SOON - In Memoriam: Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

"Hello everyone i am. Brandon keller your host for the statecraft observer podcast and typically each weekend. I bring you an episode of political discussion and I've done my best over the week since the show has launched in february of this year to bring you content every weekend Say you will be able to enjoy this particular week There is some very important news. That happened alley friday with the passing of justice. Ruth bader ginsburg. I feel like it's only appropriate to not post content this weekend in order to pay respect to justice ginsburg and her family. I do not want political banter or political opinion to take away from what everybody in the country should be focusing on. Which is the lifetime in legacy of one of our most iconic supreme court justices ever to serve so out of respect for justice ruth bader ginsburg and her family. I will not be publishing an episode this weekend instead. I will hold my recording and publish it sometime later. Next week On monday or tuesday at which point we will discuss the life and history of justice. Ruth bader ginsburg the political elephant in the room that is will president trump nominate a replacement for her or will he wait until after the election and we will also discuss some of the Already political backlash said. We're seeing from the left and some of the threatens of the threats of violence that have already started It's that that i wanted to avoid. I'm disheartened that. We're already seeing that at a time where we should simply just be paying respects to an incredible woman who exemplified what it meant to not have politics define who you are and who your friends were. She was friends with individuals Outside of her political spectrum and did not let that impact her opinion of them whatsoever. A great example is the late justice. Antonin scalia who she was an ardent opponent of but was also a a dear dear friend of his as well their shared love of opera is what brought them together and sustain their friendship through the years and so their example is what i can hoping for For our country moving forward. I hope that people will learn about her over the weekend and what she stood for and pray for her family and save the political banter for next week. That's my hope That's what i'm doing in the decision. I have made in regards to my show. So that is why. I'm only releasing this brief video to explain why there is no content this weekend But there will be content coming early this week. either monday or tuesday so i wanna thank you for coming to check out the show coming. Check out the channel this weekend. Those of you who are loyal viewers and listeners. Of the show. I appreciate you coming by. Enjoy your weekend. Please take a moment to read up. Something read some of her dissents. Read some of her decisions and pay respects to an incredible woman and the show will return on monday or tuesday. I haven't decided yet when publish this but Monday or tuesday at the latest. I will publish the episode where we will discuss further the life and legacy of justice ruth bader ginsburg until then as always please take care of each other and god bless.

ruth bader ginsburg Brandon keller supreme court trump Antonin scalia
Honoring the life of Notorious RBG Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Sister Love

01:56 min | 8 months ago

Honoring the life of Notorious RBG Ruth Bader Ginsburg

"Dedicated to making a difference and a change for gender equality in nineteen eighty-three Ruth Bader Ginsburg became the second female Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States serving almost three decades as the second email appointed to the court her objective was to get the court to understand the realization of gender discrimination known for her steadfast and Monumental work ethic up in later years for her position in advancing environmental interests. Justice Ginsburg was a role model for young girls and urged women to step into their power off and own their ambitions. Ginsberg was a person of Faith at addict in Hebrew, which means a person of great righteousness described as petite and non-smoking yet with a Steely mind fierce, but compassionate deliberate and hard-working. She told her staff to always be strong the way she liked her coffee black group strong endeared with the moniker notorious RBG. She was a Justice with Rockstar appeal. She rise. She Rose Ruth Bader Ginsburg is dead undeniable sister-in-law. She rolled off dead.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Supreme Court Ginsberg United States three decades
Ruth Bader Ginsburg Undergoes Medical Procedure at Hospital

TIME's Top Stories

01:30 min | 11 months ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Undergoes Medical Procedure at Hospital

"Ruth Bader GINSBURG undergoes medical procedure at hospital by the Associated Press. Washington Justice Ruth Bader. GINSBURG has undergone a surgical medical procedure in. New. York City and expects to be released from a hospital there by the end of the week. The supreme. Court said Wednesday night. The court said in a statement that the eighty-seven-year-old Ginsburg underwent a minimally invasive procedure to revise a bile duct stent at Memorial Sloan. Kettering cancer. Center, the stint had originally been placed last August when Ginzburg was treated for a cancerous tumor on her pancreas. The statement said that according to Ginsberg's doctors. stent revisions are common occurrences and the procedure performed using endoscopy and medical imaging guidance was done to minimize the risk of future infection. The procedure follows another one earlier this month at Johns Hopkins, hospital. In Baltimore to clean out the stand, Ginsburg had gone to the hospital after experiencing fever and chills and was treated for possible infection. The statement from the court Wednesday said that Ginsburg is resting comfortably and expects to be released from the hospital by the end of the week. Ginsburg the oldest justice on the nine member court announced earlier. This month that she is receiving chemotherapy for a recurrence of cancer. The liberal justice do has had four earlier bouts with cancer set her treatment so far has succeeded in reducing lesions on her liver.

Ruth Bader GINSBURG Associated Press Johns Hopkins Memorial Sloan Washington Ginsberg York City Ginzburg fever Baltimore eighty-seven-year
Diana Rigg & Ruth Bader Ginsburg: Feminist Icons

Ride the Omnibus

1:04:24 hr | 8 months ago

Diana Rigg & Ruth Bader Ginsburg: Feminist Icons

"Hello and welcome to right the omnibus I'm your host aerial baske-, and today we're taking time to reflect on the legacies of two women who died this past month both of them feminist icons in their own ways who died a week apart, one was known for sporting tight black catsuit and a badass attitude and the other was known for her loose black judge's robes and sharp acumen. I am talking of course about dame, Diana Rigg, and Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg the notorious RPG and here to talk about these incredible women with me is another incredible woman. The Amazing Zoya bans slur welcome to the show Zoya thanks so much for coming on. You area it's such a pleasure to be with year. I'm so delighted that you could be on to discuss this because you're one of my few friends who is so Both joyously political in your orientation to the world and unapologetically feminist in your orientation as well and I think that makes for a wonderful discussion about these two powerful women. Well. Thank you. That is so kind of year and as the. Feminist slogan groves the personal is political I see it as all interconnected. It is it absolutely is and one thing that I think. I'm GonNa sort of bring up right away is that Both of these women have sort of different relationships to the feminist movement Diana Rigg. Even. Though she was viewed. Particularly, based on her role on the avengers as a proto feminist. ICON. She herself was very vocal about never wanting to be called a feminist and how. Very Lindley she fought against ever having that term applied to her. What what do you believe that is part of in her life dino I think sometimes feminism gets a bad name I. Don't know whether with Joran. second wave of Feminism Anti era kind of efforts. And in association with Feminism with burners and people who would undermine family values but I think really feminism is about choice it's about honoring. Any choice that women could make whether she wants to have a career wants to. Have Children and be married wants to stay single. It's it's really about having every opportunity that a man would have. It's about equality. And Diana Rigg. Herself actually fought for equality quite a bit. Actually called a mercenary for kicking up a fuss that not only were her male co stars better paid than her so were the cameraman. She even said if women were paid equal to men, they'd get equal respect. A rich woman is listened to a poor woman is not. And it's so ironic that some women and some people who fight so hard for equality resists that feminist label and I think Diana Rigg falls into that category. She really did some admirable things with respect to equal pay. But you know. I. Guess we honor it. If she doesn't want to keep that feminist label even though I would consider feminist for for that. I WANNA look my favorite definition of feminism. And I know that you're familiar with it. So here's my favorite definition of feminism. From Cheam Amanda Negoti a Chia. I. May be pronouncing that name. Wrong. A feminist is a person who believes in the social political and economic equality of the sexes. It's so concise. It's so beautiful and I really think that you can see that principle in the cases that Ruth Bader Ginsburg argued in front of the Supreme Court before she became a justice herself. and it's it's a very clear part of her identity in terms of what she strove for. On a legal basis and it it it's maybe the clearest articulation I've heard of exactly what her arguments were. I don't know that it's ever been simplified down to that particular nugget about feminism for me before. But I love that. That's a wonderful quote. Thank you for sharing that. You're welcome. And you know it doesn't seem particularly controversial to me. To hear that expressed nor does it seem like it would be controversial to Diana rigg either mum both she and RPG are from the same generation Ruth. Bader GINSBURG was born on March Fifteenth Nineteen thirty three. And Diana Rigg was born July twentieth nineteen thirty eight so they were only five years apart. and. They also both. Fought for equality in different ways obviously, Diana Rigg did it primarily on sets in western media primarily whereas Ruth Bader Ginsburg was doing so in the legal code. And I I just wonder when we remember both of these women and their impact. What strange to me is the more people I talk to since both of their deaths, the more I hear about. Media representations of both of them. So in the case of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg even though she was a historical figure and there are so many dossiers of information about her that you can access at the same time most everybody who knows something about her nose it from the documentary, our BG or from the movie on the basis of sex. And in the case of Diana Rigg, I think she had a big influence largely just because she was in media an in culture and so forth. So. It's it's kind of funny how the Pop Culture Influence of both of these women has been. So pronounced Oh. Yeah. I mean Harvey was just such a rock store rockstar towards the end of her life. The notorious RGB and the following that she gained from all those means. Or something else. I. Wanted to back up and ask you what you think about the idea that. Person might be a feminist in how they play a role or. Probably. It's easier to make the argument or in the kinds of roles acting roles that they might take because in a part of the reason why I admire Diana Rigg so much is. The way that she portrayed these various characters, there was always a strength to her portrayal in in the things that I particularly loved her and you know like the avengers and game of thrones And the other thing that I really loved about her acting was. Always. Came across how how smart she was. You could see her thinking and you could see her being. A really. Logical strong person. And you know I don't think that that's always the case I mean especially in that avengers roll it might have been so easy to you at just be a sex pot you know yeah. Well, I think what's interesting about Diana Rigg is that she actually started her career on the stage he was with the are sc before her stint on the avengers she actually deliberately sought out the part on the avengers and went after it. And none of her you know colleagues at SEC understood why she was doing that or you know I mean they mostly derided her for. The choice to do something that was so. Demeaning they felt to Moore Intelligence. But what I think was really About that particular choice for her when she goes to the Avengers, her character is Emma Peel even the name is a play on the term man appeal. This beautiful intellectual confident woman. She's enormously appealing. She drives around in her little, Lotus. Alon saying things like apart for me. You're the best driver I know. She says that in the very first episode, which is almost sort of unheard of on. British television at the time. and. What's incredible to me is that she deliberately chose to go into. Pop Culture, an inch of the realm of pop culture so that she could make a difference. And This. Isn't something that she talks about white. So explicitly elsewhere, but it's hinted at in some of her interviews that she felt that she wasn't going to get very far in terms of what she wanted to do with her projects and be able to control what kinds of projects she got unless she did something that was a breakout popular. Hit? Interesting I mean there might have been a financial aspect tier also ensure there was yeah. Yeah I. Imagine that it would have been you know she would have been much much better paid as a television actress or movie actress centers the an actress on the stage but Yeah all the same. You know she she had a huge impact I mean. But before I, before you I. Started talking I was I was thinking about what I when I wanted to say about. Diana Reagan. I read a note to myself. I was like I need to look up some synonyms for beautiful and cool and poised and sophisticated because now that that was what she was in the avengers. That was what she wasn't game of thrones I think you're much more familiar with her entire body of work. So you might be able to talk more to some of the other kinds of roles that she did but but that's the overall impression that I have of her work having seen those two end points Oh. Yeah. But I mean what she did after the avengers though I mean she she tried to break into American markets with a American TV show called Diana. that kind of failed to go anywhere unfortunately. But. Her work as it continued in the seventies Chevy was doing some incredible things that to me demonstrate a very feminist mindset. That, she was only taking roles where she was clearly either the intellectual equal or superior of everyone around her. There you go. Back to my point of Kennedy's communist and what roles you select chat. And if you look at on Her Majesty's Secret Service, I mean yeah shortage be but she's the only wife of James Bond. She's the only woman who's treated as James Bond's equal. In those series of films and I, don't think that's an accident. I read that George Lazenby specifically asked for Diana Rigg in that role and he did it because he hadn't. Done film acting before and he wanted someone to. Support Him in that, he wanted someone to show him the ropes and he knew that she would be the right person for that. Yeah and you know I was an onset but I can assume that you know she did so with great aplomb. Yes. I think she held him in some affection I mean according to you that one interview that I read about her. One James Bond. Film Well an additionally like she goes on to do a number of other films like theater of blood, which is. A charming horror film with Vincent Price. A little night music is Charlotte who actually has this wonderful song called every day a little death about all the indignities you have to suffer as a woman in the nineteenth century. And you know it's it's a musical by sometime in that particular song. If you want to hear more about my thoughts on feminism and that song you can listen to the little night music podcast but. Of Good I I? Really. I really think she was very deliberate about taking these kinds of roles that allowed her to showcase both her ability, but also ways in which women were portrayed in different societies, different eras. And how little has changed for women In the centuries I, also remember her Hedda Gabler being just incredible. It's based on an Ibsen play Ibsen is mostly known now for having written adults house, which is the play where famously Nora leaves her husband at the end of the play and walks out on her family to go live an independent life. and. So obscene is that kind of author who was a bit of an iconoclast for his time who really felt that women should have their own narratives men Hedda Gabler is another one of these plays, but in this one. HEDDA is both. Extremely intellectual. And trapped. And unsure what to do with herself and Diana Rigg plays this role in such. A nuanced way if you can get your hands on the nineteen eighty-one version of it, I highly recommend you check it out. I will definitely check it out. Yeah. Oh Sorry I was going to also interject that I recall seeing Diana Rigg also in nineteen sixty, eight version of a midsummer night's dream Oh. Yes. which was another fantastic performance but pretty close to the era when she did the vendors. So she was her usual stunning beautiful south intelligent self. Who Did she play? She Played Helena Oh. Okay. Yes. That's still strong. Yeah. Yeah. Well. It's just very interesting. To to think of her in that particular role, just because most of my knowledge of Diana Rigg comes from her later life I happen to be living in England in nineteen ninety-three when she was playing media. And I fell in love with her and with Euripides and with Greek tragedy all sort at once in one thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, three when I saw her media. She was so powerful. The production. Of media spoilers for anyone who's not seen this thousands year old play. But you know what? It's thousands of years old I'm giving the spoiler anyway. She. She's spurned by. Jason, after helping him to the Golden Fleece and he decides to leave her for a Greek princess. So media decides to kill their two sons. And after the murder of their two sons, she kills Jason's bride to be and her father. And then she rides off in her dragon chariot and wreak some havoc elsewhere. But. What's really cool about this production was that. Diana Rigg literally brings down the house. She had. The. Most powerhouse performance vocally, I read later that she actually tore her vocal cords regularly in this performance and so she wasn't allowed to talk. During the day so she would just go to the museums during the day and wander around and. Enjoy looking at the art and. Wow, that was sort of her routine. That's incredible I. Mean she won the Olivier for it in London. She won the Tony for it in new. York it. It's just it is. One of those performances remember for rest of my life. And To see that in contrast with the vendors being on TV at the same time was What I don't let this. Get this. I am quite quite envious that you saw her on the stage in that production. That's that must've just fantastic. It was and I mean, you know who's to say, maybe it was part of why I became a Latin teacher who knows but became obsessed with Greek theater maybe that was that too but. That could have been a formative influence. Yes, indeed. Well, it definitely was a formative influence but. But then you have her around the same time. Getting roles like Mrs Danvers in Rebecca. On television because it seems like most of the roles that are what she really wanted to be and what she wanted to embody for people. Seem to not really be there as much. In the ninety S. However she was following in Dame Judith Anderson's footsteps with that role. And so I think that was why she Was Eager to take. That one. But then her is lady Olana in game of thrones like there is nothing better in my opinion. I think she stole the show. You're probably the those episodes where again spoiler alert where she's confessed into one of the biggest murders really one of the murders that. had been waiting and waiting for. and she's not sorry at all. It's great. It is great and what I also love about it is that she actually made the character choice to wear wimp UIL more game of thrones because she didn't want to spend excessive amounts of time in makeup. Nobody's got time for that. So Diana. Diana is going to just wear a whipple and focused on the performance. You know I look that and I thought it added. A different flavor to the. There were. There was so much of the story that came from English history and. Royal history but it it it right in now did each had it sound look and even though you know she apparently insisted on that I I love dot fashion choice. I did too and it worked so well. So I just want to ask you about a couple of other things that I noticed on. Diana rigs IMDB page. and. The first one is the easiest. I did not know that she appeared in a TV movie named after me because I can't I you know A. Clean. Nineteen ninety-five TV movie called Zoya based on the Danielle Steele Book. I was named after associates in novel not any Danielle Steele. Not. Will. Not that there's anything. Wrong. Danielle. Steele, novels. That anyway, she she had a role in that movie about that's like a very cool connection i. don't know whether you ever saw that must've been a masterpiece now you did not see that masterpiece. All right. But the other thing that I noticed that she was in and this was an era where. There's a good chance that I might have seen it. Was the nineteen eighty, five TV mini series bleak house on Mellow yes. Yes. I own that actually really okay. She plays Lady Oria deadlock. Yes. deadlock. So she was fabulous and that I'm sure Oh, she was she was quite forbidding as they say. In that. Way. You. Have to be. That production of bleak house was particularly bleak as I recall. I mean not that any production of bleak house isn't but you know not around that time but later I actually also saw her in who's afraid of Virginia. Woolf. As Martha and she did an incredible job in that role to. where she's deconstructing the feminine. Basically Yeah. Well there there again, I want to bring that back to my question which I don't think I really have a perfect answer to you're right about. You know what kind of roles would feminist take and it sounds like Diana Rigg was. Not Afraid to take an unsympathetic role I mean certainly is not she didn't play about as a sympathetic sympathetic character I'm imagining or not completely Ashley is actually a sympathetic character. Okay. That's actually one of one of the things that I love about that play by Euripides is that it's entirely from India's perspective. And you see the betrayal and the. Anger and the lack of agency that she has that she is entirely ruled that her life is entirely ruled by men I her father than her brother than Jason who she loves dearly and committed, atrocities for. including against her own brother, and then he would turn on her this way and just the anger that she has while it sounds like it sounds like a feminist role that does. And then getting back to I retract that as an example for my point about choosing sympathetic versus pathetic characters to play but it sounds like playing a Dickensian villain falls under the category of an unsympathetic character. So she wasn't afraid to take about on no, she was land and and I I think that you know I think that a feminist is someone who believes in. The full range of humanity in every gender you know it's someone who says. Just because someone is born a woman a woman. Does not mean that they're going to be somehow. More Moral Morris daintily more nurturing more. Maternal than the opposite gender. And you know? Also. Feminist would believe that. Women are just as likely to me capable of atrocious behavior. As as men are. So I, think that a Dickensian villain might might be somewhere on that. Well media is still on that spectrum for sure but so is also theater of blood. I would even say Mrs Danvers Rebecca is certainly on that spectrum as well. So she's no stranger to villainy in her roles and I would say you know the whole of being an equal opportunity. Killer is definitely within her range. Yeah. Great Stuff An probably deliberate to. Yeah So. She's fascinating to watch everything that I see her and she's she's fascinating. And I keep coming back to this quote from Elisa doolittle, one of the roles that she played on stage. was Eliza doolittle in my fair lady and. The character says the difference between a lady and a flower girl is not how she behaves but how she is treated. And You know there was an article in the New Yorker, all about how she was demanding. Parody in terms of her pay with Co Stars and parody on behalf of other females in the industry. And even though she never actually achieved it. The fight for it. Comes back to that quote for me and that you know the way in which we are treated as women and the way in which we are. Given that equality. Is the thing that is the most important. Because I feel like she had to work around. A lot of things in her life like she had to take certain like. The role in the avengers. To Take that cute kitten and Schroll was sort of. Necessary I mean. Emma Peel is still thought of as this proto feminist. Role. But additionally, it was a wise career move. She felt that she had to fight against the label of feminism. She felt that she had to. Create this cute persona in all of her interviews where she was hilarious and made her male interviewers as charring does could possibly be sounds very Jennifer Lawrence ish doesn't it a little bit Julie Roberts or some of the other people here are some of the other women here are great interviews. I'm doing air quotes there. And it's and it's funny. You know you think about this in contrast to that quote. And you know it. It makes you just wonder about. The world in which she lived in the context in which she had to. Fight for that Feminine Space. Yeah there definitely wasn't evolution in terms of the roles that would have been available to nineteen sixties actress versus beginner an actress in the two thousand, two, thousand, ten's. Yeah. Yeah. Big Big evolution and yeah and I I. Think we're still not quite at the point where. Women. Can play all of the interesting roles that men can play I, mean certainly, there's there's still a lot of I'm trying to think the right way to say it but Older older actresses have difficulty finding the full range of roles that older actors do. So that that's a barrier in kind of our current. Movies system our current system. Maybe it's a little different on the in the theater I, don't know. It's not that different in the theater. Yeah. Get No. But we're getting better improving. It's a gradual progression. It's always a gradual progression and it's always you know this. This fight over time and like our BG's said in a real change enduring change happens one step at a time. So. On that no. Talking about Ruth Bader Ginsburg who died almost exactly a week later. She earned her bachelor's degree Phi Beta Kappa at Cornell, and she was the highest ranking female in her graduating class. And she had such a fascinating history in terms of how her career shook out. I'm always kind of fascinated when I look at kind of her. I guess rap sheet isn't really the word but. Her resume resume. That's the word I'm looking for. She does the things that you would've expected of women in that era where she happens to marry a man she meets at Cornell she marries Mardi, the love of her life. And then she goes to work at a social security office and then after she becomes pregnant, they D- motor. And she gives birth to her daughter in nineteen fifty five, and here is where things get a little interesting. She enters Harvard Law as one of nine women in class with five hundred. And the Dean of Harvard Law invites all nine of these women to dinner with his family and has each of them in turn explain why they are taking the place of a man. That's brilliant scene in the movie on the basis of. Basically I. Love that scene very well done. Do. You want to explain how they did it. No they have all of the women come in in their beautiful fifties finery and and the dean asks. You know why? Why they should why they should. Take the place of a man and I. Really I love to see the women push back. Some of them just. Are taking the tack of Keep Your head down make through. But as I recall from the movie presentations that Ruth does push back a little. And I love that sort of fiery attitude that displayed in the film, but the question is from. That I've read at least. It didn't always seem like she was necessarily the person that spoke up the most that she was always the most thoughtful person in the room, but she didn't necessarily speak up at the moment in the way that. People would've expected. Actually, if you could hold on just a minute, I'm I might be able to bring up. Yes. Here it is. This is one of those online scripts. Dean, Griswald? Yes. And griswald. says. Esteemed colleagues, ladies this is only the sixth year. Women have had the privilege to earn Harvard Law degree. This little soiree is our way of saying welcome. Let's go around the table and each of the ladies report who you are where you're from. And why you're occupying a place at Harvard could have gone to a man. and. So some of the women are offering explanations that they're going to support their father's business. And Another woman pushes back and says, you know she didn't want to be a teacher a nurse and she's told by the that that's not a very good reason. And and Ruth offers both. That, her husband is in the second year class and that she harbored to learn more about his work. So I can be more patient and understanding wife. and. One of the one of the other women at the table laughs and several others gasped and the dean. Clearly. Is kicked off by that but it's a fabulous seeing A. because. Even if in real life, she may not have pushed back about hard. it's lovely to see a fiction is fictionalized version of her Be So brave in that moment she she was such a brave person. So you know why not make the fictionalized version of her rave? No absolutely, and I and I love that response. That's That's pretty great. Yeah. That was a great script I just loved that movie so much that was that was one of my favorite movies the year that it came out. And it's so incredible though where her story goes from there. Because you know her husband takes his job in New York so she has to transfer from Harvard to Columbia. And she's the first woman on both the Columbia Law Review and the Harvard. Law Review. And then she her law degree in nineteen, fifty nine and she ties for first in her class. And then in nineteen sixty, she's rejected from potential clerkship STU. Her Gender in spite of strong recommendations from the man who would become dean at Harvard Law. And then there was some implication in what I read that Mardi may have threatened. On her behalf of. One of her. Former. Professors actually went to one of the clerks and said, he'd never recommend someone to him again unless he. Accepted her as his clerk and hired her full. Mardi. Really was her biggest champion I mean I think that comes out. So clearly in RPG documentary where it it shows how he was promoting her he was pressing the flesh was having meetings to get her into that into consideration into contention for a supreme, court seat and you know obviously succeeded. It's it's a wonderful partnership I also love at the end of that movie I think it's the end of that movie where it's it has this little thank you section and it says you know to the. Marty Ginsburg wonderful husband award something like bad where. They're thanking the supportive men in their lives, the filmmakers. That's wonderful. Really Sweet. I definitely did not notice that any of the four times I watched. I I have a I have a habit of watching to the end of the credits. Every film usually it's to look at the music that sometimes I see something amusing about in the credits in the thank yous or where the phone the shots. I I have to say I got I'm going on a tangent here but it annoys some of my moviegoing friends no end to need to sit through the credits or have become out. So wait but No To actually. It's film Geek. Thing. I think it is. I think it is yeah and. You know what what I find interesting though is that like James Baldwin Ruth Bader Ginsburg kind of has to go away to kind of formulate exactly what's wrong with American society in terms of the inequities. So James Baldwin went to France and road is an ex patriot. For a number of years and was able to kind of formulate his thoughts on. what was going on in terms of racism in America and then he came back to United States to address the issues with segregation. Ruth. Mater GINSBURG. Likewise happened to go to Sweden as an associate director for the Columbia Law. Group on international procedure and she was co authoring a book on civil procedure with a Swedish. So she learned Swedish, she went there. and her time they're influenced her thinking on gender. Where women were twenty five percent of the law student population. And she saw female judges working eight months into their pregnancy and being supported. Within that society and I think. From what I read. It seems like that is where she got a lot of her ideas about what it could be. Sounds like that was a really formative experience and that's a that's a really interesting parallel I. Don't I don't think that's something that would have occurred me. I in a way when I'm thinking of Ruth Bader Ginsburg story I, think that some of her activism might have come from. A loss a certain loss of idealism Because I. Mean I think she was really idealistic in in what she was fighting for. You know she was fighting for all of those feminist ideas that we were talking about in that definition at the top of the hour but I think that you also have to be a little bit naive to go and invest the money in time and a law degree. If you know if you really were aware of the fact that you wouldn't be able to do anything with the decree when he came out, I mean, there might of then a little bit of there might have been some blinders on when she started that process yeah yeah. And a little bit of an assumption that she could make away somehow right and I mean and eventually she did you know and I think one of the interviews that she does as part of the documentary. Did just see last week. She was talking about in a way she never would have gotten to. The position that she ascended to? If so many other ways had not been blocked and Sadat's a really interesting perspective tear that you know in some ways the. the obstacles. Ken. Yeah eventually, help you get to a higher place if you can overcome those obstacles. Or or you know just navigate around them in interesting and creative ways. Yeah. And she certainly did I mean with with the help of her her wonderful wonderful spouse oh my gosh. But yeah, I mean you look at all of the things that she was able to do. I mean as the first. tenured. Female. Law, professor. Who co-authored the first casebook on sex discrimination and founded women the Women's rights project at ACLU. And to have three more than three hundred discrimination cases in two years, six of which went to the Supreme Court between seventy three and seventy six, and you had a hard time finding all of those cases didn't you I had to do a little bit of research I did hear a little bit of digging. So ACLU listed. Five of the six on their website and. Rb Documentary focused on just four of the six, but if you go to this website. As as yeah as thank you, I'm obviously no lawyer Oil is and yes, you can find all of them. It was it really was fascinating like what her strategy was in each of these. And in particular. Many. Of these cases were highlighting the injustices to men of living under the system that make such distinctions between men's roles and women's roles tries to keep each gender in its in its particular place. Yeah and it, and it's so fascinating the way that she. You know picked male plaintiffs to demonstrate gender inequality as such a harmful concept. And I love that she. Really laid the groundwork for the equal protection clause in the constitution the era you mean. Yeah Yeah, yeah yeah but but actually I mean now, I, think her worked definitely builds on that that the really interesting thing that I. Picked up on when I was researching women's Equality Davis Year was the first drafts of the era were written by Alice Paul Way back in the Nineteen Twenties Really Yes yes Alice Paul that great radical was fighting for the IRA for years and years after she got the nineteenth amendment after she helped get the nineteenth passed. So yes, but but RPG's work was definitely. Building the case helping to build the case and the other interesting thing about these cases is that she was she had studied Thurgood Marshall. and. All the case that he did. To. Help. you know civil rights in the country to help make sure that blacks weren't treated as second-class citizens. And Yeah, she was taking notes from not. In all of these cases that she argued. So yeah, the ones that I looked up I think one of the first ones was frontier versus Richardson and it was about a woman who didn't get a housing allowance despite the fact that her us, Air Force Co workers, men Co workers did get that housing allowance and then. Another big case was Weinberger versus wisn fell a man who wanted some benefits for being a caretaker for his son. So and then she also argued Califano verse Goldfarb that was Nineteen, seventy seven. That was about survivor benefits going to. And versus women. And that him when that a lot of people talk about a lot like Califano comes up a lot in terms of legal precedent. Edwards versus Healy. So that was Louisiana Law. So it was allowing women opt out of jury service and it was found. Yes. That was definitely having an impact on the decisions and the decisions weren't couldn't be considered fair if if women could automatically opt out. Then dern versus Missouri that was another jury case, and then the one out of the six that she lost that was. Verses, Shelvin it was about a male widower who wanted a property tax exemption in Florida and I think that the reason that she lost that one and I definitely could understand the reasoning on that The justices felt that in general men would have an easier time financially after the death of a spouse then. Women who lost spouse and I think. Yes in general in general that's correct. So. It was a harder time. It was a harder time winning the case than it was winning some of the other ones. Yeah. Yeah. But it's incredible. I mean the number of lawyers that you could think of that have had six cases before the Supreme Court and had that kind of wind record. I mean you. You tell me who do you? I mean it sounds like an amazing records. And initially I don't know if you know this but she actually filed the very first federal case challenging involuntary sterilization. She sued the Eugenics Board of North Carolina. I did not know that. Yeah. That is quite that is quite memorable. I mean. You know we associate RPG with reproductive rights. She was a strong proponent of reproductive rights, but I, mean that case that you just described. That seems to be more under more recent term reproductive justice. Exactly. It's not just you know the rights birth control and the right to abortion and the right to sex education. The, right to control your own sexuality and. Reproduction right to have children even though I think. Technically that's part of reproductive rights. Reproductive. Justice makes that idea more explicit. Yes people think of her as being pro choice or. You know. Pro Women's bodies. They don't necessarily think about eugenics and the role that that plays as well. So and just the lack of autonomy for women over their own bodies I mean we've seen with this administration, for example, the involuntary sterilization of detainees and we've seen you know the attempt to close down. Any organizations that help women to gain further autonomy over their own bodies right? Absolutely. I mean t to the point where. Planned Parenthood's under this administration cannot get federal funding it doesn't matter whether. they are offering. Health counseling. Screening exactly how health health health services to men like you say, cervical cancer screening, breast screening you know sex education and contraception it doesn't matter like because. The under this administration under under any Republican administration in the last in the modern era Since since Reagan I, guess, yeah there definitely has been a quashing of reproductive rights but this administration has been really brutal towards them an and and the bit about for a sterilizations or you know indications of forced sterilizations. In detainee camps is something straight out of Nazi Germany and Eugenics It's you know it's just horrible. It's just horrible. But then on the other side of it is you know Seen. Women who may have been raped on their journey is to the United States to apply for asylum and trying to restrict abortions for those for that group too. That's another thing that's happened under this administration and. Yeah I. Think. They're both horrify and I mean. Sorry I'm getting less and less articulate because I know it's okay. It's a more and more emotional issue is your talk about it because it is. It is deeply upsetting to me that there is no real respect for women. and Women's bodies right or just just this idea of reproductive justice just not not a respect for people's right to make their own decisions about. About their own bodies about their own sexuality about you know there are. The the ability to have children or not have children and yeah, it's it's very troubling to see policies that that restrict that. I am more concerned about. Life after birth I am much more in line with the policy of. Let's make abortion safe, legal, and rare I would like to bring down the number of Washington's overall in the country. Right I mean I think it would be better to have. Sex Education and better for people and know. Their rights and believe they have a right to bodily autonomy and not feel forced into sex. It would be better to have access to. To contraception and have it be no cost you know I I can't imagine. What things are gonNA be lake if the ACA goes away. which is another, which is another thing that the Republicans WanNa, do they wanna take they wanNA They WanNa overturn the affordable care act and they don't have anything to replace it with, and of course, you know a big a big item in that was making birth control free and in most cases. There are exceptions carved out for a religious institutions. But. Yeah I'd. Just, just to repeat the point I, really think that we shall be supporting. A system health system where abortion is safe and legal because it's to everyone's benefit. Yeah. and. Then of course, there's the elephant in the room, which is what are the final wishes were upon her death. which were that no supreme court justice be named until after the presidential election Of course, it's painful to think about that final wish how it's not being honored but but I think she knew that. There was no law. There was no reason that it was going to be honored just because she felt that way I mean I think that the stronger arguments against rushing into appoint her replacement relate to the fact that we're already in the election and you know in. In past administrations, all the way pack to Lincoln People have presidents have decided not to force an appointment. And certainly, the precedent that the Republican set up about four years ago when Obama nominated Merrick Garland and the argument at that point was that here we are the year before the election and there's no way that an appointment should happen and I, mean that that's a precedent to make that argument and to see that president. Not respected I'M WANNA see Republicans make one eighty on that issue is very is very upsetting it. It makes them look like huge hypocrites they they are in fact, huge hypocrites for. For during one eighty on. Yeah. But, then additionally like it made the news of Route Baiter GINSBURG's passing. So, politically charged that. It's it's been hard really to kind of process her life and to. You know this whole situation with. Replacement Appointments. With everything that's happening. Leading up to the election. Everything feels so cataclysmic right now. Yeah, huge stakes, huge stakes and I think you know whether you're on the left or the right of the spectrum the. The Supreme Court appointment Is is ways largely in your mind Yeah. I mean for people who really want see reproductive rights and reproductive justice in this country. We, need. We need someone. In the vein of RPG renowned need One. Straight out of the handmaid's tale has You Know Happily GonNa Overturn Roe v Row v Wade. and then you now if you're on the right of the spectrum and let's say you're an evangelical Christian here. is staunchly anti abortion and believes that. You ought to impose your own religious beliefs on the entire rest of the country whether they're Jewish Moslem or agnostic Then it's really important to get a justice in who will overturn Roe v Wade. Really, high stakes on both sides. Yeah. However. I would like to see people on the right standing up to the administration's choices regarding for sterilization. But. But. I mean when you think about Justice Baiter Ginsberg's work on the Supreme Court. I mean, what do you? What do you think of her immense popularity in later life? I think she really enjoyed it. I'm glad to see someone like her become an icon for younger women. you know just and all of her work and. That she represented. I I'm glad to see that held up as a model for you know the the younger generations. I I also like that She was a complicated person. You know when you watch our BG when you on the basis of sex. You see that she wasn't. She wasn't a typical American hero in that. You think of people who we lionize as being. extroverts. Tall and beautiful, and you know just a certain kind of personality. And and she was very small and quiet and. You know not not the typical hero. Yeah so I I. Love that she was an icon she's always gonNA be one of my favorite Americans. Mine too mine too, and it was so special to me being able to. See her lying in state at the Supreme Court. I-. I- braved possibly getting the coronavirus to go and see her in Washington? DC and. The atmosphere there was was very special. To be able to actually. Pay Tribute to her I. It was something where my mom had to bodily drag me. I did not. Myself want to go because I. I was just so concerned about. The virus situation, and then when we got there, there was a suspicious package and so they shut down one entrance and. It ended up taking us, three hours to. Get into. The viewing. Station. So. Scary. I didn't hear that part of that story. Oh. Yeah. I mean it was it was just a lot and Nonetheless, once we were there in the presence of the Supreme Court steps and I could see the American flag over her casket like. It. Clicked for me like what a momentous moment in American history. Had happened. And you know also the fact that she's the first woman to lie in state at the Capitol I mean. That in twenty twenty, that's still blows my mind. Absolutely. Yeah. She was. She was tiny in stature but quite big quite cast a long shadow cast a huge shadow. That's wonderful that you're able to be there. So cool. Yeah And you know I. I. Really. I really feel like. Her legacy is one that. needs to be picked up by so many women now. Who are. Looking at different ways of being female and different waves of advocating for women's rights. And whatever happens in. November. I'm really hoping for the best. Yeah. I think she's such a role model for me too because she was such a fighter I mean the way the way she maneuvered around overcame all those obstacles. But also in her personal history, you know the recurrent. Of Cancer I mean colorectal cancer, pancreatic cancer, lung counselor, and just hurts you. Push past it. Not Miss a day on the bench through years and years of those illnesses. keep training with her trainer. Yeah. I still remember the episode that Stephen Colbert dead where he was trying to keep up with her. And Yeah. That was that was pretty amazing how. How? How strong was how physically strong she was and and how morally Though. Yeah. She's a real role model on so many fronts. I WANNA. Thank you so much for taking the time to take her to these to amazing women and. For being the wonderful amazing woman that you are too as such a passionate advocate for film for women for Feminism. Thank you so much for having me Ariel. It is such an honor to be on your podcast and I can't tell you how much. I love the work that you're doing here and all of the different perspectives that you bring together. I. It's it's always entertaining when I listened to episodes, but you do ring so much scholarship, tear it and I love that chase. So thank you so much for having me on. Thank you. Thank you so much.

Diana Rigg Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Supreme Court Avengers Ruth Diana. Diana Reagan Baiter GINSBURG Euripides murder Jason Emma Peel United States Danielle Steele professor Lindley Amanda Negoti James Baldwin Ruth Bader Ginsb Joran.
Trailer

History of the 90s

01:22 min | 2 years ago

Trailer

"What do you think of when I say the nine hundred ninety s sure we all remember those things things but what you might not remember is that smartphones didn't exist in fact? Did you know that sixty one million people were using pagers in one thousand nine hundred four and just five years later Napster was redefining the music industry things move fast in the nineties really fast and that's why the last ten years of the twentieth century was a time like no other. I'm Cathy can Zora back then I was a reporter with a front row seat at the time it seems to to me like the world was undergoing seismic shift and it turns out it was on my new show. The history of the nineties will travel back in time through the stories that defined a decade from Columbine to Ruth Bader GINSBURG.

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9-21-20 What's News - RIP Ruth Bader Ginsberg Edition

The Nicole Sandler Show

05:58 min | 9 months ago

9-21-20 What's News - RIP Ruth Bader Ginsberg Edition

"It's time for Nicole Sandler's what's news from Nicole Sandler, dot? Com and the progressive voices network. I was born. Under, very bright's stone. Solemnly. Swear that I will support and defend. The constitution of the United States Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on Friday. She was eighty seven the second woman ever appointed to the Supreme Court she was known for her fiery dissents often in cases involving civil rights or equal protections. GINSBURG was appointed to the court in Nineteen. Ninety three and was well known for Championing Gender Equality Abortion rights, affirmative action, and other progressive causes in our final years. Thanks to those dissents and well everything about her she earned the nickname, the notorious RPG and to put. An other worldly stamp on it sundown Friday marked the start of Russia Shana. One of the Jewish High Holy Days according to Jewish tradition a person who dies on Rosh Hashanah is a sad dijk, a person of great righteousness NPR reporter Nina Totenberg explained the tradition on twitter writing a Jewish teaching says those who died just before the Jewish new year are the ones God has held back until the last moment because they were needed most and where the most righteous if you wanted to be a true professional. You will do something outside yourself. Something to make life. A. Little better. So people less fortunate. than. You. A meaningful life. Is. One lives not test for oneself but for once community just days before her death Ginsburg said to her granddaughter. My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed. Well, Ginsberg's death came less than two months before election day and now sets the stage for a vice of political fight over the future of the high. Court trump said, he'd choose a candidate to fill her seat and announces on Friday or Saturday Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell is vowing that whoever trump nominates will get a vote on the Senate floor. This is the height of apocryphal is McConnell. Is the person who blocked President Barack Obama's nominee in two thousand sixteen arguing that voters should determine the future of. The high, court, in an election year, the next justice could fundamentally alter the direction of the Supreme Court and have a profound impact on our country. So of course, of course, the American people should have a say in the courts direction never mind the fact that Antonin Scalia died in February, when the election was not being held until the following November and. Now, Ruth Bader Ginsburg died less than seven weeks out Democratic presidential nominee job. Aydin meanwhile said Reuters should pick the president and the president should pick the justice for the Senate to consider. This was the position of Republican Senate took twenty sixteen. When were almost ten months to go before the election. That's the position. The United States Senate must take today and. The election only forty six days off the current makeup of the Senate is fifty three Republicans Forty, seven Democrats, actually forty five and two independents who caucus with the Democrats. So we need four Republicans to do the right thing an and twenty twenty that seems like a tall order the first to speak out against taking up a Supreme Court nomination before the. Election was Susan Collins of Maine, and then Alaska Republican Lisa Murkowski joined in on Sunday all eyes now turn to Mitt Romney of Utah Cory Gardner of Colorado and Chuck Grassley. Buyoya Chuck Grassley is retiring and back in twenty sixteen he was pretty adamant but people deserve to be heard and they should be allowed to decide through their vote for the next. President the type of person that should be on this ring court. This is a reasonable approach. It is a fair approach and it is a historical approach beyond stating his praise for the late Ruth Bader. GINSBURG wrestling has yet to weigh in but when asked July what advice you'd give to Senator Lindsey Graham? Who succeeded him as chairman of the Senate Judiciary? Committee Grassley said he would not support moving forward with a nomination close to an election. So I guess in the next few days, we'll find out whether or not Chuck Grassley has any integrity and a time like this. I'd normally have some choice words for those Republicans in the US Senate but today I will defer to the words of Ruth Bader, Ginsburg. Investment Advice I ever received any came for my mother-in-law. The day we were married we will married money home. And just before the ceremony mother said. I would like to tell you the secret of a happy married. Oh I'd be delighted to know what is it? It helps. Every now and then. To be a little. Death. So an unsigned or thoughtless word is spoken you. You don't hear it. That is advice I have followed not only in a`marriage. Of Fifty Six A. But also to this day in dealing with my colleagues. And that's just a bit of what's news for now I'm Nicole Sandler if you appreciate these reports and the Nicole Sandler show I, hope you'll consider making a contribution. My work is one hundred percent listener supported and I can't do it without your help find out more Nicole Sandler DOT com. Please Click on that donate button

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Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Stamp on the ACLU

At Liberty

29:07 min | 1 year ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Stamp on the ACLU

"From the new this is at liberty. I'm Emerson Sykes Staff Staff Attorney here at the ACLU and your host happy New Year. We've got lots of exciting new content in the works for twenty twenty but this week we're bringing back a very special episode from two thousand nineteen last January. I spoke with Lenora Nora Lapidus. The former director of the women's Rights Project Lenora passed away just a few months after the interview. Having fought a long battle with cancer Lenora was a true. ACLU legend. She started as an intern in nineteen eighty eight later served as legal director of the ACLU of New Jersey and for nearly early two decades led the ACLU's women's rights project which was founded by Ruth Bader Ginsburg during this memorable conversation. Lenora reflects on her own journey. Ernie as a women's rights advocate and Ruth Bader Ginsburg is lasting impact on the ACLU. We hope you enjoy this gem from the Liberty Archive Lenora. It's a great pleasure and honor to have you with us. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks so much great to be here. Can you start by telling us a bit about the founding of the ACLU's women's rights project and the role of Ruth Bader Ginsburg sure. The women's rights project was founded by Ruth Bader Ginsburg in one thousand nine hundred seventy seventy two. The prior year she had written a brief on behalf of the ACLU in a case called read versus read. This was the case in which for the very first time the. US Supreme Court held that the Fourteenth Amendment Equal Protection Clause prohibited sex-discrimination. Just as it prohibited prohibited discrimination on the basis of race that case challenged in Idaho law that said if a mother and father both wanted to be the administrator for child state after the child passed away the court automatically would grant the father this right because because he was a man and Ruth Bader Ginsburg challenges law arguing that there could not be a preference on the basis of sex for no other reason and that men should not automatically be preferred over women. The Supreme Court agreed and struck down the Idaho Law finding finding that it violated equal protection on the basis of sex so following the supreme court's decision in Reid versus Reid the Aclu Seattle U. Board decided that women's rights would be the organization's top priority and they created the women's rights project to litigated sex-discrimination the nation cases and they hired Ruth Bader Ginsburg to lead that project. She did so until nineteen eighty when she was appointed to be the judge on the DC Circuit Court of Appeals and during that decade of the nineteen seventies she brought case after case to the Supreme Court establishing establishing the constitutional basis for prohibiting sex discrimination. Why did the board decide to prioritize women's rights? At that time this was of course. The beginning of the nineteen seventies when the women's rights movement was really kicking into full gear and there was a lot of activism. visit them around women's rights but there wasn't yet really litigation challenging the host of sex discriminatory laws that existed so the board decided that as Ruth Bader Ginsburg had written in this brief in Reid versus Reid that we could start start. A project here really focused on challenging all of these laws that discriminated on the basis of sex in the movie on the basis of have sex. It's centers around case called more. It's versus commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service and one of the interesting features of that case. was that it was actually a male plaintiff that that was used to argue. That sex discrimination was unconstitutional. And as I understand it that was actually not unique to that case. Where there was a male plaintiff? Used to argue for gender-equality. Can you talk a little bit about the risks of that type of approach so a few answers first of all yes more. It's it's actually the very first case in which Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote a brief arguing that the Fourteenth Amendment Prohibited sex-discrimination This is Fourteenth Amendment which provides that everyone is equally protected by the constitution. That's correct the equal protection clause of the fourteenth amendment was a Provision that she was bringing these cases under so in Moricz sheep. I laid out her theory. That just as equal protection clause prohibited committed at the time. Race discrimination so too. Should it be read to prohibit sex discrimination because of the way the cases work their way up through the courts Reid versus Reid got to the Supreme Court before more. It's dead so she actually took much of the brief that she had written in more. It's and use that the brief in Reid versus Reid but more involved a statute that provided if someone was taking care of an elderly parent they could get a tax deduction for hiring someone to provide some of that care while they had to go out work however that only applied if the person taking care of the elderly parent was either a daughter or a daughter in law. Not if it was an unmarried son. So Mr Morris thought this was very unfair and challenged I it and Ruth Bader Ginsburg learned about the case and she and her husband Marty Ginsburg who was a tax expert decided that they would would represent him and they did and it got only to. The Court of appeals where they prevailed but then of course Reid versus Reid came in between the Supreme Court level. So more it's never went up to the Supreme Court. This notion of representing accenting men to challenge. sex-discrimination was in fact something that Ginsburg did throughout her time at the Aclu Women's rights project. She represented men in a number of different cases on the theory. That sex-discrimination harms men as well as women. Because in both instances offenses it forces people into particular gender roles one of Ginsberg's favorite cases was a case she brought to the Supreme Court in Nineteen Eighteen. Seventy five that case was weinberger versus wise in Feld and in that case. She argued on behalf of Stephen Weisensee. Feld who was a father whose wife had died in childbirth and he was unable to stay home and take care of his newborn son because social security regulations provided that survivors benefits were only available for mothers whose husbands had died. Not Her father is whose wives had died and again Ginsberg brought this case to the Supreme Court. Arguing that that with sex discrimination and the court ruled in favor of Stephen Watson Feld so is that kind of strategy still in use today to take plaintiffs that are representing the flip side of the issue that that the core of the question. Yeah actually we have a case right now against J. P. Morgan Chase and J. P. Morgan Chase provides rides sixteen weeks paid parental. Leave for mothers who have just given birth but only two weeks for fathers who have just had a child eld. There is perhaps some discrepancy for mmediately after childbirth. When a woman who's just given birth needs to recover from giving birth however after that time the parental leave is really providing bonding time for a parent to bond with their new child? And so we we believe that that should be provided equally to mothers and fathers. The case brought on behalf of a father here is not only beneficial to men who want to spend time with their children but also begins to break down the gender stereotypes that caretaking for for newborn Israeli women's work and that winds up harming women in the workforce because then employers feel like it's more of a burden to Oh have women they won't hire them They won't promote them so really Using men as plaintiffs in these cases benefits both men and women one of the scenes that really stuck with me from the movie was when Ruth Bader Ginsburg describes a list that's been compiled of the hundreds of laws laws that discriminate on the basis of sex and caused them a hit list and it's sort of portrayed that the ACLU women's rights project is going. Make this list. They're working document for their agenda over the next several years and I wonder as the current head of the women's rights project how much progress has been made on that list. Yeah so one of the great things that happened in the more its case was that the government attached an appendix to its brief that listed these thousands thousands of laws that all differentiated on the basis of sex and treated people differently. Just simply based on whether they were women or men during during the nineteen seventies this was in fact the list that provided many of the cases that Ginsberg and her colleagues here at the ACLU brought brought to the Supreme Court and they were successful in striking down law after law that differentiated on the basis of sex by the end of the seventies most of the federal laws which were what they were challenging for the most part most of those laws that differentiated on the basis of sex were declared unconstitutional. And so in many ways the most explicit sex discrimination was taken in care of and those laws were struck down however many of the same issues that Ginsberg and her colleagues were challenging still oh exists so for example. A huge priority of Gins Burns was these gender roles and particularly Gender roles in the family we still see for example huge problems with pregnancy discrimination. That's one of the top priorities of the ACLU women's rights project today where employers refused to provide accommodations for pregnant workers. For for example. We have several cases on behalf of police officers. They're fully capable of continuing to do their jobs but for the final few months of their pregnancy request desk duty rather than going out on patrol in even though police departments will provide desk duty to officers for a whole host of reasons sends if the reason is because the officers pregnant then the police departments are unwilling to do so that of course violates the pregnancy discrimination act twitches part of title seven which prohibits employment discrimination but nevertheless many employers still do treat pregnant workers differently from other workers in the workplace. That's really interesting. I think in the current context. There's a lot of debate. Publicly about gender roles within the family and also in the workplace can think about all of the different recent developments in terms of the so-called pink wave in the midterm elections the metoo movement but the role of of gender in our society is being sort of reconsidered in a very deep way. So I'm wondering how you and the women's rights projects see yourself positioned and within the current context and how it's affecting your priority issues. All of that has had a huge impact on our work and on the the ACLU overall many of the ACLU's new members. The majority are women and enlarge part. They are activated by the same frustration with the role of women that continues today. So in the wake of the metoo movement we started getting many more calls from workers who were complaining about sexual harassment and just recently we joined forces with some other attorneys who are representing presenting workers at McDonald's and this is a nationwide effort on behalf of low wage workers who work at McDonald's restaurants around all over the country and our subject to sexual harassment where there are really very few policies in place to prevent vent and remedy sexual harassment when it occurs working within a multi issue organization like the Aclu sometimes the values that we hold dear intention the example of sexual assault and sexual harassment comes to mind where you and your team have been doing amazing work to make sure that there is recourse available to women who have suffered this sort of mistreatment while at the same time we also are committed to making sure that there are protections in place for people who are accused of misconduct this is particularly acute in the criminal context and we know that our criminal justice system is rife with bias and racism and an overemphasis on incarceration when these types of tensions arise. How do you negotiate these important questions? Yeah I think the fact that the ACLU is a multi issue organization gives us some added expertise that we can bring many of these this debates for example even in just the workplace sexual harassment context. We care very much about the victims of of sexual harassment. We also care very much about fair process for who's ever accused and so we are able to bring into those discussions this dual expertise and I think that is really helpful on the criminal justice side. I will say that one of the the issues we also care very much about it in the women's rights project is women who are caught up in the criminal justice system and that is sometimes overlooked and folks folks think about criminal justice as mostly being about men and that is really not true. Women in fact are the fastest growing population. Shirow the criminal justice system. What kinds of issues around women's incarceration are you taking up at the moment we've been working with our human rights program recently away looking at Oklahoma? which has the highest rate of female incarceration and the ways in which women who are are charged with crimes often put in jail even before going through trial and being convicted of a crime but are pretrial awaiting a determination termination the majority of women who are incarcerated where the primary caregiver before their incarceration so when a woman is incarcerated? The issues are not only only about her and her rights but what is going to happen to the children who she was responsible for and that's a huge problem in Oklahoma so our human rights it's program recently published a report looking at mothers who are incarcerated and the ways in which the criminal justice system and the pretrial system in particular really has these huge ripple effects on women and their families taking a step or two backwards looking at the kinds of cases aces that the women's rights project and other projects within the ACLU are working on now in comparing them to the types of cases that Ruth Bader Ginsburg and others brought earlier on in the women's Loyd's project. Some of the issues are very similar issues around parenting and workplace equality so the pregnancy discrimination work that we're doing the paid family leave work that we're doing some of those are very much the same issues of gender stereotypes and just on that. I'll tell you a quick story. When I first started as director of the women's Rights Project I went and met with Justice Ginsburg in her chambers and I said to her you know we've obviously made a lot of progress? You did a tremendous amount during the nineteen seventies while you were at the Aclu you what do you think are the remaining issues that are still most critical today and this was you know almost twenty years ago I had this conversation Chen Winter. She said at the time I think we made a lot of progress. In getting women into the workforce but we've made far less progress getting men to be able to play an equal role in the family. And when I began that was one of my major goals was to try to to change both workplaces and cultural norms so that men could play more of an equal role in the family. We are still fighting that fight now now again. Almost twenty years later some issues that we're working on now were not part of the dock at all so a large part of our work is around gender based violence and that was really not seen in the nineteen seventies as a civil rights issue. And in my time here beginning in the two thousands thousands. We've really tried to raise that issue more. And look at all the ways. In which institutions today really perpetuate gender based violence so for example in the housing context. There are laws in many cities around the country call nuisance ordinances and what they say is if the police are called to a home more than say three times the landlord must evict act and the landlord musty vic all members of the household so the perpetrator of the violence as well as the victim of the violence and that really puts puts victims of domestic violence in a terrible situation. They either can call the police to get help and protect them from the violence but but if they do so they know that they are risking being evicted and they in their children may become homeless. We have been challenging. Those ordinances is all across the country and also working to get states to enact legislation that would prohibit local cities from passing such ordinances. It says we've been having good success but there are still many more to challenge. I wonder if you could just highlight. Maybe two or three cases over the time that you've been a women's rights project that you're most proud of we'll all begin with A current case which I think really shows sort of the twenty any first century form of sex discrimination and this is a case that we brought against facebook for it's algorithms and digital platforms enabling employers to discriminate in posting job advertisements. Yes so we sued both facebook and ten employers who used facebook to post job advertisements and and target those only two men and these are in historically traditionally male field and they were looking for men Dan now. Discriminating in job advertising has been illegal for decades. The Supreme Court struck that down and said the New York Times could not have jobs. You know men only women only and now. We've seen the twenty-first century that's exactly what facebook is enabling employers employers to do by selecting to whom these ads will be targeted and what's the status of that case. We are in settlement negotiations now now okay so facebook is number one. Can you give us another of the greatest hits well one of the cases that I worked on also debate twenty-first-century issue this was a challenge to myriad genetics testing of the BRCA gene the Brca Gene is associated with breast and ovarian cancer and mutations on the gene can indicate whether or not someone is at greater risk of Developing Ping breast or ovarian cancer myriad. Genetics does testing and they obtained a patent on the Brca Gene Gene. Now they didn't get a patent on the form of testing. They didn't get a patent on some analysis that they did. They actually got a patent on the gene itself that gene exists in every single person's body male and female and female all across the world. Everybody has this is gene. Not Everybody has a mutation on the gene but myriad genetics got a patent on the gene itself which meant that no one and other than myriad genetics could do testing to see if there were mutations so we represented a number of scientists and researchers researchers as well as women who had breast cancer as well as some organizations that represented people with Breast cancer her and the case went all the way up to the Supreme Court and we won in a nine zero decision which is very rare And and basically the court held that no private company can have a patent on a human gene. It is part of the human body it is part of our human lineage and a company cannot get a patent on that so no other genes are allowed to be patent genes genes can be patented was gender-based argument. In that case quote we got into the case because of the breast cancer and Ovarian Cancer Ingo Oh myriad genetics holding a patent on the gene and prohibiting any other companies from testing for mutations meant meant that the cost of genetic testing was far higher than it would be otherwise and it meant that people primarily women but not only women because men can get breast cancer as well but primarily women would be denied the testing and the information that they needed while I wanted to go back just for a moment. You mentioned offhandedly that you met with Justice Ginsburg. What do you make of her sort of late in life status as a cultural well I con? I mean she's been a legal pioneer an important lawyer and judge for decades But it's only recently that her likeness is on onesies and tote code bags and everything else that you can imagine. That can be branded. And what do you make of this. Why now does the hype match the person that you've come to know? Well she's been a hero or Shiro of mine firt ever so I'm thrilled that come around And now sees just what an amazing person she is. I think that it is part of this sort of revival Oh love feminist activism and also people of younger generations saying that. Really Time's up up. You know we should have come much farther than we have since the one thousand nine hundred seventy s when Ruth Bader GINSBURG was litigating these cases he says and so I think celebrating her now is also part of the demand for change. I'm interested to hear sort of your origin story. And how you came to this work as well. Well I guess. Women's rights have always been a driving force for me. My mother was is active in the nineteen seventies in what was then called women's Lib and my mother had her. PhD was professor are during my childhood. My father was also a professor and people would call on the telephone and say hello may speak with Dr Lapidus and and my favorite thing is a little kid would be to say which one but I was always very proud of her but also saw I mean I remember members. She tried to get a credit card in her own name and wasn't able to and it was ridiculous. She was in an equal position to my father. They were both earning being equal salaries approximately fact she taught at Columbia so probably earned a little more than he did and yet she couldn't get a credit card because she was a woman so I saw her as a successful career oriented women but still facing sex discrimination and she was also as I said very active in the feminist movement so in college I was a women's studies minor along with my major her and worked at Radcliffe for two years between college and Law. School went to law school to do women's rights work the first summer the summer after my first year of law school. I was an intern at the women's rights project. And little did I know twelve years later. I'd be back as the director but so that's always been my he goal and I'm just thrilled that I've been able to actually live the life. I was dreaming of living. I wonder if we can just finish up by thinking about the future future both within your project and maybe a little bit about the country. More broadly as we said we're in a very interesting moment To say the least it for better for worse and I wonder where you think the question of gender equality and women's rights is going over the next few years. We still have a lot of work to do. We have obviously made a lot of progress but we are still far from equal if you look at all positions of power whether there it's in government or running businesses women still are not equal in those positions. I think this last election was fantastic. Hostak in the number of women who first of all ran for but then also were elected to Congress and to positions throughout the states sci-fi very encouraging but you know we have a president right now who constantly demonstrates his disdain for women and women's equality among many other groups for whom he also demonstrates disdain. So I think we still have a long way A to go. I'm encouraged that here at the ACLU. The women's rights project is growing which I think is great because that will help. nope advance our efforts. We are working In several states to pass laws for equal pay paid family family leave and pregnancy accommodations. And we've developed a great website that activists can go to it's it's just. WWW DOT org backslash gender justice and that will enable people to participate in activism. Awesome to get these. Laws passed and take other measures to push for equality in their states as well as at the federal level. Thank you very much an oral Lapidus. We really appreciate you coming on the PODCAST. Thank you very much for having me as a pleasure. Thanks very much for listening. We hope you enjoyed this conversation. Please stay tuned for more exciting live events and fascinating guests in the coming weeks and months. If you'd like to support at liberty you can donate donate at W._W._W. Dot A._c._l._U. Dot org slash liberty till next week piece.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg ACLU Supreme Court Aclu Women Reid Lenora Nora Lapidus director Ginsberg Marty Ginsburg Stephen Watson Feld facebook DC Circuit Court of Appeals intern Breast cancer Court of appeals harassment Aclu US
Pioneers: Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:16 min | 2 years ago

Pioneers: Ruth Bader Ginsburg

"The gender line helps to keep women not on a pedestal. But in a cage. From wonder media network. I'm Jenny Kaplan. And this is encyclopedia will Manica if you haven't already guest today, we're talking about the one and only Ruth Bader Ginsburg. You may know her you probably love her. Let's learn more. Joan ruth. Feeder was born in Brooklyn, New York in nineteen thirty three to a fairly average middle class Jewish family. The baiters were deeply involved in their community, and we're observant Jews who went to synagogue regularly. However gender segregation of more orthodox Judaism, made Ruth uncomfortable. She sent said that she was jealous. There were no bat mitzvahs when she was growing up. Ruth was the youngest of two children, though, her elder sister died of meningitis when Ruth was just fourteen months old death struck the family again. Right before Ruth's high school. Graduation, when her mom died of cancer Ruth was an excellent student and developed an educational resume chock full of impressive institutions of higher learning from Cornell to Harvard to Columbia. She got a full ride for undergrad studies at Cornell where she was mentored by famed professors, Vladimir Nabokov, the author of Lulita and constitutional lawyer, Robert Cushman. She also met a guy named Marty Ginsburg. I have had the great good fortune to share life with the partner truly extraordinary for his generation a man who believed at age eighteen when we met that a woman's were, whether at home or on the job is as important as a man's at Harvard Ruth was one of only nine women at the law school, and she was the first woman on the editorial staff of the lar- of you at the same time, she was also taking care of Marty who'd been diagnosed with testicular cancer, and their fourteen month old daughter Jane, she averaged something like two hours of sleep at night, and to this day, she's known for working into the wee hours of the morning. Despite the fact that she tied for first place in her graduating law school class. She struggled to find work, because she was a woman and a mother at that point, only two women had ever served as federal judges, and female attorneys were still far from ubiquitous still Bruce scored a clerkship. And then became an assistant professor at Rutgers. It was time of gender discrimination at a level that feels both foreign today when getting the assistant professor gig in nineteen sixty three the dean of Rutgers lost asked her to accept a low salary because Ruth's has been had a well paying job. And when she got pregnant with her second child, she were oversized closed because she worried her contract wouldn't be renewed. If she appeared, obviously pregnant RPG's famed work on gender inequality began around that time in one thousand nine hundred seventy she was asked to introduce moderate a law school panel on women's liberation, a year later. She published two articles on the. Subject and taught a class on gender discrimination as part of the course she partnered with the American Civil Liberties union onto briefs for federal cases RPG's fight for gender equality continue, she founded, the ACO us, women's rights project co authored, a law school casebook on gender discrimination, and argued six cases in front of the supreme court. She won five of the six. On June fourth nineteen Ninety-three, President Bill Clinton nominated Ruth Bader Ginsburg to the supreme court and she was confirmed. Two months later. Fater in bird can solemnly swear that I will support and then. We've talked of the United States against all enemy. On the court Ruth became well known for her participation in style. She's active in oral arguments, and she makes judicial fashion statements through her jackets or callers. When she made it to the highest court in the land, she didn't forget about ladies early on through the opinion found that the men only admissions policy at the Virginia Military institute violated the protection clause. She also wrote a dissent on vote that she said chipped away women's rights cheese, and a case that said that women can't bring federal civil lawsuit against an employer for paying her less than her equally qualified male counterparts, but you have called yourself and others have a ferocious feminist litigator, a flaming flaming. Ginsburg has been and continues to be pioneer for Justice. Tune in tomorrow for the story of another incredible pioneer special. Shout to the one and only Liz Kaplan, I sister and the brain behind this incredible collection of women. Talk to you tomorrow.

Joan ruth Ruth Bader Ginsburg supreme court Jenny Kaplan Cornell Liz Kaplan testicular cancer Vladimir Nabokov assistant professor American Civil Liberties union United States Feeder President Bill Clinton Virginia Military institute Brooklyn Rutgers Robert Cushman Marty
She Knows She Has Left a Legacy. The Story Behind TIMEs Commemorative Ruth Bader Ginsburg Cover

TIME's Top Stories

03:09 min | 9 months ago

She Knows She Has Left a Legacy. The Story Behind TIMEs Commemorative Ruth Bader Ginsburg Cover

"Brought to you by lucky charms magical mission. Let lucky the Leprechaun take you and your kids on an interactive adventure through the eight magical charm lands to restore magic available on your smart speaker. Just say open lucky charms, magical mission or search for it wherever you listen to podcasts. She knows she has left a legacy, the story behind Times Commemorative Ruth Bader Ginsburg cover by Madeleine Carlisle when Sebastian Kim prepared to photograph Supreme Court justice. Ruth Bader Ginsburg for the two thousand fifteen time one, hundred he knew he wanted to capture an expression he had limited time. She was characteristically busy and he recalls asking her to try on the pair of gloves she had brought and pose with her hand this way or that she stayed mostly quiet during the photo shoot as was her style and Kim did as well. Then snap, he got it the image of the legendary justice with her hand to her mouth a knowing look on her face. That was the image that I really loved of her Kim recalls with that. Smile. The twinkle in our I and the little eyebrow lift. Kim's portrait of the pioneering Supreme Court. Justice, who died on September eighteenth age eighty, seven from complications related to metastatic pancreatic cancer is featured on the cover of the latest issue of time, which commemorates her life and legacy. Since News of her death I broke the portrait has been widely shared across social media as people mourn the loss of the diminutive giant who tirelessly fought for gender equality Kim forty-six says his Ginsburg image has consistently garnered the largest positive response of any portrait he is taken and he feels extremely honored that the photo has resonated the way it has at the time it was taken. He admits he had no idea what it would become. For me it was a gift that she kind of gave at that particular moment he says schering that shoots like Ginsberg's are why he cherishes portrait setting the ability to capture her personality to actually transcend time and make an impact has created a very deep and personal impact on how I see my craft. Another image of Ginsburg from that same photo shoot served as one of the covers for the two thousand fifteen time one, hundred issue. This past March Ginsburg was also featured on the nineteen ninety-six cover for times. One hundred women of the year series which spotlights influential women from each year of the past century. Kim says, one of his favorite things about the portrait featured on the new time cover is it's optimism and power. You just have to look at what she's left behind and I think this image captures it. He says, it conveys that she knows she has left a legacy.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Sebastian Kim Justice Supreme Court Leprechaun Times Madeleine Carlisle Ginsberg
Into Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the ACLU Years

Into America

29:24 min | 9 months ago

Into Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the ACLU Years

"Ruth. Bader GINSBURG died on Friday. At, the age of eighty seven on the eve of Russia Shana, the Jewish New Year. She spent twenty seven years solidifying her place in history as an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court. I am proud to nominate this pathbreaking attorney advocate and judge to be the one hundred seventh justice to the United States Supreme Court. It was June of Nineteen ninety-three when President Bill Clinton stood in the Rose Garden to introduce his nominee. Ruth Bader GINSBURG would become the second woman to join the country's highest court following Sandra Day O'Connor in nineteen, eighty one and the courts first Jewish woman justice. The announcement, the president just made. Is Significant I believe. Because it contributes to the end of the days. When women. At least half the talent pool in our society. Appear in high places. Only as one at a time performers. As. She accepted Nomination Ruth Bader Ginsburg dedicated the moment to her mother who died just Ginsburg was graduating high school. I pray that I may be. All that she would have been. Had she lived in an age. When women could aspire and achieve. And daughters are cherished. Sons. In her Senate confirmation hearings, she passionately defended women's rights including the rights when abortion. This is. something. Central to a woman's. Life to her dignity. It's a decision that she must make. Or herself. For Justice Ginsburg the fight for women's rights with lived. Decades earlier at Harvard Law School, she was one of only nine women in her class of five hundred. In her last year, she transferred to Columbia Law following her husband. Marty to New York for job of the tax attorney. Despite graduating first in your class in nineteen, fifty, nine with stints on the Harvard. And Columbia Law reviews no law firm in New York would hire her. GINSBURG has said that she quote struck out when three grounds she was Jewish a woman and a mother. So she clerked and eventually taught at Rutgers and Columbia universities before joining the American Civil Liberties Union. And it's those years that would become foundational not only to her career in public service, but the effort to end gender discrimination in America. They began in Nineteen seventy-two when Ginsburg signed on as the founding director of the ACLU's women's rights project. She began serving as general counsel for the Organization in Nineteen seventy three. At the ACLU GINSBURG argued over three hundred gender discrimination cases, six of which came before the Supreme Court. She won five of them. Ginsburg left in nineteen eighty appointed by President Jimmy Carter to the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. But in those years with the ACLU, she set the stage for some of the most important legal victories of the women's movement. Sex like. Race. Has Been The made the basis for unjustified or at least unproved assumptions concerning an individual's potential to perform or to contribute to society. I'm really this is into America. Today, as the nation mourns the passing of Justice Ginsburg and descends into political gamesmanship over the courts future a look at this critical part of her legacy, her years with the ACLU. Kathleen. PERETTI's was a friend and former colleague to Ruth Bader Ginsburg their working relationship again in nineteen seventy four when Kathleen join the ACLU and succeeded Ginsberg in a role as director of the women's Rights Project I asked Kathleen about the first time she met Ruth Bader. Ginsburg just a year earlier. It was in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, three, I had been practicing law for a couple of years. I lived in southern California and the Ford Foundation sponsored a conference a feminist litigators. A handful or two ruth was not famous. Nobody was famous women's rights law was sort of percolating. But it was a very niche practice and we had as many failures as successes but we felt like we were on the march and that's when I met her. and. She asked me at that conference if I would be interested in applying for the job of succeeding her at the ACLU moved to New York and I've been here ever since wow, and so at that point, she wasn't she didn't enjoy the kind of celebrity status in the legal world or the world in general but was she a big deal in your circle? Did she stand out? Yes. She was definitely a big deal because she had already won a couple of cases by that time and she's a very powerful personality She was small and quiet but with a great deal of dignity, you knew when you Met Her that this was not somebody that you messed with. She was very strong. She was dear she wasn't nasty or mean ever but she had a lot of a lot of rays of power exuding from her even then and she was young I was under thirty and she was under forty. She was known in this sort of rarified circle which got bigger and bigger as the years went on but she was known as the forced to contend with all in in constitutional law. There was lots of other stuff going on and women's rights law but in constitutional law, she was already at the top of the heap. So, let's go back a little bit before she handed the baton to you and as you to join the Aclu what drew justice Ginsburg to the ACLU in the first place, give us some context around the CO founding the women's rights project. She was a civil libertarian. She was a liberal she was interested in constitutional law, but she had this sort of pivotal moment when her husband brought to her attacks case in which A. Man had been discriminated against because of his gender and Mardi came to hear about it and brought it to roof and they did this case together it didn't go to the supreme. Court. But it was a tax case it was gender discrimination and it was successful. So I believe that at that moment which was in thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, she got the idea that there were dragons to slay in this area of Discrimination Against Women Official Discrimination against women by the government and especially by the Federal Government and she took another case the next year and was successful and that just opened the path I'm not sure it would have happened if Marty hadn't brought her that case in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy. Wow. And so when you think about those early days in the seventies, we hear about how back women couldn't even open up a credit card or bank account without their husband's permission and a bunch of other you know very unfair practices socially and legally. But what was the general state of Women's rights and Activism Round Women's rights at that time? Well, the state of women's rights was pretty dismal, but the activism was extraordinarily. Electric and definitely moving moving the public Some people think I think that ruth one a few cases in the Supreme Court, and then women's rights law was established and that was that That's not exactly accurate. There was a great deal of ferment going on there was activism in the streets and is ruth often said some variation of you have to make us. Do it there has to be a strong public presence if there's going to be a change in the law, the women's movement including marches in the streets, including lots of legislative activism, including lots of activism in the courts. That's what started moving the tied. It wasn't her alone. It was a lot of people as she acknowledged over and over again but she established the most. Prominent frame, which was saying the federal government can't do this anymore. Let's talk about the women's rights project, which was central into this a bigger push for women's rights, and let's go to nineteen seventy-one with the case of read V. Read. Ginsburg wrote the planes briefs in in that case but explained like the significance and the outcome of that case. Well, it was the the first case that Ruth and the ACLU took to the Supreme Court we were. We were a make us we weren't representing. The the party, but it had to do with whether it was constitutional to prefer men as administrators of estates and it was the first case she took. She said there's no reasonable explanation for saying that men are presumptively better to be the administrators and that was a very important case. There was not a majority for the highest standard of review but there was a plurality for a high standard of review and the women's rights project hadn't really been established yet but with that success and Ruth's Pushing for the To Devote? More resources. To the issue of gender equality that was sort of the first step along the way. So read v read is significant in a number of ways but in her brief Ginsburg name Pauli Murray and Dorothy Kenyon as co-authors even though they didn't contribute directly to it at all who were Murray Kenyan, what was the significance of that move? Well, Murray was an extraordinary person I never met her but ruth was always in awe of polly murray she was an African. American woman she became a lawyer she became a pastor. She wrote a academic writings about the intersection analogy of our race and gender and law and also sexuality, and she understood how all of those identities of work together to keep women to keep. African. Americans. To keep the gay people down and as you said, she didn't actually write the brief but ruth was awed by her. How foresighted she was she was exploring these topics in the forties and fifties it was just extraordinary. A lot of times when we're talking about women's rights suffrage movement we were kind of by default talking about white women right and there are a lot of women of color and black women especially were pushing on this how clear-eyed was justice Ginsburg on that intersection and kind of disentangling women writ large and Black and minority women in this push Well, she didn't do cases that at the ACLU that explicitly had to do with with race. But her debt to Pauli. Murray is proof that she understood the importance of the intersection -ality but she was single minded on just a dealing with gender issue. So and the ACLU did race litigation. But that wasn't part of the women's rights project and you're right in the in the in the seventies the women's movement tended to be pretty white. There were women of color were important to the movement often in politics rather than in this constitutional fight but that wasn't her main focus. So justice Ginsburg argued six cases before the Supreme Court during her time at the ACLU's general counsel with the first coming in. Nineteen seventy-three frontier verses. Richardson, could you explain that case what that meant and what we're GINSBURG arguments in that case? Sharon frontier was in the army and she wanted housing benefits. For her spouse men got housing benefits for their spouses automatically because their spouses were assumed to be dependent. Sharon frontier wanted housing benefits for her spouse, but she couldn't get them unless she could prove that he was dependent. And the lawsuit was, why should she have to prove it when men didn't have to prove it? And the government's response was that it was easier to do with that way. It was administratively convenient if the government had to examine whether a spouse was or was not dependent on a case by case basis, it would be too expensive. But the fact is the government didn't examine that when it came to men wanting housing benefits, they just made the assumption. So. Ruth argument was they should either do it for everybody or do it for nobody proponents believe that appropriate interpretation of the Fourteenth Amendment's. Would secure equal rights and responsibilities for men and women. But also stressed. That such interpretation was not yet discernable. And in any event, the amendment would serve an important function. In removing even the slightest doubt that equal rights for men and women is fundamental constitutional principles. And asking the court to declare sex a suspect criterion. meekest urges a position forcibly stated in eighteen thirty seven by Sarah empty noted abolitionist an advocate of equal rights for men and women. She spoke not elegantly. WITH UNMISTAKABLE CLARITY. She said. I ASK NO FAVOR FOR MY SEX All I ask of our brethren. Is that they take their feet. Or? She won that argument that administrative convenience was not a good enough defense and the army had to extend housing benefits to everybody and did that sounds like a big deal and I wonder how that victory set the stage for will come next in terms of women's equality. It was such a big deal because it was the first time. The Supreme Court ever acknowledged that there was such. A thing is gender discrimination and that it was unconstitutional. Sharon. Frontier Rose Housing benefits were obviously not a not such a big deal but the acknowledgement. Of these nine men for the first time in history that gender discrimination existed and that it was unconstitutional it was it was an earthquake it was it was cataclysmic and that that set the path. I think what's what's amazing and equally crazy is like this is nine hundred, seventy three it's about eighteen, seventy three. People have a very short memory look at the look what's happening today? Let me just say here that times have been as bleak as they are now in the past Ruth often said that the symbol of America should not be the Eagle it should be the pendulum. Because the pendulum always swings. The pendulum is on many issues and for many of us on a one far end now and it's bleak and it's scary but it is a pendulum once it gets too far to one side it's got nowhere to go. But toward the other side, it's sort of like the the arc of history and it's the same idea things have been terrible and and they get better. We'll be right back with Kathleen Beretta's. Hey everyone. It's Chris as you know these days, I find it helpful to just take a step back from the day to day onslaught of news and take a broader look at the issues I haven't had time to cover my TV show all in everything from the legacy of racism in America to how community and creativity can flourish minster pandemic to how Democrats could win and Deep Red America do each week on my podcast wise is happening and I'm joined by uniquely qualified guests like Pulitzer Prize winning reporter Nicole Hannah Jones progress does not mean justice or equality or that we are right after four hundred years of black people being. In this country that type of remarking incremental progress in patting ourselves on the back for that has been long over author, Rebecca Settlement House, and we take care of each other in the context of not being able to physically be with each other in ordinary ways crooked media, Jon favreau it's going to be the highest turnout election in history, which means that it is a persuasion game and many others who helped me make sense of what's happening in our society and our world I. Really Enjoy Conversations I. Hope you will too. So join me for new episodes. Every Tuesday just search for wise is happening wherever you're listening right now and subscribe. We're back with Kathleen. Peretti's she told me about the kinds of gender sanctions Ginsburg tried to dismantle as she made her arguments at the Supreme Court. Every single case she did every constitutional case she did every said almost every successful employment discrimination case the core of it is stereotypes and for lgbt cases also, and for race cases often the idea is that the the law that the legislature or a constitutional precedent has a stereotypical assumption about how women are how men are how street people are, how gay people are, and those stereotypes don't fit everybody and and sometimes they they hardly fit. They fit a small number of the people who are part of that identity and her argument always was the stereotype might apply to a lot of people and it's not fair to apply to people for whom the stereotype doesn't fit. Now you're talking about these baked kind of stereotypes, where otherwise intelligent will I mean people believe in these stereotypes and I have to wonder where there and I don't want to overstate the word enemies. But where enemies made in chipping away at the structural inequalities, it was like she developing a reputation I, think there were enemies I think there were groups of people who explicitly wanted to keep women in a subordinate role, but I think the main opposition wasn't enemies of that sort. The main opposition was people who just didn't understand the damage that these stereotypes were doing or thought that. Laws that drew a line between men and women many of them were beneficial for women. They thought that protective legislation was good for women. Ruth is often talked about how she had to be sort of like a kindergarten teacher with the nine men on the Supreme Court teaching them something they really didn't know which is that there is such thing as gender discrimination and the the stereotypes which they thought were doing women favor were not doing women a favorite all she said, you think you're putting us on a pedestal, but actually you're putting us in a cage. This case more than any other yet heard by this caught. Illustrates the critical importance of capital judicial assessment of law reinforced sex role pigeonholing. Defended as a remedy. And practical effect laws of this quality. Help to keep women. Not on a pedestal. But in a cage. They reinforce not remedy. Inferior position in the labor force. And it was that process of education that made so much difference. Obviously, she had something inside of her spirit, right something that was indomitable but actually in the courtroom, what was her style? How does she get people to respond positively to arguments that she was making? I think the reason her arguments were so effective it I mean one of the reasons is that she worked so hard getting ready. She knew exactly what every justice on that court had done and said in the past. some people say nobody says on their death bed that they wish I'd spent more time in the office will Ruth Ruth would never say that because she spent. All of our time in the office and she absolutely loved it once it's not that her it's not just she walked in the courtroom and she was brilliant she was. But what preceded that argument was hundreds and hundreds of hours of knowing every damn thing she was nervous before the argument began in every case as far as I know and I was with her on several. But once she started talking she was in total command of the material and that didn't come from just being smart it came from working her ass off. And and she also brilliantly used men as kind of a cog in the machine driving towards women's rights. So let's talk about the nineteen seventy, five case of Weinberger. v Wise filled viewer the director of the women's Rights Project what was the strategy and argument case and what where, with the basics of that case the basics case are that Weisfeld his wife. Had died in childbirth and he wanted to get survivors benefits and the the benefits for being the caregiver for the child of a deceased social security covered worker. The rules were then that they were available to widows, the widow was assumed to have been the dependent when her husband died and so when she was in charge of a child she was entitled to. Survivors benefits for the widow and the child. So Stephen Weisenthal wanted to stay home and take care of his child and not go to work fulltime but he was a man and not a woman ruth argument wasn't that he was the victim of gender discrimination. Her argument was that Paulo and fell deceased wife and mother was the victim of gender discrimination because she had. worked she had contributed to social security, and then she passed away and her account her social security account was not going to give the protection to her family that the account of a male worker would have given. So it wasn't that Stephen was the victim of gender discrimination. It's that the family of a woman was being disadvantaged compared to the family of a man. But they could not be clearer case then this one. Of, the double-edged sword in operation. A differential treatment accorded similarly situated persons based grossly and solely on. Gender. Paulo Eisenfeld in fact, the principal wager is treated as though her use of work were only secondary value to her family. Stephen. Wise and fell in fact, the nurturing parent is treated as though he did not perform that function. And Jason Paul. A motherless infant with a father. Able and willing. To provide care for him personally. Is Treated. As an infant not entitled to the Personal Care. Of his sole surviving art, it was just a brilliant strategy and it crystallized how the stereotypical assumptions hurt everybody. They hurt the woman as the wage earner they hurt the man is the survivor taking care of a child and this was an extremely sympathetic case. This was a man with a little childhood lost his wife and wanted to be home with this baby. So it had real jury appeal. The jury in this case being the Supreme Court. How revolutionary idea that gender discrimination is not only hurting women but it's hurting everyone. I don't think it was a seismic shift in social theory. I think seminarists have always understood that stereotypes hurt men as well as women. And it's so obvious that they do men to are subject to the stereotype of having to be having to be macho having to be in charge all of the demands that are that are made on men because of their gender that's not fair either and it's not even accurate but I think for the Supreme Court to see it and acknowledge it and and render this massively important ruling after wise and failed it was hard to imagine. Losing a constitutional case in which there was gender line in a federal statute after wise and fell, they were all going to fall. It was just a matter of time. But but still there, there's so much you know fight left to be had when it comes to equality on. So many friends including women's rights and I wonder. When we think about with bitter Ginsberg's legacy and she became the notorious RPG and she had been this massive figure. What advice? Do you think she would have for young lawyers today who are still fighting for equal gender rights? Well, she she has. She did it many times she had Scores and scores maybe hundreds of interviews over the last ten years during this these last ten years when she became the notorious RPG in the and the the icon and the hero of millions and millions of women she said do what Your Passion tells you to do fight hard and work hard and do good. Make the world a better place. That's that was always her advice. and. She had such a huge impact on society. But also when you personally I understand you name your daughter after with. My older daughter who is now? Oh I I should probably not. Yeah I think she. I think she's forty four. I. Keep forgetting how old my children are I have four and her her middle name is Ruth and she and roof. gave me a baby shower when I was pregnant with her and Shing Yeah. She's a she's a good person. Kathleen thank you so much for your time. We really appreciate it obviously, sometimes, these luminary figures seem to loom. So large but I think you brought us into who she was a person and a lawyer. So thank you very much. Thank you for main of as a pleasure speaking with you. That was Kathleen Peretti's friend and former colleague to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg today she's a partner at outinen golden specializing in sexual harassment and workplace. Discrimination cases. Justice. Ruth. Bader. GINSBURG will lie in repose at the Supreme Court this week NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg reported that the justice had dictated the following statement to granddaughter just days before she died quote. My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed. The President and Republican Party leadership do not plan to honor that wish president trump said Monday they would name a nominee to replace Justice Ginsburg by the weekend. Any confirmation will not happen without a fight in the Senate but at the president's pick is confirmed, it will be his third supreme. Court. Justice name to the bench. Into America is produced by Angel Alison Bailey Aaron. Max Jacobs Barbara Rab Clerics High. I. Should turn her and pre Var thon. Original music by Hannes Brown. OUR EXECUTIVE PRODUCER IS ELLEN Franklin Steve Lick. Tai. Is Executive Producer audio I'm charmingly we'll be back Wednesday. Wonder what it's like to live alone. Hidden in the woods, not speaking to a single soul for thirty years. One or the desert uncover a hidden well and dive to the bottom of the deepest waterhole for two thousand miles. Experience amazing stories from the people who live them on the snap judgment podcast. Raw intimate powerful see the world from someone else's is find snap judgment wherever you get your podcast.

Ruth Bader Ruth. Bader GINSBURG Ruth Ruth United States Supreme Court American Civil Liberties Union Kathleen America Supreme Court Kathleen Peretti Ruth argument president Senate Federal Government Sharon frontier New York President Bill Clinton attorney Marty founding director
Ep. 34 - Remembering and Honoring RBG's Life and Legacy

Parenting and Politics

21:34 min | 9 months ago

Ep. 34 - Remembering and Honoring RBG's Life and Legacy

"Hello I just wanted to come on here. To share a little bit of my thoughts on. Ruth Bader GINSBURG's passing it has been. Incredibly hard. Week. Just when you think that Things can get any worse they seem to get worse. So I'm thinking you know maybe this is rock bottom. All we have to do is go up from here. So. It's absolutely devastating that we lost one of our Great Xiros Real. Life. Just majestic brilliant. Women of our times this week. So I wanted to invite. Some of our past guests to share their thoughts on losing our BG and I also wanted to share. What I I want to share. What I felt. Which is Fear I thought about my daughter and I thought about whether. When she grows up. She is going to have. More rights than than I do. You know are we going to go back to the Times where a woman needed? A man to sign. In give her permission to have a credit card or to buy a house or to. You know. Enter here, right on there are so many things that women were not able to do without their spouses and and that means a frightening thing because I want my daughter to. You know do whatever she wants to do I. Want her to be a mom. If she wants to be a mom, I want her to be able to decide that she doesn't want to be part if that is something that she chooses. To Do I don't think. Should force. motherhood on anyone. I want her to be able to decide. About her reproductive rights right and I feel very strongly about that. Not only my daughter but you know even people now women should be able to decide. When and if we have children and how many children we have, and we should be able to decide whether we choose to terminate pregnancies for whatever reason it is none of my business why someone else would want to terminate a pregnancy and I feel very strongly about that. So I feel like. Women's rights are really. Were really impacted by Ruth Bader GINSBURG is work. But also. They, hang on the balance of what's going to happen with. With whoever is chosen? To. Replace while she's irreplaceable but whoever is chosen for that seat in the Supreme Court. So I so yeah, so I'm sad and I'm mad You know and I. Cried, and I think I angry ran this week. So. So I think we need to channel that anger frustration and sadness in two determination into helping get out the vote in two. Really, rolling up our sleeves and thinking about our children and the kind of lives and the kind of rights that we want them to have, and I know that I'm talking mostly about women's rights but really. It really is about also. What's going to happen to the court? If it becomes a more conservative court, does that mean that they're going to overturn the Affordable Care Act? Does that mean that millions of people are GONNA lose their health insurance? These are real life and death decisions. That the Supreme Court justices, you know we'll have power to make. So we have to think about future generations. We have to think about the less fortunate we have to think about. Our neighbors, we have to think about the kind of society that we want to live in. And you know a lot of people I think were saying Oh that could never happen that could never happen in the United States. It's all happening. All the things that we think cannot happen are happening. After. Ruth Bader Bader GINSBURG. Passing. The occupant in the White House has said that. He he couldn't say that he would agree to a peaceful transition power and that you know our democracy hangs in the balance because what does that mean of a person does not want to? Give up the presidency and you know move move on a for a peaceful transition that means that they're pretty much just you know doing what they want and that is. That is a a dictator. Does you know they just WanNa stay in power forever, and this is very scary. The United States has spent a lot of time meddling into other elections in quote unquote developing countries or quote unquote third, world countries and right now. Our elections. Are. You know not to be envied by any other country in the world. So I'm sorry, I took a detour but I just am had to say all of that. So really. We have to vote for our children. We have to vote for future generations we have to vote for democracy we have to vote. people over party we have to vote country party, someone, send this episode all the senators out there who you know are. So in line and thinking about power and party over country and people that you know that has severely caught clouded their judgment. So I wanted to leave you two things that I learned from Ruth Bader GINSBURG and. One of the things that was that I learned from listening to her speak and reading about her life. Is that you know. When she graduated Harvard No one would hire her and I think she was. Top of her class. And no law firm would hire her because she said, she had three strikes against her she said, she was a woman. She said she was a Jew and she said she was a mom which side is unfortunately you know. Being a mom is still something I. think that penalizes a lot of women in their careers unfortunately just because of the way. Society views, MOMS and caretaking, but that's for another episode. So RPG said, you know they wouldn't hire me because that was a mom I was a woman. and I was a Jew and you know she. She. Ended up going to teach and having a remarkable career and and really with that taught me is that you know sometimes we think. So what that taught me is that. Sometimes life won't give us the job that we want her you know we won't get the opportunity that we thought was meant for us and sometimes That's just slice way of saying. I've got something better. That door closed because if ruth had. been a partner at the firm that would have been it. She would have just been a partner in a firm she wouldn't have taken this. Enormous. Just, amazing path that she took and done all the work that she did. So that's one of the things that really stuck out in her story. You know she she persevered she worked hard. And even though. Some doors close and even though she didn't get the opportunities that she should have gotten because she was brilliant. That She ended up in, you know the highest. The aspiration that you can have as a lawyer. So. So yes. Sometimes you know life will close doors and. Move Us Away. From the thing we we thought we should be doing, but we have to trust that in the end it will all work out. another thing that I learned from. Our BG's life is that it's really important who you pick as A. Partner. Ruth Bader Ginsburg always talked about. How her husband Marty. Who is also really mind was her biggest advocate and She said that he was the only boy who cared that she had a brain and I think that that is really important You know. So when we're picking our spouse or our partner in life we want. I want my daughter to. Pick the person that knows she has a bringing right and that values that she has a brain in the has the she has of waste and I think it's really important for for us to to do that. As women. So if you haven't picked your partner in life pick someone that really respects your professional. Goals. So if you are. Still choosing a life partner, pick a life partner that values your brain and the values and supports your professional goals. And believes that you are brilliant and it also helps. If he or she know how to cook especially, if you don't know how to cook and I say that from experience because my husband definitely knows how to cook and it's quite wonderful. So Yeah. Those are the two things That are kind of lesser known points because of course than we talk about. Our BG's legacy and you know she. She's talked about the fact that You know John. Let. Your emotions kind of get in the way and and you want to explain your point so that people. Will want to work with you and And always be a lady which means be independent. So all those things. So right now, I just wanted to give some space for some of my friends and former guests to share their thoughts on Ruth Bader Ginsburg's passing a what she has meant to them. and. Also, I am going to end this by saying, may her memory be a revolution? Hi Diana. This is Sarah Berliner founder of like a mother. And I I want to thank you. For the opportunity to be in community with you and your other guests. For this compilation episode because. Things. Are Hard right now and our BG's passing. Only makes them more so. On top of everything we were already doing. We have to multiply that by one hundred in her honour. Brenda Moss who is a gun violence survivor and Volunteer and advocate with MOMS demand action said. RPG passed the baton. And, I really feel that that that's right and it. Ties into the metaphor of been thinking about a lot. Recently, democracy is a team sport. I added to that. Democracy is a team sport and the season is year round. We all have to participate, and we all have to do it all the time. And part of the reason that we are in the situation where we were depending on an eighty seven year old woman with cancer, who admittedly is a hero. And did many heroic things in her life? the reason that we had so much riding on her survival. which when you think about it is an absolutely unacceptable place to be in for society. The reason we were there is that a lot of US opted out. For many years. and. If our BG HAS taught us about the need to. Stand up for ourselves. I think we need to apply that just to legal issues or to. Issues of equity that she fought for But to are just our whole ethos, our whole approach to how we show up in the world and carefree each other and fight for each other. Something that's extraordinary to me about RPG's what an icon she was not just to. Adults who've learned about her legacy watched movies about her and read about her but also to children, how many books there are in children's libraries. And classrooms my kids both know who Ruth Bader Ginsburg was that. To me a means the world. I want my kids to see me honoring justice. GINSBERG's like a C- by fighting hard now and continuing to do so after the election. Right, now it's all hands on deck. For the fight against confirming trump appointee. It's all hands on. Deck for winnable Senate races. So, that we win the Senate for empathy for caretakers. and. protecting the House and gains that we've made their and about local elections, we cannot sleep on local elections. These efforts over the next six weeks will be the way that we honor the legacy, our Ruth Bader, Ginsburg, and the way that we win a better future for ourselves and our families and those we love. ORLA. My name is Lisa Batista in Campaign Director with the digital feminist organization ultraviolet. Ruth Baiter I can tell you that as a Latina that was raised in a very traditional and religious Puerto Rican and Cuban household women weren't supposed to leave the house until they were married. And if I could not control my fertility and my Dad Dini, there is no way I could have lived to my potential end done everything that I have done to date like get a college degree and work as a journalist, and then a community organizer have two children. I had them in my twenties, but I was able to have them a little later than any other woman in my family. Because I used birth control. Because I had gone to planned parenthood when I was uninsured these freedoms and rights were all things that are BG represented on the Supreme Court? If we want these rights and freedoms for all women for our daughters then we need to get out there and vote and make sure that Donald trump does not replace her. Thank you. Hi everybody. This is Reverend Demand Hamburg s craft founder of reasoning imagination. What to say about Ruth Bader, Ginsburg, what an inspiration what a trailblazer. What a torch you have handed all of us. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. My words could never. Say enough about how you have championed championed equality and justice for women. For lgbtq rights and how you have raised the bar even for men to understand what a more equitable workplace place civic place could be. Specifically. I'm indebted TO JUSTICE GINSBURG because I was pregnant twice when working outside of the home and without legislation that she pushed forward I could have been fired. I could have lost my job I could have been discriminated against for being pregnant on the job. So. Thank you. Ruth Bader GINSBURG. For allowing me. To have a job to come back to for allowing me. To be able to be in charge of my own reproductive justice. And to be able to work and begin a family at the same time. We are indebted to you for the many decades that you fought for equality. May each of us continue to do whatever it is that we can do to live out the dreams that you laid forward for us all. And after those amazing words by Amanda I want to share the last clip and I'm super excited about this because. This clip was recorded by Mikailah. Nine years old and she is the daughter of one of our favorite people. Catalina Rubio mccray who has an immigration lawyer and activist who has been on the podcast before so Yeah I'm super excited that Mikailah wanted to share her thoughts as a nine year old girl. WHO Are. Be. G. IS A hero end and she's right. So let's listen to Mikailah and see what she thinks. Ruth Bader GINSBURG was one of the best. Supreme Court justices ever she and she was girl the second on the Supreme Court. She was the first Jewish girl and she's considered a superhero too many. She is one of our world's best heroes and. She's done so much in our world. So I'm so that's why I took these moments to honor her. I really appreciate you coming in listening to the. The slow talk and I really like and I'd really like. Google guys to all know while it is sad. The bitter GINSBURG has passed. We hope that she's with her husband. Marty. And her mom. And that's why. Their ups and downs about it but. She is done so much in our world and it's time for her to take rest will do what did she do? Well. She's fought for many girls rights and she's also. Dissented disagreed and has been warrior. She is one of our best heroes. So with those beautiful words by. The future generation to generation has spoken. And I think we're going to be in good hands if we have kids like me gala thinking. About our Shiro's and. Honoring the life of. Warriors like Ruth Bader GINSBURG and following in her footsteps. So until next time. Don't forget. Hope is our superpower. Don't forget to vote. Don't forget to help your friends registered to vote to free at too early. And Supreme Court justice. Ruth Bader GINSBURG wherever you are may your memory be a blessing? May Your memory be a revolution?

Ruth Bader Bader GINSBURG Ruth Bader partner the Times Supreme Court Supreme Court United States Marty ruth Ruth Baiter founder White House Donald trump A. Partner Mikailah Senate Google
The Life And Legacy Of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

31:55 min | 9 months ago

The Life And Legacy Of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

"Tayo from NPR I'm Sam Sanders it's been a minute listeners today we are giving you a very special bonus episode going to revisit a conversation I had a while back with two women who made the award winning documentary all about the life of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. and. As I'm sure you've noticed the conversation after Ginsberg's death, it moved quickly from honoring her life to speculating about what comes next and who might replace her on the Supreme Court. Listeners I am not a good speculator. So in this episode, we are just going to take some time to look back at RPG's life and legacy. So I talked with documentary filmmakers, Betsy West and Julie Cohen in two thousand eighteen about their film called simply aren't Beechy that movie covers a lot of ground from Ruth Bader Ginsburg stays as one of the first female students at Harvard Law School to working on women's rights cases with the ACLU back in the seventies to arguing cases in front of the Supreme Court. A whopping six times female citizens of Louisiana are denied equal protection the total absence of their peers from the jury. Is Very little difference between men and women so hard with them to Majuri be. Aware of that new theory and as a special treat in this episode listeners, you'll also hear Nina Totenberg NPR zone, liberal affairs correspondent and friend Rpg the part that is so sweet about this movie and so different about it is that they so perfectly captured. Her relationship with her late husband who died in twenty nine I think and it's a love story. All right. Without further ado in honor of Ruth Ginsburg and her work and her legacy. Here's my chat from two thousand eighteen with Julie Betsy and Nina enjoy. Why this movie now I mean Ruth Bader Ginsburg has been in the public consciousness now for decades why now and what made you WanNa? Do it now? Well, you know justice GINSBURG. Starting in two thousand, thirteen, two, thousand fourteen started to take on an enormous amount of internet fame Betsy and I had each interviewed her previously for other documentary projects and in early two, thousand, fifteen, we just said someone has to do. A full dress documentary on Justice Ginsburg telling the full life story and why shouldn't it be us? I mean even some of her biggest fans some of them millennials who are putting tattoos on themselves Ruth Bader Ginsburg face don't really know everything that she accomplished for American women and it just was a story that you know we wanted to tell. There these moments you have in the film Jillian Betsy where you're playing this archive tape of Ruth. Bader GINSBURG and her husband Marty and ruth now is watching it. And you see such a beautiful. Overwhelming smile on her face and you see the love that she still has for this man and it is hard to not be moved to tears by it. What made you both want to spin such a good amount of time in the film focusing not just on her legal career but on this the true romance well, we knew that she'd had a long and happy marriage but it wasn't until we began on the film that we realized how important this marriage was to her both personally, and professionally I mean it's an incredible model of a feminist marriage. Mardi GINSBURG was an extremely. Talented successful tax lawyer who happened to be married to a brilliant legal strategist Ruth Bader. Ginsburg and when her career began to take off in the nineteen seventies when she was arguing cases before the supreme. Court that changed the world for American women, he began to take over more of the responsibilities in the house and eventually when she became a federal judge, he moved to Washington for her and then you know when there was an opening on the Supreme Court Mardi. GINSBURG, who was a very affable connected guy campaign for her to be considered to go on the Supreme Court I mean. What more could you? You. Know I found myself watching the part of the film where you outline just how hard. Ruth was working. You know she was taking care of these kids she was. Practicing law she was carrying for Mardi while he was sick with cancer. She was averaging a lot of times like two hours of sleep a night. You know she was living this kind of Sheryl Sandberg inhabit all life before we had a name for that. was what she was doing really out of the ordinary or were there women doing this and we just didn't notice. Yeah that's a it's a really interesting she. She was leaning heck in has as you say before before leaning in was a thing. I'm not going to say that there weren't some other women are doing extraordinary feats but by any measure Ruth Bader, Ginsburg is an extraordinary woman during that period in her life when she herself is in Harvard Law School on the law review her husband who's also in law school has testicular cancer. She's helping care for him and they've got a toddler I mean it's you know. It's feels it sounds pretty superhuman. You know looking back on it now she just says she was doing what she had to do. Well, there's this moment where she's talking about basically having to leave school to go care for her young child and I feel like most people would say, yes at tired me the hell out she said, no being at home with my daughter helped ground me and made me better in school I mean really it's amazing break. Yeah. I don't know other people who've taken care of toddlers. A break, but she sought that way. To Know Ruth Bader Ginsburg is to understand that she really is a woman of unbelievable steel. I mean her mother died the day before she was to graduate from high school and her whole life has been working unbelievably hard. She always looks for a way to do something. So she'll say, well, no taking care of a child just made me better able to study until four o'clock in the morning and then get up at seven and CETERA etcetera. So you have to. You get an idea of her determination and steeliness I wanNA ask Nina. You know there's a section of the film that talks about this really methodical well, thought out legal strategy that she exercised in the seventies to push for the quality of women. And It was a grand plan that move step-by-step case by case can you outlined briefly what that strategy was and what Ruth was doing that was really kind of ahead of her time perhaps well, as she said in the film, she sometimes felt a bit like a kindergarten teacher for the courts because they were almost all male and on the supreme. Court they were all male. They've never been a woman on the court at that point, and she's trying to persuade them that discrimination based on gender is discrimination against women even when it's done for a good purpose to protect them like you shouldn't work after a certain time of night will that means a whole category of jobs as closed off to you And so she often picked not always but often picked male plaintiffs and the one that Julie and Betsy talk about in the movie is a case involving a widower whose wife died in childbirth and he's left supporting a child and he wants to take care of the child and he doesn't qualify for survivors benefits under the Social Security Law and his wife had paid into social security. She'd been a schoolteacher and he wasn't eligible for the money. So GINSBURG tastes this case it goes all the way to the Supreme Court and in the end the court. For a variety of reasons, sides with the argument that she's making that this is discrimination against the man based on his gender is discrimination against the woman because she's not getting the same benefits for her child and her husband after she dies and that it's discrimination against the child because the child doesn't get the benefits that he would've or she would have gotten otherwise if the two parents weren't treated equally. There was another case with a woman who had joined the Air Force and was married but she did not qualify for a housing allowance that her male counterparts Dot v Indeed Sharon frontier. Oh. When she was lieutenant in the Air Force as you say, couldn't get the same housing benefits for. Married Woman that married man in the air force could have gotten a she thought the whole thing couldn't possibly be how it was. She just auto someone made an administrative error all just get this all straightened out and was sort of horrified not only that she was denied the benefits but also I think by the condescending attitude that she was treated with which was kind of like, Hey, you're lucky to be. In the Air Force at all lady and she just said forget it. I'm going to fight this got a lawyer Ruth Bader. Ginsburg who was then working with the women's rights project took on the case and she and lawyer who had originally brought it together or unit before the Supreme Court and just starting off on on Ruth Bader Ginsburg path of making the case that men and women should be treated. Equally, under the US Constitution Yeah and so she ends up during this time period are during what six cases in front of the Supreme Court she wins five of those six. It's a very it's so interesting because she's always so calm and self possessed but she said she didn't eat lunch that day because she hers argument was the first one after lunch and she was afraid she'd throw up in the courtroom sheet lunch. We know there's one once or I'm gonNA tell. I I met her by phone. I was a brand new reporter assigned to cover the Supreme Court. And I am trying to learn everything I can learn about the court, and of course, I know next to nothing and there's this brief and it's I guess what seventy two and argues it's it was the first sexist rumination case to go to the Supreme Court and it argues that women are covered by the fourteenth amendment guarantee of equal protection of the laws. Now, this is a post civil war constitutional amendment, and so I I didn't really understand why this would apply to women why wouldn't apply to you know it was enacted for the freed slaves. It's to hear you say that because I hear equal protection now into me in my mind, it applies to everyone and everything, but it didn't during. A that's what I thought. So I, go I, call her up this I. Look on the Front of the brief. It's written by professor at rutgers named Ruth Bader Ginsburg I call her up and I emerged from the phone booth like an hour later. Sort of like a a goose who'd been. Force Fed information for an hour to get me ready for to produce my liver in this case, my story and And and what she said then was that the first of all the Fourteenth Amendment says all persons should be treated equally, it doesn't say all African American and white people it doesn't say all men and women doesn't it says all persons and there's a fair amount of legislative history. So to speak that about some people who were sponsors of the of the that amendment and what they intended, and she was able to present that and argue that and present it as this is one of the reasons she's for she believes in a living constitution. And she didn't argue that case she wrote the brief but you didn't argue. But that argument basically that equal protection clause applies not just to black people, white people but also to women that was the foundation for all of those cases she was bringing up during the seventies right? Exactly. Cats the NFL a body of law that Ruth Bader. GINSBURG. was really the champion of she. From the star was a young girl that wanted to be able to do all that the boys did like climbing garage roofs and such she said, but also she experienced discrimination. Before she was even a lawyer, there's a scene in the film where you talk about her being what one of nine women in Harvard Law's class of five hundred in the Dean has this meal for the women at this dinner for them he asked him why they're taking the men's spots. Like this is the thing that she dealt with from the start was was that as much a part of why she did the work she did. You. Know. I. Think initially fighting this kind of discrimination became her life's work. But at the very beginning, it was more she loved the law and as she says in the film during the McCarthy era, she had a professor who explained what lawyers were doing to fight that injustice and she sought, Hey, that's a good thing to do. With Your Life that you could use your brain and your skills to help other people and I think that was her motivation when she gets to Harvard law school she's Juggling family and a sick husband and everything else, and she still excelling and then and then you get out of law school and it's like, no, no sorry, we hire you. You're woman. You know that that was the beginning of certainly of the discrimination, but it was really the women's movement at the end of the nineteen sixties where some she she credits her students with coming to her and saying, we want to know more about women in the law can can you research this and she? She does the research which he says doesn't take very long because there just aren't that many discrimination cases and and that's when she sets on this path that. Ultimately addresses the discrimination that she experienced and and you know helps everybody else to the everything is the idea of law and rules really appeal to her at one point in the movie she says well I I don't I don't March I. Don't do that. Let me do this thing I can do. One of the areas of the law that she's a master in civil procedure, which let me tell you. As somebody who covers the supreme court is really boring. You're you're white why it's not in our field? Yes. Exactly, right and I should also say that you know the very first sex discrimination case that she handled her husband actually brought to her attention. Gregory was a tax case involving a guy who couldn't deduct the care of his aging mother under the tax code. But if he'd been a woman, he could have and the two of them took that case together he did it from the tax perspective and she did it from the sex-discrimination perspective. You all touched on it in the film but during. The election season in the runup to November twenty sixteen. Ruth Bader Ginsburg made some uncharacteristically harsh comments about candidate then candidate Donald Trump. Says back in July of two thousand sixteen. She told The New York Times quote he is a faker. He has no consistency about him. He says, whatever comes into his head at the moment. He really has an ego. How has he gotten away with not turning over his tax returns? The press seems to be very gentle with him on that. Job also said quote I can't imagine what this place would be. I can't imagine what the country would be with Donald Trump as president she later had to apologize for those comments it was. Thought by many that she stepped out of bounds and as a supreme, court justice should not have said, those kind of things about someone that could be president. Nina. How much how out of line was it? I remember when it happened and I said this feels weird and if that were to do it, it was out of line and it wasn't and she did it more than once in the space of three days I think she did it three times. Why did you do it? I? Have No. Idea is inappropriate after the the first time she did it, it didn't seem to get much attention it but once it was on the front page of the New York Times, Cub whom and she knew she'd made a mistake she made an apology. But of course that prompted Donald trump than I guess it was candidate trump to call her a loser. WHO's lost it and all kinds of other things but it was it was a mistake and there's no way you can take back a mistake like that except to apologize does it tarnish her legacy? No I don't think. So if she had kept it up, it would have. I. Think. You know for Julian Betsy. How much did she talk about that moment and what did she say was her mental calculus going into it. Well she after she did apologize she basically said I think it would have been best. SAID NOTHING and so she wasn't really going to elaborate. We did ask her about The idea that that somehow disqualifies her from you know sitting on cases involving the current administration and she was very forceful in saying if anybody thinks that who I might have voted for as president is going to affect the way I, do my job in interpreting the laws they do not understand how the UT basically how I work and how the judicial system works. Yeah. Yeah. You know I wanNA talk about. The notorious are BG's place in the culture right now you guys hit on it towards the end of the film but. This woman who has for her entire life been intellectual and quiet and focused is now at eighty five, a bigger star than she's ever been. Why why now and why her it's she's in a very unique moment that seems. Surprising. Yeah we think that it began in two thousand thirteen with Shelby County case. That cases? Where the Supreme Court McCarthy ruled that certain oversight of voting in states which had a history of discrimination against African Americans could be loosened because our country has changed and she wrote a stinging dissent in which she said taking away these protections is like getting rid of your umbrella in a rainstorm just because you're not getting wet. And a young law student started a tumbler entitled notorious rb G. and it just her persona just kind of took off the idea of this. Small Octogenarian Grandmother, who speaking truth to power I mean it's it's funny and it's inspiring at the same time and it just kind of grew from there. Yeah basically, every every time that justice Ginsburg would do something to put herself in the news. If any any legal opinion that she wrote at any dissent in particular, you know the Internet would just go wild. It's not what you think of when you think of social media. But like that's how you know instagram pictures of her, the Merch that people started Beijing's phenomenon of tattoos you know they're just. There was just something about the juxtaposition of a soft-spoken great legal mind and you know, and of course, with the great comparison being made to the notorious B I g a a joke that Justice Ginsburg, herself seems to enjoy an amplifies by making the point that the two have so much in common because they were both born and bred in Brooklyn. You know it's like cookie and it's funny. But there's like a carnal of real substance to it because people are seeing like this little fierce intellect is speaking up and there's no longer for that the the seat for it I think actually was planted in two thousand eight which she wrote a dissent and voiced it from the bench in a major sex discrimination case. That she lost five to four in the Supreme Court which case it was called it was brought by a woman named Lilly ledbetter was worked in a tire factory in Alabama and realized years after being there somebody sent her the statistics that she was being paid like more than half less than the men who were doing exactly the same thing and so she sued. and Won a judgment it by jury and the Supreme Court struck down because they said, she didn't sue quickly enough. She didn't end Ginsburg wrote the dissent saying you know a lot of times you don't even know you're being discriminated against. You don't have the data to prove it until when you and that's not what Congress intended when it enacted the civil rights law and. It was a fiery descent that ended by saying this is now the ball is now in Congress's Court to fix this with that was an election year and it became a big campaign issue Barack. Obama, used it crusaded on it and it was the first bill that he signed. When he was president was elected president was the Lilly ledbetter act. First of all, it is fitting. That the very first bill. That I signed. The Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Restoration Act. Is upholding one of this nation's founding principles. That we are all created. And so I think in some ways that at that point she was the only woman on the court justice O'Connor retired and she for several years was the lone woman on the court and was dissenting more and more frequently and especially on sex discrimination cases but also on other cases and I think that that's slow burn. So to speak is why the Internet slowly slowly but more and more got. To explode, and then of course, she was even a figure on Saturday night live which which she'd never really seen it. They showed it to her. All right. So for our audience, here's a clip of Kate McKinnon playing RPG honest L. quite funny. Listen No plans to leave the Supreme Court Colin. The bench is now my porch I'm GonNa sit down all day and screaming now get out of my yard. Realistically how long do you think he can hold on? Apple a day to keep Ben Carson away. In the movie you see her watching it watching it resembles the best seen her watching Kate McKinnon later on snl she seemed to enjoy it. She was she really seemed to be enjoying it and the Raunchier the dancing got the harder Sheila gets down I love it I. Love It. So you know y'all mentioned earlier that you know there are some parts of this film. That I think some people. It might be nudism like she's a big opera fan. She also was really really good friends with Justice Scalia who was probably just about as far to the other side of the legal spectrum as one could be you know I knew that they were friends and watch the movie and saw their friendship, but I still was like. How did that work? I'm going to take that one for okay. I know her and I knew him as long almost as long as I knew her okay and I really think that the best interview I ever did in my life was an interview of the two of them onstage just about a year before he died and they were hilarious but they fought about issues that they cared about and they end their views of the constitution. School which was basically it's dead I mean it's we're stuck with what they found. The framers meant at the time and hers that No. They meant it to be a constitution that would live and would it? It's words would change somewhat with the Times they're meaning we changed with the times and as she pointed out, then often points out the people who wrote the constitution they were white male property owners. They were not like most of us. They were not women they were not people of Color, and so it was very, it was a wonderful interview and you could see and by the way they both loved civil procedure. So. It's A. Great moment in the film helping to illustrate what some think of is an unlikely friendship. But in fact, makes total sense when you know Justice Ginsburg, you know that she did appreciate justice. Scalia's love of opera his sense of humor and it was A. The intellectual minds you know they like to spar they, and they both had underneath at all an abiding appreciation for and respect for the rule of law. Why didn't she retire when Obama was President I think she didn't feel that anybody else could bring to the she said this could bring to the court which she did that moment is that a bit of of Hubris though it may be Hubris, but it may have also been true The court was at that point very divided and she not an unrealistic person after the two thousand, twelve election I. Think she thought maybe twenty if she'd been planning to retire in two thousand thirteen or let's say twenty, fourteen, I, think she thought that Obama would have a very hard time getting somebody through who she would if approved as a replacement which she have gotten approved. would. She's gotten confirmed being who she was back then today. The climate's different. Now I think and I think it would very much depend who was in the Senate. But as you'll see in the movie, one of her big defenders was Orrin Hatch Republican of Utah who thought she was a terrific judge and understood that she was going to be a a more liberal presence on the court but that she was That was in the days of greater depth less partisanship, and so it's not she was approved ladies I. Think There were three dissenting votes right? Ninety six to three hard to picture today someone who not only a card carrying member but a longtime staffer at the ACLU and also speaking out forcefully for abortion rights during her confirmation hearings almost impossible really to picture someone like that being approved ninety six to three or. Or the other way if you matter mentioned somebody who worked for at a pro life organization being enough. Absolutely. So then does that mean in some ways that there might not ever be another quote unquote notorious RPG the climate has changed such that the type of justices will see on the bench on the Supreme Court now. Won't be allowed to be what she was. You know word a moment in time. It's hard to predict the future I think and so I wouldn't you know as I said, two interesting to be around, justice? Ginsburg she takes a long view look at where we come from and. Who knows I'm sure she hopes that maybe some of her to sense will will ring true in the future it. It's just hard to know she likes to talk a lot about the pendulum swinging and the pendulum swings in one direction, and then perhaps it will swing back so. We, we like to follow her pattern of cautious optimism throughout her career So I don't I don't think there's any any way to look at this moment and see how that you know what that says for the long term. For All three of you to close it out What is a big lesson for? Younger people any people. From our BG's life and her work, I mean for me the things that I saw in the film we're pretty evident. But what do you all want the biggest lesson to be? You know I think that When bad things happen to you when you're facing challenges and adversity to you know stop and think carefully. Okay. How can how can I approach this? What can I do? That's going to get me to where I WANNA go and I think she's done that throughout her life with great success I'm sure she's been angry in her life. I'm sure bad things have happened to her that have made her angry but somehow she's managed to to think ahead and to figure out. All right. How am I going to deal with this in a way that's going to be affected. In. A personal sense I'm going to end by telling you a personal story. When my late husband was terribly ill he was in the hospital for over a year and she gave me a piece of advice. And she said. I'll tell you what you do not spend your days at the hospital in shaking your boots. It's not good for him. It's not good for you do your work it may not be your best work, but it'll be good work and it will get you through this and you'll be a better wife when he comes home and she was right on every single count I like to do your work. Of. Thanks a documentary film-makers. Betsy West and Juvie Cohen. They talked with me about their film RPG back in two thousand eighteen also big thanks to NPR legal affairs correspondent Totenberg. Listeners Rebecca near feats tomorrow. I'm Sam Sanders Talk. Soon

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Times Nina Totenberg Betsy West president Supreme Court Mardi Harvard Law School Donald Trump Sam Sanders New York Times ACLU Lilly ledbetter Justice Scalia Julie Betsy Louisiana Obama Jillian Betsy
A Eulogy for Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Radio Free Flint

12:56 min | 9 months ago

A Eulogy for Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

"It was two, thousand and three. I walked into the. Supreme Court, building? Washington DC. To give what was. My view. Arguments and. Historic Case Flint's first criminal case to ever reach the High Court. Obviously over the years. I dreamed about. Appearing in that court. As every lawyer does was honest with himself. And on that bench were we're giants. Justice John Paul Stevens. Justice. Sandra? Day O'Connor. Justice? William Rehnquist. But none stood taller than. Justice. Ruth Bader GINSBURG. Later became known in her eighty says a Torius RPG. She was. Some kind of? Some kind of woman. Some impressive. Strong. SMART. Enormously resourceful intellectually. I had the privilege of. Representing the people of the State of Michigan in particular those from genesee county. In front of that court. On that day. In May in in May. and. As a result of that experience Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Was indelibly etched in my head. She asks questions of. My opponent. And Myself. And what I recall most vividly about that experience. Was the exchange that The justice had with my opponent. And in the case was particularly, it was a technical case that had to deal with double jeopardy questions of whether. Person could be. Tried twice for the same offence. Justice GINSBURG. Engaged in Colloquy with my opponent. Essentially, went something like this. You know. What would you tell your client at the end of the court's ruling? What would be your advice to your client at that point? Because my opponent deny argue the case didn't represent the defendant. Who He? Had was representing in front of the court in. At the time, a trial and flint. My opponent was speechless. Justice Ginsburg sat up and said. I know exactly what you would say I know exactly what you would say. And Having, read her biography and inner past getting to the Supreme Court. It was clear that. Justice Ruth. Bader GINSBURG had an enormous amount of. Experience. That dwarfed the entire Supreme Court. In Criminal Law. She had tried. Over a hundred. And forty cases. Excuse me she had appeared in more than one hundred, forty cases before the High Court and she had spent a career. Representing. PEOPLE WHO Had the system fail them or not serve them right so she took that Point of view as an advocate for the American Civil Liberties Union. Onto the high bench. Her. What was amazing about her is how truly? Smart she was and how she was able to use that intellectual skill. To help those in empathize with those who were powerless. An who who, who weren't given all the prerogatives. That so many with the high price lawyers. With the well. Endowed. Family Trust. Or who had nothing much more than the clothes on their back and barely house to in. She stood for everything that was right about America. I was sad to learn today. About her passing. because. In my lifetime, there are very few people who have left. This earth. Who had served in government? Who made a big impression on me? I can only think of John Kennedy and I was yet a young boy. At that time. Robert Kennedy Martin. Luther King never served in government but left. One Hell of an impression. For what they stood for for what they believed? For how they listened to others and what they what they meant to leave. Not Self serving. But they were in service to their country. And to humanity. I wanted to spend a second or two to explain to you what some others have said about Ruth Bader Ginsburg. One case Justice Ginsburg who had talked to national public radio about what was like to hear constant rumors about her own death. Justice Skin Justice GINSBURG. had some life principles in one of those was insist on your own survival. So, she said quote there was a senator I. Think it was after my pancreatic cancer who announced with great glee that I was going to be dead within six months. That senator whose name I have forgotten is now dead himself and I am very much alive. Kuenssberg went on to say that. She was hoping that her own eulogy wouldn't be written for many years and in the NPR interview referenced opera singer Marilyn Horne who's diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in two thousand and five and said, I will live. She was an amazing. Person because she. Believed in the notion that you need to cultivate a beginner's mind. One of the things that kept. Justice. GINSBURG intellectually spry. was she was opened a new information in ways that's rare among public officials over status. According to National Public radio during oral arguments in February Ginsburg in connor determined that was unfamiliar to her immediately asked about it. GINSBURG's question was unrelated to the dispute. Insistence on. sating satiated her curiosity is what made the moment such a flying demonstration of an expert remaining ever fresh. Justice GINSBURG. Believed in gender equality. She believed it must be lived. Perhaps, no other public official, a history of this country. Ever, did more adverse did stronger. And ever made in understood how to make changes. To make America place. where. Gender. Does not matter as to employment and other opportunities in society. She. Was a person who? Captured the imagination of. My daughters. And a lot of women in this country simply because. She stood out as somebody who believed in something bigger than herself. She taught at Columbia loss off school. She was a leading. Attorney for the ACLU's women's rights project. She did all this while raising. Two children. Of that during a time when she was litigating cases before the United States Supreme Court. Mind you that an attorney who peers in front of that court rarely. Does full time in. That's their whole business. There aren't very many of those lawyers. Around. A May argue two or three maybe four cases a year in front of the United States Supreme. Court. So the complexity and nature of the cases that she was preparing for required enormous amounts of research. Leaf of Fester wrote in an article for courts. Online magazine quote one of these calls came. The morning after Ginsburg stayed up all night writing a brief working at her Columbia Office. She picked up the phone and gave appointed responds quote this child has to parents please alternate calls. It's his father's turn on quote. Ruth Bader Ginsburg lived which she believed. `nother thing she believed in In her life principles was life changing inspiration can come from anywhere. and. In Ruth Bader GINSBURG's life. She was open to other people's points of view. And whenever? She. Heard the word feminists. She helped to shape. What's possible for women? She also believed that a woman should be vaction. Called Vision and action. We can join hands with others like mind. candling lights along paths leading out of the terrible terrifying darkness. May those lights guide us through the coming days? Another thing that Ruth Ginsburg believed in was not taking yourself too seriously. She was not up above appearing at mock trials for Shakespearian characters she loved opera and actually appeared at one point on stage in an opera but she did not put anything ahead of her work including three broken ribs. Lastly one of her principals was. You're never too old for fish net. Enough said. So. With all of that. It's hard not to celebrate the life. Of Ruth Bader Ginsburg she is one of those Americans that will live on in history and her legacy will be bright. Sad to see her go. It's sad to see people who even in this day and age cannot see beyond. Their own. Their. Own Self. To not take a moment to pause. In recognized the tremendous. Accomplishments of this woman. Because it wasn't always in the winning that she made the best points. Often, it was in dissent. We should never forget that as Americans. No matter how divided we are. Rest in Peace Ruth Bader. GINSBURG. America love.

Ruth Bader GINSBURG United States Supreme Court High Court Justice John Paul Stevens Justice Ruth Supreme Court America William Rehnquist American Civil Liberties Union Case Flint Justice GINSBURG. Washington Sandra John Kennedy Michigan Luther King genesee county NPR United States
Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Progressive Icon, Dead At 87

NPR Politics Podcast

18:42 min | 9 months ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Progressive Icon, Dead At 87

"Hey there it's the NPR politics podcast I'm Scott detro- at covered the presidential campaign I'm Susan Davis Cover Congress and I'm Nina. Totenberg and I covered the Supreme Court it's just about nine o'clock on Friday September Eighteenth Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is dead at eighty seven. The cause of death was pancreatic cancer, which she had battled along with other forms of cancer for years. Nina. In recent years, Ginsburg had become a cultural icon for so many progressives. Let's start with this. Can you tell us about who she was before she became RPG before she was a Supreme Court justice. Now. She's always been a sort of a contradiction. She was always a demure firebrand. adjusters who was dominated but decorous, she always believed don't get mad. Just move onto the next thing that anger doesn't serve you. Well, you just keep going and you do your job and you do it to the highest standards you possibly can you know when you become a Supreme Court justice it overshadow so many other parts of your life and that makes sense. But before we talk about her career on the court and her legacy on the court, what do we need to know about what she did as a young lawyer how she got to be a young lawyer and the context through which she? She really fought her way into the legal ranks and fought way into changing so many laws. You know she couldn't get a job at a law firm and do things that I was born under a very bright store because you think my life I get out of law school. I have top grades. No law firm in the city of New York will hire me. She couldn't even get a teaching job for the longest time she was dismissed. Gave me time to devote to the Movement for evening out the rights of? Women and men by the Nineteen Seventies. She was leading the crusade for women's rights in the courts and she quite simply remade. What life is like for American women the words of the Fourteenth Amendment Equal Protection Clause, nor shall any state denied to any person the equal protection of the laws or that word any person covers women as well as men. And the Supreme Court woke up to that reality in Nineteen seventy-one back. Then there were hundreds maybe even thousands of state federal and local laws that said in explicit terms that women couldn't have access to certain jobs to certain rights even to jury service. HER CAMPAIGN TO EQUALIZE GENDER rights change the way this country is and she could never have served a day on a court and she would have dramatically had an impact on the United States as we know it today. But she served thirteen years on the Court of Appeals and twenty more than twenty seven years on the United States. Supreme. Court and she had an enormous effect. You know what are some of the rulings on the court that will be part of her legacy? Well, there was the Virginia Military Institute case in which he said to the state of Virginia you can't have this military school state military school. open, only two young men true. The standards are very rigorous and it's very difficult to meet those standards for not only most women but most men but for women who can meet them, it has to be equal. It has to be open to them reliance on overbroad generalizations typically male or typically female tendencies estimates about the way most gleaming or most men are. Will defy to deny opportunity. To women whose talents and capacity place them outside the average description that was a big decision of hers early on in her career on the supreme. Court. In the two thousands as the cord grew more and more conservative and once Justice Sandra Day O'connor the first woman on the court retired it became more and more conservative and she more and more played a dissenting role descent speak to future age. It's not simply to same high colleagues are wrong and I would do it this way. The greatest dissents do become court opinions, and gradually over time their views become the dominant view. So that's the dissenters hope. The writing not today but for tomorrow and she would pick her shots very, very strategically but when she dissented. Vigorously and cared passionately about it and wanted to call attention to her descent. She did an oral dissent from the bench. They're very rare but justices do them and she used strategically for example. To say to Congress, after the Supreme Court had Conservative majority had cut back on. The. Pay That was available to victims of sex and race and other kinds of discrimination she she lost that case five to four and she wrote in her dissent from the bench I remember sitting there and she was. Very calm but very deliberate, and you could sense the power in it. She said this is now up to Congress to change its in your court Congress and the first thing that Congress passed the first bill that Congress passed after Barack Obama was elected was the Lilly ledbetter bill to overrule that Supreme Court decision. I've always been. So struck by how you have been able to cover the court, not just through the legal INS and outs but you've really been able to illuminate who these people are not just as people but to each other and I wonder what she meant to the other justices and Howard they responding to her death. Well, I assume that all of them will issue statements but In the courts, the Supreme Court's press release announcing her death this evening chests, Robert said, our nation has lost a jurist of historic stature. We at the Supreme, court have lost a cherished colleague today we mourn. But with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her attacker Lewis and resolute champion of Justice Nina, you interviewed her so many times you covered her for so long you got to know her really well, I'm wondering just what what you're remembering about her and what stands out from her career and her life to you tonight. Well, I've known her for forty eight years. and. She taught me in the beginning a lot about the law she was you know older than I but not wildly older than I and she I learned from her. I didn't even understand how the constitution could equal protection clause could apply to women and I called her up. That was how I first met her and she gave me an hour long lecture and over time we became first professional friends then personal friends and at the Andrew for life really close friends and. I'm art broken. I will never meet anybody like this. Again, she was just an extraordinary woman and she was extraordinary to me. You know when my late husband was terribly sick for almost five years she would just scoop me up, take me out. She was an extraordinary justice, an extraordinary legal figure and extraordinary human being. I mean as. Important a figure in legal history as Ruth Bader GINSBURG is. The whole story tonight is not just about looking at her life. It's about this enormous caustic massive power struggle that is about to take place and I just want to end with some reporting. You have about a statement that GINSBURG dictated shortly before she died on that front. Yes, just days before she died as here's strength waned and she was beginning to realize that her days were not that many. She dictated this statement to her granddaughter. Klara. My fervent wishes that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed and by that she meant, of course, not necessarily trump or biden, but until the next president is installed. Nina Totenberg Long-time Supreme Court correspondent close friend of Ruth Bader GINSBURG. Thank you so much for talking to us. Tonight. Thank you for having me by ready to take a quick break when we come back that political fight that Ginsberg saw coming. Support for this podcast and the following message come from the Annie E. Casey, Foundation developing solutions to support strong families and communities to help ensure a brighter future for America's children. More information is available at Eighty F. Dot, org the way things are going right now even if you can keep track of what's happening in the news, it's hard to know why it's happening. What it really means. That's why we have created a daily podcast that answers your questions about the news in about ten minutes every weekday. It's called consider this new episodes every weekday afternoon from NPR and we're back and now we're joined by Mara Liasson Mara. Hey there Su- let's start with Mitch McConnell in two thousand sixteen the Senate majority leader did not hold a hearing or a vote on Barack Obama's nominee to the court. Merrick garland he said that it was an election year. So the people should decide through their vote. We are less than fifty days before the presidential election people are already voting in some states what Did McConnell say tonight McConnell said tonight what he has been saying for the last two years that of a vacancy occurred on the court before the election, he would move to fill it tonight in a lengthy statement he concluded quote President Trump's nominee will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate just hours after the news of her death and it seems like McConnell is preparing the Senate for what could be a vicious and divisive and historic Supreme Court battle in the Senate. Do you think that McConnell would since he has? So few days left just dispense with hearings and bring the nominee of the floor especially if it's a nominee who is already a senator McConnell is powerful, but he's not all powerful and Republican senators. All have their own calculations to make here. Many Republicans. In very critical seats up for reelection I find it hard to believe that there could be zero hearings on a nominee that might be a bridge too far even for Republicans who would support this strategy but yeah, it is possible to move nominee through the Senate, forty, six days before an election normally, it would require overwhelming bipartisan cooperation and probably a noncontroversial nominee it doesn't sound like there's going to. Be Either of those things. Senate Democrats are already out tonight saying the same standard that Applied Domestic Orleans should apply here there should not be a nominee until the election takes place and whoever wins this election should be able to nominate the successor to respond against Park and of course, in the Senate races. Democrats are pointing out that people like Thom Tillis and Cory Gardner famously said that the the voter should have say and that their voice should be heard on election day before a vote on a Supreme Court nominee. One thing I think that is really important to watch our senators, Susan Collins of Maine Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, and even Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia the women. In the Senate because the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg is going to put the issue of abortion rights into the center of this debate and these are Republican women who have historically supported abortion rights some with limitations but they certainly do support abortion rights and their votes are going to be very critical and if they do not want to move forward with a nominee if president trump nominate someone who has a record of opposing abortion rights, this could get very complicated very quickly. So I, know Mitch McConnell is saying he wants to have a vote but the politics here are incredibly complicated this close to an election. and. With Republicans a lot of Republicans looking at their own survival in an election where the winds aren't really already blowing in their direction and Mara just to underscore the stakes here the one of the big story lines of the last Supreme Court term was Chief Justice John Roberts repeatedly holding back the other conservatives on the court from from issuing sweeping rulings that would change that would change American lawn big way siding with siding with the Liberals at times. Other Times writing very narrow rulings. He wouldn't really have that ability at all on a six to three court. How much of a difference would would this swing from from? One of the most progressive members of the court to a trump appointee be once they have a six three majority I think that that means the conservative judicial project has reached its fruition for forty years since Roe was decided conservatives have worked to get a durable majority. They have five four now but six three is a heck of a lot more durable majority on the court. So they could do the things they want to away at Roe maybe not undermine it in one fell swoop but there's a lot of things at stake to me. The interesting question for the election is what voters care more about. This. Historically Republican voters have cared more about the courts partially because they felt the courts were against them But now they are the ones with majority the court and they're within striking distance of having a really big one democratic voters have been slower to understand why the courts were important I think that what Su said putting row on the front burner will help energize Democrats about this, but there's not that much. The Democrats can do right now that I mean I don't see I look anything can happen. This is so unprecedented. We don't know exactly what the political ramifications will be, but it's hard for me to imagine that. That Republicans won't try as hard as they can to get someone on the court either before November third or January First Mar I. Think you're totally right that supreme court fights historically motivate conservative base more. But in this situation I think the politics cut both ways I think if Republicans attempt to put a Justice on the court who opposes abortion rights, it's not only going to motivate Democrats you know way more than they. Already are, but it raises this question of just women turnout independent turnout, and the where this country is macro on that issue is very different from where the conservative base of the Republican Party is, and that's where I think that it could be a sort of turnout historic motivating factor especially for women voters if they becomes not about sort of conservatism on the court, but about the future of abortion rights in this country. You know we've only known this news for a couple hours and I'm already thinking a lot about this. The cavenaugh confirmation hearings was the most. Caustic. You know angry. Divisive thing I've ever personally covered. We are now talking about something you know. Now two years the country has only gotten more divided more angry over past two years. We know that the president's going to appoint someone Mitch McConnell says, he wants to hold a vote with less than fifty days before an already. Over presidential election I just can't imagine how this is going to play out over the next few weeks, and that's what I'm thinking about. It's hard to imagine that it's anything but bad for the country when when constitutional rules get stretched to their breaking point when people do things are exercise political power because they can and when you don't have bipartisan buy in for the process or. Or the actual product of what the debate is. That's bad for social cohesion. It's just bad what the Democrats that I've been emailing with. Since the the announcement of Ruth Bader Ginsburg death have been saying this is going to if this goes through, it's GonNa, put tremendous pressure on the Democrats to get rid of the filibuster and expand the court if they get control of the Senate and the White House. Now, I don't know whether they will actually be able to do that because that is a huge step. But every time you break a norm, you can get an equal and opposite reaction. In other words, the other side wants to go further and. I don't see how any good can come of this. It really depends who it is You know the nominee will matter here. If it is someone consume widely considered to be qualified the court but a conservative I agree with it could be good for Republicans. If it's a neal gorsuch type jurist who has a long career in is widely respected in the field that's going to be a lot harder to you know create a partisan moreover if. Trump goes to his most base instincts and nominate someone more controversial if he pick someone off that list like Senator Ted Cruz of Texas, Tom Cotton of Arkansas. Then it's going to be a way worse and I think potentially more controversial, more angry and more divisive than the capital hearings. As we tape, we've gotten word that former vice president Joe Biden will be issuing a statement shortly president trump just spoke to the press after his rally in Minnesota tonight. What else could you say? She was an amazing woman. Or Not Jew is an amazing woman who led an amazing life. To hear that. We will obviously be covering this a lot more in the days to come, and before we go you heard Nina Totenberg talking before about how long she's known uncovered Ruth Bader Ginsburg she wrote a really excellent obituary of her life what she means in the legal community for the country you can it at NPR dot org it's it's worth the time to read their I'm Scott detro- I cover the presidential campaign I'm Susan Davis I cover Congress and I'm Mara Liasson national political correspondent. Thank you for listening to the NPR politics podcast.

Supreme Court Ruth Bader Ginsburg Supreme Court Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsb United States Senate Mitch McConnell president Nina Totenberg Congress Court of Appeals Justice Nina President Trump NPR Barack Obama Susan Davis Scott detro Joe Biden United States
R.B.G.

The Charlie Kirk Show

38:50 min | 9 months ago

R.B.G.

"Thank you for listening to this podcast one production now available on apple podcasts on couch one spotify and anywhere else you get your podcasts. Lee. Begin today's meditation with few sipping exercises to remind us a little treat can go a long way. So pick up your mccafe iced coffees, close your eyes and deep except. An. Deep satisfaction out. Sick a treat retreat at McDonald's right. Now, McAfee iced coffee in any size and any flavor for just ninety nine cents until eleven am price of participation may vary. Someone. You know has probably experienced cancer a heart attack or stroke the odds of experiencing. One of these are high, which could result in bills for thousands of dollars in out of pocket expenses. How would you pay for it with your savings? There is another option it's called active care. Active care is a supplemental health insurance policy that offers protection for covered. Heart attack or stroke in a choice of cash benefit options from ten to sixty thousand dollars and with active care the caches yours to us. As you see, fit active care is brought to you by colonial Penn Life Insurance Company and is underwritten by Washington National Insurance Company get active care for cash choice and control visit colonial Penn Dot Com for more information. This is limited benefit policy. This policy is limitations and exclusions for causing complete details of coverage visit colonial Penn Dot. com. Hey. Everybody, Ruth Bader GINSBURG has died. And we have the instant analysis here we are not celebrating. We are not saying it's a good thing. We are remembering who she is. We are remembering her rulings who she was and also taking a moment to having non moment in our country. I wish this whole podcast could be not about politics, but unfortunately, just minutes after her death there were calls for riots called for Mitch McConnell to be murdered and so much more. So we cover that and also the ramifications of what the court will look like and how president trump and how Chuck Schumer and the players that Matt are reacting that and so much more around this. News item of Ruth Bader Ginsburg passing away. This episode is made possible by those of you that support us. And Charlie Kirk Dot com slash support Charlie Kirk dot com, slash support. Buckle up everybody important breaking news episode. Here we go. Charlie. What you've done is incredible here. Maybe Charlie Kirk. On the college campus you to know we are lucky to have charlie. Charlie kirks running the White House. I WANNA. Thank jollies an incredible guy, his spirit, his love of this country. He's done an amazing job building. One of the most powerful youth organisations ever created turning point USA, we will not embrace the ideas that have destroyed countries destroyed lives, and we are going to fight for freedom on campuses across the country. That's why we are. Ruth Bader Ginsburg died at eighty seven on Friday evening. You probably heard this news. You probably got your push notifications. I was about to go on Fox News when the news came through was just hard to process as it happened, there's only nine people on the United States. Supreme Quarter nine spots I should say and when any of them resign or pass away, it is absolutely earth shattering news the clause for her death was complications of Motassedeq. Pancreatic cancer the Supreme Court said now call me. Old School. But as soon as I saw the news come through, I thought that a woman who served on the Supreme Court should at least be held in a non-political framing for Lisa weekend. And we're GONNA talk about some of the political consequences later in this episode because they're real however, I think just talk about the human being is something that is necessary important in the right thing to do. There was plenty of people on the Democrat side that we're getting very nasty very quickly about the political consequences that they saw I did not see one person on the Republican or Conservative side dive into that. In fact, I saw more people on the conservative Republican side on twitter and facebook and on television actually extend their condolences and take a moment of pause than even some of the people on the Democrat side. But here's some facts about ruth, Bader Ginsburg for those of you that do not know and are just new to politics. She was the second woman ever to serve on the Supreme Court Sandra Day O'connor, of course was the first WHO's nominated by Reagan and nineteen eighty-one. Shows appointed by Bill Clinton in Nineteen ninety-three of the year I was actually born. She's known as an advocate of women's rights I would disagree with some of that description, but she definitely did push forward in a belief that America was. Let's say waited too much in the direction of what some people would call the patriarchy. As she closed in on ninety years, she became a cultural icon to a younger generation. She was very, she was barely five feet tall. She was about one hundred pounds. She looked incredibly frail especially in these last couple of years. But she was a very resilient human being a she had beat colon cancer in nineteen, ninety, nine and early stage pancreatic cancer ten years later. Justice GINSBURG received a coronary stent to clear her blocked artery. In two thousand fourteen you might remember to small tumors were found in one of her lungs in December of two, thousand eighteen. And this was during a follow scan for broken ribs that's suffered. Famously when she was eight years old. So seven years ago during Obama's second term she refused to be replaced by sitting Democrat president. She said quote as long as I can do the job full steam will be a president after this one and I'm hopeful that president will be I find president. She was the only woman on the court for three years when Sandra Day. O'Connor retired in two thousand six and was joined by another until two thousand nine when Obama nominated the very liberal Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan in two thousand ten. Her Star really began to rise in liberal circles and in popular imagination when she became the senior Liberal Justice in two thousand and ten with the retirement of Justice John Paul Stevens it was then when she really began to write the most pointed opinions on behalf of the Liberal Bloc of the court now, I want to be very, very clear I disagree with almost every single opinion that she authored. In recent memory whether it be an immigration life. Abortion guns the constitution almost every single belief that she held I fundamentally disagree with however I don't think that is a reason to like some people have in a hyper politicized. Actor. Gleeful when somebody dies. Call me old school in that way I, just think it's the right thing to do and in truth her star only rose with the election of Donald. Trump people from across the country understanding the gravity of the court pleaded their organs to help keep the elderly Ruth Bader Ginsburg. You might know that some young women even had the image tattooed on their arms. Some girls dressed RPG costumes for Halloween, and some people had this tattooed on them quote you can't spell truth without ruth. There was an internet sensation phenomenon that was created called notorious RPG the life and times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg I was created by earn Cameron. Earn Carmen and Miss Shish. Miskin Zick, which became a bestseller the day after its publication two, thousand fifteen, and the next year Simon and Schuster brought out a GINSBURG biography for children with the title called I dissent. There was a documentary made of her life. It's pretty well done I've seen it. And, it category kind of catalogs, her entire life and her fight against cancer. What is often let out about many of the discussions about the Supreme Court is at Ruth. Bader GINSBURG was very close friends with Justice Antonin Scalia Scalia's children in fact, posted many touching tributes and tweets online, which was a very nice thing to see justice. Clarence Thomas also shared a close relationship with Ginsburg Justice Clarence Thomas is, of course, an American hero does not get the credit he often deserves Ruth Bader. Ginsburg said that choosing her favorite opinion would be like choosing a favorite among her grandkids. However, she said the ruling that she most regrets that she wishes could be overturned was citizen united. She actually ruled the way that she wanted to. She just wishes it could be overturned now immediately after hearing the news of her death, I actually did not want to think of politics I just kind of just opened up social media and Kinda got an a couple of group text messages and I'm curious. How are people processing this and so it started to trend on twitter, of course, Ruth and there are hundreds of tweets that I am reading here that I'm happy to kind of recount says, I will riot for Ruth I, have a bad leg and a terrible chronic illness but I will riot they go on and on and on. These are not anonymous council. These are hundreds and hundreds of tweets as a Kentucky, and I will riot for Ruth I swear to you mich I will riot. So immediately became. Very political moment, and I just have to say that the Democrats and the leftist that immediately politicized. This moment for a human being that has died is very disappointed. However, it quickly descended into social media into an all out political blood sport. This is not a healthy thing for our civilization. By the way I tweeted very clearly unlike most of political twitter I'm taking the night off Jesus. The answer prayers to all and I mean I think when a person dies, it's not the moment to start talking about. The type of country that might exist if somebody who you disagree with might replace her. So Raza? Azlan who I believe was best known for going after. Nicholas. Sandman at a different time. He said that over our dead bodies literally will Mitch McConnell Replace This seat Bill William who have never heard of before said, we're shutting this country down trump and McConnell try to ram through an appointment before the election. Reza Aslan tweeted the four letter word that many of you know that starts with with about twenty two exclamation point he said if they even try to replace. We. Burn the entire thing to the ground Laura Bassett who's a these are all the by the way. These are all verified twitter accounts. These are real people she writes for G. Q. Magazine, Washington Post Rolling Stone and cosmopolitan and Huffington Post said the following if McConnell Jam someone through which he will, there will be riots and she responded by saying more bigger riots and then Fred Wellman who have never heard of before said Mitch McConnell is in evil bastard burn the whole country to the ground the GOP is done. And he's an advisor to the Lincoln project, which is the Republican effort to try to destroy Donald trump other instant reaction from twitter, which by the way have been glowing tributes and we'll get to the second from the president from. scalise family from many different people that have been talking very fondly and affectionately of Ruth. Bader Ginsburg, that is how we opened our program here. That is how anyone should be remembered when they pass away. However, someone who writes for The New York Times and the name of Lydia. Kissling says quote how come the person who died is Never Mitch McConnell. Nicole on twitter who looks like a liberal fan accounts says f You Ruth Bader Ginsburg F you not retiring under Obama F you for dying under trump. F You F you. Here's Chuck Schumer and before he even remembers Ruth Bader. GINSBURG. His first tweet is political chuck Schumer goes the American people should have a voice in the selection of the Supreme Court justice. Therefore, this vacancy should not be filled until we have a new president. And then eight minutes later he realized he immediately put assizes at all. By the way tonight, we passing giant American history, a champion for justice and a trailblazer for women. She would want us all to fight as hard as we can to preserve her legacy. So politics I can Dolan second. That's Chuck Schumer's priority. And again, I'm not trying to politicize this. I'm just showing you that in a moment where we all could just remember to human being and took a night off. which should have been kind of a moment of national unity even though this person has overseen more court decisions that have allowed a million abortions year anti measures, things that I so fundamentally disagree with from the size of scope of government to the regulatory state does executive action to you name it there's a time or you just say, let's allow the family to mourn this turning into a political gladiator match. Adele Scalia who is the daughter I believe daughter-in-law of Antonin Scalia said Justice Ginsburg was more than a seat on the Supreme Court tweet accordingly she's right. So the most interesting part of the entire evening was that right as president trump exited air force one in Bemidji Minnesota great part of the world at to go to a rally I kid you not as he was walking down the stairs. All of a sudden I got a push notification that Ruth Bader Ginsburg passed away, and so he took the stage immediately the way these new rallies work is you got off the plane you go right into an airport airplane hangar and you give the speech. So the president gave an hour and a half long speech he did mention the Supreme Court a couple times. And then came off of the speech and all this was happening by the way Mitch McConnell's reaction Chuck Schumer's reaction twitter was melting down and the president did not know. So we actually have a tape right here of the when President Trump learned that Ruth Beta gainsbourg passed away and John was playing in the background, you couldn't have designed a better moment now play tape. She just died. While I didn't know that I just thought. It'd be now for the first time. Beijing like. What else could you say she was an amazing woman. Agreed or not she was an amazing woman who led an amazing. Imagine we said here that. Like you very much. Now to give a little bit of, let's say credence to theories that are out there. It is very possible that the president new on Air Force One and came down and did the rally and then was asked a question and he knew because he's the president he had the information I i. think that is very unlikely I do not think that the president would have gone down off Air Force One done. A complete rally, not mention it at all. I think that the risk of that being leaked that is classless I don't think that is what happened at all for the United States. Another theory that is out there, which is possible is that the Supreme Court or the people that were responsible for making that information public for example, the GINSBURG family was waiting for president trump to get off air force one immediately. Right after got Air Force One to the rally so that someone might come and whisper in ear. He might say it and the crowd might mistakenly cheer in a moment of confusion. All these theories are floating out there. However, what we do know is this is that when the president found out on camera, which I believe is the most believable story. And again, I'm not going to dive too much into this. Some people are saying I wanNA know the time of her death and all that I don't really care. Okay. All I know is that I know the President I know that the president would have weighed in on air. Force One. He would have not gone into a rally. If he knew that Ruth Bader Ginsburg passed away I think that he found out at the same time that everybody else knew. You could tell by his eyes and his body language. He looked a lot like you found out when the press told him and so I think all these theories that are floating out there does not make any sense to me I believe that the tape we just played his action when the president found out and it was genuine and it was full of humanity, and so the president's official statement is right on point a part of it. Here. Is a fighter to the end Justice Ginsburg battled cancer and other very long odds throughout her remarkable life. Our thoughts and prayers are with the GINSBURG family and their loved ones during this difficult time may her memory a great magnificent blessing to the world and by the way if every conservative fought as hard as Ruth Bader Ginsburg did for what she believed in our country would be a much better place me Ruth Bader Ginsburg she believed that. Abortion was okay. She thought it was good to have a million abortions year. She did not think that owning a firearm was a right. She believed that I strong federal government. She did not believe in federalist model. She believed that illegal should have the right to vote eventually probably she definitely believed in the Dacca ruling she was a revisionist. She did not believe that the law and the Constitution should be written as is and said, she thought it. Should conform to the Times. However, she fought hard she never wavered to conservatives. She never gave an inch and I think that we as conservatives can learn a lot from Ruth Bader, Ginsburg of how she fought for what she believes. I think a lot of US Republicans on our side I should say US pursue many Republicans waiver far too often to the kind of the latest trend or whatever they think is the most fashionable thing to believe in. So I didn't actually want to get into the politics of this. When we I decided to do this podcast instant analysis of Ruth Bader GINSBURG's death and Basically, just remembering who she was in the reaction and that was it but unfortunately, this has now gotten straight into the political arena. So we're going to give you political analysis because now is. Political News. One more tweet from a left-wing podcast that I think is a segue to Mitch McConnell reacted because now all eyes are Mitch McConnell. This is now Mitch McConnell's decision and it could benefit Mitch McConnell and we'll get that in just one second but Katie Herzog who's a host of a left-wing podcast said all we can hope for in times like these Mitch McConnell has a stroke from laughing too hard to clarify i. don't want him to die I just wanted to be brain dead I'm not a monster. So. This is how the left has reacted to. This is a pattern of behavior I've yet to see one conservative one person on the right celebrate the Death Ruth Bader Ginsburg but I do now have dozens if not countless examples of people on the left hoping Mitch McConnell will die. Interesting double standard how that works. All. Eyes are Mitch McConnell Mitch McConnell. Got Us to the Cavenaugh hearing brilliantly and now Mitch McConnell who is the head of the Senate can single-handedly decide whether or not to proceed with the president's replacement for the Supreme Court or not to proceed us. Senate. Majority Mitch McConnell made the following statement on the passing of the US Supreme. Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg the. Senate. And the nation more on the sudden passing of Ruth. Bader GINSBURG and the conclusion of her extraordinary. American. Life Justice Ginsburg overcame one personal challenge and professional barrier. After another she climbed from a modest Brooklyn upbringing to a seat on the nation's highest court and into the pages of American history justice. GINSBURG was thoroughly dedicated to the legal profession and to her twenty seven years of. Service on the Supreme Court for Intelligence and determination earned her respect and admiration throughout the legal world and indeed throughout the entire nation, which now grieves alongside or family friends and colleagues in the last midterm election Justice Scalia's death in two thousand sixteen Americans elected Republican Senate majority because we pledged to check and balance the last days of lame duck presidents terms we kept our promises. Since the eighteen eighties Senate has confirmed an opposite party President Supreme Court nominee in the presidential election. By contrast, Americans reelected are majority sixteen and expanded it in two thousand eighteen because we pledge to work with President Trump and support his agenda in particular his outstanding appointments to the Federal Judiciary. Once again, we'll keep our promise president. Trump's nominee will receive a vote on the floor. Of the United States. Senate. To hear that. Listen carefully. Those are the war drums of a culture war. That if you think it was intense before this. It hasn't even started yet. Very skillful maneuvering by Senator Mitch McConnell. But. However nasty you think politics were before this if you think Brett Cavanaugh was. As disgusting American politics can get. This will be the most drawn out nasty personal. Fight. Then I think any of us will ever live through when it comes to the Supreme Court. Mitch McConnell has said that he wants to make sure that president trump's nominee to the supreme court gets a fair hearing. Now, this is now debated whether or not this should happen because it's an election year and it's so close to an election. Now. I'm going to be honest with you I actually read I wrestled with this at first I thought to myself. Well, should we do it? It's this close to an election. Is it the right thing to do and I didn't come to a complete answer on that? Then I- independently thought I said, what would Democrats do now that the Democrats had absolutely fill the seat if they had the same power majorities that Republicans had but then I thought to myself just because Democrats do it does not mean we should that's never a good argument. I mean the Democrat support abortion they also support judging people on the color of their skin I'm not. I'm not justifying Machiavelli and tactics at all cost. I'm not trying to have a moral relativist argument. I think that if you do not have a good reason to do something that is rooted in Truth and morality than don't do it. So here is the best reason why this must be filled. This is the number. One reason. When. We are heading into an election year, we're Hillary. Clinton said that Joe Biden should not concede at any cost. We're Democrats are talking about the law fair to tie up this entire election in the courts. You go back to the election year two, thousand of Bush versus Gore you go back to the highly contentious forty days where we waited for a present United States to be chosen. This is before the left really got into the streets with riots. This is before a lot of their violent infrastructure was created. It ended up being United States supreme. Court that determined the winner of Bush versus Gore, and it was by thin margin by the way. And so if we allow the court to stay as with five conservatives and three liberal now, if you put Roberts in the probably will do the thing that he is told by some sort of architect chaos roberts could very well side against president trump. Therefore making the Supreme Court. A drawn out tie. This is a national security threat to our country. That's right. If, we do not have a full court. Mind seats so that you have a tie breaking vote. and. This election the most important elections and sixty goes up to the Supreme Court which by the way Biden has a army of six hundred plus lawyers. And the Supreme Court ties. You'll. have. Bedlam. Who will determine the president? Then there is no precedent for that it could go down lower courts it could get drawn out again to another supreme court decision it would be irresponsible for the president to leave that position vacant that simple. It comes down to Arizona. It goes to the ninth circuit comes down to main it goes to the northeastern southern district circuit. Please listen to our sister episode about the Color Revolution of what the Democrats are planning to try to usurp authority and try to launch a coup against the president of the United States. It's called a coup against President Trump listened to our sister episode. It's very, very important. We did two episodes on the Saturday because it is so important and that only adds more into the intrigue abyss and so if I were to make the argument, it is not my preference I don't care about eight, hundred eighty or any of that I don't like having to fill a supreme court seat. This close to an election. I don't but I think it's necessary. The Republicans were given these majorities and if we do not fill it and this election as promised by Hillary Clinton and many others gets tied up into the courts and gets quickly puts the United States supreme. Court. which it will end up because no circuit court is to want to decide it because it can get appealed eventually kicked up the Supreme Court we'll take the case and you have a four four tie. That could break. The back of our country would be so irresponsible especially where that position could be filled. Now, even going by Joe Biden's own rule though the Biden rule is that if you have different parties in the executive in the Senate when you have an open supreme court seat, then you wait for the election but even according to the Biden role, we should move forward we have a Senate and an executive. And so I Have Long said that if you think you've seen the left get nasty, they have been saving a whole new level of viciousness for when Ruth Bader Ginsburg seat gets open that moment is now you put that mixed with the hatred of President Donald Trump with BLM INC a nationwide shutdown pandemic tens of millions of people out of work. We are in the midst to something that very well could get chaotically out of control. That's one of the reasons why did not want to dive into politics as I'm recording this episode? Is One of the reasons why I wanted to just look at somebody as a human being and then deliberately come to this conclusion. that the left has now taken the gloves off. This is now a political moment. I'M NOT GONNA get into accusing the left of all this all these sorts of things that'll be future episodes out because I still want to keep the tone that I started this episode on consistent. But I do know this the one thing that truly united conservatives in the era of trump is Cava I believe our muscle memory will ultimately prevail I. Think one of the reasons why we expanded seats in the US Senate in the fall of two thousand, eighteen in November two thousand eighteen is because of the confirmation of Justice Brett Cabinet. So what are the electoral ramifications of this I? See it both ways it can be very positive for president trump I also think it could energize now that early voting has started states all across the country people are voting right now in Virginia all across the country early voting sites are opening that it could energize younger female and minority voters to go out and vote against Donald Trump and vote for Joe. Biden. So, Mitch McConnell might be doing the right thing here he might be. However if riots start taking place. And if the left shows us who they really are. and. They start marginalizing decent people and accusing decent people based on their religious beliefs. For example, if president trump nominates amy coney Barrett which I don't even WanNa get into the speculation or the conjecture will we'll have an episode ready for you next week on that that I can guarantee. Is All of a sudden if they attack her for being Catholic? Not exactly the way to win Pennsylvania or Michigan or Wisconsin very heavily Catholic states. And so if the Democrats and their activist enforcement wing and TEPA start to demand nationwide riots, which is not an unfounded thing 'cause I just read you dozens of tweets of blue check journalists that are already calling for riots in the streets that could very well help the president. Electorally and politically. But quite honestly, let's put all of the politics aside. It's the right thing to do to fill this seat. Because if Joe Biden wins this election. Truly, and honestly I want the supreme. Court to certify that election I do I do not want the person who wins this election to have to go in front of the Supreme Court and have a tie. That's how a civilization unravels very quickly it would be irresponsible to leave it open. If, you have a contested election that gets kicked all the way up to the highest levels of our court, and then all of a sudden, you cannot have that court ruled correctly. That would be a tragedy. And finally, if President Trump is looking at his legacy getting three. Conservatives on the US Supreme Court. Is More than most people do in two terms and president trump has always said he would rather do the right thing and lose than do the thing that compromises his values and get another four years mind you. I'm not saying that the president should do this and not get reelected but it is never the wrong time to do the right thing and the right thing in this case is to put a conservative on the US Supreme Court before the election. So what does that look like hearings? Character assassination, the left will be mobilized as I'm recording this episode I. Look at Three Thousand People outside of the Supreme Court building right now gathered. And their morning RPG right now. They are remembering her legacy four now. However I, want to read you an email from nail, which is the National Association for pro-choice leak at least hogue who is the head of natural. This. Is Her subject line. Quote Tonight we mourn RPG tomorrow we fight. Team. This is to the pro choice activists across America. Yes. Do sign up for pro choice action alerts. So I can get an understanding of what the opposition is planning. Team devastation just doesn't cover it earlier tonight received the news. We hope never come Supreme Court Justice Ginsburg passed away from. Complications related to pancreatic cancer. She continues by saying the world is a much much worse place, her presence integrity and her grit a brilliant legal scholar she served for twenty seven years Tyler defender of reproductive freedom on the Supreme Court also known as. Terminating unborn human beings. She continues by saying tonight we mourn. Tomorrow we fight. I'll be in touch soon about with the fight will look like and how you can take part keep your eyes peeled. They're already drawn their battle lines everybody. So if you think. For just. A minute. that the left is going to. Want a unifying moment here. No Way Mitch McConnell has singled that this gets a vote therefore is our on Mitt Romney Murkowski said, she will not confirm a Supreme Court justice before the inauguration that's she's a write off anyway Mitt. Romney said he would not do it allegedly and then came out his spokesman said it is not true. Romney will consider it. and. I am Mitt Romney's number one critic. I spoke against him at CPAC. Vocally. And loudly and publicly but if Mitt Romney votes to confirm a conservative to the US Supreme Court. I'll be the first one to applaud I'll be the first one to complement him. Same does for Democrat Mansion. We also have Doug Jones from Alabama who might want to save his Senate seat Cory Gardner from Colorado's in a tough race. There's a lot of questions. And guess who else might have to show up to the Senate Judiciary Committee. Yes. Lindsey Graham who is the chairman? But also the vice presidential nominee Senator Harris who made her name for character assassinating an innocent man Brad Kavanagh. If you think that this two thousand and twenty race was interesting before this this has completely reset the landscape and this will help president trump it will. Especially, in key battleground states, it'll hurt him in California New, York? Speaker. Pelosi will probably continue to be speaker. Martha. mcsally who was down in the polls in Arizona, said quote the US Senate should vote on president trump's next nominee for the. United. States Supreme Court Rick Scott from Florida said it would be irresponsible to allow an extended vacancy on the Supreme Court. I. Believe that President Trump's nominee should get a vote in the US Senate you're already seeing Senate Republicans. Signal. That way this is all at Mitch McConnell's direction. I criticize Mitch McConnell for being far too kind corporate interests at times but I gotta give Mitch McConnell Credit He is the best operator when it comes to confirming supreme. Court. Justices I've said that once I will say it again he's terrific at it. He knows what he's doing. He's a brilliant tactician when it comes for winning the courts for future generations. So when Senator Harris is on? The Senate Judiciary Committee that takes off the campaign trail, and it leads Biden alone and lost to wander out of his basement. Senator Harris will not have to contend for this supreme court nominee. Against Vice President Pence who might be the tiebreaker in the vice presidential debate. I always say up everybody at the beginning of every episode. But if there's ever been a time to get focused, be clear hold on and get active this is the moment we've been waiting for. Because I'm telling you the republic will be decided based on whether or not. The Supreme Court justice gets confirmed whether or not president trump wins reelection never been a more important time to get engaged and do something for our country. So, in closing I want to say Ruth Bader Ginsburg lived a full life. She truly was a rags to riches story not that she was very wealthy, but she got to the US Supreme Court only in America something like that possible I think I've made it abundantly clear through this podcast that her views I found to be immoral on abortion guns, the constitution and many other issues. But I am not someone who thinks that when somebody dies, it should be relished as a smiling gleeful political opportunity. I encourage all of you to have that same sort of spirit this weekend. In, whenever this comes up, just take pause and say she was a human being all human beings are made in the image of God and all of them deserve some form of remembrance when they pass away. And so. As, we move forward. This kind of humanity I'm trying to establish will never happen with the Democrats. Let's be very clear. They now see this as a threat to their power. They now see this as whatever level that they reach previously they are going to find a new one trending on twitter as I conclude, this episode is get Mitch or die trying. Basically, saying, let's try to murder Mitch. McConnell. Crooked media says it's get rich or die trying fund, which has been raising money to flip the Senate and replacement. McConnell as majority leader has raised six hundred thousand dollars in the last two hours. I'm sure. So. WHO's the one raising money off a tragedy? WHO's one politicizing the? Of course the left is. A time for that. I see this very clearly. that. President trump is most likely going get his third Supreme Court justice. For those of us that know the generational significance of the Supreme Court. This means everything. However. That's not the reason why I'm saying he should do it I'll go back to my original thesis. It'd be irresponsible to leave a vacancy when a contest that election because a mail in voting being problem because of pandemic is imminent, the seat must be filled. Stays close and tuned to our podcast. Everybody. I've been through a Supreme Court nomination before on the front lines I was there when Brad Kavanagh was under duress I. was there being screened at by leftist lunatics and activists I know what it takes to get. This future nominee that we don't know confirmed. It's not going to be easy. It's GonNa take. Persistence it's going to take focus. It's GonNa take facts. It's GonNa take organization and it's going to take you guys continue listening to the Charlie Kirk show here we're finishing up very late evening here on Friday night but that's why we want to thank you guys for supporting us at. Charlie Kirk Dot com slash support. When there's breaking news, we go straight to the PODCAST. Mike. So you guys have the information you need to be able to be an informed citizen. And be active. It's about to ramp up everybody the temperature in the room is about to increase. Stay focused stay clear stay prayerful and we'll be back with more this weekend and of course, next week and please listen to our sister episode against the coup mounting against president trump, e mail us your questions freedom at Charlie Kirk, dot com freedom at Charlie Kirk Dot com get involved with turning point USA A. T. P. USA DOT COM TEEPEE USA dot com type in Charlie Kirk shoulder podcasts provider hit subscribe give us a five star review screen shot at and. Freedom and Charlie Kirk Dot com prematurely. KIRK DOT COM. Thank you guys so much for listening. Have a great weekend God bless. Introducing touch free payments from pay pal a safe way for your customers to pay whether you're a market seller. Poodle Pamper. Piano tuner. Or plummer. Signing up to accept touch free payments for your business is easy. Simply download the pay pal APP, and display your own unique qr code for your customers to scan touch free qr code payments no seller fees until two, thousand, twenty one not applicable to pay out your transactions. Other fees may apply shops with paypal. Someone. You know has probably experienced cancer, a heart attack or stroke the of experiencing. One of these are high, which could result in bills for thousands of dollars out of pocket expenses. How would you pay for it with your savings? There is another option it's called active care. Active care is a supplemental health policy that offers protection for covered cancer, heart attack or stroke, and a choice of cash benefit options from. Ten to sixty thousand dollars and with active care the caches yours to us. As you see, fit active care is brought to you by colonial Penn. Life Insurance Company and is underwritten by Washington national insurance. 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EPISODE 24:  Life & Legacy of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

The STATECRAFT OBSERVER Podcast

27:36 min | 9 months ago

EPISODE 24: Life & Legacy of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

"Hello and welcome back to this day. Craft observer podcast. I'm your host brandon. Keller and in this week's episode we're going to be discussing life and legacy of justice ruth bader. Ginsburg passed away on friday. September eighteen. I recorded this episode on saturday. September nineteenth and intentionally withheld the episode. Because i didn't want to participate in any of the mudslinging or any of the negative commentary. That i was afraid is going to happen over the weekend which actually did There's a lot of arguments and discussions as to whether or not the should be filled or should not be filled. I'm gonna talk about that in this episode. I didn't wanna talk about it over this weekend. Out of respect for justice ginsburg her family. So this is the episode recorded on saturday with my thoughts and what my emotions were at the time shortly after her passing and after seeing a lot of the conversations already popping up on social media so i hope you enjoy the episode. And i hope you understand why i played it You're listening to statecraft observer. Podcasts hosted by brandon keller. Hello again and welcome back to the show. This week's show is going to be a little bit more somber than usual We're gonna be addressing something that everybody is talking about this weekend Due to the news that broke late. Friday evening Of the passing of justice. Ruth bader ginsburg This episode is going to be somewhat more somber than most because I have great respect for ruth bader. Ginsburg i always have. It's not that. I necessarily agree with her on her decisions or her sense. You can disagree with somebody and still have great respect and admiration for what they have done and what they have achieved in their life and i think that that is something that i hope i can express in in this show but also address the political elephant in the room. That is what's going to be coming up this coming week. My assumptions on that my predictions and expectations as we move forward over the next few days. It is Saturday september nineteenth when as of recording this Show i am not going to release this episode until sometime early next week. Out of respect for ruth bader ginsburg dish shows a political show but at the same point in time. We're all human. And i want to let there be time for grieving and respect of such a great woman that i don't want to pile on this weekend. Where a lot of news organizations are And they're they're talking about The political elephants that i will be addressing in this episode is well i i want to put the political aside for a few days if you will so even though i am recording this on a saturday it will not be released into early next week So some of the things that i'm speaking about may seem dated or there's new information news and revelations that's why so moving on ruth bader ginsburg again. She was eighty seven When she passed away due to complications of metastatic cancer of the pancreas she'd been battling for a while She'd been in and out of the hospital. We all know it. It's something that we've all kept an eye on. Because republicans and democrats alike really like it when there's an opportunity to replace or fill a seat on the supreme court You know she was elected or nominated by president. Bill clinton in nineteen ninety-three The year i graduated high school and she served on. For twenty seven years on the supreme court became a liberal icon for the left her to sense again as i stated though i may not have agreed with them They were legendary and she. She was one of the most eloquent writers that i know of in her in regards to her descendants because they were they were concise and sensible in her argument for the leftist agenda in the issues that she was in favor of an four. I apologise. that's my dog in the background Again i'm recording downstairs. 'cause the whole studio situation you guys know about but mickens berg was or mrs. Ginsburg was very sensible and concise arguments. And she did stick to her beliefs which i respect There there's a link that i believe it was Usa today who put some for more famous decisions and dissents and publish those for us to review. Just to kind of look back at you. Know who ruth gator. Bruce banner ginsburg was. Rpg is going. I two or and some of the more interesting ones As far as her decisions go obviously The virginia military institute the male only admissions policy. They she decision seven to one. The only person who dissented against her was anti antony. Scalia and as many of the news outlets are reporting. Now ruth bader ginsburg and antone antonin scalia They were polar opposites in regards to how they view the constitution. They you know they look at the document and both see two completely different things and had two different ideas as to what the document meant but even though they were so radically different in their political views and how they viewed the constitution they both shared a love of opera and they were very very close friends because of that and that is one of the things that i respect most about ruth bader. Ginsburg is the fact that politics are one thing. But that doesn't have to define who you associate with in your life and i think she was a brilliant example of that she was a champion for the left but she wouldn't limit herself to only being friends with people on the left and and i think that's an example. Quite frankly that today we need more of and i hope that as the weekend continues and we were looked back on her incredible life that people touch on that specifically and really point that out. I think that's something that a lot of people today need to hear. He's didn't have strong political opinions. You can disagree in your strong political opinions but you can still be friends at the end of the day. I know i have friends that we differ in political opinions That i would be heartbroken if they were to ever no longer be my friend because of a political discussion debate that we may have some. It'd be a great loss. So her example is one. I hope we can all live by when it comes to that. But i thought that was interesting. That one of her landmark decisions was actually. The dissent was written by justice scalia. Who was her polar opposite. And i think that's just a a brilliant illustration of their relationship Some of the dissents that she wrote she was sassy in her dissent a lot of times and there they were interesting to read even if you didn't agree with them. I said before. They were concise and to the point. And they they made you think especially one of the more famous one was gorby. Bush in regards to halting the presidential recounts in florida That was in two thousand and again. All of these are in the The article that i'm going to be linking in the Description below so you can read them yourself It does include probably her most famous descent. the shelby county vs holder and twenty thirteen It it struck down. A voting rights act where southern states were no longer having to clear their voting changes through the federal government I wanna read. What she said in her dissent That they quoted in the article because it's poignant throwing out pre-clearance when it has worked and his count continuing to work to stop discriminatory changes discriminatory changes is like throwing away your umbrella in a rainstorm. Because you are not getting wet. You can't argue with that kind of logic. Brilliant in making complex issues understandable for the everyday american And i think there is. There's a talent and skill that not many people have when it comes taking complex issues and making them simple and breaking them down And i think ruth bader ginsburg was an expert at that now. Her passing was reported last night. I want to say it was early in the evening for me Central time it was around six or so When the news was breaking and You know they're immediately already. Discussions being had which is the political elephant in the room as to whether or not president trump should or should not nominate a replacement to the supreme court Chuck schumer took to twitter. Almost immediately after the news broke Expressing the same sentiment others on the left her parenting and He said that in his tweet that The american people should have voted in the selection of their next supreme court justice. Therefore this vacancies should be filled until we have a new president Chuck schumer obviously making the decision in hoping that president trump will be replaced in november that he will lose the election and that There will be joe biden administration that would get to nominate replacement I know it has been reported in a us a known. I'm sorry it's not. usa. Today it's an npr article. Where i will link to this as well as an npr article where as ruth bader ginsburg was starting to decline. She had recorded some requests and one of those requests that she not be replaced until a new president. you know again being hopefully that it would be a joe biden administration got to choose a replacement democratic replacement at that so a lot of people who are now There is a you know on the steps of the court as memorial. That's being built in a lot of the signs. They respect her wishes. And that's what they're referring to. Is that audio recording where she expressed her desire to not be replaced until after the presidential election on fox. News this morning Andrew napolitano judge age napolitano discussed potential scenarios in regards to potential nomination for a replacement that was on fox news. This morning and critically important nomination would be in regards to several key. Voter issues such as The aca or more commonly known as obamacare Second amendment in of course definitely roe v wade. I'm gonna play the clip for you and then come back on the other side and discuss it a little bit further. So here is judging. Apollo judge napolitano fox news this morning. I'll be back on the other side. You know judge. Let's say the president chooses someone Someone very soon. He's already indicated that he's gonna move on this Mitch mcconnell said he's going to act on this and that all the others who are raising concerns in the republican party that maybe they talk less to the media and keep their powder dry but what if we get to election day. We still haven't decided on this then. You're into a lame duck session. I know there have been nominees approved and one or two not approved during such sessions but it gets weird. So how do you think this plays out. Well if donald trump is reelected. I don't think it matters if he nominates someone in the lame duck session. If joe biden is elected and president trump nominate somebody in the lame duck session. You'll see extraordinary pressure to prevent this vote from from coming to pass trump's a tough guy do whatever he wants to do whether it's for his reelection bid or because he really believes this person whoever she or he may be off to be on the court. But as chad said the confirmation hearings for then judge now justice cavenaugh will probably pale compared to what we can expect this time around because this is a game. Changer ruth bader ginsburg is a was a liberal progressive democrat from the liberal wing of the democratic party. If you know what i mean. President trump is going to appoint someone who will be her polar opposite that will significantly and substantially changed the outcome of five to four votes on hot button issues like obamacare second amendment and abortion. So again was judge napolitano on fox news this morning. I think he's absolutely correct. I think Whomever president trump will nominate would forever change the dynamic of the supreme court indefinitely. Move it to a more constitutionally sound institution. In my opinion. I think that with the to been able to have in you'll gorsuch and brett kavanagh that getting a third nomination and supreme court justice in the court would definitely solidify more conservative judicial moving forward which i am very much in favor of which was actually one of the driving reasons behind the two thousand sixteen election of president trump Everybody knew on the conservative side that there was a supreme court seat at least one if not two potentially three that that president would ultimately get to decide and so that was the reason why i believe a lot of voters came out because they knew presidents come and go every four years but the supreme court. That is a lifetime appointment as everybody knows. And it is vitally critical that we have people there that are making decisions based on the constitution and the rule of law. We want as conservatives. We want that to dictate what is right and wrong. And how we adjudicate issues here in the united states. We don't want a proliferates feelings. That are in constant flux to rule the day we want fact we want law we want the constitution to dictate right and wrong so i find interesting In judge napolitano's absolutely right. It will be historic change to the court should trump people to get his nomination not only nominated but through the confirmation process as well and you know it is going to be a show for those of us who can't get enough of politics and for us. It is a blood sport. Youth thought the confirmation of justice. Cavanaugh was ruthless. You've seen nothing yet. should president trump making nomination this week which i believe he will and that he should and they are able to get confirmed regardless of what happens on november third very historic moment and The left are going to pull out all the stops in order to try and prevent that from happening. But it's not only democrats. Senator susan collins of maine who's a republican and also senator lisa mccaskey's republican of alaska They both have expressed their objection to the idea of possibly voting on a replacement for the supreme court before the election They both expressed that in new york. Times article published yesterday which i will link in the description as well So i found that interesting that they are already coming out. You know as well as saying they likely would not now keep in mind if they lose three republican votes. I believe it's three If they lose two republicans. And we've already down to their able to convince another one looking You know certain individuals. We would a mitt romney being one of them potentially have to go to a split decision and where The vice president would make the final decision on that unless it shifted to where more republicans decided not to vote in stained from that which would be a problem. i hope that the republicans pulled together and unanimous unanimously. Vote to confirm a supreme court justice That is nominated by president trump Were already seen. It doesn't matter who it is right. They haven't even announced who you know. Who president trump would nominate yet It's just the political elephant in the room as i've said before and just discussing potential replacements and we're already seeing on twitter and other venues Seen calls from the left for violence Some of them i saw. I can't remember who it was. I had his name written down. And i i don't know where it is. I apologize for that but saying that it would burn down the senate before they allow them to replace ruth bader ginsburg. Just awful awful things. I will link the article that i saw those names in so you'll have them in the description as well because i did save bookmark the article because i thought it was just utterly disgusting. The people were already calling for violence. should a replacement be stated That's just the world we live in. Unfortunately today folks that left when they don't get their way They call for violence and yet The are supposed to be the violent ones. is that an interesting twist But going back to the possible replacements. Even though none have been announced there are several names that are being floated Amy coney barrett ted cruz. Tom cotton josh hawley. Daniel cameron paul clement and noel francisco. Are the list that i see floating around quite a bit hands down the most talked about Potential candidate for replacement is amy. Coney barrett She seems to be the odds on favourite so far when you're watching coverage of this I don't know a lot about her I know that she was questioned Quite extensively based on her religion Whenever she was appointed to the position. She's in now by president trump and i felt like that was completely unconstitutional I think some people in congress need to go back and reread the constitution. And then know the loss that they're They sworn to uphold. But regardless you know over the next few days i would not be surprised to see amy conybeare get the nod from president trump and then moved to the senate judiciary hearings to her confirmation underway mitch. Mcconnell has already gone on record saying he would move a nomination to a vote. So i believe this will happen. Very quickly I know that. I i don't expect to see nomination this weekend So that's why i was. I wanted to give the weekend out of respect to the ginsburg family and to root peter. Ginsburg are for her lifetime of service but we will likely see a nomination sometime this week. with confirmation hearing starting likely before the presidential debates pro even have the first presidential debate on september twenty ninth. I fully believe that's how quickly this will move and so very possibly For christmas this year we might be getting a new supreme court justice and I'm just gonna go on record as saying by christmas or for christmas. In december There will be a new supreme court justice being sworn in To replace ruth bader ginsburg who that is remains to be seen Odds on favourite. Though is amy coney barrett so our gb my be replaced by acb so that could be it. But that's this episode. I wanted to go on record as to what i thought the outcome of this will be. I do believe it's going to move very very quickly. i don't think november third and whoever gets elected Is is going to impact this decision whatsoever. Even let's say. Joe biden wins the election. President trump still has up until january twenty to make that nomination and get confirmed so it's gonna be political fodder for the left and right absolutely it's gonna be a talking point it's going to be discussed ad nauseam But at the end of the day. I do think this is a decision that president trump is gonna make. It's going to be a nomination that he makes. It's going to be a nomination and mitch. Mcconnell will move forward to a vote and at that point we will see. I do believe that whoever is nominated will be confirmed. Especially if it is amy coney barrett i the things that i've read so far today Are all good things very constitutional in her decisions that she's made so far so that makes me feel good. I'm confident that she would be just as good as cavenaugh. Gorsuch have been so But a the key thing is that she is going to be complete polar opposite of who and what ruth bader ginsburg stood for so it is going to be a dynamic shift in the court itself so huge huge political coming with this and It's definitely gonna be fun to watch so that's gonna be it for this show. I do want to say again I don't wanna use this as a be respectful A person has has died A very iconic and historic person Who served our government selfishness selflessly and They did so with grace and elegance and just beautifully written decisions and descent so For me that means a lot to me and again her example of friendship beyond politics regardless of where your politics are. I think an example that all of us should be living by and so with that. I want to express my deepest condolences to the ginsburg family as their grieving. A loss of their matriarch and Yeah i wish nothing but the best for your families and forward and I am praying for you all and as always i wanna thank you viewers i for watching episode and listening into my opinion on this If you haven't already please remember to subscribe to the show and give a like or thumbs up on whatever platform you are listening or viewing this episode It does help me out a lot and please be sure to share with friends and family and co workers and you know anybody that you think might be interested in the show We continue to grow steady pace. So i'm happy about that And as always thank you again for spending time here with me and until next time take care of each other and god bless.

ruth bader supreme court Ginsburg brandon keller Joe biden ginsburg dish trump metastatic cancer twenty seven years mickens Bruce banner ginsburg antone antonin Chuck schumer justice scalia judge napolitano roe v wade Usa napolitano fox news virginia military institute napolitano
Coming Soon

Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

01:32 min | 11 months ago

Coming Soon

"Hi it's Dahlia, and you're probably here because you're expecting a show today, but you're going to have to wait a couple more days and I promise promise promise. It's going to be worth it back in January, our team piled into a rideshare. In Washington DC headed to the Supreme Court. We were kind of excited, and so is it turns out. Was Pam are dry? Interviewing respond Kuenssberg. Wow that is so exciting now. How did you all get chosen to do? The truth is somebody at the magazine had a very cool idea about interviewing all of the women who entered Harvard law school with turns out. There is like a whole bunch of them, and they are kind of interesting, and so we have gone through and interviewed the surviving ones, the families of the ones who are not surviving, but it's like an amazing little snapshot of what their lives. Story Yeah I. Mean It's just such a weird. Moment out of history. Thank you. bye-bye! On Tuesday July twenty. First amicus presents the classic RPG The stories of the women of Harvard law school's class of Nineteen fifty-nine, the other women and Ruth Bader Ginsburg a two part special audience series.

Harvard law school Ruth Bader Ginsburg Supreme Court Pam Washington
Ruth Bader Ginsburgs economic legacy

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

08:15 min | 9 months ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburgs economic legacy

"This marketplace podcast is supported by transfer wise. The smart new way to send and receive money internationally join over eight million customers in eighty countries who are already saving and try it for free at transfer wise dot com slash marketplace, or download the APP. A new term to learn Fincen F. I N. C. E. N. leaked documents from the US Financial Crimes Enforcement Network I'm David Brancaccio shares of a number of global banks are falling sharply after a trove of leaked documents obtained I by the publication buzzfeed which share them with other news organizations showed evidence that criminals use the global financial system to move about two trillion dollars of dirty money around the world HSBC bank. saw its share price fall to the lowest in twenty five years the BBC's economics correspondent Andrew Walker reports. The International Committee of Investigative Journalists says examined leaked documents, which it says reveal major banks to find money laundering crackdowns to move staggering sums of cash for what it calls shadowy characters and criminal networks. The group published its investigation, the weekend reports quickly hitting the share prices of some of the banks that were criticized HSBC in Standard Chartered traded in. Hong Kong where the share price fell and stocks in deutchebanks dropped in early trading in Frankfurt. All three banks have responded with statements indicating that they are serious about combating. Money. Laundering. HSBC stock is down more than six percent in London. Now, J. P. Morgan Chase stock is down about four percent in pre-market trading with those leaked documents alleging it allowed a billion dollars to go through a London account without the bank identifying who owned the money funds that are linked to gangster on the FBI's most wanted list. The Dow futures down more than five hundred points now one point eight percent the S. and P. future is down one and a half percent. A deal to keep the China social media APP Tiktok One an interim of reprieve from the trump administration over the weekend delaying a ban of the APP from US APP stores by another week this while the companies involved in their investors review the deal. US database firm Oracle and Walmart will reportedly partner with bite dance to oversee operations as a US based firm called TIKTOK. Global Molly would host of marketplace tech has more. The deal will boost Oracle's cloud business. It currently lags behind Amazon Google and Microsoft for Walmart it's likely to introduce new commerce features into the APP and get access to user data. And actually analysts say. May Be happy about this deal as well. The Chinese company maintains a huge stake in a huge hit and if anything trying to get to save face and keep access to accompany, it legitimately owns some former security officials told NPR and other media outlets that the actual national security concerns wouldn't be addressed by the steel at all and tweets from Chinese state media suggests that China may see the deal as a model for how companies could operate internationally in more cases. One verified account suggested that perhaps facebook or Google should also be under control of local companies in order to. Place like China. As for the ban on, we chat a messaging and commerce APP that's in. For American companies who either want to reach Chinese consumers or communicate with their suppliers, a federal judge delayed that ban on free speech grounds. Marketplace tecos molly would the founder and executive chairman of electric truck maker Nikola has stepped down amid accusations. The company made inflated claims about its technology the Securities and Exchange Commission is investigating claims in a report by a short seller that's an investor who profits when a sharp price drops. The company rejects this idea that it claimed to have proprietary technology that it didn't actually develop just weeks ago General Motors had bought a two billion dollar stake in nickel for work on electric pickup trucks. ME. Justin Ho with marketplace, the economy is changing so fast it's hard to keep up to our latest podcast is here to help. It's called the marketplace minute give us just sixty seconds and we'll bring you the latest on what's happening in the economy three times a day market updates business news in how the numbers affects your personal economy. We'll tell you what you need to know and why it matters. Just ask your smart speaker to play the marketplace minute or find it wherever you get your podcasts. The late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader GINSBURG leaves a legacy of rulings that define many crucial areas of American life including economic issues such as the gap between what men and women are paid. Marketplace's Nancy. Marshall Genzer reports Ruth Bader Ginsburg graduated first in Columbia law school's class of Nineteen fifty-nine and struggled to find a job because it was perfectly legal to discriminate against women. The pressure problem she had was getting interviewed Ginsburg biographer Jane. Sharon D. Heart says even when Ginzburg got interviews, she didn't get the jobs. GINSBURG. Eventually started teaching and she became director of the women's rights project of the American Civil Liberties Union GINSBURG argued six gender equality cases before the Supreme Court. She won five in documentary. RPG. GINSBURG mused about the argument she made before the court as a young lawyer I didn't see myself as kind of a kindergarten teacher in those days because the judges. Didn't think sex discrimination existed. She convinced them. It did exist by arguing cases involving discrimination against men take the Social Security Act. It said widowed fathers weren't entitled to the benefits earned by their late wives Ginsburg said that wasn't fair to men. The Supreme Court agreed the team Goss Graves had the national women's law center. She was really able to blow up what up until that point had been very well accepted notions that it was okay for the law to treat men and women differently Ginsberg continued. Blowing up accepted notions after she was appointed to the Supreme Court in Nineteen, ninety-three three years. Later, she wrote the majority opinion requiring Virginia Military Institute to Admit, women in two thousand, seven Ginsburg wrote a dissent that led Congress to pass the Lilly ledbetter fair pay act which does away with limitations on how long workers have to file equal pay lawsuits. Juuling Nelson is an economist at the University of Massachusetts Boston and the more people that can fight discrimination the more people can get their wages adjusted. And that helps narrow the wage gap Nelson says in the nineteen seventies, men made forty percent more than women. Now they make twenty percent more they're still a pay gap, but ruth, Bader, Ginsburg helped cut it in half in Washington I'm Nancy Marshall Genzer or marketplace. It's expected. The Justice Ginsburg will lie in repose at the Supreme Court for two days ahead of a memorial service with details of those plans expected soon. I'm David Brancaccio this is marketplace morning before. From APM American public media. It is asserted that we are officially in Pumpkin spice season and my colleague dollars known at least on twitter for loathing pumpkin spice everything. But if we can raise a hundred thousand dollars from me, investors by the first of October, kyw is willing to drink a pumpkin spice beer. This'll be fun and we all need a little more fun. These days donate today at marketplace dot org slash donate.

Justice Ruth Bader GINSBURG Supreme Court US HSBC David Brancaccio China Hong Kong Google International Committee of Inv Securities and Exchange Commis BBC Financial Crimes Oracle Standard Chartered General Motors N. C. E. N. deutchebanks
Here's What Every Supreme Court Justice Said About the Passing of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

TIME's Top Stories

09:44 min | 9 months ago

Here's What Every Supreme Court Justice Said About the Passing of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

"Brought to you by lucky charms magical mission. Let lucky the Leprechaun take you and your kids on an interactive adventure through the eight magical charm lands to restore magic available on your Smart Speaker just say open lucky charms, magical mission or search for it wherever you listen to podcasts. Here's what every current Supreme Court. Justice said about the passing of Ruth Bader GINSBURG. Tara Law. With passing of US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Friday the United States lost a champion and the fight for equal rights between the sexes and a distinguished jurist. But for the current and former Supreme Court justice who served beside her Ginsberg's death also means the loss of a respected colleague and for many a dear friend. On Saturday. The Supreme Court released statements from the eight current justices who served alongside Ginsburg until her death, as well as statements from to retire justices who were closely with her and their statements. The justices remembered the remarkable individual they knew as well as the icon who left her mark on American history and law. Chief Justice John G Roberts Junior. Our nation has lost jurist of historic stature. The we at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague today we mourn. But with confidence that future generations will remember. Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her a tireless and resolute champion of. Justice. Justice. Clarence Thomas. My Wife Virginia and I are heartbroken to learn of the passing of our friend Justice Ruth Bader GINSBURG. Ruth, and I I met when I began my tenure on the DC, circuit in nineteen ninety with the exception of the brief period between our respective appointments to the Supreme Court. Have, since been judicial colleagues through the many challenges both professionally, and personally she was the essence of grace civility and dignity. She was a superb judge who gave her best and exacted the best from each of us whether an agreement or disagreement and as outstanding as she was as a judge. She was an even better colleague unfailingly gracious thoughtful, and civil. Through her loss of her wonderful husband Marty. And her countless health challenges she was a picture of grace and courage not once the pace and quality of her work suffer even as she was obviously suffering grievously. Nor did her demeanor toward her colleagues diminish The most difficult of a long tenure is watching colleagues decline and pass away and the passing of my dear colleague Ruth is profoundly difficult and so very sad I will dearly miss my friend. Virginia and I will keep her family, our thoughts and prayers. Justice Stephen G brier. I heard of Ruth's death while I was reciting the mourners cottage at the Rosh Hashanah service. I thought. A great justice, a woman of Valor, a rock of righteousness and my good good friend. The world is a better place for having lived in it. and. So as her family her friends, the legal community. And the nation. Justice Samuel A. The Martha. And I were deeply saddened by the news that justice GINSBURG has passed away. Ruth and Marty made us feel at home immediately when I joined the court and we will certainly miss her justice Ginsburg down as a leading figure in the history of the court. She will be remembered for her intelligence learning and remarkable fortitude. She has been and will continue to be an inspiration for many. Justice Sonia Sotomayor. My dear friend and colleague Ruth Bader GINSBURG was an American hero. She spent her life fighting for the equality of all people and she was a pathbreaking champion of women's rights. She served our court and country with consummate dedication, tireless NECE, and passion for justice. She has left a legacy few could rival. I Will Miss Ruth, greatly, she welcomed me to the court with a warmth. I could not have expected and I came to feel a special kinship with her. She was someone whose wisdom kindness and unwavering support I could always rely on. I will forever cherish the moments we shared. I send my deepest condolences to her children, grandchildren and great grandchild. I know how much she? Treasured lofty. She often said that leading a meaningful life means living for once family and once community not for oneself. Ruth lived a profoundly meaningful life and the numerous ways in which she changed hours will never be forgotten. Justice Elena Kagan. To me as to countless others, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a hero as an attorney. She led the fight to grant women equal rights under the law as a judge she did justice every day working to ensure that this country's legal system lives up to its ideals and extends its rights and protections to those once excluded and in both roles she held to indeed exceeded the highest standards of legal craft. Her work was as careful as it was creative as disciplined as it was visionary, it will endure for as long as Americans retained their commitment to law. Ruth reached out to encourage and assist me in my career as she did for so many others long before I came to the. Supreme. Court. and. She guided and inspired me on matters large and small once I became her colleague. I will miss her her intellect, her generosity, her sly wit, her manifest integrity, and her endless capacity for work. For the rest of my life. I give my deepest condolences to her beloved children and grandchildren. May Her memory be a blessing. Justice. Neal gorsuch. Louisan I have lost a cherished colleague and friend for forty years. Ruth serve the American people as one of our most distinguished judges, her sacrifices for the country were many but always performed with honor. We are blessed by the happy memories that will remain like traveling with Ruth to London to her delight. Uninformed Guide kept calling her Ruthie. Or? All, the operas she tried. So valiantly to teach me or her sweet tooth at lunch or the touching stories of her remarkable life with Marty, we will miss ruth and our hearts go out to her family. May she rest in peace? Justice Brett M. Cavanaugh. Ashley Margaret Liza and I are profoundly saddened by the loss of Justice Ruth Bader GINSBURG and we extend our prayers in deepest condolences to her family and to her four decades of law clerks. No American has ever done more than Justice Ginsburg to ensure equal justice under law for women she was a cherished colleague and she inspired me and all of US With her unparalleled work ethic and devotion to the law a meticulous and path marking judge, she held herself to the highest standards of precision and accuracy in her beautifully crafted opinions and she inspired all of us to try to meet those same exacting standards I learned from her principled voice and marveled at her wonderful wit, our weekly conferences and daily lunches. Justice Ginsburg pave the way for women to become lawyers and judges. She made it possible for women and girls like my daughter's to compete on equal footing as student athletes. When justice GINSBURG was last in my office earlier this year I pointed out a photo I keep a first standing with four women who served as law clerks in my chambers in my first term as long as I am fortunate enough to serve on the Supreme Court. I will keep that photo prominently in my office as a continuing tribute to justice Ginsburg and as a daily reminder to work hard and pursue equal justice. May God. Bless Ruth. Bader GINSBURG. Justice David H suitor retired. Ruth Ginsburg was one of the members of the court. He would sheep greatness before she became a great justice by loved her to pieces. Justice Anthony Kennedy retired. The members of the court always will cherish all that justice. GINSBURG meant to us as a distinguished jurist and inspiring wonderful person. She will have an esteemed place in the history of our record. Ruth was a close dear friend. Mary joins me in sending our deepest sympathies to her family. And our court sessions and conferences ruth was remarkably well prepared for every case down to the smallest detail. If the two of disagreed, it was always in a civil principled respectfully. By her learning, she taught devotion to the law by her dignity. She taught respect for others and her love for America. By her reverence for the Constitution. She taught us to preserve it to secure our freedom.

Ruth Bader GINSBURG Miss Ruth Supreme Court Justice Justice Stephen G brier Justice Anthony Kennedy Marty Tara Law Virginia United States Leprechaun Clarence Thomas Sonia Sotomayor Elena Kagan Ginsberg America Samuel A. John G Roberts Junior
Supreme Court hears arguments in Trump tax return case

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00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Supreme Court hears arguments in Trump tax return case

"The US Supreme Court will decide if president trump has to turn over his tax records. One of the cases involves democratic led committees in Congress looking for financial records as they investigated trump speaking during oral arguments yesterday president. Trump's attorney Patrick Strawbridge said the subpoenas are unprecedented justice. Ruth Bader Ginsburg mentioned that other presidents trump refused to turn over his tax returns.

trump Ruth Bader Ginsburg US Supreme Court president Patrick Strawbridge Congress attorney