19 Burst results for "Rutger"

"rutger" Discussed on The One You Feed

The One You Feed

03:09 min | 11 months ago

"rutger" Discussed on The One You Feed

"What i'm saying here but i think it's still incredibly important to remember that. The indians were so so similar to one another. I agree i mean. There's a teaching from buddhism. That influenced me so strongly which was just recognized that everybody underneath wants to be happy like you are. And so then at that point if i can orient that way towards somebody then what. We're debating strategies. I'm not seeing them as fundamentally different than me. I'm seeing the strategies. They're employing okay. We can debate those but underneath. We are people. And i do even despite what i was saying beforehand about some of the frustrations i've seen in the us about like mask-wearing and some of that. I still do believe in the genuine goodness of most people. I really believe it's there in the question is just how do we cultivate it. How do we cultivate ourselves. And how do we cultivate it and others. Yeah absolutely there's a saying from nelson mandela that. I really love. He wants said that it's easier to change the world than to change yourself so if you can change yourself than changing. The world is piece of cake. Yeah yeah my background. Maybe some would see me. Some kind of vanina looney leftist or like a progressive. Personally see myself as someone who tries to combine ideas from both conservatives and progressives something like basic income for example is both quite left-wing right wing idea. It's it's both about freedom and about equality so there's tendency of people who are on the left or progressive right that they often this miss the importance of self help and individual change. They say no. We gotta talk about amazon and jeff visas and the evil system and structure right and they gotta pay their taxes. And we talk about inequality and blah blah blah. We gotta talk about the big things and don't talk about the individual because that's neoliberal something like that and to be honest. I used to believe that. As well. But again as i've become older and i've looked at some of the people i've really radiant meyer of the people who really changed the course of world history. What i see is that i i change themselves. And then they changed the world. Martin luther king today great edinburgh one of the most climate activists over time she. I became a vegan. Then she convinced the parents to buy solar panels then. She convinced the to buy an electric car. Then she convinced her mother to stop flying around the world and she's a famous opera singer her mother so that was basically our job but humans are mothers. Stop doing that. She did all of that and only then. She started protesting in front of swedish parliament. So the political is personal and the personal is political. If you can change yourself you can change the world. That is a beautiful place for us to wrap up. Thank you so much rutger for coming on the show. I enjoyed this conversation. I highly recommend the book will have links in the show notes to the book and where you can find more about rooker. Thanks so much. Thanks man really enjoyed this. If what.

vanina looney nelson mandela amazon jeff swedish parliament Martin luther king edinburgh rutger rooker
"rutger" Discussed on The One You Feed

The One You Feed

05:24 min | 11 months ago

"rutger" Discussed on The One You Feed

"We just go well that's just the way it is and we're completely disconnected from the process. I often think that if people have to just watch a short video of what they eat of. What's on their plate. They wouldn't be able to eat it anymore. And that case. They don't feel the empathy because the distance is too great. We can feel a huge amount of empathy for someone who's in the news. A girl has fallen down. Well and the whole country is obsessed with question. Is she gonna make it right and we're all going to send money and dole's etc to the family and win support them and there's a crowd fund a millions. Come in but at the same time you know. We know or we should note that mortar. Forty million kids die. Every year from easily. Preventable causes like malaria and measles and diarrhoea and we also know what the solutions are. You know you can just donate not all that much money to a highly effective charities such as against malaria foundation. And you know that statistically speaking i mean you're gonna say lies with that but we don't do that because we don't feel it right. There's no identifiable victim in many ways when we talk about those issues. Empathy is not going to help us right. We need something different right. Yeah that whole issue of distance is such a big thing is that we simply would not tolerate in front of us. We are willing to tolerate at a distance and your book actually points out a lot of examples of that. You know we think well. Soldiers are all trained to kill but that it's relatively hard to train somebody to want to kill somebody. And the more close up that combat is say a bayonet versus pushing a button on a drone across the world. It's totally different. You know once relatively easy to do the others really hard to do is one of the best kept secrets of psychology. Actually is that humans find it incredibly hard to kill someone else that was a american historian military man who discovered during the second world war when he was allowed to travel on the pacific fraud and also in europe and do a lot of group interviews with soldiers. Just after you know. They have been in a coma situation. What he discovered his name was samuel. Marsal was that only fifteen to twenty five percent of soldiers actually fired their guns..

malaria foundation dole diarrhoea measles malaria Marsal europe coma samuel
"rutger" Discussed on The One You Feed

The One You Feed

02:17 min | 11 months ago

"rutger" Discussed on The One You Feed

"You'll remember this in two thousand eleven when some right wing fanatic murdered. You know dozens of teenagers with some kind of political camp on on an island in norway and it was. It was terrific and the interviewer offs. The debt you know you want the death sentence right for this guy. You want to torture him a murderer etcetera but you want vengeance right and it was credibly moving moment because the dad said well look. I've thought about that quite a bit. But i don't wanna sink to that level. I'm so much better than that. And i agree with the prime minister of norway. Who at the time said when the texts happened where we're going to respond with more openness with more transparency and more democracy and that's how will defeat this evil ideology. It's difficult but it's really worth it you know. I was about to talk about relief. Band i was just remembering this time. I went on a boat just off of key west and how sick i got and how that affected basically the rest of the day now. I sure wish they had had relief band back then but anyway relief band is the number one. Fda cleared anti nausea wristband that has been clinically proven to quickly relieve and effectively prevent nausea vomiting associated with motion sickness anxiety migraines hangovers morning sickness chemotherapy. And much more. The product is one hundred percent drug-free non-drowsy and provides all natural relief with zero side effects for as long as needed. How it works is relief. Band stimulates nerve in the wrist that travels to the part of the brain that controls nausea than it blocks the signal. Your brain is sending to your stomach telling you that you are sick. The technology was originally developed over twenty years ago and hospitals to relieve nausea from patients. But now through relief band it's available to the masses. If you don't believe it works listened. What jan had to say about her experience. This is the best thing i've ever bought. I get extremely carsick. But i was in the car.

norway nausea vomiting motion sickness anxiety migrai nausea Fda jan
"rutger" Discussed on The One You Feed

The One You Feed

05:08 min | 11 months ago

"rutger" Discussed on The One You Feed

"The cost of believing the worst in people. So that you protect yourself then cost is to me like you said. I'm not willing to pay it. It's a huge cost. They used to see this in aa. I'm a recovering alcoholic addict. And i would see people come early into a. There's a lot of trust that you have to have their you're trusting in a program you're trusting in a sponsor you're sharing things and people would be very distrustful and you know i just used to say like the benefits of trusting. Are that you get your whole life back. You recover and you live this wonderful life. Yes maybe you tell somebody something in confidence and they share it. Okay yep it happens. That price is so small compared to the cost of not trusting which is basically for an alcoholic or an addict is. You're going to go back out. You might very well die when we painted that starkly and addict sort of amplifies all these things we can see it really clearly but if we deescalate that to more of a normal situation it's still the same cost you know which is that believing. The worst in people takes a huge psychological cost. It's also true for forgiveness if you look at the literature on forgiveness. It's very interesting that the people who've thought about this deeply emphasize over and over again is that you forgive someone and in the first place you do it for yourself because you want to liberate yourself in a way for giving someone is a selfish act because you do not want to be imprisoned anymore you do not want to be held back by that thing that other person is done to you. i think. That's a very powerful way of looking at it. What you said also reminds me of what we do. As a society policymakers politicians ride a law. They think about the one percent instead of the ninety nine percent right so i think about the whole welfare system or the benefit system in the western world. We've created these systems where poor people have to prove over and over again that they're really depressed enough that they're really sick enough that they're hopeless case. Who will never get anything done in their lives and once they've proved that on enough forms and in enough interviews with government officials. That may be at the end of the day. We'll give them a little bit of assistance right but then we've already created a form of dependency depression right if you go through the process. You'll feel absolutely miserable and sure you're you're not going to find a job anytime soon because the whole system met you miserable. What would happen if we just give people a guaranteed basic income. Which is i think. One of the really exciting new ideas out there. Just give people monthly ground. That's enough to pay for your basic needs. Food shelter education clothing..

depression
"rutger" Discussed on The One You Feed

The One You Feed

05:53 min | 11 months ago

"rutger" Discussed on The One You Feed

"One of the things we say at the one you feed a lot is that there's no shortcut to last in happiness right. We've got to do the work to improve our lives but this can be really challenging to do without some support. Our lives are busy. There's a lot of things cloyne at our attention and we might have ways of working with our thoughts emotions and behaviors. That are not very good for our well-being so if you'd like help working on any or all of those things. I've got a couple of spots that have just opened up in my one on one. Coaching practice. You can book a free thirty minute. Call to talk with me. No pressure and we get to know each other at one. You feed dot net slash coach if you study some of the biggest atrocities in human history. The incredibly uncomfortable thing you'll see is that we quite often do the most terrible things in the name of friendliness in the name of loyalty because we do not wanna let our friends down. Welcome to the one you feed. Throughout time. great tinkers have recognized the importance of the thoughts. We have quotes like garbage in garbage out. Or you are what you think. Ring true and yet for many of us are thoughts. Don't strengthen or empower us. We tend toward negatively self-pity chelsea or fear. We see what we don't have instead of what we do. We think things that hold us back and damp and our spirit but it's not just about think our actions matter. It takes conscious consistent and creative effort to make a life worth living. This podcast is about how other people keep themselves moving in the right direction. How they feed their good wolf. Thanks for joining us. Our guest on this episode is rutger bregman. One of europe's most prominent young thinkers the twenty-seven-year-old historian and author has published four books on history philosophy and economics..

rutger bregman europe
"rutger" Discussed on VelociPodcast

VelociPodcast

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"rutger" Discussed on VelociPodcast

"This was supposed to be comedic relief. It was a pretty lame joke. A lot of the jokes. Senator quite lame. But i think it's a younger group in me. people who had actually maybe not heard these jokes before. I realized one of the problems with a lot of the jokes in movies are things. I've heard multiple times so they're not actually funny to me anymore. There's a lot of movies. I've shown to my son and a very lame joke will come up and he'll think it's really funny but it's because he's never heard it before so. This is one of the problems with age. Isn't that you know you have great experiences that you've experienced everything multiple times and so the thrill of that initial experience gone so there's probably jokes that i remember being super funny and movies that if i saw with an adult at the same time they'd probably already heard some version of that joke before and found it less funny than i did. Weirdly bloodshot might be a really good kids film. If you know. You're comfortable with them. Seeing people get body parts blown off and then have them digitally reconstructed in front of them but it was one of those moments where. I wonder what that young woman is put on a resume. Did she put comic relief. Co-worker girl who shakes her head. I should read the credits. I didn't actually take the time to read the credits. So that's where this fell apart. Only because i started thinking about it. Just as i was talking about the last part Where i'm talking about ice tea as soon as i said. Ice t thought of the movie poster. The movie by the way is surviving the game. It's not just like ice. Tea gets hunted by white people. If i remember correctly there is like one guy. One african american dude in the hunting party and i think that was just to make it so they could then claim to be more minded. I guess i don't know let's face it rooker howard's in it so of rigour was in it i was going to see it. That was just sort of a base rule throughout the eighties and nineties. But on the poster you have ice tea running away. he's got big dreadlocks and stuff and then you have like an of rigour that has ice teas name over a white guy and then rutger hauer over the overlay of rutger hauer. So it actually looks like someone else is getting the credit for ice tea because they usually put the name across the head But in this case they weren't actually doing that they were putting like ice t the lead character so he actually gets first billing but it just didn't look right on the poster. That's something if you're gonna make movie posters that something should think about is making sure that the names go appropriate with the person or the person who is the lead gets the biggest face that you can actually see. I think you already getting what i'm talking about. It was confusing as to who iced. He was if you never knew who is he was. Although at that point in the world pretty much new ice tea was the black guy but does she put on her resume. I was the asian girl who silently shook her head..

rutger hauer howard
"rutger" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"rutger" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Patrick Mahomes, Travis, Kelsey and company come through again a seven place 75 yard drive in a minute and 15 seconds and the Chiefs have taken a 35 31 lead over the Raiders. With just 28 seconds to play here in Allegiance Stadium Now Bucker will kick it away. Henry rugs is back deep. Rutger on the approach. Here comes the kickoff drills. This one on the Raiders will start at the 25 yard line. Well, Rod looking at the replay, how in the world to Travis Kelsey gets so wide open with seven and coverage there and cover too, And nobody is going with Chelsea that Chelsea across the face of the safety and when he did, so there's another player coming up to seeing. But me being a safety. I know how good travel skills he is. I'm gonna go with Travis Kelsey. Make somebody else beat me and Patrick Holmes this extend to play with his feet and found it and throw a dart to Kelsey into the end zone. Raiders have one time out 28 seconds on the clock. Two receivers, right Single man left field goal won't do it. Raiders need to find the end zone. Car back in the shotgun. He takes the snap cars back to pass steps up in the pocket looks, floats it up down the left sideline, and that's intercepted by Daniel Sorenson back over the 15 years, Sideline will slide down inside the 45. The Kansas City Chiefs will win. Derek are trying to drop that one of the bucket toe angle or, but Sorenson came over the top picked it off. It's his third interception of the year, and the Kansas City Chiefs are on their way to nine and one. Derek.

Travis Kelsey Raiders Kansas City Chiefs Daniel Sorenson Allegiance Stadium Patrick Holmes Derek Patrick Mahomes Chelsea Rutger Henry Rod
"rutger" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"rutger" Discussed on WJR 760

"Jason from the watch here, Krystle Rutger just received treatment on its left ring finger, had a splint put on it by the doctor by asking with the okay to play. Is that he's more than good. Well, let's watch that. Alright, Thank you, Jason, Second and nine Notre Dame of their 21 brought down by the middle of the Spartan defense, and that would be General Worthy and Kevin Pickled thie air would to the left of Chris gets a low snap fires over the middle leaping Graham made by Michael Boyd. He's hit. The ball is loose. The ball is loose. Eric Gordon stunned laying on the grass. Let's see who has the pigskin. Notre Dame's football. There's a spartan her. I think that Sarah Gordon Floyd recovered his own fumble. Chris L. Rutger in the collision with Floyd, but prior to that Eric Gordon in a collision And he's down. Growing on the field. Catch first down was good in and out coverage. It's really there, Gordon, come on underneath. Get underneath the slant route. Jane, Chris Rosa High, So only Michael or Floyd can. Michael Floyd has the opportunity to catch it, and he just caught his neck a little bit. Maybe it's a stinger. Hopefully, it's nothing serious. He's moving his extremities. I think here has made the tackle. He hit him around the ankles. It's always the second blow was Krystle Rucker coming over the top to get the hit. And then all that moment, um of two bodies falling on Air. Gordon. This's one tough customer. He wants to get up. He wants to stay in the game. You know what his thoughts are, but Right now. Our thoughts are with him and our prayers hopefully This is not a serious injury. He went down like he took a knock out punch, but he is up now and coming off the field. But it's a good sign because Munro and Sally Noble the trainers walk him off the field. They they didn't have to have his arms over their shoulders..

Eric Gordon Sarah Gordon Floyd Michael Floyd Notre Dame Krystle Rutger Jason Chris L. Rutger Krystle Rucker Michael Boyd Chris Kevin Pickled Floyd Munro Chris Rosa High Graham football Sally Noble Jane Michael
"rutger" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

06:24 min | 1 year ago

"rutger" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"Have you heard of Lady who? I have not heard of Lady Hawk. Sell me on it under first off. I don't have to sell you on it later. Understand something, Lady Lady Hawks. Legend and lore is already in place, though. How? I can't even believe That you have not seen Lady Hawk And this is the period in which you like to dwell. Lady Hawk was a film directed by Ah young Richard Donner. You might know Richard Donner is the man that brought a Superman. One of the greatest comic book movies ever also gave us the lethal weapons franchise. Richard Quite quite a few other interesting films and a couple that were fluff, But Richard Donner was an A list director. Lady Hall stars a young Matthew Broderick. As a thief. But the main stars are Rutger Hauer from the greatest movie ever made Blade Runner and a very beautiful Michelle Pfeiffer. Now there is a There is a witch off sorts that puts a curse on them. They're there. They're lovers, they but they're for their forbidden lovers. And so the curses And I don't make sure I get this right because sometimes I reverse it. The curses Rutger Hauer is a wolf by night. And Michelle Pfeiffer during the day. Is A hawk. Ah Hawk right. That explains the title deed. Yes, yes, And it's a It's a very cute C. It's a very like record. Howard, if you know him his presence. I mean, alright, His presence on screen is just phenomenal. And Matthew Broderick is his kind of whimsical, smart Alec. You sell, and Matthew Broderick is the one Rutger Hauer puts him in tars of watching her. And and and I want to say, Yeah. Matthew Broderick eyes put in charge of watching her when he's a wolf because he can't protect her. So he starts calling her. He starts calling her Lady Hall and that's an and Rutger Hauer likes that, But that's where the title comes from. So but but the curse of it isthe They can never touch each other. They can never lay human to human eyes on each other s O. They are they are destined to never, you know, be able to consummate their love. They're destined to never be ableto have a romance. There's one scene in particular. And it is my favorite scene from the movie, and I think if anybody else watches it It always points out to be their favorite scene. There's one scene where you get to see that you get to see the transformation. Rutger Hauer Ah, is it And it's It takes place in Ah, snow covered region, So it's just absolutely stunning. It's absolutely beautiful, but Rutger Hauer Is the wolf. And Michelle Pfeiffer is Michelle Pfeiffer and The wolf starts turning back because the sun starts coming up. And Matthew Broderick keeps Michelle Pfeiffer keeps the wolf at his side and the wolf protects them at night. The sun starts coming up. And you start to see the wolf starts to turn into Rutger Hauer. And now Michelle Pfeiffer, who is Michelle Pfeiffer and not the hawk at this point is looking at this body of the wolf starts to morph in back into Rutger Hauer. And The Wolf's eyes. Wow, it's transforming is looking in myself. Five human eyes. It's really It's really, really touching and Brazil with five. It's looking at him and he's He's like 2/3 storing the transformation that he starts to transform from myself. I've been to the hawk, but there's still enough form of her toe where you're looking at it, and you're like, okay, this is gonna happen. They're going to be able to do this. They're going to be able to touch They're going to be able to a human eyes on each other again and in the end and and and the music is building That's just a really poignant scene and in the fraction and when I say the fraction of a second you couldn't sly the sliver of Hair through it. It looks just like they're about to do it and see Turkey as Rutger Howard now becomes a man and he's laying on the ground because it was well. He reaches his head out for as he flipping turns into a hawk and flies away and he buries his head into the snow. And he goes. What do you gotta do, Teo? Make a witch man. Put that kind of curse on you. That's just I have to be out of which there though. There's a lot of the movie that I forget. I will tell you this Matthew Broderick, it's hilarious. The fight scene in the end is brilliant. Rutger Hauer was born TTO play at night. If there's a There's a There's a there's a very old film. Call it Don't to dare. Don't you dare play off Rutger Hauer with music that you gonna pull that music down, You know also that time understand some when I'm when I'm in my eighties movies bag don't ever interrupt me is where I live right there is there's a movie called flesh and Blood that was directed by their who, even whom was just this really blood and guts Director German Director, which put Rutgers How on the map, So you want to go back and you want to look at flesh and blood. But Rutger Hauer was born to play a night is beautiful. The one flaw and I have to say this. The one flaw of Lady Hong is that there's it has. It has a very organic To the times to the era soundtrack, which is beautiful a score, which is which that scene that I told you about with score to, But then there's also this tangerine dream score..

Rutger Hauer Matthew Broderick Rutger Hauer Ah Lady Hawk Michelle Pfeiffer Lady Lady Hawks Rutger Howard Lady Hall Richard Donner Lady Hong Director German Director director Turkey Teo Brazil Alec
"rutger" Discussed on VelociPodcast

VelociPodcast

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"rutger" Discussed on VelociPodcast

"That was just sort of a base rule throughout the eighties and nineties. But on the poster you have ice tea running away. He's got big dreadlocks and stuff and then you have like an overlay of rigour. That has ice. T's name over a white guy and then rutger. Hauer over the overlay of Rutger Hauer. So it actually looks like someone else is getting the credit for iced tea because they usually put the name across the head But in this case they weren't actually doing that they were putting like ice t the lead character so he actually gets first billing but it just didn't look right on the poster. That's something if you're GonNa make movie posters that something should think about is making sure that the names go appropriate with the person or the person who is the lead gets the biggest face that you can actually see. I think you already getting what I'm talking about. It was confusing as to who iced. He was if you never knew who is he was. Although at that point in the world pretty much new ice tea was the black guy but does she put on her resume. I was the Asian girl who silently shook her head. No at the Dick joke on her resume. Is that something? You're proud of because bloodshot. I'm sure that's a big movie. You know technically speaking She did get facetime on the film. She didn't get any speaking lines but she did. Provide the actual closest thing to proper comic relief in the film. She was just a throwaway character. Just say so. I don't know what to do with that. I appreciated her performance. It was very deadpan. And that's what the scene called for because there was any sort of goofiness and actually would've taken away from the joke itself whereas this actually enhance the joke joke itself being quite poor so the job needs to be as enhanced as possible but I hope this actually helps career. I would be interested in an interview with people like that. People who have singular scenes in movies that are you know significant but then also could have been edited out completely in wouldn't have made any difference to the film itself. How do those moments impact their career overall? So you know someone who's in that position or has been in a position similar to that I would love to hear their experience even as his personal Because that in itself is interesting to me. We're coming up very quickly on episode two hundred in honestly. I have no idea what to do. I've run through a creative drought because I am at home and I'm doing the quarantine thing and I'm not really leaving my house. I'm having fewer experiences. An actually realized what I'm having most of all our fewer interactions with other people. And that's probably something that sparks a lot of the ideas so for episode one hundred and fifty or episode one hundred. What I did was just trying to get a theme stick the theme. I forget which one it was. I think it was one fifty with the all. Game of thrones episode which was actually very popular. If there's a theme you would like to recommend you can post a message or a Rican record voice message voice link Dot FM slash. Veloce PODCAST and I will get it and I will hear it and honestly what. I'm kind of trying to figure out. What can I do to commemorate episode two hundred because right now honestly very much like this podcast for the last one hundred ninety six episodes? I got nothing. The loss of the Black Veloce veloce podcast..

Rutger Hauer facetime Dick
"rutger" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"rutger" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Talk and everything entertainment update heard at the top of every hour on my talk one of seven one so what is new in your world sources say that during the making of once upon a time in Hollywood crew members were instructed not to make eye contact with Leonardo di Caprio full of but Hollywood execs says that Leo is a truly lovely human being and I'm sure that he in some way is connected to Leonardo in a positive way that's good for him on a financial base yeah because I don't know a you would he didn't go to the Oscars because he wasn't nominated for Titanic as Best Actor he didn't support his other co stars in the movie itself yeah I made an impression on me that this kid I mean I don't know if he's going out of that behavior I hope so but he's always sort of been one of those guys that this is a little bit too big for his britches you know what I mean E. else I did not hear this last week but Rutger Hauer died yeah a couple days ago he was seventy five he was in Blade Runner lady hawk he played a wolf and a man and she was a lady and a hot I love that movie all but anyway he was in that the Hitcher Batman begins Sin City and and he had a big resurgence with the movie hopeful with a shot gun that was in the last like ten years so is the yeah yes it's been a little bit longer than that now with a shock although the shock and it's like a low budget film but it's like a cult classic now in broad Hauer plays a a but also yeah I want to see that now yeah yeah it's not for the faint of heart there's some pretty gruesome stuff in it but yeah don't show it to your ten you're thirty three and see here a British tabloid suggested that one of the things that broke up one direction was the popularity of gay fan fiction featuring Kerry styles and Louis Tomlinson as of now it looks that is the biggest though to be as I story there that you're lying one yeah backs not tomorrow there was a lot of gay fan fiction but that's not why they broke up no despite the fan petition HBO.

Leonardo di Caprio Hollywood Leo Oscars Rutger Hauer Louis Tomlinson Kerry ten years
"rutger" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"rutger" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Actor Rutger Hauer died last week after a brief illness worker how we're going to be a star in his home country of the Netherlands in the late sixties and early seventies with roles on TV and in the movies one of them Turkish delight was nominated for an Oscar and then Hollywood came calling and how are kept being cast as bad guys most famously in the nineteen eighty two science fiction movie Blade Runner yeah that's what it is to be as his character re baddie is an android on is a replicant and he is desperate to extend his life he spends his last moments terrorizing Harrison Ford's character during a rainstorm and then our delivers one of the most memorable death monologues in the history of film and listen this was partially written by record how're himself seen the attack ships on fire sure I watched click through the darkness ten hours okay the loss time thank you time that was the actor wrecker how're he died last week at the age of seventy five this is morning edition from NPR news this is WNYC in New York good morning I'm Richard hake.

Rutger Hauer Netherlands Oscar Hollywood Harrison Ford New York Richard hake Blade Runner NPR ten hours
Dutch Blade Runner star Rutger Hauer dies at 75

News, Traffic and Weather

00:37 sec | 3 years ago

Dutch Blade Runner star Rutger Hauer dies at 75

"He made a career out of playing bad guys in the movies Dutch actor Rutger Hauer Rutger Hauer died Rutger Hauer is probably best known for playing a rogue replicant in nineteen eighty two's Blade Runner telling us he was really proud of that role you know I'm really happy the way it turned out in the way people carry me around you know for like a lifetime the Dutch actor's Hollywood movie debut was in nineteen eighty one night hawks playing a terrorist bomber opposite Sylvester Stallone and Billy Dee Williams with over a hundred and seventy credits to his name how're had five projects in the works when he died but how're was seventy

Rutger Hauer Rutger Hauer Sylvester Stallone Billy Dee Williams
"rutger" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"rutger" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Podcast. We are back here on finebaum. I'm Brad Edwards filling in today. And I am pleased to be speaking with I've amaze L, who is giving us a little bit of insight on what we're going to start to see a lot of in the coming months, which is the celebration of college. Football's one hundred fiftieth anniversary for those who don't know the first college football game was played in eighteen sixty nine between Rutgers and Princeton final score Rutger six Princeton, four doesn't sound like today's game. In fact, if you look there's no video of it, I've right? But, but I think if we saw the video, we would recognize very quickly. It's no nothing close to what we know football today to be, and that's one of the fun, things about this just on top of everything else just learning how the game itself has changed over these years while there were twenty five men to aside, and you couldn't run with the ball. All but a little bit different thing is Brad is it a week later? They played again at Princeton and Princeton one. So a weekend to history of the game, we had established homefield advantage, which I thought was pretty cool. Yeah. And, and I think I also saw that someone retroactively applied national championships to all of these seasons from way back and including all the way back to eighteen sixty nine and they gave out a split national title that first year between Princeton and Rutgers, so yeah, this indecisiveness in being able to name national champions in college football started from the very onset of the sport. And one of the things that, that I guess. Kind of kind of makes this whole project. Interesting is, we're trying to go back here and put together some lists for all the fans of the greatest, this, the greatest that we're going to start in August..

Princeton Brad Edwards Football Rutgers L Rutger
DutchChains Odyssey On Its Blockchain and AI Hackathon

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

08:45 min | 3 years ago

DutchChains Odyssey On Its Blockchain and AI Hackathon

"The street has a crypto winter is finally Thorin most importantly, all blockchain projects remember, those that were all built on future promises and lies Leo culture. Well, the future is right here. We're beginning to see the first fruits from those icy hose from Lowe's future promises. So the future is already here. We're not talking about real partnerships real use cases and stories of early adopter businesses leveraging emerging technologies, but this daily tech podcast. It's not about buzzwords or fuelling hype of anything but hearing right from the heart of the tech world and how it's actually transforming multiple industries. So today, we have Rooker van Zuid dam on the show, and he's the founder and CEO of a company called Dutch chain, which is a leading ecosystem development agency for open. Public infrastructure and also odyssey an open innovation program, which provides a unique collaborative infrastructure for governmental corporate, a nonprofit partners to help them. Find breakthrough solutions to complex societal challenges all using blockchain and so many other emerging technologies. Exile installed Freud that Rooker also has more than fifteen years experience funding companies across communications digital media and tech sectors. And was also the co founder and commercial director of pay logic, which is a next generation ticketing and technology company based in Amsterdam. So buckle up and hold on tight. So I can be meal as all the way to the Netherlands. So we can speak with Ruka who's not only going to talk about everything I've just mentioned, but also ought to see hack twenty nine thousand nine which sounds incredibly exciting. So massive warm. Welcome to the show Rutger. Can you tell the listeners about who you are? And what you do. Thank you, Neil. So thanks for having me first of all, and yeah, I'm from from the Netherlands, and I'm the CEO of this chain and reorganized the one of the largest opening ovation programs in Europe called odyssey can can see everything about it on all the orc. And what we focus on is really the how how can all these new types of technologies like blockchain and a I serve our society in the best possible way. And what we found out is that there is a really interesting space to look at and we call it digital public infrastructure, and this is where we have managed to get corporates. Governments startups regulators. Scalable scientific institutes all on board in a in an open ecosystem that is focused on discovering the future by actually building it. And in this innovation program. We have a a highlights, which is the all the hacker Thon, and that one is taking place in in a week time and about fifteen hundred people from all over to will gather to to work with teams and experts on on solutions in the context of twenty complex challenges. So this is in a nutshell what what what we are working on with a with a team of of nine very very driven people from the deadlines. Tacitly so much to unpack this, I suppose we better start we do chain, which like you said you the founder and CEO of mine to stunning off. It's chinese. It's a leading ecosystem development agency for open digital public infrastructure. But can you begin by telling me a little bit more about that? And the kind of problems that you set out to solve a we'll put you on this path. Yeah. What's put me on this bath really is. And that goes way back to when I was a teenager and internet came into my life. So to say, right. The connection with the rest of the world, and all the creativity simply blew everything away in most positive sense of the word, and this was before Napster when there was no MP3. yet. You know, so but still this this new thing was was there. And then, of course, that evolve, and it was shaping our society more and more than a good way. But also in in ways, we we we don't really know how to cope with yet. I think and then off the social media came in mid and late two thousands. I came across a bitcoin and then. For me. Everything else was just kind of boring because all of a sudden, we we have this digital public infrastructure for a global payment network, and it is not owned by anyone, and it is absolutely independent and neutral, and this whole idea, I think we can take much further, and this is also whether it's basically at the core of what we're doing at other see, so that's that's basically how we came to it. Because what I was doing. When when when I came across bitcoin is both doing experiments with it like built all kinds of new chemical apps. Like, I was at a at a bitcoin conference one of the first ones in Europe organized by mode eleven I think it was in two thousand fourteen or so and then I couldn't pay my beers at the bar with bitcoin. And I was like what what is this? All right. So then we'd you Philip this point of sale system for for restaurants in boss where you could easily pay your base with with bitcoin. But we also. It was a time when when when Google gloss came out, and we connected to go glass to to a blockchain dot info wallet and Aucoin baseball, so then you could do hence free payments. So you could you could say okay glass. Make payments, and then scan QR code like RoboCop style, and then you could not wise, and it pays the actual Bill, and we had so much fun doing these things. But also we learned so much about how this. Bitcoin as an infrastructure system works. And it. It gave me the idea that you can actually discover the future by actually building. It's in a very good way. It takes you out of your comfort zone. It's not a fun. And I also have organized a couple of conferences, but it wasn't really satisfying enough for me because it's just talking. Right. So then I merged the two into this innovation program with the hacker Thon, and and turned it into a professional innovation and collaboration infrastructure. I'm so glad you mentioned you'll teenage years then the arrival lived in

Founder And Ceo Blockchain Netherlands Europe Lowe LEO Ruka Napster CEO Neil Co Founder Amsterdam Rooker Freud Google
"rutger" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:40 min | 3 years ago

"rutger" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This week on the media, if Rutger bregman didn't exist, the right would have to invent my idea is that poverty is not a lack of character. But just the lack of cash also the college cheating scandal puts the opportunity in meritocracy. Don't miss this week's on the media from WNYC. On the media is coming up tonight at midnight tomorrow on forum in the ten o'clock hour, professor psychology. Professor Ellen winter studies how humans interact with art. And why we liked what we do. Her new book how artworks challenges some commonly held beliefs such as literature's ability to develop empathy forum with Michael Krasny. Tomorrow morning starting at nine. Welcome back to political breakdown. I'm Marie Salah goes along as always was Scott Schaffer. And today, we're delighted to have with us. A woman who's fingerprints are all over those policies and proposals coming out of Sacramento, especially ones affecting children and O'Leary is governor Gavin Newsom chief-of-staff look into the breakdown. Thank you so much delight to be here coming in. So you're titles chief staff. What does that mean? What do you do all day? You know, it's a combination of dealing with the major policy issues of the day. So that's both things that are coming at you. So wildfires crisis management what's happening with our utilities, but also the the positive agenda going forward. How do we make sure that we're driving that in order to do that you have to have an amazing team? I feel like I'm the team captain and the team of public policy is a team sport. So I have you know, really managed just a group of people to make all that happen. And is a day like eighteen hours long. Usually it is often very starts worked for a number politicians Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton. How does this governor has Gavin Newsom compare in terms of his style? You know, he's a very easy person to be around. He's really smart. He reads all the time. He's thinking all the time. He's always active involved, and he's incredibly bolt. I mean, we we saw it here in San Francisco with same sex marriage. But everything he does is how can we do as much good as fast as possible? But also with people coming with us, you know, he talked about the African proverb in his inaugural speech. Which is you know, you if you wanna go far you'd go together. If you wanna go fast, you go alone or maybe. Is it different than other politicians? You've worked for does it feel different. Ramos feel difference. They all feel different. You know, I worked for Hillary Clinton for nearly twenty years on and off in. So I could tell you what she was going to say before you said, she said it I knew her so well, and she was bold in her own ways. But you know, from a different time a different era in some ways. And so I think, you know, that's it's different know, my impression of Gavin Newsom is that he's a lot more like Bill Clinton, then like Hillary in the sense that he's very spontaneous. My hunch is that he comes into the office in the morning, and you're not quite sure what he's gonna wanna do. He's has a lively big set of interests. I would say he has a big set of interests. He's really am bishops about everything he wants to get done. But he has real ideas about how to do it. So one of the things I'll just give you an example that he does it's will I'll be having a staff meeting. We'll be planning out, and he'll just walk in unannounced and sit down and say, no, no, no, let's think about doing it this way, I want to be even more do that sooner or do that faster do that differently? I want to make sure I have people standing with me in this way. So he has a lot of opinions about how to get it done. All right. I want to move onto you and your life because this is a good transition. I'm just curious like I feel like he's had a pretty great reception in Sacramento. But I think the one thing I hear from a lot of people up there is he wants to do so much like is there is there a set of priorities. What what can you actually get done? I mean, what would you say are the really sort of core things I understand you have to walk and chew gum in this job. You know, but. I do too much. I don't think he's trying to do too much. But I do think we have to be smart about how we prioritize and get things done. There's three things. He's trying to do one. Is that he's trying to address the cost crisis in California? Yeah. We know that about sixty percent of young people say they literally cannot afford to live in California sixty percent. That's a lot. If we don't deal with the housing healthcare transportation, the cost issues than we were. We're gonna lose people the second big bucket is he really has this ambition of Justice for all. And you saw that yesterday with the death penalty announcement you see it in his passion for safe drinking water. And then the third thing is he's very focused on government. How do we make sure that when we look at climate change a wildfires that we have working utilities that was a lot that. I'm really. Got it got it down. I'm so surprised that no the children's issues because that's important to you. I know as you worked for Hillary Clinton. And he's talked a lot about childcare, parental leave early childhood education. I mean, I'm surprised. You know, I think I probably should have expanded the first one where we talk about the cost crisis. But we also talk about it in terms of affordability and opportunity, and so there's a whole agenda regarding opportunity from cradle to career, and we are very focused on that. You know, I think part of it is that there's such great people. We have working for us who are doing that every day. So part of his how do you use his time versus how do we use our our team's time? So we're trying to both of those things. Well, all right. Well, let's talk a little bit about you and your life. You grew up in Maine. I dare dad was head of the AFL CIO. There sounds like a kind of larger than my figure. He was a great Irish man who told a great story and a great joke every room he walked into he had people laughing how but he was also just really inspirational person walked picket lines with him when I was growing up on a time. When a lot was changing in Maine. So I learned a lot from him and your momma who was a social work. My mom is a social worker. So they really were you know, kind of the spirit of public service and helping people and really had it in their core being and pass that on to me. Was politics. I mean, it sounds like like he brought you into at least union politics was politics. Something you thought you might go into I had. Yeah. I had an it's for an early in part. What I saw when I was in high school. There were major strikes in the paper mills and Maine, and they didn't end. Well, in fact, actually, the paper mills permanently replaced. The strikers so other union members lost their jobs, and I saw communities devastated. I saw people lose their jobs as young people their parents, literally not having any income in a made a real impact on me. But I also grew up with a sister who had pretty serious mental health issues and seeing the fact that she didn't get great service in our small town. Those things combined led me to really want to do more, and you were instrumental in sort of putting the opioid crisis on the agenda was that does that have anything to do with your, you know, your upbringing in terms of what you saw and what your dad talked about your mom talked about you even in the in the presidential campaign. Not long. Into the future. But I just wonder because I know up in that part of the USO is really we during the Hillary campaign. I ended up doing roundtables Oliver New Hampshire on the opioid crisis. And you know, it it's a drug that really knows no income bounds. I knows no geographic bounds. But it does end up in a lot of rural towns, and it's devastating. It is something that my family's experience with my sisters problems at something that many families says experienced it'd be hard pressed to find someone in America right now who doesn't know somebody who struggled with this. So it's something that I think, you know, it's interesting because I think per particularly in urban areas, we are officially sitting here in San Francisco, don't see and feel it as much, but you get into rural areas in California. It's just the same as it is in a Hampshire. So did you come out to California? I for school was that kind of the first draw a now my ex-husband's from here. So we came out together after we got married and becky's and then evacuees in Washington, he grew up in Sacramento. And so we came out here when he joined the faculty. Berkeley. And was that what was that transition like because you've been in DC for identity see for about ten years, but I I actually come on here before I met him. I came on here on my own and I went to Stamford. I got a master's in education policy had been working in the White House. But at night I've been volunteering for a program DC that helped young people in in the high schools who needed tutoring. And I was very inspired by some of the inequality issues that I saw in DC. So I came out here to Stanford got a degree in education policy. So I've been familiar with the area, but it's really different than the east coast out here I've been here for sixteen years now, and I am a California, and I've got to California children. And I love it kids to kids. You said third grade and the same birthday and the same birthday tomorrow. Happy birthday to my children. Good luck this weekend. Wait. So let's go back though. Because you you said you were in the White House. So how did that like how did you kind of enter the political world? This was after undergrad is I did. So I went underground in Massachusetts at mount holyoke college a women's college. And then I got an opportunity to intern for Senator George Mitchell from Maine who is the Senate majority leader at the time. My dad helped me get that internship. And then I didn't I didn't have any money. And so I couldn't really afford to have an unpaid internship. So after college I actually started doing somebody bliss before the internet. So I volunteered at the White House. And I went in at four AM, and I did newspaper clippings and handed them out to the west wing. Folks, you do that was nineteen I graduate from college in nineteen Ninety-three and started volunteering that year so volunteers so his volunteering in the White House because the internships I couldn't afford to work during the day. I had to work. Oh, I see. I would go from four AM until about seven AM with the newspaper. Thanks, and then I'd go to my job by year later. They asked me if I wanted to apply for a job at the White House, and I got to do that. So sorry, I was just gonna say what's it like clipping all those bad article about your boss here? Here's what they're saying about. You know, it's so fascinating because it was such a different time. And I think sometimes I've taught law school in the past and people are surprised that you know, that we grew up at a time when there was no internet, even in the White House, the least to go when we get newspapers from all over the country and would look at the volley had to clip the major news articles. And then everything about the president. I'm in sometimes there were some pretty bad days, although it was nineteen Ninety-three. So the early days were good. Ninety six seventy when I came back after I got my masters in education policy came back to the White House and those were darker days. I mean, it was definitely the second term was hard and lots of raw emotion in the country about what the president was doing. And what we're trying to do. How did you and other women on staff during that era talk among yourselves about what was happening? You know?.

Hillary Clinton White House Gavin Newsom California Maine Sacramento Bill Clinton San Francisco WNYC Rutger bregman Professor Ellen winter Michael Krasny professor Marie Salah Scott Schaffer president AFL Ramos O'Leary
"rutger" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"rutger" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Very convincing to be honest. I hope this gets picked up. Harry. Handle the criticism. Kanye. Okay. So there is that's swearing and losing again. That's my question is the guys literally half a world away. He's on a little their little interview on a satellite like this. I've done lots of interviews. I I can say that I've never done that. I've had lots of L had plenty of bad interviews where things go badly. And you you just say, you know, this is over boom done and you walk away. But what's the deal with the meltdown? You got gotta f this guy and call how does that higher on the world? How does that even happen in this day and age? How does that even happen in this day and age express, your anger? Authentic. What's interesting because now we've got the backup. But yes. Tucker owned it that's part of the hashtag own it. I believe and he says that he apologizes for the vulgarity. So he didn't deny it. That's the first question. I always ask is it fake. And then he pulled the I'm sorry that what I said upset you. So Tucker admits it had happened. So it's not fake apparently or we can be but that'd be really three d chassis. But he's he's on it. So he says it's not fake it absolutely did happen. And then he says that he meant it with total sincerity. He's just sorry that he used swear words, so he's living in his his authenticity. What does the term for that live your authentic life because he believed it believes it therefore, it's true. Therefore, it's true. And it's okay. The only problem is used swearwords. Okay. So if he didn't call him an effing more on just most just a more on that would be okay starts, screaming tone defined. Okay. Well. Big difference. So Al Jazeera CNN of the Middle East state. Sponsored by the nation of Qatar. They're getting closer as I've always said on this program. It's usually not ideology in terms of I'm a liberal Democrat or on the conservative or libertarian. That's what most people are still in the in the the wound up on that Tucker's, a conservative therefore, I hate him because he supports Trump or Rachel Maddow. She loves Hillary Clinton. Therefore, I either like her, you know, this is the nonsense if you're thinking like that again, you're at a very low level y'all think of food pyramid. Is we always talk. But where are you on the food pyramid? That's the most important position you need to assess when you're doing your critical thinking if you're at the top of the food pyramid. Good for you. If you're a little bit lower little bit lower. But you have to understand that because that'll allow you to only you can only do so much until you can move up or down on the pyramid. So this this Dutch historian, what's his name Rutger Rutger? Yeah. It's a great name Rutger so Rutger he makes makes legitimate points. That's the thing. He really does make legitimate points. Aljazeera picked up the story. So now, we've got a Middle Eastern news agency state-sponsored doing this. They get close. They're getting closer to the idea that it's not about journalists who are you know, ideological a four Trumper against Trump. It's the money. It's the business model. That's what I keep saying. It's the business model. Go ahead. Oh, no. I've got on a voice to America.

Tucker Rutger Rutger Middle East Kanye Trump Harry Qatar Hillary Clinton Rachel Maddow Aljazeera America
"rutger" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"rutger" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"The only thing that the only thing that gives them credibility. The only thing that would give them not gives them. I don't wanna make the only thing that would give them credibility is evidence. Not their Sern Rutger concern means nothing if they could say, look, we know this crime was committed rhino this happened or this conspiracy happened to commit a crime. We know this for sure, well, here's the point there at an and I'll say this again be Tampa size it there. FBI agents. That's right there FBI they only work on evidence. Right. Not conjecture. No, not suspicion not demeanor. Not rumors not demeanor, not language not tweets, but not tweets evidence that a crime has been committed and they didn't have any. So the fact that they were concerned is does not give credibility to those Trump critics out there. It gives no credibility only evidence does. Well, it completely destroys any credibility. If they have any at all of them the cable saying that you know, he was concerned because that's when he started he says after director Komi was fired. He's the one that launched the obstruction investigation. Because he was afraid that if anybody came in his new boss, a new director came in. He he would make it. They would have to go out of the way essentially, and I'm paraphrasing. They would have to do a lot of work to destroy the work. He's doing on the obstruction case and make the entire case go away. Right. So in other words, I it's almost like the Evelyn Farkas thing we want to get to it all of our friends on the hill to make sure the incoming administration couldn't squash. That's basically what he was saying there in that interview that you're gonna see on sixty minutes on Sunday. Is that I wanted to make sure that the whoever was going to be the new director would would this would be in place before they got in there. Based on what based on what what I wanna see yet? The president had the legal ability and power to fire. The director of the FBI they ask that question on on sixty minutes. Because that's the only question where all the only question that you should be asking is what's your evidence? Right. What did you base? If you're talking about removing the president what was the evidence of wrongdoing, right? It somebody destroy files in if they say the dossier was, but you knew the dossier was faked by that time, right? You know, it was fake where's instruction aside from the firing of Komi, and that's not evidence because that was legal eight six six ninety redeye. We'll.

director Komi FBI president Sern Rutger Evelyn Farkas Tampa sixty minutes
"rutger" Discussed on Pivot with Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway

Pivot with Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"rutger" Discussed on Pivot with Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway

"Although I don't I don't. Love you. What happened in wherever the heck when he was test opping, the traffic bridge bridge gate. Yeah. I think he's a lawyer about that not all his people. Did it? I don't I think my win. Yeah. Governor christie. Okay. All right. My win is is historian Rutger bregman who called out the billionaires at Davos for not talking about tax avoidance, and he got back. They him and Winnie by EMA from Oxfam had a back and forth with someone. I know very well, the former CFO of y'all who can Goldman about it. Let's listen to Mr. bregman talk about this, very simple. Just stop talking about for them. For a start talking about Texas, Texas, Texas, we need to just two days ago. There was a billionaire. What's his name Michael Dell and he also questioned like Mamie one country where top marginal tax rate of seventy percent is actually worked, and you know, I'm historian United States. That's where has actually worked in the ninety. During Republican President Eisenhower, you know, the war veteran the top marginal tax rate in the US was ninety one percent for people like Michael del Este Tech's for people like Mike Elvis mortis seventy percent. I mean, this is not rocket science. I mean, we can talk for a very long time about all these stupid philanthropy schemes we can vibe Bono once mar come on. We gotta be talking about Texas. That's Texas, Texas, Texas, all the rest is bullshit in my opinion. So here he is making the salient point that we had it in this country for years. This is this is not and he love we can talk for a very long time. But all these stupid philanthropy, schemes, we can invite Bano once more that was my favorite. What do you think of this? He's he's the taxes taxes taxes. You don't like Texas..

Texas Rutger bregman Bono Bano Michael del Este Tech Governor christie Michael Dell President Eisenhower CFO United States Oxfam Goldman Mike Elvis Mamie seventy percent ninety one percent two days