35 Burst results for "Rust Belt"

Blue Moon (MM #3720)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 4 months ago

Blue Moon (MM #3720)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation at this point in life, having lived all over the country and being up there in years, I'm always amazed when I encounter some kind of products. I probably should have encountered earlier on in life, but didn't the other day. I read a story about Blue Moon ice cream. It's a product. Usually of Wisconsin. Sometimes hitting the Chicago land area, which of course, is where I came from, and it's an extremely popular ice cream. Original ice cream flavor. That was started by some Dairy years years ago. Now, they say Blue Moon, ice cream kind of tastes like cotton candy in a way. But the one thing Blue Moon is a part of its Superman ice cream. What she may be aware of a lot of Midwestern towns. I know, it started in Detroit, it's in Cleveland. It's in Columbus Ohio Chicago it's kind of in those Rust Belt. Midwest states. Superman ice cream being blue and red and yellow supposedly the Blue Moon. Ice cream is a part of the Superman blue. Something I'm fascinated about finding now and I may have traveled, North when travel gets a little bit easier, cuz you can get Blue, Moon ice cream up in Wisconsin. Well, I've got friends and family there. Who knows? Dead.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Cleveland Wisconsin Chicago Detroit Columbus Ohio Chicago Midwestern Years Years Ago Maison ONE Rust Belt Blue Moon Kevin Nation Superman Columbus Midwest Ohio
Blue Moon (MM #3720)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 4 months ago

Blue Moon (MM #3720)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation at this point in life, having lived all over the country and being up there in years, I'm always amazed when I encounter some kind of products. I probably should have encountered earlier on in life, but didn't the other day. I read a story about Blue Moon ice cream. It's a product. Usually of Wisconsin. Sometimes hitting the Chicago land area, which of course, is where I came from, and it's an extremely popular ice cream. Original ice cream flavor. That was started by some Dairy years years ago. Now, they say Blue Moon, ice cream kind of tastes like cotton candy in a way. But the one thing Blue Moon is a part of its Superman ice cream. What she may be aware of a lot of Midwestern towns. I know, it started in Detroit, it's in Cleveland. It's in Columbus Ohio Chicago it's kind of in those Rust Belt. Midwest states. Superman ice cream being blue and red and yellow supposedly the Blue Moon. Ice cream is a part of the Superman blue. Something I'm fascinated about finding now and I may have traveled, North when travel gets a little bit easier, cuz you can get Blue, Moon ice cream up in Wisconsin. Well, I've got friends and family there. Who knows? Dead.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Cleveland Wisconsin Chicago Detroit Columbus Ohio Chicago Midwestern Years Years Ago Maison ONE Rust Belt Blue Moon Kevin Nation Superman Columbus Midwest Ohio
"rust belt" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

07:22 min | 4 months ago

"rust belt" Discussed on On The Media

"On the media. I'm bob garfield as we've heard in the telling of arising healthcare economy. We must deal with the number of bewildering paradoxes. One is the orwellian. Newspeak that asserts employees are not employees and so largely unprotected by regulation and collective bargaining another. Is that on. The one hand from the manufacturing days healthcare evolved into an entitlement but on the other hand it is propped up by exploiting the labor of the very people made vulnerable by the death of manufacturing the median wage in the united states for nursing assistants fla botanists medical assistance and home health care. Aides in two thousand and nineteen according to brookings was thirteen dollars and forty eight cents an hour. Twenty eight thousand dollars a year just above the poverty line of twenty six thousand five hundred for a family of four this on top of brutal shift schedules and sometimes harsh working conditions gabriel wine and introduces us to a ups. Emc worker named neidl payton dilute painting has a medical assistant working for the university of pittsburgh medical center. She helps people call in make appointments and understand things. The doctor said laster other primary conditions. You hear from people about she said black lung and mesothelioma both pathologies caused by living in the kind of ruins of industrial capitalism. You know her phone rings and rings rings. There's no one but her to take those calls. The damage that one economy did set a bodies appearing in the form of mesothelioma. Black lung was now taking a toll on her body in the form of having to sit at her desk all day. Not able to go to the bathroom because she was trying to take care of those people. And furthermore she is in medical debt to her own employer so there was this process over the eighties nineties into the two thousand consolidation in pittsburgh big academic hospitals buying up a little ones. The insurer getting freaked out to the insurance holiday in the church is to buy hospitals hospital system by insurance companies that they try to each not accept payment from the other one to build these monopolies that is able to keep prices high. If you don't have goldplated health insurance as most working class people don't the toll of that is gonna fall on you. And it's not a perk that these hospital systems give to their workers. They get free care. That's not how it works at. They as much as anyone have to bear the brunt of these rising costs which them these kind of company store like debt relationships. Another paradox is the notion of communitarianism which you invoked at various points yet. Up health systems is something like a twenty billion dollar organization running at approximately a two billion dollar annual profit when community hospitals. They acquire run at a loss. Management shuts them down leaving the local community without services which doesn't sound very communitarian to me. What kind of beasts are these holding. Companies whom did they serve. And to whom do they answer. Ups's nonprofit as are many of the big academic hospital systems. Cleveland clinic would be another classic example. Which is off the biggest employer in ohio. Johns hopkins hospital system in maryland is again the biggest employer in its state. However these big non profit hospital chains have come to behave in very market conscious ways. They're very very concerned about accumulating and maintaining market share about having leverage over insurers and about holding wages down this out as they have shareholders in the same way as a for profit corporation. Might but it's difficult to figure out how to distinguish it from a for profit. Corporation is a storyteller. The book a new account has been hired one of the kind of more successful hospitals. He says his boss a. I'm looking at the count sheets here and you know she did something funny It looks like here is all of the revenue that were making beyond our costs. Is that what we would call prophet. His boss has no no no. That's not profit. That's net aggregate revenue after losses. Like that you can't says. I don't understand why we're using aim words and we can use one from wages to publicly financed debt to the dubiousness of growth as a measure of success. It makes you wonder the city that likes to think of itself as the miracle on the mananga hilo miracle. And you've heard someone say this right. Oh great now. It's had this recovery these all these young people do these tech companies are neighborhoods in pittsburgh where you can buy a sixteen dollars sandwich now to the broader thing that could getting at in your question. We are undergoing Polarization of the entire economy. There are some sectors that generate a lot of profit. You know attract a lot of capital but don't generate a lot of employment. You know in pittsburgh because the carnegie mellon. There's a glut of robotics in this thing and that's a big source of the city story of its own recovery but not many people in the grand scheme actually work in that industry not in this country so the industries like tech like finance that are major drivers of profit. Accumulation are not drivers of employment and the industries that are big drivers of employment like healthcare are actually not centers of profit. Generally speaking hospitals and nursing homes are actually pretty low margin operations so employment is on one side and profit and accumulation are on the other side and the two are not necessarily directly linked as we might once have thought if the trial. Emma you mentioned dictates that payrolls must be suppressed to achieve low unemployment and affordable public expenditure. How to d impale the health economy from the horns of the trauma. I think there's a lot we can do encouraging unionization you know. Raising staffing mandates improving safety standards is a lot that would improve working conditions and carrying conditions in the immediate term but until the provision of care is extricated from the logic of market discipline than the question of how to make either patients or workers or both pay for it is going to recur recur. Once you're talking about but we call de commodifying or socializing so large sector of the economy. I mean of trillion dollars here trillion dollars. They're producing. You're talking about real money. We're not really the same credit society anymore. After we do something like that that'd be huge sectors of the labor force shielded from the kinds of market pressure that have brought us the bloodbath of covid nineteen just to take the most recent example..

thirteen dollars neidl payton twenty six thousand ohio Emma two thousand sixteen dollars pittsburgh bob garfield maryland nineteen two twenty billion dollar both Twenty eight thousand dollars forty eight cents an hour trillion dollars mellon eighties nineties both pathologies
"rust belt" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

04:25 min | 4 months ago

"rust belt" Discussed on On The Media

"Have these.

"rust belt" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

07:38 min | 4 months ago

"rust belt" Discussed on On The Media

"The department rather than the whole factory. Even if you were accumulating seniority you are a long term employee. You're unlikely to be able to change. What part of the plant you worked in. And that created these racialized traps in the blast furnace hot and dirty and hard job in the open hearth which is a hot and dirty at her job and worst of all in the coke ovens with a baked coal to turn it into fuel with disproportionately work that was assigned african americans and also african american workers because it couldn't get out of these undesirable departments when there is a cyclical downturn. They would be the first out in the last to be hired back. And if i understand your book correctly the unions were complicit in this absolutely so organizations like the uaw or the steel workers. The united mine workers would accept african american members and sometimes embrace them. They supported civil rights nationally at the political level. But they didn't really want to disrupt discs small-scale pattern within the plant of who got the good jobs and who didn't get the jobs white men who had good jobs more or less want to be able to pass them down to their sons they certainly didn't want the integration of the seniority lines at their work. Really enough african americans inside the union to disrupt that politically so straightforwardly. We discussed earlier. How the cartels grip on the global market created a spiral of higher wages and higher prices and higher wages and so on. isn't that more. Or less the definition of an inflationary cycle. Yeah so if you're gonna organize working class prosperity through attaching large groups of workers to big kind of monopoly employers than this is a risk that you're gonna run into an already in the late fifties. You see the strange thing happen where inflation is starting to go up and at the same time unemployment starting to go up and those two things are supposed to be opposite supposed to be one or the other. Now we know that phenomenon in the seventies later as stagflation right it came back in a big way but it's kind of intrinsic feature of the new deal state the public private welfare system. Add these big industrial corporations. That were it's private sector component. This is a structural fault. In that system meantime another kind of inflationary phenomenon. Steelworker families really leaned into healthcare. Now the work was taxing as you've said dangerous and the environment was foul. But does that entirely explain the medical gold rush of the fifties sixties and seventies. No it doesn't so is a couple key things first of all. I think it's actually hard to overstate. How significant it was for people who you know. Did backbreaking work all day long felt cast off and look down on treated like mules and different ways that they could go to this kind of modern house of science. That is the hospital and you know. Have someone pay attention to them and take care of them in an effort to reduce healthcare us. One hospital doesn't experiment trying to enroll people in getting mental health services. You know some kind of therapy and seeing does that affect how much they use the rest of the healthcare system and the answer is yes actually. So there's reason to see the healthcare system as a whole doing kind of social work for this population but it's also important to say. Steelworkers were at their most numerous at the time of the korean war and their numbers diminish steadily that what that means is that young men have a harder and harder time getting into industry because of the seniority system therefore the workforce is getting older over these decades. And so you have. These people who have is really good. Insurance who increasingly an elderly population had the social needs and had these health needs and that drives very intense use of the healthcare system in nineteen seventy nine at the end of this cycle. The pittsburgh region generated one point six inpatient days in the hospital per capita that year. That's about triple our national rate today. So all these seeds have been planted in the economy and the culture from healthcare consumption to fiscal policy to racial segregation to the devaluation of non-industrial labor to the patriarchy which seeds maybe didn't fully germinate till the steel economy began to erode. How did it look the beginning of the beginning of the end. Well you know i. It didn't look like anything much. Union president would look at the numbers he would say. Gee there are. Fifty thousand fewer steelworkers this year. Where five years ago. But it wasn't for quite a long time that people start to realize something. Profound is changing and has already changed. Denial ran high. But then in. September nineteen seventy seven. Just across the border you know hieaux it. All began to accelerate in young town and nearby campbell. They have a name for the day disaster struck they call it black monday happening after working for so many years to believe that. We're put out on the street and don't know what we're gonna do. Between nineteen seventy seven and about nineteen eighty six millions of industrial jobs lost in places like youngstown pittsburgh the us steel corporation announced. Today that it will close all or part of more than twenty of its plants in cleveland. Now myra new york trenton. New jersey and three towns in pennsylvania johnstown shift ler amperage basically kind of localized great depression. That happens. I mean unemployment rates rise up to twenty percents whole communities are devastated really profoundly in a very short period of time. Your dream has been turned into the american nightmare with john. Manley reagan up the population which has been already aging and also shrinking as the leave. That speeds up really intensely therapy increases in homelessness in a couple of these steel mill. Towns suicide rates double depression rates. Alcoholism domestic violence all of these kinds of indicators of social distress are increasing very rapidly in one thousand nine hundred president. Ronald reagan offered some choice words of consolation. How could the major employer in the town the very lifeblood of the town close its gates and lock its doors. This was as inconceivable as the town itself closing down but we know the plant can close no matter how essential it is to the employees and the townspeople. We know that america's economic strikes change and grow in different directions sometimes without regard to the people who serve the old industries. There's just call the free market. And it's what gives our children and their children and economic future reagan's message. Steel workers was always learn to code. Basically keep up the question of whether or not the steel mills could have been kept open. Should've been kept open.

New jersey cleveland Ronald reagan reagan Today Fifty thousand five years ago September nineteen seventy sev myra korean war this year seventies later first about nineteen eighty six mill late fifties two things pittsburgh african american today more than twenty
"rust belt" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

05:05 min | 4 months ago

"rust belt" Discussed on On The Media

"From wnyc in new york. This is on the media. I'm bob garfield. You can't not start with the tallest building in pittsburgh. Pennsylvania the old headquarters for united states. Steel it's a black monolith symbol and fortress of industrial power soaring in the now pristine pittsburgh sky above the confluence of three rivers. But it's vista has changed. Gone is the golden sulphurous as gone or the belching smokestacks blazing furnaces and slag lined river valleys. Snaking along the appalachian foothills the industry that sustained a region girded the world infrastructure and underwrote a now vanished. Way of life has long since cross oceans. These are unemployed laid off steelworkers in the naga. Hilo valley the area around pittsburgh. There was the birthplace of american steel. These workers are angry because they are losing their place. In the american dream decades into this new pittsburgh the vanished vanished mill jobs and vanished industrial working class persist in the american imagination back in march joe biden used pittsburgh last hall as a backdrop for his infrastructure plan and it's good union jobs and then again in his address to congress there is simply no reason why the blades for wind turbines can't be building pittsburgh instead of beijing. No donald trump who lied to the coal belt about reviving the moribund mining industry use the city to define what america first is all about pittsburgh not harris and john kerry stumped here in two thousand four he invoked depression era poet langston hughes. He said let america be america again. Let it be the dream that it used to be for those whose sweat and blood whose faith and pain for those whose hand at the foundry something pittsburgh knows about for those whose plow in the rain must bring back our mighty dream again but they were all seeing ghosts. Steel city is now healthcare city representing almost one in four jobs in the region. Some ninety two thousand of them work for just one employer scrawling omnivorous university of pittsburgh medical center u. p. m. c. Whose logo now adorns the black skyscraper sentinel of the three rivers. But this is not just a case of a clean economy. Displacing filthy one to historian. Gabriel wine it author of the next shift the fall of industry and the rise of healthcare in rustbelt america. The story of economic transformation in pittsburgh is the story of disparity of wealth income and political power. That did not vanish. When the smokestacks came down as we shall see it was a metamorphosis that has so marginalized those ninety two thousand hospital workers that their employer has claimed they're not employees at all ghosts too. It turns out in this hour. We'll explore with wine at the saga of to pittsburgh's reveals in rim detail. How america has strayed so perversely far from its founding. Promise gave welcome to win the media. Thanks for having me nice to be here. We're going to approach this. As a story in three acts beginning with steel it was an industry built on minerals like iron ore limestone and coal and hard labor folklore celebrates a hearty croat named joe maggie. Who's last name translates to jackass in. Croatian and who the story goes only knows how to work into like a donkey. Dogging what was the work like the absolute first thing you have to say. It was hot was dangerous filthy. One of the guys came up and took his goggles off in. The skin came off with it because there was so hot we would come out of that thing. Hey we completely a coal mine and stuff that gotten all into my skin around my privates and everything that he got in. And i had to go to the doctor because peeling one of my friends died yet recently from the inches if he got a role seen on fell on him from a crane and.

pittsburgh donald trump new york john kerry harris Pennsylvania congress One bob garfield Gabriel united states Hilo valley joe biden america ninety two thousand hospital w wnyc ninety two thousand two thousand langston hughes first
"rust belt" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

03:18 min | 5 months ago

"rust belt" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"The number.

"rust belt" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

08:08 min | 5 months ago

"rust belt" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Were really high. Everyone who spent the whole career is steel mill. Sakai harp harld as you head injuries themselves. Typically and there's just an intense form of ilya nation that came from you know being this kind of provider breadwinner figure who had to kind. Keep your family going And knowing that this was kind of honorable in her roic thing to do is everyone saw it and you feeling miserable all the time so get a lot of people who work these jobs. Whose dads were these jobs. I mean they'll tell you about all and domestic violence in these kinds of things it was. It was not an easy life by any stretch And underlying all of that. His last thing i'll say about it other. All of that was the fact that it was gradually always falling apart economically so that of work reached its peak in nineteen fifty in nineteen sixteen with smaller than it wasn't mentioned. Fifty nine hundred seventy. It was smaller than it wasn't hundred sixty and on and on and so even back in the golden age already. Were wondering starting to wonder got. You'll keep this job you know. Am i going to be a fulltime next week where it was this week insecure. You always eating away at the edges and you gave us a sense of the proportions of how many people work in the healthcare sector now in these communities. What was that proportion like for. Say the steel industry Back in the day. Yes sir pittsburgh and fifty a steel was about twenty percent. The ball of all jobs show similar level to healthcare around now manufacturing in general but more than that but but steel and metal production about twenty which is very high very intense degree of specialization. Right i mean every fifth person you're meeting more or less is associated with that all right so Let's talk about what happened. In terms of the development of healthcare this story about truman making heading into to sort of pushing for universal health care and the unions. Creating What is the term. I wanna say trajectory but like a determined path for where on some level. Some of our our. Our fate was sealed here because unions were trying to just basically provide for these type of of workers yes wants to generation has a fight over health insurance. Basically political level happened in the nineteen ten. Nobody remembers that anymore and it happened again in the nineteen forties which was president You know in the war was over. They thought they were going to continue the new deal. Basically right they had established social security unemployment insurance decent these kinds of things and turn their attention to healthcare thinking. This was next and treatment big battalions of social support for doing this is main base was a new industrial unions at this time. We're really dynamic. Growing exciting militant people really identified with them That's the united auto workers. The steel workers united electrical workers. Big unions of manufacturing workers mine workers. And you know a bunch of different factors came together to stop that from working. Our basically. they're trying to achieve what we would now call medicare for all And you could summarize it. Basically the onset of the cold war made that harder to do for various reasons that you know the rising tide of anti communism Kind of be back that effort Let me let me just stop for a moment. So what's interesting is there. There was a ideological almost not just a question of big entrenched interests at that point but it was more of an ideological. Is that right or is it. Just the big entrenched interests had an ideological as opposed to like sort of a political economy type of of both going on gives him the big entrenched interest in this time actually is the american medical association Who you know organized medicine. Today are actually much much weaker than they were to. Target at doctors having this kind of sway but organized medicine in the forties very strong and was very conservative And in alliance with kind of anticommunist you know increasingly kinda mccarthyesque politics was able to beat this back And you the union movement itself was undergoing serious turmoil as you know increasingly internal conflict along the same lines right. The mainstream unit unions pershing the left wing unions and having civil wars and things and through all the labor movement saw gila. We're going to keep our name on the paper. Saying we support medicare for all but seemed like it probably not gonna happen. Let's let's get health insurance out of our players and auto workers. Steel workers in the minor is also pushing in the late. Nineteen forties for their employer is to cover their members and that basically is where employment based health insurance comes from in this country. I mean that's how it became a widespread phenomenon. Was these unions build these private sector. Well clear states further on members and this is like increasingly. Part of your story is about this sort of public private welfare state that gets developed It's also the case with prisons on some level too. I guess So the the you have now these this private Sort of welfare state that is developed because through union dues and what is that grow into and and and then how does that relate to this story. Yeah so over. The basically in the late forties negotiate these plans at over the fifties and sixties these players get good workers are on strike all the time in the fifties and sixties in the big industries and their coverage starts. Toge- becomes a today. Oh my god. I never seen anything like that Folks who had parents iranian industries will remember this And you know they use the hell out of it. You know they have this really powerful kind of access to a certain care and very understandably. I you know working class people are like i can go to the hospital and told me to leave mistake for two weeks. You know exaggerating a little bit but not by much This however causes the costs of character is Inevitably right Yeah there's boom working class market. In industrial cities hospitals think we should expand. We should build a new wing. We should buy new equipment We should jack up prices as that happens. People who go have been through their unions they start the priced out of the market and in particular. If you think about who is that right. It's not the wealthy 'cause they could just by their own access. What kind of working class. People aren't gonna have access. It's pouring employed. Who are kind of below the union standard at the elderly. Who are retired. Are out of the workforce so that leads to the pressure for congress. Passed medicare medicaid begging sixty five. That's basically where that comes from And once a late sixties you have medicare and medicaid and the private sector collectively bargain plans functioning together You have this massive stream of income into the healthcare industry Through what calling the public private welfare state the other key part of this same before. Yeah they use the hell out of these plants but in particular I mentioned earlier. How you know every decade or is it. A fewer and fewer steelworkers as community goes through deindustrialization. It gets older right. Young people sensitive is not going to be opportunity. Leave and this big cohort of steelworkers. You had in. Nineteen fifty-eight are pushing.

two weeks next week congress this week Today late forties Nineteen fifty-eight cold war fifty both about twenty truman today nineteen forties about twenty percent fifth person united electrical workers Nineteen hundred united auto workers
Inside The Russell Wilson-Seahawks Rift

The Lead

07:14 min | 7 months ago

Inside The Russell Wilson-Seahawks Rift

"Years russell. Wilson has been wanting to throw the ball more and at the start of this year. It finally happened russell. Wilson was not good in the first half of the twenty twenty season. He was excellent deep cap touchdown. Seattle you run down there and set in his answer. Any better than that was fourth in yards per attempt. Weeks one through nine i. In passing. touchdown percentage was second in passer rating. Wilson keeps as default talk. He was legit. The best player in the league madden gave him a ninety nine overall rating during the season because he was cooking notion as he throws an accident. Edi feeds defensive player of the years like russell. Lula's legitimately the best guy in football games of the season then week nine arrived and they had this game against the buffalo bills that you recently wrote about. Can you tell us what happened in that game. And afterwards what happened is russell had to cook in the kitchen. Just kind of just caught on. Fire his paycheck wine with a sack at a takeaway from russell wilson. I actually watched that game with a former cr defensive and cliff april and teased talking me through it. And he's like russ's off he's trying to do too much and i think turned it over like four times. He threw a pick on the goal. Line throws for the jordan with tyco. I think that really turned the tables for the whole team. After that loss where they gave up forty four points and turned it over a bazillion times and got embarrassed in buffalo. Well what i would tell you that. I don't recognize that game. We haven't seen the look like that and it's a game that i don't have any place in my brain for. He told us he didn't even have any space in his brain for that game. That's very important subjects right like the fact that he considered that not seahawks. Football was influential the rest of the year. Well the following week against the rams things. I guess only got worse. Wilson throws and the other one four darius williams second game. I know that there are better days ahead. I'll use a baseball now but sometimes you go up to the plate you know and you don't have your way today mike. You and our colleagues. Mike sando jason jank's wrote about a meeting. That happened shortly after that loss to the rams can you take us inside that meeting room and just explain what went down russia's meeting with the coaches normal game planning type of meeting and he has suggestions he is giving input usually does and his suggestions just weren't dismissed. There were dismissed in a way that russell didn't feel appreciate it. And i think that is really important. I'm sure they disagree in every meeting ever but in this particular instance rust belt that he was not being appreciated so rushed stormed out was basically this idea that. How dare anyone in this building. Be dismissive of my ideas. I am of the quarterback was almost like kevin durant warriors when he was like no way up. I'm kevin durant russell wilson and he rustled perceives him to be someone who has succeeded. In spite of what's been around him not because of running for his life making the pro bowl with battle lines perceive that to be like the story of his career. And you get to week eleven. And it's like do. Just chill out. We got this no. You don't don't get it. I got it and that forced him out the door. Russell in the second half of the season was which is not himself like he was twenty eighth in yards per attempt in his final eight games he was sixteenth. In a touchdown percentage nineteenth in passer rating. These are bad numbers. These are not just like below average twenty nine yards per attempt man that was lower than the cincinnati bengals. Even when the circumstances are bad around russell he's been good enough to elevate situation still played inefficient level and twenty twenty was the first time it was like. Wow he's not able to elevate the lack of talent or execution of preparation around him and it produced like some of the worst numbers of his career certainly produced the worst playoff game of his career against the rams in the wild round sitting meeting big. Who's going into other sack four sacks two takeaways the interception return for the touchdown and floyd now all right. Let's fast forward a few weeks to the super bowl. The seahawks have been knocked out by the rams in the wildcard round and russell. Wilson is at super bowl. Fifty five in tampa bay sitting with none other than commissioner. Roger goodell mike. Tell us what you found in your reporting about russell. Wilson's experience at the super bowl. You know it's really interesting. Because i tweeted during the super bowl. That antonio brown caught a touchdown from tom brady in front of russell. Wilson there is the pass for the touchdown. What drive a super bowl. Winning drive that brady's only done throughout his whole career. I kind of just said it like star cast the as a joke. Not really thinking about how russell fell and then as our reporting i was like okay so i i was right like he is really upset. And it's so many factors. There is the fact that tom brady is in. The super bowl is the fact tom. Brady's they're playing pine. A good line is the fact that tom brady is playing in a system. That gives him some atonomy like got to pick players gronk. Antonio brown is the fact that mahomes is there again laying for again in a system that like essentially like his talents. The last time also played in the super bowl loss of tom brady seven years later prime many years. Tom brady's back. I suppose in a soup. Kitchen fuming so during the superbowl. He's texting his quarterback coach. And just close. Friend jake heaps. He's a local radio guy. Here jake to set it on the radio. He's talking about how russ was missed during the game texting him. They'll look the he had was in reflective of the text messages. I was receiving russell wilson. Just ultimately the overall sentiment was that he was mad that he was not lying in this thing and then russell spoke to the shortly after the game show. What's up with our line. You see that. Winning requires a good line and the gist of peace response. As far as i was told is about faith. And just you know we got this. And that just wasn't good enough for us

Russell Wilson Russell Wilson Rams Darius Williams Mike Sando Jason Jank Kevin Durant Super Bowl Seahawks Lula Buffalo Bills Tyco Tom Brady Madden Russ Seattle Mike Buffalo Jordan
Trump Rule Allows Natural Gas Transport By Rail In Dense Areas

Environment: NPR

03:33 min | 9 months ago

Trump Rule Allows Natural Gas Transport By Rail In Dense Areas

"The us produces so much shale gas it needs to find new markets overseas. The trump administration has approved moving a liquefied form of the gas by rail. But some say that is too dangerous. Susan phillips of member station. whyy reports on a route. That would be one of the longest in the country. The guests will go first to a new plant in northeast. pennsylvania where refrigeration units will chill it too negative two hundred and sixty degrees fahrenheit. That's how it goes from a guest to a liquid. The part of the plan that scares a lot of people is the transport two hundred miles by truck or rail through some of the most densely populated areas of the east coast to a planned export terminal in new jersey. Vanessa keegan lives nearby with her family including three year old. Theo thank you want to take a picture. Okay you gotta get mommy ipad. We take another picture right. Era go railcars. Full of highly flammable liquefied natural gas or lng would roll about a block and a half away from keegan's home a daycare center sits right at the company gate so they want special permits to transport them right there. That train track. You could skip on down to in about a minute and a half and that terrifies me. This project is part of a larger push to export natural gas last summer. The trump administration changed long-standing federal policy to allow rail transport of ellen g anywhere in the country fifteen states including pennsylvania and new jersey challenged the move saying it puts people's lives at risk in this rust belt reason of new jersey. The export project does have support from building trade unions and powerful state lawmakers including assemblyman. John bursa kelly. He says grandfather worked at a former dupont plant on the site of the planned export terminal. That's will create jobs as it once did contribute to tax base as wants to be an important economic driver for people to make a living in fear families. I says safety issues should be raised and addressed but he says railcars carry much more hazardous materials through the region every day. Ray mentzer is a chemical engineer at purdue university who spent his career on ellen g projects for exxon mobil he says specially designed containers have a good safety record but he says transporting the guests through densely populated areas increases the risk if there's a leak. It's not flammable until it's vaporized but it's going to bait rise pretty damn quickly and then it's going to seek an ignition source. Believe me it will find an ignition source. Pretty darn readily mentor says. A vapor cloud would definitely catch fire. If i was at a town meeting and i lived there i would want to know. Just what routes are you going to us right now. The exact roots are unclear. Multiple attempts to reach the developers of the project. New fortress energy went on answered if the overseas export terminal gets built. None of the guests will go to power new jersey homes instead the state is planning a large coastal wind farm off atlantic city to help new jersey reach the goal of all clean energy by twenty fifty

Susan Phillips Ellen G Vanessa Keegan New Jersey Whyy Pennsylvania John Bursa Kelly Theo Keegan East Coast Ray Mentzer Dupont United States Exxon Mobil Purdue University Atlantic City
What the Election Taught Us About the Latina Vote

Latina to Latina

04:06 min | 10 months ago

What the Election Taught Us About the Latina Vote

"A majority of latino voters did vote for joe biden and comma harris. They played a critical role in states like arizona like nevada. The played in pennsylvania part of my theory of what happened. Is that because florida went. I what happened in miami dade set the narrative about let the nose around the country in the eyes of people who don't know our community is that well and we're providing a lot of that analysis and it then became a wave of headlines that took what was a part of the story. Because i think there are two story. There is both the truth. That latinos turned out in incredible numbers for democrats and the truth. Donald trump made inroads among some communities within the latino community. Both things can be true. They didn't weighted equally in the way that we talked about it. But i also think most of the national media is based on the east coast. So there's a tendency to see things through that lens. Miami comes in first. Miami is wear people tend to think of a power center of latinos. Being latinos in miami are much more powerful than latinos elsewhere. But then when you step back is your sanely. The majority of latino voters are actually not for out there. They're all over the southwest. they're also in the in. The rust belt made a difference not only in pennsylvania. I think also maybe even in wisconsin and we tend to forget about those places where we tend to gloss over them really easily and i do think a lot of that has to do based on where the national media is based. Let's talk about what did happen in arizona because that story provides such a narrative counterweight to what we saw happening in florida. Especially because it was a story ten years in the making you have to go back to senate bill ten seventy which was known as this. Show me your papers law and came at the same time period. Sheriff joe arpaio Huge anti immigrant sentiment within the government of arizona and all these young people some undocumented themselves some not took to the streets they did tons of protests and they started to organize there. Are i would say half a dozen organizations that came out of that era that now for people to vote in arizona knocked on doors to get people out to vote. Sorta sold the messaging to get people to vote not just for biden but for people down ballot. They were really trying to flip the state legislature and a lot of these organizations by the way are not big. Joe biden vans. I mean they like biden better than trump and they certainly wanted to get trump out of office but it was much more about getting trump out of office than voting for biting. It's what a lot of people have called a one time biting coalition that the group of people who voted this time joe biden or not going to be there in four years in the same formation because donald trump will not be on the ballot which means the democrats are gonna have to reconfigure a lot of their strategy while next. The florida story matters not for the national narrative this election but the fact that they were so off in what they thought was going to happen in florida from the democratic side that they lost so big to trump. I mean even those of us who were covering it at new. That trump was to do better than he added. Twenty sixteen in florida etc. The he did so much better than people thought with so many many more places that it was real devastating blow to the floor democratic party. In so that just reinforces your point that. Where does the party go from here. Because this was such a sort of unique set of circumstances. Nationally and in the st louis makes it look bleak for the future of democrats.

Comma Harris Miami Dade Arizona Joe Biden Florida Pennsylvania Donald Trump Miami Nevada The East Coast Biden Sheriff Joe Arpaio Southwest Wisconsin Senate Legislature
US 2020 Election: Trump wins Ohio, Biden wins New Hampshire

CRUSADE Channel Previews

00:32 sec | 11 months ago

US 2020 Election: Trump wins Ohio, Biden wins New Hampshire

"Trump did win. Ohio and joe biden took new hampshire on tuesday while the president took the all important florida and some other battleground states remain too close or too early to call the calls were the first and only in an election night. That is many experts. Warned had been far so slow to yield results. The critical rust belt states like pennsylvania and michigan are expected to be slower to count and release results. While georgia officials have announced a delay in vote counting in the state's largest county which includes

Joe Biden Donald Trump New Hampshire Ohio Florida Pennsylvania Michigan Georgia
Don't expect a call in the presidential race anytime soon as Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin process votes

BBC World Service

02:18 min | 11 months ago

Don't expect a call in the presidential race anytime soon as Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin process votes

"Election is hanging in the balance, with the outcome dependent on a handful of battleground states, where the results may not be known for days. President Trump has just said that as far as he is concerned, he has won the vote on any attempts to frustrate that victory would be taken to the Supreme Court. He presented no evidence for his claim. This is a major fraud in our nation. We want The law to be used in a proper manner. So we'll be going to the U. S. Supreme Court. We want to all voting to stop. We don't want them to find any ballot, said Four o'clock in the morning and add them to the list. OK, it's It's a very sad It's a very sad moment. To me. This is a very sad moment and We will win this and a CE. Far as I'm concerned. We already have. Mr. Trump hailed his victories in Florida, Ohio and Texas as triumphs and predicted further success in Georgia and North Carolina. He also hinted Pennsylvania would fall to him. Mr Trump's challenger, Joe Biden could still take Arizona on crucial states such as Wisconsin and Michigan in the Midwest. Speaking to supporters, Mr Biden said he still believed he was on track to win the election wouldn't be over until every vote had been counted. You know, we could know the results as early as tomorrow morning, but it may take a little longer. As I've said all along. It's not my place or Donald Trump's place to declare who's won this election. That's the decision of the American people, But I'm optimistic about this outcome. Of the election Now on a knife edge, John. So Opal reports from the White House. America seems to be heading towards a nightmare scenario where, after a divisive campaign, it could still be days or weeks before the country knows who's won its presidential election. A blue wave that Democrats had hoped for failed to materialize. And it all looks on a knife edge. All seems to hinge on the old rust belt states of Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and Michigan. Those states have not declared on final results may not come until Friday, and then there's the possibility of legal challenges. This election has resolved nothing so far on North

U. S. Supreme Court Mr. Trump Mr Trump Mr Biden Donald Trump Joe Biden Pennsylvania Wisconsin North Carolina Ohio Midwest Georgia Michigan Florida Texas Arizona White House John America
The final countdown: What to expect on Election Night

World News Tonight with David Muir

03:44 min | 11 months ago

The final countdown: What to expect on Election Night

"Tonight we are on the cusp of one of the most uncertain election outcomes in recent history after the most heated campaign season in memory the pandemic and the economy are defined the candidates closing arguments to an electorate that's extremely polarized but also energized more than ninety three million. Americans. have already cast their ballots. We could see one, hundred, fifty, million Americans vote this time. That's never happened before president trump in five battleground states today all once he took four years ago now. Fighting to keep them telling supporters a quote. Great Red wave is coming former vice president Joe Biden campaigning in Michigan yesterday with former President Obama trying to rebuild the Democrats Blue Wall of Rust Belt States Pennsylvania is the most important of them. Biden is in all three there today a new ABC News Washington Post poll from Pennsylvania Shows Biden with a seven point lead but the president is promising a come from behind victory. We have reports from both campaigns and from key battleground states and ABC's White House correspondent. Rachel. Scott leads us off in Detroit Michigan. Tonight president trump in an all out push five rallies in five states he needs to win again to stay in the White House vote the big thing you gotta go Tuesday the president, predicting a tremendous election day turnout and today his campaign advisor Jason Miller falsely suggesting votes counted after election date would be illegitimate if you speak with many smart Democrats, they believe the president. Trump will be ahead on election night, and then they're going to try to steal a back after the election Democrats have argued in court that ballots postmarked by election date should be counted. Many state laws allow that but president trump continues to insist a winner must be declared that night. We should know the result of the election on November third the evening of November third. That's the way it's been, and that's the way it should be. But the reality though news organizations often project winners on election night the final tallies in each state aren't certified for days. If not weeks more Democrats tend to vote early than Republicans and officials say those early votes may take some time to count in key states like Michigan that could. Decide the election and it's more important that we get a count that as accurate. Then account that is fast and might not be accurate. The president started his busiest day on the trail yet here in Michigan State that was decided by just under eleven thousand votes in two thousand, sixteen, two days from now, we're going to win the state of Michigan again. In Washington township in crucial mccomb county, the line started hours before he arrived cars bumper to bumper waiting to get in overflow parking nearby cornfield. He is the one and only guy that has had the guts to stand up for what this country was based on just afternoon the president was off to his second stop Iowa. And their signs it will come through for him. Again, trump holding a seven point lead over Joe Biden, and the latest demoing register poll were very happy with Iowa. Thank you very much. But nearly every national poll. The president is behind in recent days even. It could you imagine losing to this guy? Could you imagine on defense in his final blitz stopping in? North Carolina, Georgia and Florida to over and over again, the president downplaying the coronavirus rounding the turn on a pandemic we're rounding the corner. But after the nation had a single day record in corona virus cases, Dr Anthony Fauci warning the country is in for a whole lot of hurt in the coming months telling the Washington Post, you could not possibly be position more poorly.

Michigan Biden ABC Pennsylvania White House President Trump Joe Biden Rust Belt Jason Miller Washington Post Mccomb County Rachel Detroit Donald Trump Barack Obama Scott Washington Township Cornfield Iowa
Trump's Scattershot Campaign Strategy

CNN Political Briefing

03:17 min | 11 months ago

Trump's Scattershot Campaign Strategy

"Trump continues to behave in a way where he simply seems in search of rationale for his candidacy and a closing message. It's really an astonishing thing to observe how Erratic House scattershot his messaging has been. We know that to be true over nearly four years of covering a trump presidency that he has the tendency to do that. There's always the stories with the blind quotes of Republican allies of the white. House just wish Donald Trump would talk about the economy or would stay on message Donald Trump is who he is. We all know that he's not going. To Change, he is committed to this notion of grievance politics. That's his whole sort of reason for being in the political realm, and yet he does have a proven political gut an instinct of where he can go to find pockets of support. So it's amazing to observe him trying to throw everything against the wall and seeing what sticks this close to the election I mean that's one thing you can do earlier on. But when you are within two weeks, you've got one more debate ahead of you and then just rally after rally to try to drive home a message. You want to be locked into what that is. That is not where Donald trump is I mean just take the storming out of the sixty minutes interview or cutting short or whatever he did with Lesley. Stahl in tweeting about that, what what is that that is not going to accomplish his political goals here and here's the thing Donald Trump knows it. He knows he's in a weakened position he was in Erie Pennsylvania last night, and once again, he said the quiet part out loud before the plague came in I had made I wasn't going to Erie. I've been. Honest. Go Way I was coming I didn't have to we had this one and then we got hit with the plague the had to go back to work hello weary at least. I mean, just imagine there's the president of the United States going to eerie Pennsylvania telling them. They would never have seen him if he was in a stronger position than he is but here he is yes to actually work for it that his closing message right now today's been tweeting about the economy's who maybe for a moment he consumed some television news analysis that he really should be talking about the economy. It is the one area of strength. We see in poll after poll for him, and yet that has not been where he has centered his closing message inexplicably, and we have new evidence to show that what he's doing isn't working we have a brand new. CNN. In Pennsylvania and one in Florida in Pennsylvania a state critical to Donald Trump's success for years ago. He's down ten points fifty three to forty three against job Biden. This is the Tipping Point State folks and he is Badly behind at the moment. Now in Florida as we see across the whole Sunbelt, it's a different story. It's a margin of error race. We've got Joe Biden at fifty percent and Donald trump forty, six percent in this poll, but it is a race at the margin of error with no clear leader. Consistently, we see him behind in that critical upper midwest rust belt, and if he can't turn that around, he's in serious trouble and that kind remark, an eerie Pennsylvania that's not going to help.

Donald Trump Erie Pennsylvania Stahl Erie CNN United States Sunbelt President Trump Florida Lesley
Political Ad Nauseam

Planet Money

09:04 min | 1 year ago

Political Ad Nauseam

"As much as campaigns want to keep spending secret federal law actually requires TV stations around the country to disclose all the political ads, the campaigns by and those TV ads account for something in the ballpark of sixty percent of campaign ads. Spending a lot of the rest is stuff like Google and facebook ads at those companies actually don't have to disclose as much information about the ads. So today we're going to focus on. TV. Spending the majority of the spending. So think of the United States as a giant game board to campaigns walk around the board they put some of their ad money down this part. Of the country a little bit more over here, and the way they put that money down tells us what places they think are most important for winning the election. If you're looking just at the state level, the bronze medal goes to Wisconsin Sixty, four, million dollars, worth of TV ads they're not surprising. Wisconsin was one of those states that trump flipped from the democratic column back in Two Thousand Sixteen Silver Medal Pennsylvania with one hundred, seven, million dollars worth of TV ads also not surprising Purple State with twenty electoral votes and in first place with one. Hundred thirty, three, million dollars America's favorite election meltdown waiting. Oh Florida, my beloved Florida. Now, this is just are beginning calculation. We're going to dig in more, but there are lessons to learn just looking at the big picture the big campaign game board. Yes. So so take Florida this is not a monolithic place. You're going to have super republican areas like the panhandle and then big democratic areas around places like Miami and you might imagine that the most. Cost effective thing is for the Republicans to completely pull out of the democratic strongholds and vice versa. But in fact, neither political party is doing that the whole state is getting bombarded with ads from both sides Daniel. Butterfield. From the Super PAC PRIORITIES USA she says it can start to turn into something like an arms race. So when you see your opponent spending money in a market, it really raises The question of should I be spending money there to to keep up area competitive and if you want to understand why political spending just keeps going up, it's at least partly because of his arms race if your opponents bins more in, Tampa you have to spend more in Tampa which in turn makes the cost of ads in. Tampa that much more expensive. Next thing you know you blue one. Hundred thirty, three, million dollars in Florida. Danielle says, the arms race thing is not just irrational fear. There's a real electoral cost to waving the white flag in a particular area. If you're in an ad market and your opponent clears out, that is great news for you. You have the airwaves to yourself. Your advertising goes a lot further in terms of impact than if you have to opponents that are. Driving opposite messages is there like a particular tipping point to that that sort of campaign folks like you gotTa. Spend the twenty percent otherwise. Like what counts as as not being drowned out. Good? Yeah. There is actually a lot of areas some data behind like what is the particular percentage that is required? It's I'd say that's probably more of a secret sauce that I wouldn't necessarily WanNa name on this podcast for you know that numbers, you're just tell me. I I. Know. Roughly what percentage I think is useful is, is it twenty three percent? You got it. But okay. So fine lots of money being spent in Florida but this is not a very specific answer to our question who is the most expensive voter we want to be more granular, which is why we got her hands on a more precise data set. Thank you advertising analytics. This data set is GonNa let zoom in on every single television market in the entire country. So for example, we know that forty million dollars has been spent in the Orlando Daytona. Beach Melbourne market. Compare that to the grand rapids, Kalamazoo Battle Creek Michigan market where it's twelve million dollars and sure there's more people in Orlando but still, how are the campaigns arriving at exactly forty million and exactly twelve million to help answer that we brought in some help Michael Beach. CEO. Crushing Media Michael Runs an advertising analytics company now, but he has worked in the past for the presidential campaigns of George W Bush John McCain Mitt Romney, and the reason we wanted to talk to Michael is his whole job. is to figure out where companies or sometimes political campaigns should place millions of dollars. Worth of ads Michael has all this fancy proprietary software. If you're an advertiser, he can tell you whether you should be focusing your ads on like Republicans, with Minivans are Democrats ride motorcycles or neither. He's got all these different attributes in his computer thousands of attributes for. Anything from certain partisanship to likelihood to buy a Ford truck into those do those specific categories correlate. Yes and no it like it's pretty geographic if you're looking at northeast, Ohio or you're you know. You're in Alabama in the Senate race. that. Wouldn't be a probably a good signal. Reich is like. As owner everyone drive structure. Now, the reason we went to Michael is because we thought it might be interesting to look at how many dollars were being spent on any given swing voter swing voters in theory are people who might be influenced by a political ad. The problem is it is very hard to pin down exactly how many of these people are out there but Michael Software can at least take a stab at it what is GonNa do is go through all these data sets to first identify how many likely voters there are in a particular TV market and then identify which of those has even the tiniest probability of changing their vote and a lot of this calculation is just sifting out the diehards. If you are somebody who voted in the last five, Democratic primaries were every year you donate to the R. N. C. You are out. But maybe your party affiliation switched a couple of times. Maybe you're a first time voter that may put you in this bucket the basically using generic party model and generic it's party not not candidate. Driven in other words, we're estimating voters chances to swing between Democrat and Republican as opposed to trump and biden specifically. But there's still does give us a way to compare across TV markets and when you re ranked the country based on dollars spent per swing voter the markets are not in Florida. In fact, the top five ad markets are all in Pennsylvania and number one on that list where campaigns are spending around ninety dollars per likely swing voter. Is My home television market the region in western Pennsylvania in and around Erie Pennsylvania. Okay. So Kenny you grew up there like what is it? What is the what are we talking about just to be clear I grew up in Meadville which is south of Erie, but it's in the market and like yeah, this is a region with a lot of manufacturing jobs these jobs have been leaving. It's predominantly white its having the. Same kind of brain drain problem that a lot of the other parts of the so-called rust belt are having. But look like I don't know anything about who a potential swing voter would be in the Erie television market. This is why we have Michael's fancy software. It can help us understand who that is. What can we know about the Eerie Market area? How does it compare to the rest of the country? Like who's there? It opened up my magic machine here. Michael Punches Eerie plugs in a few numbers so it's running. Then he opens up a tab that lets us compare the Erie population as a whole to just the likely swing voters. So now I look at in. Eerie. For instance, the average adult is fifty three years old if you just take the whole population in the market. Target, audience if you said. swing likely to turn out is forty seven other words. Michael's machine is telling us that the average swing voter is is six years younger than the average, their forty, seven years old, and the other incredible thing about Michael's machine is that it's also able to spit out this whole media plan for how to reach those people. The machine can name the single TV show watched by the most swing voters. Each week that show in the Eerie area is the OT on Fox football shows or wrap up of the day's games. That'd be fair. that is one of the most watched shows in the entire country. But the numbers do show that in terms of efficiency like sports would be a pretty good way to get your ad in front of a decent chunk of swing voters in Erie Pennsylvania Espn you can reach sixty percent on eerie and a week. Again, this target in this market if the secret to understanding what the campaigns are thinking is to learn where the most money is being spent per swing voter. That place

Michael Florida Erie United States Wisconsin Two Thousand Sixteen Silver Me Tampa Pennsylvania Google America Michael Beach Facebook Michael Software Michael Punches Orlando Daytona
Has Scott Morrison spent too much?

Between The Lines

09:41 min | 1 year ago

Has Scott Morrison spent too much?

"Me. If you've already heard me mention this but one of my favorite quotes during the covid crosses a pdf the guardian. This is the British lift wing newspaper. Now, this was the heart of the coronavirus crisis. It would have been light much quote just as there are no atheists on a sinking ship, there are no free marketeers during a pandemic. Now, the author of that apt quote Jonathan Freedland, he was referring to the audio logical revolution within the British conservative. Party. Now, according to Freedland Boris Johnson's his have defied four decades of thatcherism small-state free-market, thinking I to spend staggering amounts of money and then subsidizing the wages of workers. Could the same thing be said about Australia's Liberal Party they're the party of Howard and Costello now embraces big-spending high deficit government interventionism. And is a permanent state of affairs poor kilis editor at large of the Australian US pipe and Judas Brit is emeritus professor of politics at Latrobe University poll judy welcome back to the show. Hristo Paul, you've written to calms about this subject in the past week, summarize your faces. Will Martha is that all parties and all governments have to respond to the times in which they find themselves on display in Australia. Now we face an extraordinary economic crisis and the response reveals the nature of Scott Morrison, his prime minister and the Mars and government. So Morrison, not responding as Liberal Party progressive or is it Liberal Party conservative? He doesn't see himself in those terms his responses pragmatic selects able and practical. He's not inhibited by former policy and audio logical icons of the Liberal Party. Say What we say is the government has abandoned the long-term syllabus aspirations. It's A. Big Spending government it's a government government intervention focused on Keynesian demand management. It does however on the Liberal Party tradition of tax cuts will see next week. So it's prepared to regulate or deregulate according to the situation according to what's required. So to sum up say that Morrison wants to be defined by results and outcomes not philosophical principle. Okay. You mentioned the tax cuts leaving that aside traditional liberal governments are about balancing the books Paul, how much an as do you think aries in the Liberal Party about in the parliament and outside about these handouts to preserve jobs and livelihoods? Are. I. Don't think there's much on these at all OPTIMA and Tom. and. A couple of reasons for this if there is to be on, he's He's will come through the down the track, but essentially what's happening here is to govern is following the Orthodoxy or what you might call the new Orthodoxy in terms of meeting the financial and economic crisis. So roller response is sort of radical. It's also conventional. The official family is working together very closely. The Treasury the Reserve Bank, what the government is doing is essentially supported by private-sector economists. It's in law and with Patrick amended by the VCD and the IMF not the cabinet is very nodded, the Prime Minister and the treasurer are working very closely together so far the results look good. I think the Overwhelming sentiment on the back benches. Support, the government strategy in the hope that this gives individual employees, the chance of actually being reelected and my will give the government the chance of being reelected. So the reinvention of Australian liberalism is on full display with this budget judith break you agree with Paul Kelly about the the audio logical significance of these changes but actually think the government had much choice in that sense I do think we can see something audio logical preferences in a couple of the policies poor mentioned the tax cuts they've chosen tax cuts over for example, committing to a permanent increase in new act now co Job Seca. They've also, for example, if we look at the way, they wanted to stimulate the housing market. They've gone for giving money to individual owners rather than, for example, embarking on a social housing project. So I think in some of the means, we can still see some of the ideological preferences of the Patty. One of the things I've wondered when I've been watching the events unfold. If Labor had won the last election was in government with the Liberals have supported the same levels of spending or would they have if you like stayed in the sort of ideological bunker bean and attacked the blow out of the deficit? I mean, it's a hypothetical. In some ways I think we've been very lucky that it's been the liberals and the coalition in government because they can sense being able to Ghana much more support. I, think than I have been able to do for the same levels of spending but isn't cameras response to the COVID crosses more consistent with other Western governments during the pandemic Judy. Yes that's what I think. I had much option but the question is if the coalition of being opposition, would they have supported a Labor government going? You've written a lot about this have many many decades about when orthodoxies or overturned. It's usually bipartisan is that you'll since if the coalition cypher argument's sake wherein opposition I would have gone along with this big spending interventionism. Look are essentially agree with what Judy's said about this I think in a sense we're. Fortunate, if you liked that the coalition's in government because it's taken all the big spending decisions. and. Lay has been prepared to go along with back. In fact, it's argued that there should be even more spending. So in that sense, we've had a broad degree of thought-out ship within the economic framework. It is hot the typical of course to tron speculate about what would have happened if alive had been in office doing this but I do think that the coalition in opposition would have been tempted to make caught a lot of criticisms and to suggest that the spending had gone too far. There's a big difference for party thing in government managing across and being an opposition. Cape with this theme of a political realignment among center right parties around the Western world. If you think about Donald Trump in two thousand sixteen, he tapped into widespread anxieties. America's rust belt. What can class constituencies? Boris Johnson showed last December, he resonated with traditional British Library voters in the Midlands and northern England. Judy. Do you think that Morrison in a wise doing the same thing here in Australia? Now, I think they're very different sorts of crises. I mean the pandemic is an external. Crisis, it's not being caused by politics in any way it's not back nationalism versus globalism or any of those things, and so I don't agree with that. I agree with what Paul was saying earlier that Morrison's shown himself to be pragmatic and quick footed in this and I think we're lucky for that. But I I don't think that this lines up with bricks and with trump's appeal to the rest spilled poor Kelly. Well I think conservatism is changing if you look at. America Britain Australia and there's not a dopey getting very significant changes into servitude. Thought. Different changes argued very strongly that there are very substantial differences between Donald Trump and Scott Morrison. I think people who argue that. Morrison is a pilot version of DONALD TRUMP MAUREEN DOWD in the New York Times by the way, but go on. I think. I think turned him mentally misunderstand the situation I. Think the change in conservatism is very dramatic in the United States. If you'd like because we've got the transition from Ronald, Reagan who a generation ago was the great conservative champion, and now we have Donald Trump, who if you lock is a populist conservative? And that transformation is simply enormous install ending content I mean trump violates all the virtues of conservatism in terms of restraint prudence disciplined respect. Regard for the political system, he thrives on division. So he likes all the traditional conservative norms, and then when looks at his policies. Well he's sabotage the global trading system. He's an arch protectionist. He's engaged in this trade war with China he's appraised dictators and suspicious about. So I guess one of the Fundamental Christians here is the extent to which trump is an aberration. And the extent to which post trump American concert is we'll have to try and create a new position cognisant of the damage that trump has done to the traditional Republican Party

Government Donald Trump Liberal Party Scott Morrison Hristo Paul Australia Freedland Boris Johnson Jonathan Freedland Judy Paul Kelly United States Republican Party Prime Minister America Optima Covid Latrobe University Treasury Martha
Trump signs order targeting undocumented immigrants in the US census

Bruce St. James and Pamela Hughes

03:24 min | 1 year ago

Trump signs order targeting undocumented immigrants in the US census

"So the undocumented immigrants to the president tried to I have a question about citizenship added to the census, The Supreme Court said that it couldn't be not that it could not be done. It couldn't be done the way that the president wanted to do it. So that was nixed from the census. Now the president is saying that what they want to do is they don't want illegal aliens to count toward the citizenship or toward the numbers in a district when it comes to when use move. Congressional seats around how seats are dictated by population in the census changes it every 10 years. Arizona has gained seats since I've moved here 25 years ago. Because Arizona is growing. It's the fastest growing place in the country for a while. Both Maricopa County and then Harris County, where Houston, Texas is where the two fastest growing counties in the U. S. Maricopa County has been the leader so far this year. The desert Southwest is a new destination for people. So the growth in Arizona will continue. I believe as well. Our neighboring states of New Mexico, Nevada, California, Southern California's always been very populated. But these other places we're going to see growth, which means those congressional seats will migrate from some of the states. Where population has been falling. Now it was called classic with Rust Belt in the Midwest. But we're seeing other states in the northern US people are migrating to the cooler states. And let's be honest. Arizona is a very tax friendly state next to Nevada, which doesn't have a state income tax that also plays a role. So all that being said we should. In the next census, we should gain at least one house seat in Arizona. And where we get that from? I don't know, but we should get one at least one. But how will this affect if they cause right now? How do you How do you count Illegals? Because if we're not counting them officially in the census, how do you know how many people in the state are illegal? Now? Let's be honest. If you're talking about congressional seats, let's drop the racial aspect ofthe of immigration. The immigration issue legal versus illegal Dropping the racial issue for a moment because again it gets to be very emotional, and I understand it. It does seem logical that when you're talking about the migration of house seats, it would be based on voters. It would be based based on families of voters. So when you are seeing the numbers of families moving here with people that are citizens in the U. S. They're voting families whether the kids aren't voting, but the parents are Wouldn't that make sense that you would be counting people that were citizens because they're the only ones that have the availability to vote? Do the census once every 10 years. So if your child is eight, they'll be voting age the next time that the census is taken So It seems like a logical thing to do, But it's going to get challenged in court. There's no doubt about it. And the question is. How do you make an accurate count of that? How do you accurately count the number of people in the country illegally? This, of course, is going to become one of those big racial issues and I I don't think that it should. But there's no doubt that it's going to But I've always thought we do a bad job off, making a distinction between legal and illegal immigration, which is what clouds the waters on the issue.

Arizona President Trump United States Maricopa County Supreme Court Nevada Midwest Houston Harris County New Mexico California Texas
Obama's Trump attacks electrify Democrats, anger GOP

This Morning with Gordon Deal

04:38 min | 1 year ago

Obama's Trump attacks electrify Democrats, anger GOP

"It Barbara Bahman has spent a lot of time on the sidelines because he didn't want to take an active role in the democratic primary but since Joe Biden clinched the nomination Obama's back Obama's going to take an active role in the campaign and he clearly has a pretty big interest in seeing Donald Trump defeated president trump has been a big critic of Obama trump pushed the birther conspiracy theory as president trump has tried to roll back a lot of Obama's initiatives and I think it is beautiful sort of failing Obama that he was replaced by trump the trump is the successor so Obama has really deviated from the sort of normal post presidency being quiet about your successor practice and that's really going to be enhanced as Obama tries to get his former vice president elected to the White House that trump has not exactly been a shrinking violet in terms of how he's dealt with Obama either he blamed Obama for a lot of the problems with the stockpiles that would need to deal with the corona virus he's he's saying that Apollo sensually spied on his twenty sixteen campaign and he's called him grossly incompetent so we've seen a sort of trump Obama proxy war happening in this twenty twenty campaign even though Obama's not gonna be on the ballot himself from a strategy standpoint Barack Obama didn't get Hillary Clinton to the winner's circle four years ago what I guess what makes this time different yeah that's that definitely how a lot of Republicans feel about it but it isn't that big of a deal Obama gets out there that it probably if anything kill over shadowed by mail point out that Biden is most hello to the speaker is much older yes Sir Obama couldn't drag Hillary Clinton across the finish line in twenty sixteen and he wasn't very good in getting down ballot Democrats selected even while he was president I mean the mid term elections both of them while he was in office for disasters for Democrats Democrats what's the tone of state legislative seats closer thousand while he was president and so there is a case to be made that discovered matter very much now Democrats are hoping that it draws a contrast with trump in which trump looks like this raging sort of maniac compared to No drama Obama and Obama was able to win in two thousand eight twenty twelve because he put together a coalition that included much higher turnout among minority and millennial voters and we've typically seen and that was how he not only wanted two thousand eight but about a much more competitive race against Mitt Romney in twenty twelve and and Joe Biden need help turning out those voters and they're hoping Obama can do it at that but that is the key Obama's appeal in the past not seen that transferable to other Democrat we speak with Jim Antle politics editor at the Washington examiner his piece called Democrats think Obama helps Biden draw a contrast with combative trump the C. reference that that divide with regards to the ages of voters last time around what about the rust belt voters who switched as you point out from Obama to trump four years ago but certainly another thing that Democrats are looking at because you know trump won in large part because he was able to turn rust belt states that have been blue since the eighties read again and there were a number of voters in the state we backed Obama in two thousand eight twenty twelve who voted for Donald Trump in twenty sixteen and because those are voters that Democrats are really targeting this time as they try to turn the Michigan Pennsylvania Wisconsin try to turn them blue again they want Obama to see if he can win back some of those voters for Joe but now some of these are white working class voters who are turned off by possibly even though they did vote for him in his collections and so there is a limit to what you'll be able to do but to take them away from trump and when the back to but but some of these people do have a history of voting for Obama and therefore Democrats hope that if he's out there campaigning for button even if it's only partially because of the pandemic that that's

Barbara Bahman
"rust belt" Discussed on Swing Left - How We Win

Swing Left - How We Win

11:04 min | 1 year ago

"rust belt" Discussed on Swing Left - How We Win

"Swing left's field director for Wisconsin Illinois and Minnesota the big three welcome Jarrett. Thanks for joining us today. Let's Talk Strategy for having me on. Yeah so what is our strategy. And let's start with Wisconsin. And and why is it? Part of swing left's superstate strategy. Absolutely so as I spoke. No SWING LAPSED. Is Targeting Twelve superstate. This election cycle the twelfth safe. That are GONNA have outsize importance on our ability. Democrat to take back the White House take back the Senate and to end the most egregious. Republican gerrymanders now Wisconsin unfortunately will not get a shot at a Senate again until twenty twenty two bites. We'll look at the White House. We know the story about Wisconsin. Right. I'd gone to The Republican nominee president since the eighties since Reagan Two Thousand Sixteen. It was part of that. We thought was a blue wall. Michigan Wisconsin Pennsylvania that trump was able to carry by a combined. What like eighty thousand votes And so you know. Two Thousand Sixteen. We nearly lost Wisconsin. Twenty three thousand or so votes which is about seven tenths of a percent and so we know that Wisconsin is scarily. Deathly close In terms of the presidential election We also know that it's really really important if you look at. How do we win the Electoral College? It's hard to envision. A strategy where Democrat is able to lose Wisconsin and still win the Electoral College. It seen by many as as a tipping point state and. I think I think that's you know I spent a lot of my time trying to focus. Focus on how they're interested in. Wisconsin is the egregious Republican gerrymandered maps. Which we have a chance to in in twenty twenty one if we can when the right set of of elections and the state legislature this year back in two thousand and ten Republicans gained Unified Control Wisconsin state government for the first time in decades and they use that new power to enact. Maybe the most egregious gerrymandered electoral maps in the entire country. They set up shop in this law firm across the street from the Capitol Building Brought IN REPUBLICANS. One by one made them sign. Nda's let them view only their district map. Put the maps out at five o'clock or later that on Friday. Evening voted on them. First thing the next week Democrats never really hardly got chance to see these new maps before they pass And the maps that ended up being enacted. I mean the the words to describe them or not fit for a podcast families but suffice. It this one so fair enough to say you know just to sort of paint a picture for what we're up against here in Wisconsin in terms of the math that we're trying to to put into two thousand eighteen With big blue wave right Democrats won every single statewide election in Wisconsin for the first time in forty years. Wow If you add up all the votes that Democratic candidates for state assembly got and you add up all votes that Republican candidates for State Assembly Democrats won about fifty four percent of all votes cast in the state assembly which is our version of the House of Representatives and our state legislature right. So Democrats won. Fifty four percent of all votes cast They want every single statewide election and for their trouble. They ended up with thirty six of ninety. Nine seats in the state simply. So that's about thirty. Seven percent of the despite winning well over fifty percent of the vote to so in the spirit of being a family show. I just want to say that is some both. Yes it Brat I mean that's the nicest thing to say about it and so that's not just you know obviously the state legislature but even for folks that look at Wisconsin and the mass there they should be concerned about our us house maps as well. If we had fair maps in Wisconsin would be at least maybe one two. Maybe three or four more competitive. Us House and so. That's what's what's on the ballot in Wisconsin in November. That's what we're sort of focusing on. And that's why swing left is is targeting Wisconsin As one of the Super States because delivering Wisconsin Is going to have an outsized impact on our national politics? Not just over the next four years over the next ten years. Yeah it's it's so important and the power of working in these local legislatures Can't be understated. Just for the longevity of this movement. We're building Building our power the way that. Republicans have been able to in such a disciplined way for decades but also as you mentioned Wisconsin such an important presidential state and when you invest in some of these smaller races it pays dividends up the ballot two so Howard pupil what are you doing on the ground? How can folks plug in absolutely? That's a great question. So I'm an organizer. Some four of course too hard ask for our listeners. Nice automatic to match most of our listeners are not within a couple of hour drive of Wisconsin. So it's been less is raising money for The most important state legislative seats in Wisconsin. Now the TAK taking the approach in Wisconsin and in twenty twenty isn't necessarily take back the state legislature. You guys heard the numbers earlier it is going be. It would take a Herculean task to actually flip the state legislature. However we have a democratic governor in Wisconsin and he can veto gerrymandered maps. Only if his veto power is protected And because of the GERRYMANDER Republicans are within three seats and he's the state assembly of the State Senate of creating a veto proof majority. Which would allow them to override. A veto by Governor Iverson. So folks can donate money to a slate of seats that we're targeting both Democratic Defense Asleep as well as Republicans that we think might be vulnerable so that we can at a minimum protect government. Uber's veto hopefully go on the offensive. A little bit to set ourselves up for for twenty twenty two and so for folks outside of Wisconsin and one of the easiest things that you can do is to donate to the swing left. Flippable states fund We are raising money actively for those most important state. Legislator Braces folks Are also writing ton a ton. A ton of letters into Wisconsin We had all sorts of Letter Writing Campaign that folks from California to New York and everywhere between I've been participating in to help us registered voters in Wisconsin tells us make sure that voters are activated around the election that they are committing to being a voter all those things. We're talking hundreds and hundreds of thousands probably at this point of letters into Wisconsin and a lot more to go and so another way that we can have an impact on fair maps in. Wisconsin is to flip a seat on the Wisconsin Supreme Court on April seven. Now that's that's really interesting. Yeah that that. That's something that people don't think about getting involved in especially right now and everyone's talking about presidential primaries you know there's a Supreme Wisconsin Supreme Court seat it's pivotal. That's right that's right. It's held by conservative judge. She was appointed by Scott Walker We have a good pro democracy Challenger This election is pretty. Well set up For the Progressives candidate not certainly far from the guarantee It's worth noting that in a Supreme Court election last April the progressive nominee lost by five thousand votes Which is insane And so we know what these elections how these elections team go but as it so happens the Democratic primary in Wisconsin the same day as as the judicial election. So folks can help out there. So That's the thing that folks can do remotely. They can phone banks election or they can can give money as as well to progressive candidate. Joel Hausky then for folks that are that are here in an around the Wisconsin. Area my region right. I work with folks in Wisconsin as well as our border states. Two of our border states. I should say And in Illinois and Minnesota and what we're doing is trying to sort of do that work together on the ground to build progressive grassroots power to contact voters and to build a movement that will set us up to win in a month for the Supreme Court election in eight months or seven months. Whatever it is and until election day in November and then not just that but instead of stop once we have fair maps crossing fingers and twenty twenty two to retake the state legislature to reelect governor everts and kick Ron Johnson out of his Senate seat And so what? That work on the ground is partnership partnership partnership working with our our good buddies from the Democratic Party of Wisconsin. Are you guys are GonNa Talk to you in a few weeks here? All about the incredible organizing back the den Party is doing that. The State party that gets it. They are investing in the grass roots. They're investing in local teams to build a sustainable progressive movement. That has been lost in this state over the last decade that has such a proud progressive history and they were working with progressive grassroots groups in the state. As well as I've gotTA SORTA GIVE A shutout system Bruce In and around the Chicago Land Area and individual coalition of groups swing left groups unaffiliated progressive grassroots groups. Look LOOK DIM club. All of whom recognize what's on the line in Wisconsin who are busting their butts To get themselves up to Wisconsin to help the Democratic Party contact voters And make sure that that we are getting our people registered motivated and ready for the elections that we have both in a month from now and of course the big in November. Yeah that coalition that you all are working together as a group as different groups towards the same goal is so important so definitely people in driving. Distance should be part of that drive on over. Get SOME CHEESE KURDS? Knoxville doors registered voters and injured a supper club. There you go. That sounds like the perfect sounds. Great Jared thanks for you know you are so incredibly busy. I don't know how you found. Even you know five ten minutes to talk to us but thank you so much. Thanks for taking time shape. You guys. spotlighting Wisconsin Of course also states are important. I'm always going to be biased. And think about in in Wisconsin right. Well it's it's a very important state so there's a good bias there but yeah but they're all important. Yes you're right yes. We Love our children equally. But we love Wisconsin about all right. Thanks jared hope to talk to you again soon. Grabbing me out yet take care..

Wisconsin legislature Supreme Wisconsin Supreme Cour Wisconsin Supreme Court Democratic Party of Wisconsin Wisconsin Illinois Democrats Senate Supreme Court State Senate State party Minnesota White House House of Representatives director Democratic Party Jarrett
"rust belt" Discussed on Swing Left - How We Win

Swing Left - How We Win

13:13 min | 1 year ago

"rust belt" Discussed on Swing Left - How We Win

"That would make a big difference as well so those are some things you can do as well as passing The House Bill. What now's new one provides for Voucher. So the the the Basically every American Has a chance to contribute a little bit to political campaigns. And that would be a great step forward all outside of citizens united and what you're talking about in part is one of the reasons. I think why people who are concerned about this are so intent on flipping the Senate but also you know given the Senate that we do have in. How hyper partisan everything is. Do you think that it would be possible today to get a transformational bipartisan? Bill through the Senate. It wouldn't be easy After they continue to gut the Senate and it's impeachment powers in the trump impeachment. It gets even worse But look if the Democrats can take over the Senate I think the world's going to look a lot different to some of those Republican senators and there are some few who I think might say you know what. Let's let's try to do this. You know took John McCain and I seven to eight years of trying to get people to come along and we finally succeeded and passed an important piece of legislation so somebody and we did it under Republican Senate a Republican House and a Republican president and a majority appointed Republican Supreme Court. So it can be done but it has to be bipartisan. And hopefully it will begin After this election this year things go and reasonable direction. Of course it would help enormously. If a new president was in office. You know by the time. This interview airs. The Senate will have certainly voted to dismiss trump's charges and he will undoubtedly be even further emboldened to do whatever he can to win reelection in this whole process Just pin foundationally depressing Where where do we go from here? How can we restore our citizens faith in our institutions and even the rule of law after this whole process unfolded? What we're just. We've been put. We've dug a huge hole. The society has no. I mean first of all. The Supreme Court was stolen when justice? Scalia died by Mitch McConnell. They stole it. Yeah and now they're destroying the Senate itself by gutting the really sacred constitutional powers regarding impeachment. We have a president who not only believes that he can do whatever he wants but will do whatever he wants and you know whatever happened to political courage. Whatever happened the idea. is as was said by Edward R Murrow that we are not descended from fearful men. We should add women and yet the senators who go with this. Who Don't have a real impeachment trial they're fearful of Donald Trump. They have no guts and they are willing to sacrifice our constitution for their own political future said and I also just knowing what we don't know and all of the documents and witnesses that have been Prevented from coming to the public. I we don't know how many of your former colleagues and current occupants in the Senate are implicated in this to you know it's not just a cover up of Donald Trump but certainly we see love. Parnassus picture around a lot of these fellows and women so I mean they made me directly implicated but if not their implicating themselves by not having a real trial there. It is not an exaggeration nor is it disrespectful to say that they are part of a a basically criminal cover up and You know you know you can say look. You should be ashamed of yourself. You should think about your legacy. I think they should think about the fact that in fact they're part of a criminal conspiracy. Well we have very little faith in hope in in the current Senate rain now the Republicans but we do have hope when it comes to the twenty twenty election because that in a place where volunteers and voters can make a big difference. So let's talk about your State Wisconsin. I used to work in Superior Wisconsin long time ago. Yeah we're up there. I worked at a Karaoke Uvira. A lot of fun town. That would do good curiel. Definitely but Wisconsin is such an interesting place to watch politically. How do we win Wisconsin? Well you have to appeal to voters in the kind of area. You're talking about northern Wisconsin and superiors very democratic town. But you know a lot of people used to vote. Democrat decided it would be a good idea to vote for Donald Trump. I guess they didn't like Hillary Clinton I guess they like for the brutal appeal. That trump had was phony but his talk about jobs and the things he talked about. Maybe had an appeal. We cannot win Wisconsin unless some of those individuals many of whom voted for Obama but then voted for trump Come back and vote for the Democratic candidate so that is what I'm really hoping is that the candidate is somebody they can live with and that they can get away from this exhausting and embarrassing reality that we have basically a fool in a monster for president. That's all we have. I mean I don't use that kind of language. Usually I don't believe in using that kind of language right when the shoe fits wear it and in this case that's what we have and I can't believe That the people that I met up over the years really want to continue with this with this horrible attack in our system governed by a president who doesn't care about this country and only cares about himself. Well you you want a lot of elections in Wisconsin over I guess. Twenty eight years In both the state Senate and the Senate what were the issues then have? They changed now. How has the demographics of the chain of the State Changed Since you're active there well. Some of the demographics have changed In the state is is more diverse than it was. When I first came into politics there are people from many different ethnic racial backgrounds in the state that are not only In in the big cities but around the state. And that's an interesting and in my view It's been a very positive and exciting development for the state on the other hand I I would say the two biggest issues really Over time are still probably the biggest issue the biggest issues when I did a town meeting. And every one of the seventy two counties every year was healthcare. The other one was job. Loss due to unfair trade agreements. I voted against all those trade agreements. Well I'm before people started You know basically taking the snake oil from from Donald Trump. I was pointing out even to Democratic President Clinton and Vice President Gore that these agreements Nafta and others. We're going to take jobs out of Wisconsin. And that's exactly what happened so those issues continue to be got issues and to the extent. Democratic candidates are able to show that they will really take these issues seriously and do something about it that will help to see Donald Trump in Wisconsin. I know there's a lot of is on Wisconsin from what I understand. The prevailing wisdom is if Wisconsin can go blue than Michigan. Other states are are more likely to go blue as well. Yeah I think the most likely connection would be Pennsylvania Michigan Wisconsin but another possibility. Because it's not just. The Upper Midwest is Florida if we were able to win Florida and there are some poll showing at least Biden and maybe others ahead there That would be another way to win. You know naturally I hoping that the upper mid west comes to its senses and says wait a minute why would you want this Corrupt person to be your president anymore while we got to talk to a lot of people up there and got a knock on a lot of doors senator. You are a champion for environmental protection and biodiversity. It must be so infuriating to see an administration in power that is actively rolling back regulations. That were put in place to protect these things in preparing to destroy our environment in the process. Well it's devastating. I come from the Great State of Wisconsin that was always known for we used to call conservation and one of my predecessors. Gaylord Nelson was the senator that invented Earth Day and yes administration has gutting the Ah Dangerous Species Act Gutting the migratory bird protections. They're cutting the clean water act. They're rolling back Protected areas. And that's why I'm pleased to be involved in a movement and an effort that really tries to go around this and that's the international effort to do something about the crisis in biodiversity. So I'm working as a sort of honorary ambassador for the Campaign for Nature and the Campaign for nature is a group. That's trying to get the a treaty that was created at the same time the climate change treaty to to really have some teeth and what the goal is is to is to answer the fact that the scientists are telling us that over a million species maybe going extinct in the near future and that we are at a tipping point in terms of protection of animals and and for US and other aspects of our natural environment they say that at a minimum. We have to protect thirty percent of the planet by twenty thirty so the Campaign for. Nature Through hand. You're we use and others is trying to get as many countries as possible when they convene coming China in October to sign this thirty by thirty goal for the next ten years Very similar to what happened in Paris. Climate Accord and I'm especially working on the African countries because I've done a lot of work there when I was a senator and as a special envoy for President Obama to Central Africa Congo. But it's an international effort that People can get involved in And and it connects with the climate change issue. It's different than the climate change issue but it is an absolute essential thing that we stop the destruction of our forests oceans And our Nash Natural Areas. Yeah well obviously the most pressing an exponential threat that we have tried That often gets buried in other compelling news and but you mentioned people can get involved and help out. How can they do that? Contact and Campaign for Nature See Campaign for Nature Dot Org and Offer to help This is you know what whatever country a person might be. This would be great. One of the great ironies is at the United States is the basically the only significant country in the world. That isn't a party to the treaty because of Jesse Helms and others killing treaties back back in the early nineties but citizens here can indicate that the United States really does want to be part of this and in fact I was able to get a bipartisan letter. Signed a lot of former Republican senators and Congressmen as well as Democrats urging That this thirty by thirty strategy be endorsed so we're trying to create International acceptance of this but also grassroots support for this so you know young people holding protests are rallies like some of the climate change people connecting it with this Connecting with climate issue. There hand in hand. That is something people can do visibility in the hometowns explaining to people. What the crisis and biodiversity and the extinction crisis is all about. That's amazing that's great Campaign for Nature Dot Org and we'll put a link on our page about that as well. Thank you so much of course and one final question that we we want to end with on a on a high note hopefully is what gives you the most hope for twenty twenty well. I think we might be able to win the election because in the end I think people know if they vote for Donald Trump. I mean maybe last time. They thought he wouldn't win or how bad he be. They know they're voting for basically a criminal. Somebody who has violated the laws of the country. And we'll do it time and time and again and somebody who is exhausting our system. I mean why is it that we had this impeachment trial? It's nonsense to say political reasons. It was done because these congressmen had no choice. But to to do something about this and look all the time and Resources. We're not talking about bio-diversity we're not talking about the climate. We're not talking about healthcare because everything revolves around this one awful person and I'm hoping that people say you know I've had enough of this. That's my greatest. Hope that they're they're just sick and tired of this. Well I'm sick and tired of it. I really had enough of it. So we'll keep organizing and I'm excited to see what we can do. Wisconsin your home state because it is. It is a very important state for us. Antastic right keep up your work. I appreciate Senator Feingold. Thank you so much bye..

Senate Wisconsin Donald Trump president senator President Obama US Hillary Clinton Republican Supreme Court Senator Feingold John McCain Supreme Court Edward R Murrow Michigan Republican House President Gaylord Nelson Jesse Helms
Why Michigan is the next big Bernie Sanders-Joe Biden battleground

America First

02:59 min | 1 year ago

Why Michigan is the next big Bernie Sanders-Joe Biden battleground

"That is that it's not over yet but it's not looking good for Bernie Sanders and his socialist revolution let's just put it that way it's out he's got it he needs a miracle to come back in and win this thing in the end it or don't have a shot at it he needs to do really well and a lot of these upcoming states he doesn't have my chart margin for error and the reason for that is is that what happened in the a few days after South Carolina was the Democrat establishment coalesced behind Joe Biden really quick and it's pretty clear deals Joe Biden's wouldn't on super Tuesday the DNC machine gave it to on they took it for granted I'm they gave it to him so there's a few things that happen in the lead up to super Tuesday that are really important Terry McAuliffe the former governor of Virginia former DNC chair endorse Joe Biden that means the whole Virginia machine got behind that's why does Clinton though he was outspent by eighteen million dollars by Mike Rosenberg so Clinton's hatchet man Hillary Clinton hatchet man have a cold AF send the message and and then in that in the state of Virginia McCall's machine went to work but I didn't did but barely any campaign events are spent barely any right in Virginia so it's like how the hell did he win that big sorry I didn't mean to say that that that bad everywhere here but how the heck did you win that big of a race on hi I'm fine in in Virginia to the point where Bloomberg didn't even get any delegates after spending eighteen million dollars there Bernie did get a handful of patents out of Virginia but that it wasn't just for Genya Beto Rourke came in from in Texas the genesis machine came in Amy Klobuchar who dropped out at the urging of the party al there's the behind the scenes people the Obamas and so on and so forth I I came in for I'm in Minnesota in Massachusetts Elizabeth Warren the supposedly leftist progressives socialists who really it doesn't actually believe in what she puts forward is more loyal to the party establishment that she is and to the ideas she supposedly espouses and she just dropped out today but she stands in Massachusetts that blocked burning in Massachusetts and in Maine Rodney near nearby neighboring Maine and so on biting winds all these states that he probably should know one and Bloomberg really under performed across Italy he's got already and now warrants out of the race and it's really a two person race and so again Bernie's gonna need a huge night in Michigan he needs to not just win message when Michigan who needs to win decisively he he are coming on Tuesday other states I the upcoming that burning is to do really well in other rust belt states like Maine upper Midwest states like Wisconsin or Pennsylvania Arnaud heiau Bernie Bernie has a swing pass show but it's not looking good form and it's pretty clear they came for Bernie on Tuesday night and they seem to have delivered pretty close to a knock out

Bernie Sanders
Iowa caucuses results are in but chaos and confusion reign as no clear winner emerges

The News & Why It Matters

09:33 min | 1 year ago

Iowa caucuses results are in but chaos and confusion reign as no clear winner emerges

"AP has declared officially after so many days of waiting eating That there is no winner. They are unable to declare a winner of Iowa Democratic caucuses because of irregularities in this year's process and the tight emergent between Pete Buddha judge and Bernie Sanders now. This comes after The Democrat National Committee Chair. Tom Perez has already dad. We need to re canvass. We need to go back and count all you know all of the paper Th th the paper trail everything because it's too close to call. There are too many questions we gotta start over Pat What are your thoughts on this tobacco. I think we've already left behind. Have we got New Hampshire coming up in a couple of days as we might as well. Just forget it this year. Yeah I mean nobody's going to really be able to have the bragging rights here because They can both claim victory. Sort of Bernie is already saying he won the initial Vote and Buda judge one the one after that and and it's kind of like I think it was two thousand twelve with Rick Santorum where we found out a week later right that he won when they thought it was. Who Was it Romney or they thought somebody else one yeah and it turned turned out? Sanatorium did and so he never really got the credit for that I mean he never really got any momentum going or anything for that because it was too late this. It's going to be as well. I think we're wins. Josh Pat points out you know. Historically the person who wins does get that momentum going into the New Hampshire voting and no one's going to have that now. How do you see that playing out yet? So need silver at five. Thirty eight had a pretty good column on Tuesday the night after this total crap show unfolded where he basically. We said that. Even if Iowa does get you know what together. It's never going to be too little too late. It's already too late because what happens. Is the boost. You get head. Is You go on national television that night and you're able to declare victory as someone who was very active in the Cruz campaign. Two Thousand Sixteen. I remember Ted's victory speech in Iowa very well and he got a bump out obviously didn't take them all the way but it did help so no candidate is going to be able to claim that this year and I think there are serious questions about the Avocados process going forward. I mean I'm actually longtime defender tender of it. I happen to like the caucus process. I participated in and I to me. It kind of embodies all that Alexis de Tocqueville famously looked at America everyone kind of game together and like like they're doing their civic duty in a very fundamental level. It says it's much more engaging process and the privacy of a ballot box clicking lever so I'm long time defender but having said add that if the Iowa Democratic party can literally not tabulate the votes to give us what the party apparatus needs. I think there are very serious questions but I will going forward. So whoever ends up the winner and perhaps we'll never know. It seems to me quite possible. It will be the last winner but I will caucus what do you think trial in. Good clear even at we don't know winter. The the clear loser was Joe Biden. Who by all accounts came into distance? fourth-place talk about the former vice president of the United States coming in Pretty low in an in a state that he he should have carried or at least come into the top two and we were just talking a little bit earlier that there has never been a nominee of of either party Who has placed below second place in both Iowa and The caucus in the New Hampshire primary. So if Joe Biden doesn't get his act together and at least place in the top two Next week in New Hampshire. There's really no precedent for him to become the the party's nominee. I mean how incredible would that be that. There's been all all this talk about Joe Biden and we could be looking at him dropping out within a week or two. He's done I mean I do a weekly election. Newsletter for the daily wire comes out Thursday's you can describe bribe. LP DUCK LP dot daily wire dot com slash. Get election wire so I said Yeah. I'll talk to folks about. Yeah but I mean I guess I basically said stick a fork in Joe Biden. He's done I don't see it at this moment. He's fourth place in Iowa. He's not going to get any better in New Hampshire that so-called firewall in South Carolina which the the campaigns been touting for months maybe a year on. Then it's already dissipating. He's four or five points. The most recent poll there if he goes fourth-place in Iowa third or fourth New Hampshire. He's probably not GonNa Win Nevada because again it's a caucus state caucus eight does not play well to his campaign apparatus. He's going to go over three in the first three. That firewall Julia Florida already saying he's not he's he doesn't have a very good apparatus in Nevada. He doesn't have have a good organization on the ground there and he's not looking good right now. Now we obviously see judge with a little bit of momentum going into New Hampshire sure You know let's let's pretend for a second that's already played out. Buddha judge gets the gets this boost and suddenly Buddha judge is the person that we're looking got running against trump in the general just UC. That is that going to be a problem for trump. Do you think or do you think trump could handle it partly I I do not. They blew judges a particularly scary general election for trump I actually think Bernie Sanders. Despite being as radical as he is a more formidable generally Bernie Sanders and trump. Have this weird crossover appeal read. They're both kind of burn it. All down anti-establishment counter cultural in their own unique sense figures. I think they actually she probably a appeal to a lot of these similar. kind of rust belt's More antitrade Anti Nafta style voters would adjudge. There's just so much material for trump come to work with their and he's so young he's so inexperienced. I mean a lot of you are these conspiracy theories that he's like a CIA agent. It's kind of sketchy. We don't really know exactly what he was doing. There's just like he's too USA by happy but he's what he's thirty seven years. Old Trump could torture in the debate. I think he's the mediocre mayor of a town one-seventh the size is of your average congressional districts I I mean E it's not serious I was telling somebody from Miami. Yesterday I was making like a reference in terms of like how how big South Bend is compared to like some of the small municipality down there and it's just really ridiculous and I I totally agree with Josh. Not only does does Bernie Sanders. Had I think the strange crossover appeal. I also think he can activate people who otherwise don't vote just bring a lot of people out of the woodwork to show up to vote so I think I think I think president trump is in a very strong position heading into November. But it's going to be very interesting to see what Democrats do you at the convention because it would. There's no clear front runner. I don't think that the powers that be. You're convinced that Buddha judges is strong and the clearly do not like Bernie Sanders so we may. We may be going into broke. Invention Pat. Do you just to play. Devil's advocate Josh. Do you agree with Josh. That Bernie would be formidable candidate against against trump. Because it's because the just put it out there you know. I agree with what you're saying that they kind of have this same anti-establishment feel but it's so hard to vote for for someone like Bernie wants US radical change people's lives are good right now. You know you have the economy that trump touted during the state of the Union. You people are working on It seems so unlikely to me that people would say yeah. Let's change everything. Let's burn down when it's working for the majority of two and especially since Bernie as a socialist list. My hope is that this is still America and we're not quite there yet. Another young people who were there that think socialism might be a great alternative to capitalism. Something I think this shows the greatest difference you can possibly show going into an election a guy who's overseeing a great economy for for four years and who is a hardcore hardcore capitalist and a socialist curmudgeon. WHO's seventy eight years old? I mean I think that's a great economy That that trump could exploit whereas does with Buddha judge who I don't think is that strong either And it seems like you don't go from South Bend Indiana mayor to President of the United States. Although there was a country where can happen. It's here thank you. Don't go from reality. Show host president if that happened but Budi judge has has one other thing going for him and that's identity politics and you've got to be a little bit careful with him because of what you say and trump isn't careful and he could run into trouble I think. Yeah I mean my concern with with with Buddha judges his his youth and I think he could definitely use that to his advantage. But it is as far as Bernie and socialism. I mean like Josh like Josh Nine you as well like we were born in in in an era where like the Cold War is like a distant memory the most people of Dr Generation. Wow we have no recollection of what socialism even is the here it. There's like some scary S. word but they don't exactly know what it means. They don't remember the bread lines in the former Soviet Union or or the Eastern Bloc states countries and and they're not learning it at school either so when you call someone a socialist. They'll think. Oh Yeah it's like the Norway pavilion at Epcot They're completely disconnected from it. So have to be the baby. Maybe boomers who understand that and don't vote for for Bernie Sanders hopefully still will we like the the people have educated on it. Yeah

Bernie Sanders New Hampshire Iowa Donald Trump United States Pete Buddha Joe Biden Josh Iowa Democratic Party Tom Perez President Trump Josh Pat America Rick Santorum Alexis De Tocqueville Soviet Union Buda Romney CIA
Harvesting tech shows up down on the farm as Brexit labor shortage looms

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:13 min | 1 year ago

Harvesting tech shows up down on the farm as Brexit labor shortage looms

"As it turns is out that all jobs where a human touch is or has been irreplaceable fruit and Berry picking is a good example. Soft delicate fruits must be assessed zest for ripeness and then gently plucked without smashing them in a vice like grip but in Britain one looming effect of Brexit is a shortage of cheap human when labor and that spawned a new flurry of interest in robots. That can do the job. So you see that it's Reaching the stem and now the gripper cutter will cut the stem and grip the Strawberry Visha Mohana University of Essex Marketplace's. This is London bureau. Chief Stephen Bid went to see his robot in action. This is definitely very difficult. Territory for robotics These aren't repetitive. Movements in a highly structured environment as you would get in a car plant. The environment with fruit-growing is very unstructured. The robots gotta find the the fruit through a massive leaves so it needs stereoscopic cameras. David Three D. Image. It assesses the rightness of the fruit by measuring its wavelengths on the visible spectrum. It needs to deal with fruit of different shapes and sizes and machine learning going on here so it is pretty difficult to these robots. What's move with any sort of speed. I'm kind of imagining them. Shooting up and down these rows of fruit arms flinging grabbing berries filling baskets. Well they can do with that but They wouldn't be very effective they. They cannot pick as well as humans yet. They're getting there But they're they're picking more slowly than humans but they can work much longer so lacking speed they make up foreign stamina an average human raspberry picker picker can collect fifteen thousand berries in an eight hour day. The robot can harvest twenty five thousand in a twenty hour day so so slower but hard working robots also can pick at night which is not so easy for humans and that's better for the fruit because they they've been picked at low temperatures. Have they could be chilled more easily. How does the cost of these machines. Workout I'm guessing. They're expensive to buy but do they. Balance Out over their lifetime. Well this probably is the the major stumbling block in the path of this technology the Belgian company Tinian which is probably the most advanced of the European robot developers won't say exactly how much they cost which is never a good sign. They say the cost is comparable with the cost of human Picking but I've heard a lot of suggestions that One of these robots could cost as much as a hundred and thirty thousand dollars. It'd be very hefty price to pay. What Tinian says is that. They offer a complete package. They offer to rent out the equipment but one fruit grow that I spoke to said that he didn't expect Robots to become widespread in the UK or Europe until now the decade at least Stephen Beard in the UK on the robots revolutionizing farming now for some related links automation in farming doesn't just have to mean robots. Robot's there are other ways that tech continues to infiltrate agri-business here in the US. Drones can help with monitoring crops checking for hydration levels so that watering schedules can be adjusted dynamically. They can spray pesticides and autonomous tractors and harvesters could do the monotonous back and forth driving over miles of fields old. Forbes looks into this in detail and says that it's bringing the high-tech west coast and the rural rust belt together as farming tools become increasingly software independence. That old question of who actually owns them is cropping up again. Farmers have started hacking. Their tractors manufacturers like John. Deere basically lock them down around to stop what they would call an authorized repair work. The farmers the vice interview say when something breaks down. They can't get to a dealer and they don't necessarily want to pay for that. I'm Jackie Stewart. And that's marketplace tech.

Robot Strawberry Visha Mohana Univer Berry Chief Stephen Bid London Bureau Britain Tinian Deere Fruit-Growing Jackie Stewart Stephen Beard David UK Europe United States Forbes
'A distinctly American phenomenon': Our workforce is dying faster than any other wealthy country, study shows

Morning Edition

04:39 min | 1 year ago

'A distinctly American phenomenon': Our workforce is dying faster than any other wealthy country, study shows

"A new study in the journal of the American medical association tests the assumptions some people have about life in America the research finds that working age Americans are less likely to live to retirement age than any time in recent history Dr Steven Wolff is the report's lead author he's director emeritus of the center on society in health at Virginia Commonwealth University thank you for being here as a pleasure I just wish it was for better reasons yeah I mean if these numbers are pretty alarming you what you were looking at life expectancy mortality across the United States between nineteen fifty nine and twenty seventeen telling what you found well what we found is that since two thousand ten all cause mortality that means the chances of dying before eight sixty five have been increasing in the United States and for the past three years life expectancy has been decreasing it's a it's a quite alarming recent trend but our study shows that it's been decades in the making starting back in the nineteen eighties is this happening in in other wealthy countries or is this a distinctly US thing that's the thing in this this does appear to be a distinctly American phenomenon there's some element of this happening a little bit in the UK and Canada but nothing on the scale of the United States life expectancy continues to climb in other wealthy nations so what are the factors here what do you think is happening well we did a pretty detailed analysis to peel back the onion and try to understand this the trend in life expectancy is being caused as you said by increased mortality and working age Americans from age twenty five to sixty four and the leading contributors to that is is the drug addiction problem drug overdoses are a major factor in explaining this trend however we also found increases in deaths from alcoholism from suicides in from dozens of organ diseases all told thirty five causes of death where mortality rates had increased in this age group so you did that's the age group abroad age group as you start to to look into to different parts of that age group I mean who exactly is this affecting the most well it's affecting everyone both young adults and middle aged adults but I guess the more alarming piece of this is the large increase in young adults we saw twenty nine percent increase in mortality among adults twenty five to thirty four and Hansen the data that even younger Americans late teens early twenties those numbers are beginning to creep up is there a geographic element to this there is exactly in fact our analysis intentionally looked at the data for all fifty states to try to locate where in the country this was happening the most and what we found was that the increase was largest in the industrial Midwest central appellation in northern New England but particularly in the Ohio valley that was like ground zero for this phenomenon we found for example that of all the excess deaths that occur in the United States due to this increase in mortality one third of them occurred in four states Ohio Pennsylvania Kentucky and Indiana those four states accounted for one third of the excess deaths between two thousand ten and two thousand seventeen why those four states do thing well that's something that researchers like myself continue to need to tease out but one very attractive explanation is the economy this is the rust belt and and the area where at the time when this decline began the nineteen eighties and nineties is when we saw a major transformation in the economy the loss of manufacturing jobs coal mines closing steel mills closing and families and communities exposed to many years of economic stresses and we think they're taking their toll on on folks health I mean I mentioned some of the assumptions that that some make about life in in America and you know I mean I think about the medical advances we've made it look like when you started looking at these numbers how surprised were you were you and your team well this is not a new subject for us so we were entirely surprised by the trend we were concerned about the scale of it the pervasiveness of it and how it's cutting across all racial and ethnic groups affecting basically all geographic settings large cities suburbs and and rural America can be reversed I think it can but we need to change our policy priorities in this country and focus more on improving the social and economic conditions for the middle class if were going to see a reversal to this trend otherwise our children are destined to you to live younger

Journal Of The American Medica Twenty Nine Percent Three Years
Life Expectancy and Mortality Rates in the United States, 1959-2017

Morning Edition

04:54 min | 1 year ago

Life Expectancy and Mortality Rates in the United States, 1959-2017

"A new study in the journal of the American medical association tests the assumptions some people have about life in America the research finds that working age Americans are less likely to live to retirement age than any time in recent history Dr Steven Wolff is the report's lead author he's director emeritus of the center on society in health at Virginia Commonwealth University thank you for being here as a pleasure I just wish it was for better reasons yeah I mean if these numbers are are pretty alarming you were you were looking at life expectancy mortality across the United States between nineteen fifty nine and twenty seventeen telling what you found well what we found is that since two thousand ten all cause mortality that means the chances of dying before eight sixty five have been increasing in the United States and for the past three years life expectancy has been decreasing it's a it's a quite alarming recent trend but our study shows that it's been decades in the making starting back in the nineteen eighties is this happening in in other wealthy countries or is this a distinctly US thing that's the thing in this this does appear to be a distinctly American phenomenon there's some element of this happening a little bit in the UK and Canada but nothing on the scale of the United States life expectancy continues to climb in other wealthy nations so what are the factors here what do you think is happening well we did a pretty detailed analysis to peel back the onion and try to understand this the trend in life expectancy is being caused as you said by increased mortality and working age Americans from age twenty five to sixty four and the leading contributors to that is is the drug addiction problem drug overdoses are a major factor in explaining this trend however we also found increases in deaths from alcoholism from suicides in from dozens of organ diseases all told thirty five causes of death where mortality rates had increased in this age group so that's the age group abroad age group as you start to to look into to different parts of that age group I mean who exactly is this affecting the most well it's affecting everyone both young adults and middle aged adults but I guess the more alarming piece of this is the large increase in young adults we saw twenty nine percent increase in mortality among adults twenty five to thirty four and Hansen the data that even younger Americans late teens early twenties those numbers are beginning to creep up is there a geographic element to this there is exactly in fact our analysis intentionally looked at the data for all fifty states to try to locate where in the country this was happening the most and what we found was that the increase was largest in the industrial Midwest central appellation in northern New England but particularly in the Ohio valley that was like ground zero for this phenomenon we found for example that of all the excess deaths that occur in the United States due to this increase in mortality one third of them occurred in four states Ohio Pennsylvania Kentucky and Indiana those four states accounted for one third of the excess deaths between two thousand ten and two thousand seventeen why those four states do thing well that's something that researchers like myself continue to need to tease out but one very attractive explanation is the economy this is the rust belt and and the area where at the time when this decline began the nineteen eighties and nineties is when we saw a major transformation in the economy the loss of manufacturing jobs coal mines closing steel mills closing and families and communities exposed to many years of economic stresses and we think they're taking their toll on on folks health I mean I mentioned some of the assumptions that that some make about life in in America and you know I mean I think about the medical advances we've made it look like when you started looking at these numbers how surprised were you were you and your team well this is not a new subject for us so we were entirely surprised by the trend we were concerned about the scale of it the pervasiveness of it and how it's cutting across all racial and ethnic groups affecting basically all geographic settings large cities suburbs and and rural America can be reversed I think you can but we need to change our policy priorities in this country and focus more on improving the social and economic conditions for the middle class if were going to see a reversal of this trend otherwise our children are destined to you to live younger lives thank you Stephen wolf as director emeritus of the center for society in health the Virginia Commonwealth University lead author of the report life expectancy and mortality rates in the United States nineteen fifty nine to twenty seventeen it's in the journal of the American medical association we

Journal Of The American Medica Twenty Nine Percent Three Years
"rust belt" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"rust belt" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"The rust belt or losing talents to places like San Francisco New York and Seattle according to a recent study of census data to stop that trend Vermont for example is offering incentives for new comers perks like working spaces and gym membership segment of downtown railyards said to be completely redeveloped the city of course we can get a Major League Soccer team MLS has been pretty tight lipped about whether not Sacramento will be on that next expansion list they are expected to be it's full steam ahead now for the city's largest infill projects so we're going to take a deeper dive this morning into the project and the people who are involved in a cover story for this month's issue of Comstock's magazine yeah we had a long discussion about the railyards project with Comstock's reporter Graham Womack and Comstock's executive editor Tom cousins and you'll hear from cousins here when can we see when is this going to change do you think for for all of us exchanged now they're turning dirt down there and things are being done right now but for the history looking back at Comstock's magazine for anniversary issue and thorns lease was on the cover nineteen eighty nine Basile Ansel's accomplice were were partnered up in a deal to buy the real years back in eighty nine eighty nine and it turned out there was too much as a Superfund site US government step in and help clean it up so they backed out and I I can't remember but just for five or six effort since and that was almost family than on the kings on the runners and then they defaulted on right I remember that yeah what was what was the turning point that you see in looking back over the history I mean the MLS obviously and Darrell Steinberg played into this and Ron Burkle obviously trying to bring the team here but I think first of turn four from is Leri killing some damn Callie bought that land you know they did a stand on March now they are lower they local developers and they they they get staff rancher from Rockland master developers and they sold to owners they also have done McCollum park they have a history of taking over sites Smith from a clone we need to be repurposed so there's a reporter named Graham all mac he works FOR Comstock he spent a goal few months working on this piece he says he thinks the bill it's going to take about twenty years or so in time we'll see a mix of things you know more than likely you know some sort of stadium if MLS does come through beyond that I mean that Kaiser's build a hospital there there is I think it's zone for for like six to ten thousand residential units would be a major housing center we should know both those guys think that the soccer deal will happen for Sacramento right US will approve it could give us the exact time they're pretty sure it's going to happen and they said this could result in the expansion of downtown all the way to the American river in the city they talk about downtown in the grid extending all the way to the American river I always you know I've lived on the grid me off and on for years and I I always think of kind of the great cotton off when you go under the tunnel at sixteenth street as you're passing like salvation army but really in time the city just once this massive expanse basically going all the way out to like the Richards district and that in the American river so the railyards could could be a key part of that I'm really really helped transform kind with the western part of downtown looks like so we have a full conversation you can hear the whole thing if you go to our podcast it's posted on my page Sam's page if you go to KFBK dot com yeah I'm Comstock's as their cover story so you can read it there as well let's go to the Rose right now checking with.

New York Seattle Vermont San Francisco twenty years
"rust belt" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"rust belt" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Win going today. Watch television. And damaging wind. He's talkradio six eight WCBS. Rush Limbaugh broadcasting from the fifty thousand one towers of truth. Talkradio six eighty WCBS. Rush on America's number one radio show. Let us go to Mike in. In pennsylvania. Which part of the state is is Butler in Mike. About thirty five miles north of Pittsburgh. Oh, Cavs about to complain that you didn't come and see me in Wilkes Barre. But I think that's about a four and a half. What was that four to five hour drive from you something like that? Yes. Something like that. Okay. Okay. We'll we'll come. We'll come. We'll come a bit. We'll come to Pittsburgh or something next on. That's good. What's on your mind? Mike just thank you for the opportunity to let me. All spoil recovering rust belt on. On. The media in my opinion, all report on the waste tax ballers on this. Outside of which. I'm a working, man. I respect my income more that these people respect the money that I give them and they're just wasting money. Trying to give people a bad name warning lives, and they're just pushing me. Earlier in politics and closer and closer to like what you're saying the voice in the. Being the same. I believe that President Trump's air voice, his voice, and what I hear. Fiesta for putting out there that they can't accomplish. But trying to get I don't know. Do but it's just get sick of it. Well, you're right that it's that is actually an outrageous waste of money. And and again, it's this thing whether if you investigate for long enough, then people's reaction to the investigation becomes a crime in itself. In other words, they they they they convict people on miss remembering the for the crime of miss remembering when they've interviewed by the FBI about things that incur occurred evermore years ago. It's actually disgusting. It's completely disgusting. It shouldn't be permitted. And I would like by the way, I don't know this new attorney general, but I would like an attorney general who actually would be seriously committed and fat. I'll volunteer myself because it's a disgusting system. So if I don't know whether I could get confirmed by congress, Bobby having to give it a go because they need someone to actually stop a lot of these processes stupid process crimes. These abusive investigate the man until everything is illegal now, Mike so that if if you investigate someone full full month four years looking for something you will get something on him because the average American breaks three hundred crimes three hundred rules fended laws every day just because everything's illegal now. You're absolutely right, Mike. This is a disgrace. Do you think Mullah and the Democrats get that? No, I I they are some cavalier. And so. Disrespectful. My capstone. They don't I I don't know what they get. I totally. I don't wanna know how they say the way they think. The office of how I live my life. God. Good good for you. Mike. The I don't know how they don't make that mistake. Well, I got to close it out in just about. But you're listening to the IB network. Rush.

Mike Cavs Pittsburgh Limbaugh Wilkes Barre pennsylvania America FBI IB attorney Butler Mullah President Trump congress Bobby four years five hour
"rust belt" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"rust belt" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"Of this country where where what formerly was very powerful organized labor presence on the ground you don't have right well organized labor can can speak to the working class specially those working classes blue collar whites and a very important way and there and in the rust belt they're very important part of the democrat coalition and they came out they they show muscle in this past election in a way that quite frankly we haven't seen in a long long time from from labor and they can replicate that the rust belt and i think democrats going to do really well a lot better this time around with bluecollar weiss and we saw in two thousand sixteen how much jason do you think that the underlying structural conditions are going to sort of our baked in how much does what happens in the next six months better well what happens in the next six months matters a lot because what has to happen in the next six months is we've got to execute we gotta get out and we gotta do the work the structural conditions are people see a president who promised that he was you know the basic deal that president trump made with everybody was he said look you don't like me you know like the way i treat people but it's made me very personally successful so i'll do that for the country and it's not like people said you know that's awesome a lot of people said well i'm willing to give that a try what happened was is they still don't like him he's still not nice to people and now he's still just does it for himself so that's the structural condition is that people are that's the big you know.

democrat coalition bluecollar weiss jason president trump six months
"rust belt" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"rust belt" Discussed on On The Media

"Go out and then those good he was finding audiences in places like wisconsin the end what we call the rust belt though that 1968 nineteen sixty nine period was really transformative both for the politics of race in america and also for the politics of country music we've been talking about 1968 19th sixty nine which happen to be the year when this song was released we joan marijuana in most lee jon teige grid donald as well as the we don't nod grab barred down on lanes three god we lag livein right convened free merle haggard ozeki from muskogee may tell me about that song so haggard says that he initially wrote that song as a joke the story that a haggard told about it is that they were on their tour bus going through oklahoma they were smoking we'd they went past the decided from muskogee somebody said i bet they don't smoke marijuana in skokie and then they wrote the rest of the lyrics lactate him sam scoobydoo and when he started performing it it got this explosive reaction what he had written as a parody became an imf the song became a sensation and then what happened so he then followed that song up with a song called the fighting site of me which was a very direct attack on people protesting against the vietnam war and that sounds much more like it was intended to be empty stomach they're on the planet sad to me.

wisconsin marijuana donald muskogee oklahoma skokie sam scoobydoo america imf
"rust belt" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"rust belt" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"The living green and all of that is not serving the greater good that you know i grieve and it's the people in the rust belt it's the blue collar workers that are wellintentioned in destroying to live their lives that ultimately you know sort of need these ideas the most or are suffering the most as a result of a lack of understanding or policies that could be enhance their day to day you know sort of general wellbeing yeah this whole vote against selfinterest is a bizarre place though it i mean many of the people who voted for trump is not in their self interest in any way shape or form and yet they did it because of a belief that the current system was not helping them yeah the idea that he was going to look out for them that he was going to bring jobs back from these old sort of outdated sectors was pushing a button that you know they needed to here and i don't begrudge them for that like they're suffering and they're having a hard time and somebody comes along who's breaking ranks and and someone who they feel is speaking to them directly that's going to activate that you know that sector for her to me it's about getting back to grass roots that's where that's politics and environment and all this needs to happen it's been so focused on washington dc that it's become becoming abstraction when we are talking at the beginning of the the hour about what climate change is to most people it's only real when you equated back to their situation if the kid has asthma if the you know look subject to hurricanes they hit more frequently but they he this big concept of global climate change that doesn't really mean anything so we've abstracted notions of the environment to such a degree that it doesn't mean anything to any person and we need to get back down to a place where people care about the hills in malibu because they hike that people care about santa monica bay 'cause they fish that not some abstract notion and i i think epa is partly to blame we become so specialized as a society that individual scientists understand individual pot.

selfinterest trump asthma malibu santa monica bay washington epa
"rust belt" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"rust belt" Discussed on RobinLynne

"I'm telling you have he he didn't miss a beat uh and i djindic ju waive him in cherry work together it was almost like they could read each his mind they know exactly what to do and how to do that and and they were really interested in me philly whatever i was feeling and so and so at that point i remember saying i've gotta get this singer on this track this igc becoming a rope i wrote that i can't stand that i can't stand apart for somebody to sing and i wanted to person to the economy gospel like right right that's something the rust belt and so i remember walking into the room i was making some calls to see if i could find uh did somebody that i knew that could sink come through and what's ironic it to me it was almost like heaven uh evans said in the mid to beat because all uh look you know when you go to stu heels there's always these or would car all people he their bullets in a whole world you exacting well there on the bulletin boards uh that's how i found pinball kimberly ball the militant bore and i call there and i said you saying and she says yeah i that uh i said well let me how are you saying this real quick this thing that is and she's saying it and i say who got can you get down here she said i believe on their in about an hour i think we'll go about could we not leave it to you get here and bad and i walked in there whether and i said this is war i want you to do and then what i told her what i wanted to do the jimmy in cherry did the rest of it by children what to do and man that was it my brother i remember walk out at any that's all going.

evans cherry
"rust belt" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"rust belt" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"Youths thing angel the buck and he was a key the angel investors from like middle america in the rust belt should be investing in companies have to think about that but if you've lived in the rust belt in your coal miner you made seventy five thousand dollars a year a fifty thousand dollars a year ghana coal mines and you invested five hundred thousand dollars a new are credited but i have a problem with that i don't think i've ever met with avenue yeah i was like i think you're kind of turning your nose up at individuals having the ability to do what they want with their money because i know people are putting a thousand dollars on this conor mcgregor fight uh versus four mayweather or the super bowl so if you can gamble on those things went out gambling serves which are advice for family members were nonaccredited people who wanna get their tell into this matter you advise them i mean the easy way to think about this game is a positive expected puzzle bv lottery ticket so you you're going to get your ticket and just expect you're gonna be ripping it up over and over and over again so if you can afford to lose money than don't do it because you're going to lose the money but on an aggregate if you invest in enough startups hopefully eventually you get lucky and you get the one that you know returns a thousand or ten thousand ober yet nerve or airbnb or drop oxen and you know and so the math works in aggregate at scale but it doesn't work on the individual deal deal bases so if you can if you can't afford to lose the money if you can't afford to put it in the lottery ticket don't do it how many startups do you think you need to invest in at this early stage at say preseries a how many would you feel comfortable with your family member doing how many would you advise them to do to have enough diversification.

america mayweather super bowl conor mcgregor airbnb five hundred thousand dollars seventy five thousand dollars fifty thousand dollars thousand dollars
"rust belt" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"rust belt" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"The gist is brought to you by at and t enjoy unlimited entertainment with unlimited data from eighteen thi don't settle for any unlimited data plan only the at and t unlimited plus plan comes with each b o included learn more at at and t dot com slash unlimited after twenty gigabytes of data usage at and t may slow speeds credits for hbo start within two bills channels available subject to change charges other usage and restrictions may apply see eighteen t dot com slash unlimited for details and by i'm dying appear on showtime a new drama series from jim carrey that centers around a group of young comedians hoping to make it big in the nineteenth seventy's la comedy seen don't miss the premier on sunday june fourth at ten nine central only on showtime down on the show time app now to start your free trial the following podcast contains explicit language ooh it's wednesday may thirty i twenty seventeen from slate it suggests and as you tell this is not mike pasqua i may harris filling in for my today allow meetings juice myself you may know me as a culture writer for slates browbeat culture blogs or as the host of the sleep podcast represent and that show i talk about film and tv from the perspective of anyone who's not a straight white dude so there's a story that was big in the news a couple of years ago i was very obsessed with that have forgotten about it sense and now it's back in the news oppositon what does it take for a cop who literally jumped the gun and murdered an innocent black kid without cause to be fired from his job just almost three years of an investigation and the revelation that said cop lied on his employment application before he killed the kid.

jim carrey mike pasqua writer twenty gigabytes three years
"rust belt" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"rust belt" Discussed on 1A

"Gain but i lost my job i still lost my job so i think i see that piece of it on the other hand there isn't that affect so i see jose's piece of it and it sounds jose if i gotta be chime in that there's this macro effective nafta and there's the microfilm of nafta and maybe depending on what individual you're on both of you can be right but the motion among the american people can be very different depending on what side of that equation landed on a pressure scary your point is well taken i don't want to appear on sympathetic at all to to those americans who are directly affected with losses of jobs when factories relocate i do think that we as a government have dropped the ball on more attention to retraining programmes and transition programs for workers whose who find themselves in that situation the us government has responsibility through assistance programs to help those those people who have lost jobs and i don't think that we have done a good job as a country when you look at the rust belt and see the pain and and the end that this locations of many americans and loss of faith in the system in lhasa faith in the future so i think that we as government have to be on top of helping these workers make those adjustments doris meisner i wonder it seems like having that kind of labour mobility and just making this kind of labor that we know we need for industries easy to get makes good sense why hasn't it happened.

jose us lhasa