Audioburst Search

36 Burst results for "Russian government"

What Is Unit 29155? The Russia Intel Branch Accused of U.S. Troop Bounties

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 6 d ago

What Is Unit 29155? The Russia Intel Branch Accused of U.S. Troop Bounties

"Paying paying bounties bounties to to the the Taliban Taliban in in Afghanistan Afghanistan to to kill kill American troops. W GOP National security correspondent J. J. Green says a group called Unit 29155 is believed to be behind it. W T O P has been telling you since 2017 about a secret squad of killers linked to the Russian government. They've been involved in assassinations and attempts across Europe, and there are some that believe they're actually involved in possible deaths of prominent Russians here in the US, the group tried to kill Sergei Scree Paul in the UK and 2018 there have been murders in Germany, Ukraine and the Balkans. The group is so well connected there, reportedly receiving diplomatic cover from the Russian government, which means they could strike Anywhere in the world. G green

Taliban Taliban Russian Government Afghanistan GOP J. J. Green Sergei Scree Europe United States Ukraine Germany UK
Fresh update on "russian government" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:03 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "russian government" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"90 in the district at 3 40 Former national security adviser under President Obama, Susan Rice was asked about her response to the reported intelligence that Russia was offering bounties in return for the death of American soldiers in Afghanistan. I said President Trump is doing Russia's bidding and that his staffers are not telling him the truth that he needs to hear. We have a president who is doing our arch adversaries bidding it would seem And he's surrounded by sick of crimson weaklings who aren't doing their jobs. You don't have the confidence in themselves and in the mission that they're there to carry out. To bring the president the tough messages he needs to hear. She appeared on NBC's Meet The Press. The Russian Bounty story tied to Afghanistan this past week brought a strong denial on NBC Nightly News from Russian President Vladimir Putin spokesman Dmitry Peskov. This is a 100% books. It's It's not diplomatic thing, but it's a bull. That's strong. Mr Pascoe as a simple isn't it scoff on a video chat with NBC News correspondent Cure Simmons. Still w. T. O p and others are reporting the organization behind the bounties has a history of Destabilising rival governments. W T O p National security correspondent J. J Green breaks down the situation with Dmitri sodas. There's an organization called Unit 29 1 55 That organization is very well known. For its activities that are designed to destabilize governments from other countries. W T. O P did a series of reports in 2018 called assassins ink and in that report that serious of reports we looked at the origins of this organization and exactly where this kind of activity was coming from, And basically it's a collection of people that work for special operations. Inside the Russian military. The G R U there called. They're made up of veterans from Chechnya, Afghanistan and Ukraine. And these are hard core people that are engaged in nothing but assassinations and covert operations designed to destabilize governments. This organization is the one that that's believed to be behind this, and it's believed to be behind it with the full support of the Russian government and the military. Why did Russia want to do this? Russia has never, ever been satisfied since the Cold War ended with how it ended. It's always felt as though it was short changed, and Vladimir Putin has said, and you probably have heard this many times. One of the greatest travesties of the last century was the crumbling of the Soviet Union. They've been trying to reconstitute it. They've been trying to re litigate that war. We fight that war of the Cold War, and despite what they have said publicly, they've gone out of their way. To find every opportunity and technique and tactic they can to try to make life miserable for the US, including lying about it's an interest. And helping the U. S. And this is another one of them. It's w t o p national security correspondent J. J Green on Skype. Thousands took to the streets of Houston this weekend to demand justice for Vanessa Guion Missing Fort Hood soldier investigators found human remains this week believe to be long to Vanessa. Our friend. Euros. Adovia is says the military should have done more to protect her. I'm actually.

President Trump NBC Afghanistan Vladimir Putin Russia Susan Rice President Obama J. J Green Vanessa Guion Russian Government Adovia Dmitry Peskov Mr Pascoe Soviet Union Dmitri Sodas Chechnya Cure Simmons
Flynn and Russian ambassador transcripts released

John Batchelor

05:03 min | Last month

Flynn and Russian ambassador transcripts released

"Congressman Devin Nunes twenty two California ranking on the house intelligence comment on documents just tap now in the last hour these are the trends of the conversations between lieutenant general Michael Flynn retired U. S. army in December of twenty sixteen when he was on the trump transition scheduled to be the national security adviser come the twentieth and the inauguration the conversation with the then Russian ambassador Kislyak the conversations were said to be pertinent to the background that the Obama administration at the issued sanctions against the Russian federation having to do with the election interference and other bad acting by players that subsequently we learned were not directly attached to the Russian government that would be the internet trolls of Petersburg but in any event there was a lot of noise at the time that these conversations contained violations of certain obscure laws like a Logan act or perhaps a tip A. as a in exchange promises that were not Michael Flynn's to give or perhaps it had something to do with the allegation of collusion between the trump administration the trump campaign and Russia we didn't know because we didn't have the transcripts Devin you've now read these transcripts which were denied to you when you were conducting the investigation that led to your memo of the winter of twenty eighteen that is the gold standard for what we know about russiagate you've eggs you've read the transcripts now what do you make of them what surprises do you find here well I would just say this the briefing that we received shortly after the F. B. I. agents when an unannounced unprecedented into the White House to interview general plan just red flag one big problem right there at the beginning of all this weeks later we get into we get debriefed by the F. B. I. D. F. B. I. says look at the agents there that didn't think of when was lying about anything what will now we know why there wasn't anything to lie about John if if you read the the transcript they are you know as a river when president trump when during the Ukrainian impeachment hopes that you know trump had a call with the with the president and then when the call got released there was really nothing in the car when trump president trump you say was the perfect phone call well John this is not only a perfect phone call it's a very boring phone call and it fax it back it just looks like clothes that I have with with diplomats it doesn't look anything like anything different than what a a member of Congress has whenever I go overseas and meet with my fellow colleagues in the the and whether it be the foreign minister or the defense ministers or the intelligence leadership of foreign countries or even the prime ministers or presidents of countries it looks like a normal call that anybody that's in in the U. S. government or general Flynn's case the incoming national security adviser it looks like a normal perfect phone call and John you know what's missing we don't talk about sanctions in the call all this time suppose a we were led to believe that Flynn was having these long conversations about sanctions and no bother sanctions that the Obama it ministration president Obama put on to the Russian government John it's kind of hard to find in there if you go through you have to read really really close you know within a microscope to find where exactly they were talking about sanctions because the word sanctions doesn't even come up well there was a you know the the if anything it looks like a a normal conversation the only thing that that even gets close is general plan saying you know Hey we still want to work together you know don't hold this against us paraphrasing but that's about it yes the quote that I like here is general Flynn reminds ambassador Kislyak of his status he says remember ambassador you're not talking to a diplomat you were talking to a soldier I'm a very practical guy it is all about solutions a very humble statement from a man who is about to be national security adviser at the general also says we need cool heads to prevail and we need to be very study about what we're going to do because we have absolutely a common threat in the Middle East this is boilerplate very sensible and for general Flynn to say he's not an ambassador at not a diplomat I would say that's the most diplomatic of language there was no threat there was no exchange there were no promises this almost is a polite way of saying here I am you can call me up if you have

Congressman Devin Nunes California
Russian President Vladimir Putin's spokesman Dmitry Peskov has been hospitalized for coronavirus

Here & Now

00:55 sec | Last month

Russian President Vladimir Putin's spokesman Dmitry Peskov has been hospitalized for coronavirus

"Crowed of iris is reaching the highest levels of the Russian government a Kremlin spokesman is now among the more than two hundred thirty thousand people in Russia test positive and Paris Charles Manson's coronavirus cases in Russia are climbing president Vladimir Putin's longtime spokesman Dmitry Peskov now joins the list of Kremlin insiders who've tested positive for the corona virus in an interview with Russian state media Peskov said he was getting treatment in hospital and then the last met with Putin over a month ago and pose no risk to the Russian leader whose prime minister Mikhail misused and step down from his duties earlier this month after he contracted the virus so too has put as minister of culture and the head of Russia's state infrastructure projects despite the rise in infections inside the Kremlin and among the population at large Tuesday marked the end of a six week nationwide work stoppage it's now up to regional authorities to tailor their response in combating the outbreak Charles Maynes NPR news

Charles Manson Russia Vladimir Putin Dmitry Peskov Prime Minister Mikhail Kremlin Paris President Trump NPR
Vladimir Putin's spokesman hospitalized with coronavirus infection

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:55 sec | Last month

Vladimir Putin's spokesman hospitalized with coronavirus infection

"Coronavirus is reaching the highest levels of the Russian government a Kremlin spokesman is now among the more than two hundred thirty thousand people in Russia test positive and Paris Charles Manson's coronavirus cases in Russia are climbing president Vladimir Putin's longtime spokesman Dmitry Peskov now joins the list of Kremlin and others who've tested positive for the corona virus in an interview with Russian state media Pascoe said he was getting treatment in hospital and then the last met with Putin over a month ago and pose no risk to the Russian leader whose prime minister Mikhail misused and step down from his duties earlier this month after he contracted the virus so too has put as minister of culture and the head of Russia's state infrastructure projects despite the rise in infections inside the Kremlin and among the population at large Tuesday marked the end of a six week nationwide work stoppage it's now up to regional authorities to tailor their response in combating the outbreak Charles Maynes NPR news

Coronavirus Charles Manson Russia Vladimir Putin Dmitry Peskov Pascoe Prime Minister Mikhail Kremlin Paris President Trump NPR
Could We Be Entering an Era of Commercialized Space Exploration?

BrainStuff

05:16 min | 2 months ago

Could We Be Entering an Era of Commercialized Space Exploration?

"I S A great deal to Nasr's defunct Space Shuttle Program Green Lit by then president Richard M Nixon in nineteen seventy two. This initiative gave the world its first reusable spacecraft from nineteen eighty one to two thousand eleven NASA astronauts into orbit on American made shuttles. These were often used to transport portions of the ISS during its construction on July Twenty first twenty eleven. The space shuttle. Eric came to an end. As the Atlanta's orbiter returned from its final mission with the program just continued. I S bound astronauts grew dependent on Russian Soyuz rockets. Then the law of Supply and demand took over for nearly a decade. No other rockets were capable of sending people to the ISS. All astronauts bound for that station had to be launched out of Kazakhstan Baikonour cosmodrome which is spaceport least to the Russian government and by April of two thousand twenty. The Russians were charging eighty six million dollars to include foreign astronauts in their Soyuz missions. Another Soyuz rocket launch is scheduled for October. And Breitenstein says NASA is currently negotiations to book a seat. Nevertheless it's hoped that the SPACEX x crew dragon will end the spaceflight monopoly. Rydin Stein explained. We want the russian-american relationship in space exploration to remain strong. We see a day. When Russian cosmonauts can launch on American rockets American astronauts can launch on Russian rockets by now space x the International Space Station? Have a fair bit of history. Using unmanned crafts the company has delivered supplies to the orbiting laboratory since two thousand twelve. The crew dragon aced dress rehearsal and March of two thousand nineteen when it left. Merritt island on the nose of a spacex Falcon nine rocket and autonomously docked with the International Space Station. Five days after its departure the crew track and returned to Earth splashing down in the Atlantic Ocean. Some one hundred and forty three miles or two hundred thirty kilometers a Florida's eastern coastline. But that trip only passengers were in earth shaped plush toy and a dummy named Ripley AB- named after Sigourney Weaver's character Ellen Ripley from the alien movie franchise a flight later. This month will be the first time that live. Astronauts will be on board space x crew mission director. Benjamin Reed said at the May First Conference Dragon will be fully autonomous. Expectation is that can carry the crew safely to the station and bring them home without direct intervention even so hurley and Bankin are set to take control for a short period before the crew dragon. Docs they'll be able to guide the vessel using touch screens or physical switches. Both options are available for certain portions of the journey while aboard cruise expected to test out such components as the maneuvering thrusters and in my own. Mental Control System. And then there's the spacesuits one piece outfits designed by SPACEX to supply the astronauts with oxygen provide the appropriate temperature and maintain pressure spacesuits plug into the crew dragons chairs when their wares. Sit down read. Said suits also have an integrated communication system so that the crew can communicate through their helmets. Neither Bank nor Hurley are strangers to low earth orbit. Lincoln's logged more than seven hundred eight hours in space and Hurley a member of NASA's last shuttle era crew back in two thousand eleven but every mission presents its own unique challenges like the rest of the world NASA space x and these two astronauts had to make adjustments during the krona virus taking extra precautions. So what does that mean? Both SPACEX and NASA have implemented social distancing protocols like keeping work desk six feet or two meters apart at their respective control rooms. Meanwhile the cruise getting a wide. Berth contact with them by any other team. Members has been minimized and many training sessions have been done. Virtually and the safety of is S. crew the astronauts will observe a preflight quarantine for May sixteenth until the launch on May twenty seventh. Right now. There are three space fares two Americans and a Russian living and working aboard the International Space Station. The length of Benjamin's and Harley stay at the facility will be determined at a later date it could last anywhere from five to thirty days when the time to head home arrives the crew tracking should undock Disley and deliver. Its human charges to Florida by way of the Atlantic. There's a long proud tradition of civilians gathering near the Kennedy Space Center to witness rocket launches. Unfortunately NASA is discouraging people from following suit this time lest they spread or contract Cova nineteen. But you can tune in and watch launch online for just the fifth time in history NASA astronauts will be test flying a new type of spacecraft should bankin an early complete their mission objectives. We may yet see a golden age of space tourism and innovation with private industry taking on development roles long adopted by governments Breitenstein. Said this really is the next major step. In commercializing low earth orbit and having a really vital low earth orbit economy in which NASA is one of many customers.

Nasa Spacex International Space Station ISS Kennedy Space Center Hurley Florida Benjamin Reed Russian Government Richard M Nixon Kazakhstan Nasr Atlantic Ocean Eric Atlanta Rydin Stein President Trump Merritt Island
China targets US coronavirus response

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

China targets US coronavirus response

"Moscow data indicates Russia has now surpassed China in the total number of confirmed coronavirus cases the Russian government has announced just over eighty seven thousand positives which is close to four thousand more than China's official told Moscow says around six thousand two hundred new infections have been registered in the past twenty four hours she was reporting comparatively low numbers of coronavirus cases until April with the Kremlin insisting the situation was under control but the number of confirmed cases has been growing exponentially since then the actual number of infections in Russia and China is thought to be far higher because many people have not been tested the studies suggest people could be infected with the virus without feeling sick I'm Charles there this month

Russia China Russian Government Moscow Charles Official
China targets US coronavirus response

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

China targets US coronavirus response

"The Russian government has announced just over eighty seven thousand positives which is close to four thousand more than China's official told Moscow says around six thousand two hundred new infections have been registered in the past twenty four hours she was reporting comparatively low numbers of coronavirus cases until April with the Kremlin insisting the situation was under control but the number of confirmed cases has been growing exponentially since then the actual number of infections in Russia and China is thought to be far higher because many people have not been tested the studies suggest people could be infected with the virus without feeling sick I'm Charles the last month

Russian Government China Moscow Russia Charles Official
Alexander Pushkin in Opera, Pt. 1

Classical Classroom

06:33 min | 3 months ago

Alexander Pushkin in Opera, Pt. 1

"Hello everyone and welcome to the classical classroom. I'm dish plate and here with me today in the studio is Jonathan Dean. He's the he's the drama for the Seattle Opera and you may remember him from such episode of classical classroom as that one about the Steve Jobs Opera. The Seattle Opera is about to begin performances of Eugene Oregon which is based on a story by Alexander Pushkin and today John is here to talk to me about Pushkin and Russian upper John. Welcome thanks thanks for having me here. Sip before we get started. I have to ask for those listeners. Out there who don't know an me. It was a drama teacher. It's sort of a funny title. Not Every Opera Company has dramaturge but I would describe my job as being charged with making sure that everybody understands what's going on out of the CI- and actually sometimes the people on the other side of the stage to the I was hired at Seattle opera billion years ago to perform the super titles meaning to sit at the booth at every performance. Do make sure the right words over the right characters so when you go to the opera you can like actually read subtitles. But winter actually called Super Title Saban Super Titles. The same things have one is below and the other is up above Right if we did the bottom you wear the conductors head would be people like looking at those shiny bald heads words. Yes we've you know we've been doing super titles in opera in Seattle since the eighty s and pretty much everywhere in the world. That's very normal which gives opera audiences way more access to the drama than they used to have to do some cramming ahead of time and try to memorize what who everybody was going to say to. You know who and then Good Luck. Once the music started and super titles make them much much much. Easier to offer has turned his evolved since that new technology really into something much more theatrical you the listener can play along even if you don't speak Say Russian yeah and and the funny thing is I have that. I started doing that a long time ago as the musician. Getting the right line of if the right person's head by worked on my languages and took over writing the translations. Oh in the nineties. So if it's a talented French German you're usually reading and translation that I wrote. I have never actually learned Russian. We don't do too many Russian opera. So in this case for instance somebody else's has written the translation My job is just to make sure that it all happens. And and goes smoothly. Okay oh but still what a great story Eugenia again. And what a great honor Jerry working with this amazing artistic legacy of this this writer who he is he's one of Russia's greatest writers he belongs to the World Sorry Russia. You CAN'T kill this writers. Work Yeah. I was really excited. That we're going to talk about Pushkin today because back in the olden days when I was doing my Undergrad at Evergreen State College. I studied Russian literature for a while. I just fell in love with it. Because it's like I don't know it's got this really particular flavor this particular character to it that is just like you are curled up in a chair next to a fire with like a goblet of vodka on a winter's nights and having all of the emotions known to humanity all at once. I don't know I don't know how else to describe it. But but like I remember reading Pushkin and it just being this. There's something about his language just made me get what it was like to be Russian and it's very yeah involving it's the rest of the world goes away and it pulls you into so intimate. Yeah yeah so we should say like like who he was and like when he was writing which I think was like the early eighteen hundreds. Yeah remember the beginning part of the nineteenth century the operas you. I've been calling Pushkin. The wellspring of Russian opera every great Russian composer of made operas based on Pushkin Stories with him until much later took them a few more decades to get organized musically. It's funny because he became such a really just pivotal person in the Russian Arts night night even just literature but in the Russian arts but like he started out not so great like his home. Life wasn't great. He had kind of a bad time. He did a lot of Like gambling and drinking and he died young. Yeah that's right. Yeah he like. He was exiled south of Russian. Yeah yeah he kind of lived a lot of the stuff that he was talking about. One thing that I read about him was that he I think he got a lot of the fodder for his stories when So he had been had been exiled by the the Russian government for basically talking smack about them poet writing Commons writing for the stranger Seattle. Yes yes he was a Dan savage or Orlandi Western guy up your exile. So they sent him away like you. Do I guess at that time? And so he's like exile for like six years and then he finally a news. Art comes in like okay. I forgive you. We're still going to censor your work. You can come back. But right after the exile. He was like staying. His family was kind of well to do and they had the state and he went and he stayed on it after his period of exile. And there is. This nurse lived on the estate. Apparently Netanya Netanya. Jagna is the nanny. Oh yeah and so she like. It's just the two of them like everybody else's abandoned the state so he's just like on this estate with this old woman and she must have been a genius storyteller. Everything I don't understand is that he learned from her. How you tell traditional Russian story. Yeah she tells him all these folktales and then he kinda like I don't know yeah so I think she was. Maybe like the secret genius behind his. He he because he does a lot of those Russian folktales verse as these Long Narrative Poems so miserably the language in the poetry's his

Alexander Pushkin Seattle Russian Government Russian Arts Opera Company Pushkin Stories Pushkin Netanya Netanya Writer Russia Jonathan Dean Saban Eugene Oregon Evergreen State College Dan Savage Eugenia Jagna John Jerry
Rosneft sells Venezuelan assets to Russia after U.S. sanctions ramp up

NPR News Now

00:50 sec | 3 months ago

Rosneft sells Venezuelan assets to Russia after U.S. sanctions ramp up

"Largest oil company is making a move to extract itself from US sanctions as Charles means reports from Moscow. The company says it's selling its assets in Venezuela Rosner two state-owned Russian company. With top management close to President Vladimir Putin said it dumped its assets to protect its global operations and private investors from US sanctions last month. Washington slapped penalties on Rosneft subsidiaries because of their work exporting oil from Venezuela which the White House says targeted with broader sanctions in an effort to force President Nicolas Maduro from power the Rosneft investment in Venezuela had symbolize Kremlin pushback against that. Us pressure less. Clear how much that dynamic has now changed. Rosneft shares were bought by an unnamed company also owned by the Russian government but unlikely to match the oil giant's global

Venezuela United States President Vladimir Putin President Nicolas Maduro Rosneft Russian Government Charles Moscow White House Washington
Russia passes bill allowing Putin to stay in power past 2024

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 4 months ago

Russia passes bill allowing Putin to stay in power past 2024

"Moscow State Duma has endorsed a set of amendments to the constitution resetting the term count the Putin passing by a three eight three to zero vote with forty three abstentions then approved by the upper house the Federal Council several hours later a nationwide vote on the proposed amendments is set for April twenty two the changes redistribute the executive powers of the Russian government in Moscow and further strengthen the power of the presidency Kremlin critics are condemning the move as a cynical manipulation and a calling for protests I'm Charles the last month

Moscow State Duma Putin Federal Council Russian Government Moscow Charles Executive
How Russia Is Trying To Boost Bernie Sanders' Campaign

All Things Considered

03:41 min | 4 months ago

How Russia Is Trying To Boost Bernie Sanders' Campaign

"Last month senator Bernie Sanders acknowledged he'd been briefed by the intelligence community about Russia's efforts to boost his campaign efforts that are unwelcome NPR's Tim mak looks deeper into what Russia's campaign to boost Sanders looks like Russia's campaign includes an ever changing number of targets based on Russian strategic goals including reportedly the reelection of president Donald Trump but its support for Sanders in particular has become an attack line take this example from former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg during a recent presidential debate Vladimir Putin things that Donald Trump is should be president added states and that's why rusher is helping you but you'll have Sanders had this response Hey Mr Putin if I'm president the United States trust me you're not getting into it anymore American elections the Russian government's apparent campaign to aid centers would mostly be hidden behind the anonymity of the internet but there are ways to look to Russia's public messaging to see how they're supporting the senator Clint watts has been monitoring Russian interference as part of his work with the foreign policy research institute he says Russian state backed media was more neutral on Sanders in the fall but has begun to mirror pro Sanders talking points for scene four years ago but what's really come on strong just in the last thirty to forty five days are very similar narratives that we saw in twenty sixteen about Sanders on Russian news agencies RT and Sputnik what's noticed that Sanders received substantially better coverage than his opponents Sanders received a higher percentage of positive coverage two and a half times more than any other democratic candidates surpassing even president Donald Trump by that metric and Sanders received far less negative coverage than his rivals Jessica Brandt who works with the alliance for securing democracy has also examined Russian narratives about Sanders those tend to be that the corporate media and that the democratic establishment the DNC and elites are breaking the system against him and you know endeavoring to deny him a win another way to gauge Russia's support for Sanders is by examining social media accounts linked to their efforts in October Facebook announced it has suspended Instagram accounts with apparent links to the internet research agency a Kremlin linked troll farm based in St Petersburg Facebook share this data with graphic a social media analytics firm which said that four of the suspended accounts had a focus on praising senator Sanders he was the only candidate on the democratic side there was a focus of these fake accounts in some cases these accounts plagiarize memes and content directly from the centers can paint one post read quote millions of people in America want to get an education and Bernie Sanders is their last hope the centers can paint says Russia is trying to do their best to sow discord in the race not elect Bernie Sanders and campaign co chair congressman ro Khanna points out that the senator has been a fervent advocate of solutions to foreign interference senator Sanders has been at the forefront of election security what we need is paper ballots what we need is an investment in our election infrastructure what we needed is smart regulation against disinformation campaigns but Sanders is disavowal of Russia's efforts haven't stopped them we can yeah is the vice president of the national security program at third way a center left think tank that opposes a Sanders candidacy one of the things I think Russia looks at when they see Bernie is that he's someone who's talking about a rigged system he's talking about delete aren't with you with a long election campaign ahead this year the sense among experts is that problems with foreign interference are

Senator Bernie Sanders Russia
How Russia Is Trying To Boost Bernie Sanders' Campaign

All Things Considered

01:54 min | 4 months ago

How Russia Is Trying To Boost Bernie Sanders' Campaign

"National security officials issued a warning on Monday foreign actors are using social media to interfere in this year's presidential race last month senator Bernie Sanders acknowledged he'd been briefed by the intelligence community about Russia's efforts to boost his campaign efforts that are unwelcome NPR's Tim mak looks deeper into what Russia's campaign to boost Sanders looks like Russia's campaign includes an ever changing number of targets based on Russian strategic goals including reportedly the reelection of president Donald Trump but its support for Sanders in particular has become an attack line take this example from former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg during a recent presidential debate Vladimir Putin things that Donald Trump is should be president added states and that's why rusher is helping you know you'll have cinders had this response Hey Mr Putin if I'm president the United States trust me you're not getting it to feel it anymore American elections the Russian government's apparent campaign to aid centers would mostly be hidden behind the anonymity of the internet but there are ways to look to Russia's public messaging to see how they're supporting the senator Clint watts has been monitoring Russian interference as part of his work with the foreign policy research institute he says Russian state backed media it was more neutral on Sanders in the fall but has begun to mirror pro Sanders talking points first scene four years ago but what's really come on strong just in the last thirty to forty five days are very similar narratives that we saw in twenty sixteen about Sanders on Russian news agencies RT and Sputnik what's noticed that Sanders received substantially better coverage than his opponents Sanders received a higher percentage of positive coverage two and a half times more than any other democratic candidates surpassing even president Donald Trump by that metric and Sanders receives far less negative coverage than his

Mr Putin Senator United States Vladimir Putin New York City Senator Bernie Sanders Clint Watts Rusher President Trump Michael Bloomberg Donald Trump Tim Mak NPR Russia
Political Ads are on streaming apps now too

Reset

04:18 min | 4 months ago

Political Ads are on streaming apps now too

"Reported on an interesting about how political advertising is seeping into a new realm which is streaming services obviously not all streaming services have ads. Netflix doesn't so what streaming platforms are we talking about yeah we're talking about a wide array of platforms so the big one. Obviously is Hulu where people are watching television but also streaming on demand video content. We have connected. Tv's and Those services things like Roku for example There's a good chance that when you're watching the food network APP or you're watching the the TLC APP or content related to those providers that there's A. There's a good chance you're going to see political ads there really any of the on demand streaming APPs So there's one that we uncovered called to be that recently has been in the news because a potential merger those streaming platforms also increasingly are accepting a political ads along with the other ads that they already have so you went in and started reporting on it. What did you find what was your takeaway right? We discovered that streaming sites and services had become this new way for political campaigns to try to reach voters. And that kind of makes sense right. We know more Americans than ever are cutting the cord so to speak ending their normal cable subscriptions and shifting their viewing habits online and so it makes sense that some of the political dollars had followed that as well but the other thing that we had discovered was that it's really impossible right now to measure the scale of that and that's largely because neither the companies nor the federal government tracks requires companies to track. Exactly who is spending and how they're spending on these streaming media sites so that results in a major transparency gap. That makes it really difficult to know. Who is targeting? Whom and why right? That's super different from basic broadcast television. Where we have these big regulations we have the FCC right with broadcast television for many decades. Now your traditional ABC or CBS or NBC. Local station has to compile what's called political file that indicates how much money campaign spans the general topic of the issue which they advertised and the General Times that that ad ran they have to be transparent about that stuff. But if that's aimed at that you saw watching your local. Nbc Station had run on NBC programming. That had been streamed on Hulu for example even though the AD is the same. There's no disclosure requirement around it. So that's what prompts this concern among regulators in watchdogs that there are serious gaps here. Why is that a problem? Exactly like why. Should we be worried? Yeah folk should be concerned because they have the right to know who is speaking to them and what they're saying and why they're targeting them in the first place remember. We got here because of the two thousand sixteen election. The reason we're having this conversation about transparency in political advertising is because agents of the Russian government took to social media sites and use those sites to spread and stoke social and political unrest and some of what they did relied on using ads on a site like facebook to try to create those divisions and to promote falsehoods. Now four years later. We're worried about Russian interference. Maybe not so much on streaming services but there is this concern that adds could essentially service wedges it could be the thing that divides the American electorate as opposed to motivating them to vote for example or informing them so just take even the instance of President Trump's campaign. We had a whole conversation. A few months back about the president using facebook to lie and able to lie without the company taking action against that though with facebook. You're able to see it. You can go to facebook. You can visit their ad archive you can measure with. The trump campaign is doing and who they're reaching and exactly how effective that potential falsehood might have been. But you can't do that when we're talking about streaming services you can't see if a campaign is changing. Its message depending on the audience that speaking to or even just the amount of money that they're spending to speak in the first place which is certainly an issue this time around given how much money the Bloomberg campaign is spending. Just these basic questions about who is talking to you. Why they're talking see where things we can't answer streaming context at. It's something watchdogs definitely. Want to fix.

Facebook Hulu Netflix Nbc Station NBC President Trump FCC Russian Government General Times Bloomberg ABC CBS
"russian government" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:56 min | 4 months ago

"russian government" Discussed on KTOK

"With the Russian government to influence the election is that true in any way shape manner or form Julian Assange's answer that is absolutely false and if you read their statements carefully goes on to give a more detailed as I put this up on Twitter if you want to watch the whole interview and then I go back again can you say to the American people unequivocally you didn't get this information about the DNC Podesta's emails can you tell the American people a thousand percent he did not get it from Russia yes meeting go to Russia or anybody associated with Russia answer we can say and we have said repeatedly over the last two months that our source is not the Russian government is not a state party and I I went back even more times asking Linda how many times I go back on this thing I went back again and again and again now here's my point okay they want to go after Juliana signage but the espionage act I might all hello Hillary is top secret classified our information on her secret server why don't we go after her how come we have this dole justice system we have somebody that we know bought and paid for a dirty Russian dossier to influence the twenty sixteen election all the things they're saying I guess it's in this extradition hearing about Julian a son Lee's Julian a son I did ask him at one point how does he view himself you know do you think you are a journalist what we know what is what do you think your role is armed and I hear but I asked about other things have you ever talked any surrogates of the trump campaign now have you ever talked to put no trump no any of his targets now not one no his report you may have talked to somebody is associated with the campaign Roger stone no that's false I mean we asked all the questions and then I said well how do you view yourself are you a journalist you view this as reporting and his answer was well there's a difference which is our materials better presented etcetera etcetera he likes to put out a whole information is what are you saying here the public responded to it more than say The New York Times that's interesting The New York Times and I think it has everything to do with the Pentagon paper case and and that's what the Washington post and The New York Times the Pentagon papers a series of documents put together about the Vietnam War and the publishing of a series from page articles based on the information that came from the Pentagon papers is a landmark six three decision of the U. S. Supreme Court this was a big deal ruling that the government had failed to prove there was any harm to national security in the publication of papers justified under the first amendment's protection of freedom of the press well this Hillary Clinton get that we have a dual justice system that is the biggest problem.

Russian government
US election 2020: Sanders 'told of Russian effort to aid his campaign'

WAOK Saturday Morning

00:27 sec | 4 months ago

US election 2020: Sanders 'told of Russian effort to aid his campaign'

"Imports it appears the Russian government is trying to help Bernie Sanders gives the White House The Washington Post reports US intelligence officials have told the Vermont senator about the country's push to aid in this campaign it's part of Russia's efforts to interfere with the democratic primary election Sanders responded by calling Russian president Vladimir Putin and autocratic thugs and he stands firmly against their efforts the report comes after Sanders had a strong showing in both Iowa and New

Russian Government Bernie Sanders Washington Post Senator Russia President Trump Vladimir Putin Iowa White House United States Vermont
Man arrested for acting as Russian spy in Miami

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:47 sec | 4 months ago

Man arrested for acting as Russian spy in Miami

"Meanwhile the feds have arrested a man accused of acting as a Russian spy in South Florida prosecutors charged a man identified as a Russian spy Hector Alejandro Cabrera Fuentes was charged with conspiracy to act within the United States as an agent of foreign power the FBI says Fuentes fluid to Miami International Airport working for the Russian government they say he then snuck into a condo complex in Miami county where US government confidential source lives according to the criminal complaint the Russian official task when days with locating the confidential human source CHS his vehicle in the parking garage of the CHS his residence ambassador say when Fuentes his wife was flying out of Miami international she was stopped by federal agents and they found pictures of the U. S. sources license plate on her

Hector Alejandro Cabrera Fuent United States FBI Miami International Airport Miami County CHS Miami South Florida Official
Russia's Radio Sputnik airing in Kansas City

KNX Evening News

00:55 sec | 4 months ago

Russia's Radio Sputnik airing in Kansas City

"As the FBI and other federal federal agencies looked high and low for signs of Russian interference in the twenty twenty election you might be surprised to learn Russian propaganda is being transmitted right now on America's airwaves CBS news as CBS news correspondent Jeff the gays give it a listen Kansas city may be known for jazz there's a new sound these states you're listening airing on three stations here radio spot is funded by the Kremlin but delivered by Americans from a Washington studio the capital of the divided states of America US intelligence believes the Russian government uses Sputnik to influence American voters formally known as radio Moscow it has a TV equivalent called Russia today the Kansas city star newspaper warns beware of radio Sputnik adding that Putin uses mis information to

FBI America Jeff Russian Government Moscow Russia Putin CBS Kansas Washington Kansas City
DOJ open to reviewing credibility of any Ukraine-related material: Barr

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

13:23 min | 5 months ago

DOJ open to reviewing credibility of any Ukraine-related material: Barr

"Even after the acquittal of the president his lawyer Rudy Giuliani is pursuing allegations of corruption in Ukraine this past week Attorney General William Barr said the justice department would carefully scrutinize what Giuliani finds last July president trump made the phone call to Ukraine that led to impeachment he asked the president of Ukraine to investigate a mysterious Democratic National Committee computer server that Mr trump said was hidden in Ukraine we have found that odd request is a story that has grown over the years and was influenced by Moscow you may have wondered how the president was impeached over Ukraine of all places the answer is in the story of the mystery server a reminder that the US and Russia have been on opposite sides of a war in Ukraine since Russia's invasion in twenty fourteen Ukraine security is important to our security and the reason I believe that is that Ukraine is on the front line few people understand what's at stake as well as ambassador bill Taylor he led the U. S. embassy in Ukraine as the trump administration withheld military aid while pressing for investigations of Democrats it was a logical that could not be explained it was crazy trailers testimony carried the weight of his resume west point one hundred and first airborne in Vietnam thirty three years as a diplomat and an expert on Ukraine the Russians are fighting a hybrid war against Ukraine but not just by the crime they're fighting hybrid war against Europe and against the United States the war that the Russians are fighting in Ukraine we have a stake in we have a stake in but it's not just the military war was the cause hybrid wars more than tanks and soldiers hybrid war is information war it's cyber war made its economic war it's a tax on elections and as we know they've attacked our elections the Russian attack on the twenty sixteen election included hacking the computers of the Democratic National Committee US intelligence agencies found the Russian government inspired to help president elect trump selection chances when possible by discrediting secretary Clinton former deputy national intelligence officer and see I a Russia analyst Andrea Kendall Taylor worked on that report the report itself is based on a large body of evidence that demonstrated not only what Russia was doing but also it's intact and it's based on a number of different sources collected human intelligence technical intelligence you seem to be saying that the evidence is convincing that this isn't a close call that's absolutely right if you read the intelligence report it's the consensus view of three intelligence agencies at CIA and NSA and the FBI I'd like to highlight from the same conclusion was reached by the Republican led Senate select committee on intelligence the committee's report on Russian interference was unanimously approved by all of its democratic and Republican members rushes uses social media to him a credit mark Warner is vice chairman the Russian project was a top down government run covert operations that hacked into the DNC an individual's personal emails and weaponize that information to release it at the most important times but the idea that the trump campaign was helped by Russia even unwittingly was a unanimous judgment Mr trump would not accept and by the way folks just in case you were curious no Russia did not help me okay Russia the Russian hopes Mr troop begin a campaign to discredit the intelligence community's conclusions he tweeted so how and why are they so sure about hacking if they never even requested an examination of the computer servers in Mr trump's telling the FBI failed to look for evidence on the Democrats computer network the story of the mystery server was born you dealt directly with the FBI I did yeah sure would Robert Johnston was an investigator of the DNC hack for crown strike a leading cyber security company hired by the Democrats the same he told us the FBI didn't physically examined the DNC servers because crown strike gave the bureau copies of the data from the servers if there is also a server for a computer system of any kind that's involved in the incident you can take an exact bit for bit digital copy of what's on that system now that digital copy is just as good as having the real thing as far as you know the F. B. I. god what it needed and what it wanted exactly and and evidence of that is you don't hear the FBI complaining he's right a former senior government official familiar with the investigation told us that the FBI would have preferred to work along side crowd strikes investigators but the Democratic National Committee decided to give the bureau digital copies of its servers instead the official told us this was acceptable in fact even typical in FBI investigations the F. B. I. use the data to help indict twelve Russian intelligence agents for hacking the DNC but Mr trump's tweets persisted why did the DNC refused to turn over its server to the FBI and where are hidden and smashed DNC servers there were more than one hundred forty servers and the Democrats network but Mr trump created an image of a single box of incriminating information where is the server I want to know where is the server and what is the server saying with that being said all I can do is ask the question my people came to me Dan coats came to me and some others they said they think it's Russia I have president Putin he just said it's not Russia I will say this I don't see any reason why it would be but I really do want to see the server that statement leading Russia off the hook course president trump to issue a retraction the next day we'll probably through all of this Vladimir Putin wasn't just standing idly by he was working to shift blame away from Russia what we can say is that Russia did what Russia dies and that is piling on they amplify those narratives in ways that than advance Russia's own interests they look for conspiracy theories that are already out there they're picking up on elements or narratives that already exist in a society and amplifying those narratives that advance Russian interests the interested Putin was to drive a wedge between his enemy Ukrainian and Ukraine's most important ally the United States I successful prosperous western oriented Ukraine provides a direct threat to Putin's hold on power he can't how the successful Ukraine on his southern border because then it demonstrates to Russians what is possible we need to weeks after Mr trump's inauguration Hooton said in this news conference you it was not Russia that help Donald Trump but Ukraine that helped Hillary Clinton Russian media and U. S. conspiracy websites began to spend suspicion of Ukraine ultimately those rumors appealed to Mr trump's private lawyer Rudy Giuliani who was working to discredit the investigations of Russian meddling in twenty sixteen and there were concerns that there was another game being played another channel that Mr Giuliani was involved as head of the U. S. embassy in Ukraine bill Taylor was frustrated that Giuliani was agitating for investigations that were never official US policy did anyone at the state department ever direct you to investigate whether there was a server in Ukraine so why not no internet search for no one perhaps except the president in twenty seventeen for the first time he added Ukraine to the story of the server in an interview he said why wouldn't Hillary Clinton allow the FBI to see the server they brought in another company that I hear is Ukrainian based crown strike the reporter asked that's what I heard I heard it's owned by a very rich Ukrainian the securities and exchange commission shows that crowd strike is incorporated in Delaware and based in California it's larger shareholders are American venture capital firms over the years crowd strike has been hired by both the democratic and Republican parties so the server they say is held by a company whose primary ownership individual is from you perfect I'd like to see the server are there any links to your knowledge between crowd strike and anyone in Ukraine not to my knowledge was this something that the embassy was concerned about no during the investigation you were leading the crowd strike ever send any of the DNC's computer hardware to Ukraine now that that is that is insane and that is not within the realm of reality last July reality suffered a final blow the story Mr trump first adopted as a server the FBI was blocked from seeing and then became the server investigated by a Ukrainian company finally morphed into the server hidden in Ukraine in the call after the Ukrainian president ask for anti tank missiles to defend himself from Russia Mr trump replied I would like you to do us a favor though they say crowd strike I guess you have one of your wealthy people the server they say you crane hazard this was the first favor Mr trump asked for even before his request that Ukraine also investigate the son of vice president Biden this past November Mr trump spoke by phone to fox and friends the server to cloud strife or whatever it's called which is a country which is a company owned by a very wealthy Ukrainian and I still want to see that server you know the F. B. I.'s never gotten that server that's a big part of this whole thing why did they give it to Ukrainian company they did that are you sure the David to Ukraine well that's what the word is the word that Ukraine was involved was amplified by the president's defenders in the impeachment inquired think pointed to a twenty sixteen opinion article and social media posts written by Ukrainians that were critical of Mr trump as though they were equivalent to Russia's covert campaign targeting U. S. computer networks voting systems and social media Fiona hill Mr trump's former senior director for Russia on the National Security Council warned the committee some of you on this committee appear to believe that Russia and its security services did not conduct a campaign against our country and that pops somehow for some reason Ukraine days this is a fictional narrative that is being perpetrated in propagated by the Russian security services themselves what are the chances that this whispering campaign about a Democratic National Committee server in Ukraine is actually a Russian intelligence operation the Russian disinformation operation the Russians are very good and fast it's these fake stories that they have propagated and that's what they do they do it pretty well we have to be on guard against the that is the diversity from Vladimir Putin's perspective it worked last November as impeachment played out in America's next election season was under way he said at this forum thank god no one is accusing us of interfering in the U. S. selections anymore now they're accusing you cranes assembly not we reached out to the White House multiple times on this story but they did not

President Trump Rudy Giuliani Ukraine Attorney General William Barr Donald Trump
UK's Boris Johnson shakes up government with Cabinet shuffle

The Briefing

01:23 min | 5 months ago

UK's Boris Johnson shakes up government with Cabinet shuffle

"Boris Johnson's reshuffling his top team. So they might have been playing cool publicly but the said to be power neue in the cabinet about who still be in the job by the end of the day. The prime minister's having a purge his reshuffle kicked off at eight o'clock this morning next the promotions. By the time. Chris speaks to you this evening. The cabinet level changes will be dumb. So who's in the firing line? One man who appears vulnerables? Ben Wallace the defense secretary. You might remember. He's previously clashed with Downing Street's about defense spending and War Way L. Team in Westminster have also been hearing the names of other junior ministers. Who IN LINE FOR PROMOTION? My colleagues have details of the expected winners and losers and of course follow every twist and turn in our life blog now. He's the mysterious professor at the hall of the trump Russia scandal. Today Josef Mifsud speaks for the first time about his involvement he denies any links to the Russian government. He could be heard in crossfire out. Brilliant new podcast. Us Editor Ben Reilly Smith reveals the untold story of spies lies and an election like no other. There were six episodes. The first ones out today. Please do. Listen and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts

Ben Wallace Josef Mifsud Boris Johnson Ben Reilly Smith Prime Minister Westminster Chris Russia Editor
"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

13:36 min | 6 months ago

"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

"So you may have seen a strange and totally disturbing headline this week. Just that the entire Russian government resigned Including Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev and a whole host of other top level officials. Now this doesn't mean that Vladimir Putin's regime gene is over in fact quite the opposite. We're GONNA talk about this week on worldly part of the VOX media. podcast network are the ways in which should setting up plan for succession for someone coming after Vladimir Prudent for Putin to take over in a different role. I'm ZAC beach in here. Is Always with generalize outward hit him. Hey what's going on. We are also here with dre. Kendall Taylor Taylor who is a senior fellow at the Center for new American Security very well-known Russia expert and particularly authored a paper on regime succession. Some really happy. Happy that she's here happy to be with you so I have to tell you guys. I was running a little bit late this morning. And part of that is that I had a dream last night. That and this is real. This is all real That I shot Vladimir Putin accidentally well visiting Russia and it didn't go over well with the Russian government and it was quite disturbing and so overslept alarm and kind of freaked out. I think even over. We're preparing for the PODCAST. A podcast stress the Russians. Back by making you late somehow in your dream no. I was just so stressed out when I woke up. Because because I'd difficulty differentiating reality dreamland. That I like overslept by alarm I looked at I was like okay. What's going on and then filled later? So you shooting. Putin could be a reality for you and your mind. It seems like I was in a shootout John. Krasinski was there. It was really cared that you didn't actually shoot Putin power correct. That's actually the thrust of this episode shows our guest Andrea. I want to start with you. Tell US exactly what these reforms reforms quote Putin proposed this week might do I think the most important change was Putin's announcement about pretty radical changes to the constitution That would shift power away from the presidency towards the parliament. I think quite notably he also talked about strengthening this kind of relatively sleepy almost defunct a funk State Council which I think gives some clues about maybe what Putin is planning so basically. He's announce these constitutional changes not only. Did he shift power or away from the president towards the parliament but there were some other rules about any future. President can only serve two terms so at the end of the twelve years. That's it taking away. Those consecutive terms as we know Putin served two terms stepped out and then was back that will be no more and there was another interesting reform to that. Talked about about Any future president has to have had lived in Russia for twenty five consecutive years. Not hold any resident permits. So he's basically saying no. The future president in Russia will not be Alexei. Navalny or Koepke or anyone like that so in many ways just like you said these changes should be interpreted as setting up Putin Hooton to continue to rule Russia for the foreseeable future. Okay and that's kind of what I wanted to know is like if you look at this on paper. It seems like you know he's Setting up term limits. So it looks like he would then be kicked out. He's expected to. He's supposed to step down in two thousand twenty four that's when his term is up and he's giving more power word of the parliament. Can you kind of just explain 'cause like when I just look at this on paper. It looks like he's giving away power right. It looks like he's you know. Moving power away from the presidency toward for the parliament telling the parliament that they can pick new prime minister. You just kind of explain how that actually may extend his power. Because I think just looking at it. It's a little confusing. Yes so we would the one thing that we were all expecting that Putin would do something. I think. That's the timing of this caught everyone by surprise rave but we've known for a long time that Putin's his consecutive term limits expired twenty twenty four so he was going to have to do something people expected he would do something that would enable him to continue to rule and so now he's creating a Russia currently under this nineteen ninety-three constitution has a very strong executive branch. It's a very very strong presidential system. The previous President Boris Yeltsin wasn't really able to ever to fully leverage the powers that that constitution gave him but Putin obviously has been quite effective at fully exploiting the powers that are are pro allowed under the nineteen ninety-three constitution so Putin now is basically saying like there will never be another president as strong as I am and so he you know. Oh He's come a long he has taken Russia out of that. Very turbulent transition wave after the fall of the Soviet Union and he basically wants to to create a system that is less allows for less concentration of power So no one can really benefit the way that he did He is then changing and shifting power towards the parliament and I think than the expectation would be that President Putin would shift he would move over and serve of either as prime minister or he would take over as head of the State Council and I think the the thing. That's interesting is that there is some precedent for this. And so you if you look at Turkey you for example I was Kinda thought about this as like an Air John but in reverse Amazon had served as prime minister for something like eleven years and then through change the constitution to make for a strong presidential system step down as prime minister was elected to President and now he's able to continue to rule there so that's one one option he's moved powers president. Putin now has moved these powers towards the parliament so he could step in his prime minister or I think the most likely option in my mind seems names that he will step into this role as head of the State Council and be able to rule from there and again. There's another precedent when you look Kazakhstan and so that's something that we saw just as recently as twenty eighteen and I think was probably something that Putin was watching very closely and so they are nozzle by was president for almost thirty years. changed his constitution to empower. This new you know. He stepped in as head of the Security Council empowered that gave it more powers stepped in in there and allowed his successor to rule so I think he was watching that quite closely. He's basically setting up a new system shifting power to an area where he would be able to. Let's stop in and continue to control an influence domestic and foreign policy. I don't know until the end. No like the obvious question or at least that I have thinking about this is is why doesn't Putin. Just change the constitution to get rid of term limits and stay informal power and my understanding is that there are real concerns about popular backlash in that world right. He is at a relatively low ebb. popularity-wise Americans are used to thinking of Putin is being spoiler strongman but in actuality the economy's not doing very well. Well it seems like just cemented. His time as a fallen authoritarian would risk some kind of more direct backlash from the Russian populations that wrong. No I think that's exactly right even stepping back before yesterday I mean there were. He basically had a couple of options disposal. That would allow him to stay on one option. One would be he could pick a successor handpicked. Someone step down fade into the to the background in allow successor to run in elections and continue on That's a model. We've seen in some authoritarian regimes. It hasn't worked out that well. There are some really cool political science research that shows when an incumbent authoritarian regime doesn't actually stand in elections that the opposition than has a much higher chance of winning so we saw that for example in Kenya when Moi stepped down his chosen successor Kibaki lost elections Another highly personalized authoritarian regime in Ghana. Jerry Rawlings did the same thing. His handpicked successor. reince stepped in ran in elections in lost their so. That is something that looks like. That's probably not in the cards for Putin. The the the other option that as is as you rightly said is that he could have just abolish term limits. And that's what we saw in China Xi Jinping. He did that very early in his term to set up the situation where he could be ruler for life and and it is interesting. That honestly what. I expected what happened. I thought that Putin would find a way to change term limits in stay on In part because there's also kind of a global trend towards that happening we're seeing leaders across Africa and also all across the globe. There's been an increasing incidence of leaders who using referendum or other kind of legalistic mechanisms demonstrating that it's the will of the popular vote to legitimize the action that they are extending term limits so in in all honesty. That's what I thought would happen but this is another what we're seeing now. This shifting powers to a different is a constitutional change of another kind. That seems I think. Think a little bit less outrageous a little less egregious probably from popular perspective. It is interesting that Putin van will take this to a referendum. We've heard now. Oh By may first. Because he is he he does want to try to legitimize these actions but I think the the term limit extensions probably would have been seen by Russians Russians as unacceptable. He did face when he stepped back into office. In twenty twelve those huge street protests. And so I think that was probably top of mind for him too so the timing of this. This actually is what's fascinating to me because basically anyone who's the thing about this including you came early right and so I think one of the reasons that I should say before I continue is that I talked to a friend of ours read standish who's a journalist Moscow so anything I say the smartest probably likely because of him But the the doing this early was one to to stop a popular backlash to make sure that there weren't those big protests that we've seen so far but another one is that he's trying to set the table Oh for the important Duma elections in twenty twenty one the lower being the president. It's a lower house of parliament and where that's where they're going to need to ratify a lot outta these changes and so having a year plus ish to work on this to signal that this is what Putin wants the kind of system emme wants. It gives him time to lean on a lot of these lawmakers which shouldn't be that hard gas but also to just kind of set the table for what's happening And I'm also wondering 'cause there have been some reports of infighting within the government that there have been some elites who have been trying to. I've been thinking about well. What does life after Putin look like? And they've been sort of jockeying and fighting for position and maybe trying to get ahead and I wonder if this is Putin like slapping his kids you know and just stop it. I'm going to be here for a while and you guys need to stop infighting and just kind of get along with the package. It's it's I mean Putin is a smart tactician. This seems like a really good sort of just political move and also public relations move And I think he's learned the lessons lessons of the past couple of years. Yeah I think it's incredibly smart it. It seems like it's relatively well played and now it seems obvious. You know obviously hindsight that this was something that is planned in part because because of the the way that it latches up with the Duma elections like you mentioned but there is something to be said that the timing came as a total surprise that what happened the substance of what happens opens isn't necessarily surprising but the timing. I think caught almost everybody by surprise. And you are right to note that this is taking place amid the context of a lot of in-fighting. I mean I think you can kind of think back to what it was like In around two thousand eight when no one knew what Putin was going to do them. The level of infighting is really intense hence. And there's been a lot of as you said elites jockeying for position using laws going after each other trying to eliminate opposition so the elite infighting has been intense and and also the public dissatisfaction. When you look at Putin's public approval ratings are down back towards the sixties down from upper eighties after the sixties? That's love love. Hello or the illegal annexation of Crimea. His public approval rating was in the high eighties. And so in this you know he's down around sixty three percent at the moment and so having kind kind of this elite intense in-fighting high levels of public dissatisfaction. I think when you look forward. I don't think that any of that was going to is likely to get any better. So certainly from an economic economic perspective Russia's economy is expected to grow more than one two percent of GDP. So I think if you're Putin you're looking forward. None of the elites are jockeying because there's all of of this uncertainty looming about what his future is going to be. The economy isn't gate set to to improve by any means. And so he does it now. I think to avoid having the pressure build up to twenty twenty four. If you're in authority leader particularly a highly personalized one like Putin leadership transitions and succession are really scary. Times and they have to be managed carefully and so to do it now. I think is in large part because because of the context of the discontent from the from the public and it is interesting. Like you said gives Russia time Putin time ahead of the twenty twenty one Duma elections because those those I think now will be a really are key I right now. The United Russia the party that Supports Putin Putin isn't the head of the party which I think is really interesting but kind of brush off a little bit because their popularity is suffering as well but it you know right now they hold a two thirds majority in the Duma which allows them to do all sorts of things and so I think having that majority continue in twenty twenty one is going to be critical for allowing Putin's plans to unfold smoothly early..

President Putin Putin Hooton Putin van president Russia prime minister President Boris Yeltsin Dmitry Medvedev Kendall Taylor Taylor Russian government senior fellow Jerry Rawlings United Russia Krasinski funk State Council Kazakhstan Andrea Soviet Union
"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

13:36 min | 6 months ago

"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

"So you may have seen a strange and totally disturbing headline this week. Just that the entire Russian government resigned Including Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev and a whole host of other top level officials. Now this doesn't mean that Vladimir Putin's regime gene is over in fact quite the opposite. We're GONNA talk about this week on worldly part of the VOX media. podcast network are the ways in which should setting up plan for succession for someone coming after Vladimir Prudent for Putin to take over in a different role. I'm ZAC beach in here. Is Always with generalize outward hit him. Hey what's going on. We are also here with dre. Kendall Taylor Taylor who is a senior fellow at the Center for new American Security very well-known Russia expert and particularly authored a paper on regime succession. Some really happy. Happy that she's here happy to be with you so I have to tell you guys. I was running a little bit late this morning. And part of that is that I had a dream last night. That and this is real. This is all real That I shot Vladimir Putin accidentally well visiting Russia and it didn't go over well with the Russian government and it was quite disturbing and so overslept alarm and kind of freaked out. I think even over. We're preparing for the PODCAST. A podcast stress the Russians. Back by making you late somehow in your dream no. I was just so stressed out when I woke up. Because because I'd difficulty differentiating reality dreamland. That I like overslept by alarm I looked at I was like okay. What's going on and then filled later? So you shooting. Putin could be a reality for you and your mind. It seems like I was in a shootout John. Krasinski was there. It was really cared that you didn't actually shoot Putin power correct. That's actually the thrust of this episode shows our guest Andrea. I want to start with you. Tell US exactly what these reforms reforms quote Putin proposed this week might do I think the most important change was Putin's announcement about pretty radical changes to the constitution That would shift power away from the presidency towards the parliament. I think quite notably he also talked about strengthening this kind of relatively sleepy almost defunct a funk State Council which I think gives some clues about maybe what Putin is planning so basically. He's announce these constitutional changes not only. Did he shift power or away from the president towards the parliament but there were some other rules about any future. President can only serve two terms so at the end of the twelve years. That's it taking away. Those consecutive terms as we know Putin served two terms stepped out and then was back that will be no more and there was another interesting reform to that. Talked about about Any future president has to have had lived in Russia for twenty five consecutive years. Not hold any resident permits. So he's basically saying no. The future president in Russia will not be Alexei. Navalny or Koepke or anyone like that so in many ways just like you said these changes should be interpreted as setting up Putin Hooton to continue to rule Russia for the foreseeable future. Okay and that's kind of what I wanted to know is like if you look at this on paper. It seems like you know he's Setting up term limits. So it looks like he would then be kicked out. He's expected to. He's supposed to step down in two thousand twenty four that's when his term is up and he's giving more power word of the parliament. Can you kind of just explain 'cause like when I just look at this on paper. It looks like he's giving away power right. It looks like he's you know. Moving power away from the presidency toward for the parliament telling the parliament that they can pick new prime minister. You just kind of explain how that actually may extend his power. Because I think just looking at it. It's a little confusing. Yes so we would the one thing that we were all expecting that Putin would do something. I think. That's the timing of this caught everyone by surprise rave but we've known for a long time that Putin's his consecutive term limits expired twenty twenty four so he was going to have to do something people expected he would do something that would enable him to continue to rule and so now he's creating a Russia currently under this nineteen ninety-three constitution has a very strong executive branch. It's a very very strong presidential system. The previous President Boris Yeltsin wasn't really able to ever to fully leverage the powers that that constitution gave him but Putin obviously has been quite effective at fully exploiting the powers that are are pro allowed under the nineteen ninety-three constitution so Putin now is basically saying like there will never be another president as strong as I am and so he you know. Oh He's come a long he has taken Russia out of that. Very turbulent transition wave after the fall of the Soviet Union and he basically wants to to create a system that is less allows for less concentration of power So no one can really benefit the way that he did He is then changing and shifting power towards the parliament and I think than the expectation would be that President Putin would shift he would move over and serve of either as prime minister or he would take over as head of the State Council and I think the the thing. That's interesting is that there is some precedent for this. And so you if you look at Turkey you for example I was Kinda thought about this as like an Air John but in reverse Amazon had served as prime minister for something like eleven years and then through change the constitution to make for a strong presidential system step down as prime minister was elected to President and now he's able to continue to rule there so that's one one option he's moved powers president. Putin now has moved these powers towards the parliament so he could step in his prime minister or I think the most likely option in my mind seems names that he will step into this role as head of the State Council and be able to rule from there and again. There's another precedent when you look Kazakhstan and so that's something that we saw just as recently as twenty eighteen and I think was probably something that Putin was watching very closely and so they are nozzle by was president for almost thirty years. changed his constitution to empower. This new you know. He stepped in as head of the Security Council empowered that gave it more powers stepped in in there and allowed his successor to rule so I think he was watching that quite closely. He's basically setting up a new system shifting power to an area where he would be able to. Let's stop in and continue to control an influence domestic and foreign policy. I don't know until the end. No like the obvious question or at least that I have thinking about this is is why doesn't Putin. Just change the constitution to get rid of term limits and stay informal power and my understanding is that there are real concerns about popular backlash in that world right. He is at a relatively low ebb. popularity-wise Americans are used to thinking of Putin is being spoiler strongman but in actuality the economy's not doing very well. Well it seems like just cemented. His time as a fallen authoritarian would risk some kind of more direct backlash from the Russian populations that wrong. No I think that's exactly right even stepping back before yesterday I mean there were. He basically had a couple of options disposal. That would allow him to stay on one option. One would be he could pick a successor handpicked. Someone step down fade into the to the background in allow successor to run in elections and continue on That's a model. We've seen in some authoritarian regimes. It hasn't worked out that well. There are some really cool political science research that shows when an incumbent authoritarian regime doesn't actually stand in elections that the opposition than has a much higher chance of winning so we saw that for example in Kenya when Moi stepped down his chosen successor Kibaki lost elections Another highly personalized authoritarian regime in Ghana. Jerry Rawlings did the same thing. His handpicked successor. reince stepped in ran in elections in lost their so. That is something that looks like. That's probably not in the cards for Putin. The the the other option that as is as you rightly said is that he could have just abolish term limits. And that's what we saw in China Xi Jinping. He did that very early in his term to set up the situation where he could be ruler for life and and it is interesting. That honestly what. I expected what happened. I thought that Putin would find a way to change term limits in stay on In part because there's also kind of a global trend towards that happening we're seeing leaders across Africa and also all across the globe. There's been an increasing incidence of leaders who using referendum or other kind of legalistic mechanisms demonstrating that it's the will of the popular vote to legitimize the action that they are extending term limits so in in all honesty. That's what I thought would happen but this is another what we're seeing now. This shifting powers to a different is a constitutional change of another kind. That seems I think. Think a little bit less outrageous a little less egregious probably from popular perspective. It is interesting that Putin van will take this to a referendum. We've heard now. Oh By may first. Because he is he he does want to try to legitimize these actions but I think the the term limit extensions probably would have been seen by Russians Russians as unacceptable. He did face when he stepped back into office. In twenty twelve those huge street protests. And so I think that was probably top of mind for him too so the timing of this. This actually is what's fascinating to me because basically anyone who's the thing about this including you came early right and so I think one of the reasons that I should say before I continue is that I talked to a friend of ours read standish who's a journalist Moscow so anything I say the smartest probably likely because of him But the the doing this early was one to to stop a popular backlash to make sure that there weren't those big protests that we've seen so far but another one is that he's trying to set the table Oh for the important Duma elections in twenty twenty one the lower being the president. It's a lower house of parliament and where that's where they're going to need to ratify a lot outta these changes and so having a year plus ish to work on this to signal that this is what Putin wants the kind of system emme wants. It gives him time to lean on a lot of these lawmakers which shouldn't be that hard gas but also to just kind of set the table for what's happening And I'm also wondering 'cause there have been some reports of infighting within the government that there have been some elites who have been trying to. I've been thinking about well. What does life after Putin look like? And they've been sort of jockeying and fighting for position and maybe trying to get ahead and I wonder if this is Putin like slapping his kids you know and just stop it. I'm going to be here for a while and you guys need to stop infighting and just kind of get along with the package. It's it's I mean Putin is a smart tactician. This seems like a really good sort of just political move and also public relations move And I think he's learned the lessons lessons of the past couple of years. Yeah I think it's incredibly smart it. It seems like it's relatively well played and now it seems obvious. You know obviously hindsight that this was something that is planned in part because because of the the way that it latches up with the Duma elections like you mentioned but there is something to be said that the timing came as a total surprise that what happened the substance of what happens opens isn't necessarily surprising but the timing. I think caught almost everybody by surprise. And you are right to note that this is taking place amid the context of a lot of in-fighting. I mean I think you can kind of think back to what it was like In around two thousand eight when no one knew what Putin was going to do them. The level of infighting is really intense hence. And there's been a lot of as you said elites jockeying for position using laws going after each other trying to eliminate opposition so the elite infighting has been intense and and also the public dissatisfaction. When you look at Putin's public approval ratings are down back towards the sixties down from upper eighties after the sixties? That's love love. Hello or the illegal annexation of Crimea. His public approval rating was in the high eighties. And so in this you know he's down around sixty three percent at the moment and so having kind kind of this elite intense in-fighting high levels of public dissatisfaction. I think when you look forward. I don't think that any of that was going to is likely to get any better. So certainly from an economic economic perspective Russia's economy is expected to grow more than one two percent of GDP. So I think if you're Putin you're looking forward. None of the elites are jockeying because there's all of of this uncertainty looming about what his future is going to be. The economy isn't gate set to to improve by any means. And so he does it now. I think to avoid having the pressure build up to twenty twenty four. If you're in authority leader particularly a highly personalized one like Putin leadership transitions and succession are really scary. Times and they have to be managed carefully and so to do it now. I think is in large part because because of the context of the discontent from the from the public and it is interesting. Like you said gives Russia time Putin time ahead of the twenty twenty one Duma elections because those those I think now will be a really are key I right now. The United Russia the party that Supports Putin Putin isn't the head of the party which I think is really interesting but kind of brush off a little bit because their popularity is suffering as well but it you know right now they hold a two thirds majority in the Duma which allows them to do all sorts of things and so I think having that majority continue in twenty twenty one is going to be critical for allowing Putin's plans to unfold smoothly early..

President Putin Putin Hooton Putin van president Russia prime minister President Boris Yeltsin Dmitry Medvedev Kendall Taylor Taylor Russian government senior fellow Jerry Rawlings United Russia Krasinski funk State Council Kazakhstan Andrea Soviet Union
"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

13:36 min | 6 months ago

"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

"So you may have seen a strange and totally disturbing headline this week. Just that the entire Russian government resigned Including Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev and a whole host of other top level officials. Now this doesn't mean that Vladimir Putin's regime gene is over in fact quite the opposite. We're GONNA talk about this week on worldly part of the VOX media. podcast network are the ways in which should setting up plan for succession for someone coming after Vladimir Prudent for Putin to take over in a different role. I'm ZAC beach in here. Is Always with generalize outward hit him. Hey what's going on. We are also here with dre. Kendall Taylor Taylor who is a senior fellow at the Center for new American Security very well-known Russia expert and particularly authored a paper on regime succession. Some really happy. Happy that she's here happy to be with you so I have to tell you guys. I was running a little bit late this morning. And part of that is that I had a dream last night. That and this is real. This is all real That I shot Vladimir Putin accidentally well visiting Russia and it didn't go over well with the Russian government and it was quite disturbing and so overslept alarm and kind of freaked out. I think even over. We're preparing for the PODCAST. A podcast stress the Russians. Back by making you late somehow in your dream no. I was just so stressed out when I woke up. Because because I'd difficulty differentiating reality dreamland. That I like overslept by alarm I looked at I was like okay. What's going on and then filled later? So you shooting. Putin could be a reality for you and your mind. It seems like I was in a shootout John. Krasinski was there. It was really cared that you didn't actually shoot Putin power correct. That's actually the thrust of this episode shows our guest Andrea. I want to start with you. Tell US exactly what these reforms reforms quote Putin proposed this week might do I think the most important change was Putin's announcement about pretty radical changes to the constitution That would shift power away from the presidency towards the parliament. I think quite notably he also talked about strengthening this kind of relatively sleepy almost defunct a funk State Council which I think gives some clues about maybe what Putin is planning so basically. He's announce these constitutional changes not only. Did he shift power or away from the president towards the parliament but there were some other rules about any future. President can only serve two terms so at the end of the twelve years. That's it taking away. Those consecutive terms as we know Putin served two terms stepped out and then was back that will be no more and there was another interesting reform to that. Talked about about Any future president has to have had lived in Russia for twenty five consecutive years. Not hold any resident permits. So he's basically saying no. The future president in Russia will not be Alexei. Navalny or Koepke or anyone like that so in many ways just like you said these changes should be interpreted as setting up Putin Hooton to continue to rule Russia for the foreseeable future. Okay and that's kind of what I wanted to know is like if you look at this on paper. It seems like you know he's Setting up term limits. So it looks like he would then be kicked out. He's expected to. He's supposed to step down in two thousand twenty four that's when his term is up and he's giving more power word of the parliament. Can you kind of just explain 'cause like when I just look at this on paper. It looks like he's giving away power right. It looks like he's you know. Moving power away from the presidency toward for the parliament telling the parliament that they can pick new prime minister. You just kind of explain how that actually may extend his power. Because I think just looking at it. It's a little confusing. Yes so we would the one thing that we were all expecting that Putin would do something. I think. That's the timing of this caught everyone by surprise rave but we've known for a long time that Putin's his consecutive term limits expired twenty twenty four so he was going to have to do something people expected he would do something that would enable him to continue to rule and so now he's creating a Russia currently under this nineteen ninety-three constitution has a very strong executive branch. It's a very very strong presidential system. The previous President Boris Yeltsin wasn't really able to ever to fully leverage the powers that that constitution gave him but Putin obviously has been quite effective at fully exploiting the powers that are are pro allowed under the nineteen ninety-three constitution so Putin now is basically saying like there will never be another president as strong as I am and so he you know. Oh He's come a long he has taken Russia out of that. Very turbulent transition wave after the fall of the Soviet Union and he basically wants to to create a system that is less allows for less concentration of power So no one can really benefit the way that he did He is then changing and shifting power towards the parliament and I think than the expectation would be that President Putin would shift he would move over and serve of either as prime minister or he would take over as head of the State Council and I think the the thing. That's interesting is that there is some precedent for this. And so you if you look at Turkey you for example I was Kinda thought about this as like an Air John but in reverse Amazon had served as prime minister for something like eleven years and then through change the constitution to make for a strong presidential system step down as prime minister was elected to President and now he's able to continue to rule there so that's one one option he's moved powers president. Putin now has moved these powers towards the parliament so he could step in his prime minister or I think the most likely option in my mind seems names that he will step into this role as head of the State Council and be able to rule from there and again. There's another precedent when you look Kazakhstan and so that's something that we saw just as recently as twenty eighteen and I think was probably something that Putin was watching very closely and so they are nozzle by was president for almost thirty years. changed his constitution to empower. This new you know. He stepped in as head of the Security Council empowered that gave it more powers stepped in in there and allowed his successor to rule so I think he was watching that quite closely. He's basically setting up a new system shifting power to an area where he would be able to. Let's stop in and continue to control an influence domestic and foreign policy. I don't know until the end. No like the obvious question or at least that I have thinking about this is is why doesn't Putin. Just change the constitution to get rid of term limits and stay informal power and my understanding is that there are real concerns about popular backlash in that world right. He is at a relatively low ebb. popularity-wise Americans are used to thinking of Putin is being spoiler strongman but in actuality the economy's not doing very well. Well it seems like just cemented. His time as a fallen authoritarian would risk some kind of more direct backlash from the Russian populations that wrong. No I think that's exactly right even stepping back before yesterday I mean there were. He basically had a couple of options disposal. That would allow him to stay on one option. One would be he could pick a successor handpicked. Someone step down fade into the to the background in allow successor to run in elections and continue on That's a model. We've seen in some authoritarian regimes. It hasn't worked out that well. There are some really cool political science research that shows when an incumbent authoritarian regime doesn't actually stand in elections that the opposition than has a much higher chance of winning so we saw that for example in Kenya when Moi stepped down his chosen successor Kibaki lost elections Another highly personalized authoritarian regime in Ghana. Jerry Rawlings did the same thing. His handpicked successor. reince stepped in ran in elections in lost their so. That is something that looks like. That's probably not in the cards for Putin. The the the other option that as is as you rightly said is that he could have just abolish term limits. And that's what we saw in China Xi Jinping. He did that very early in his term to set up the situation where he could be ruler for life and and it is interesting. That honestly what. I expected what happened. I thought that Putin would find a way to change term limits in stay on In part because there's also kind of a global trend towards that happening we're seeing leaders across Africa and also all across the globe. There's been an increasing incidence of leaders who using referendum or other kind of legalistic mechanisms demonstrating that it's the will of the popular vote to legitimize the action that they are extending term limits so in in all honesty. That's what I thought would happen but this is another what we're seeing now. This shifting powers to a different is a constitutional change of another kind. That seems I think. Think a little bit less outrageous a little less egregious probably from popular perspective. It is interesting that Putin van will take this to a referendum. We've heard now. Oh By may first. Because he is he he does want to try to legitimize these actions but I think the the term limit extensions probably would have been seen by Russians Russians as unacceptable. He did face when he stepped back into office. In twenty twelve those huge street protests. And so I think that was probably top of mind for him too so the timing of this. This actually is what's fascinating to me because basically anyone who's the thing about this including you came early right and so I think one of the reasons that I should say before I continue is that I talked to a friend of ours read standish who's a journalist Moscow so anything I say the smartest probably likely because of him But the the doing this early was one to to stop a popular backlash to make sure that there weren't those big protests that we've seen so far but another one is that he's trying to set the table Oh for the important Duma elections in twenty twenty one the lower being the president. It's a lower house of parliament and where that's where they're going to need to ratify a lot outta these changes and so having a year plus ish to work on this to signal that this is what Putin wants the kind of system emme wants. It gives him time to lean on a lot of these lawmakers which shouldn't be that hard gas but also to just kind of set the table for what's happening And I'm also wondering 'cause there have been some reports of infighting within the government that there have been some elites who have been trying to. I've been thinking about well. What does life after Putin look like? And they've been sort of jockeying and fighting for position and maybe trying to get ahead and I wonder if this is Putin like slapping his kids you know and just stop it. I'm going to be here for a while and you guys need to stop infighting and just kind of get along with the package. It's it's I mean Putin is a smart tactician. This seems like a really good sort of just political move and also public relations move And I think he's learned the lessons lessons of the past couple of years. Yeah I think it's incredibly smart it. It seems like it's relatively well played and now it seems obvious. You know obviously hindsight that this was something that is planned in part because because of the the way that it latches up with the Duma elections like you mentioned but there is something to be said that the timing came as a total surprise that what happened the substance of what happens opens isn't necessarily surprising but the timing. I think caught almost everybody by surprise. And you are right to note that this is taking place amid the context of a lot of in-fighting. I mean I think you can kind of think back to what it was like In around two thousand eight when no one knew what Putin was going to do them. The level of infighting is really intense hence. And there's been a lot of as you said elites jockeying for position using laws going after each other trying to eliminate opposition so the elite infighting has been intense and and also the public dissatisfaction. When you look at Putin's public approval ratings are down back towards the sixties down from upper eighties after the sixties? That's love love. Hello or the illegal annexation of Crimea. His public approval rating was in the high eighties. And so in this you know he's down around sixty three percent at the moment and so having kind kind of this elite intense in-fighting high levels of public dissatisfaction. I think when you look forward. I don't think that any of that was going to is likely to get any better. So certainly from an economic economic perspective Russia's economy is expected to grow more than one two percent of GDP. So I think if you're Putin you're looking forward. None of the elites are jockeying because there's all of of this uncertainty looming about what his future is going to be. The economy isn't gate set to to improve by any means. And so he does it now. I think to avoid having the pressure build up to twenty twenty four. If you're in authority leader particularly a highly personalized one like Putin leadership transitions and succession are really scary. Times and they have to be managed carefully and so to do it now. I think is in large part because because of the context of the discontent from the from the public and it is interesting. Like you said gives Russia time Putin time ahead of the twenty twenty one Duma elections because those those I think now will be a really are key I right now. The United Russia the party that Supports Putin Putin isn't the head of the party which I think is really interesting but kind of brush off a little bit because their popularity is suffering as well but it you know right now they hold a two thirds majority in the Duma which allows them to do all sorts of things and so I think having that majority continue in twenty twenty one is going to be critical for allowing Putin's plans to unfold smoothly early..

President Putin Putin Hooton Putin van president Russia prime minister President Boris Yeltsin Dmitry Medvedev Kendall Taylor Taylor Russian government senior fellow Jerry Rawlings United Russia Krasinski funk State Council Kazakhstan Andrea Soviet Union
"russian government" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"russian government" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"The Clinton campaign conspired to violate among other laws the federal computer intrusion statute, and they have been so charged see United States v Nettie show at all. And then there are probably three and a half lines redacted for harm to ongoing matter. Second while the investigation identified numerous links between individuals with ties to the Russian government and individuals associated with the Trump campaign. The evidence was not sufficient to support criminal charges. Among other things. The evidence was not sufficient to charge any campaign official as an unregistered agent of the Russian government or other Russian principal and our evidence about the June ninth two thousand sixteen meeting and WikiLeaks is release of hack materials was not sufficient to charge a criminal campaign finance violation further. The evidence was not sufficient to charge that any member of the Trump campaign consp-. Fired with representatives of the Russian government to interfere in the two thousand sixteen election third the investigation established that several individuals affiliated with the Trump campaign. Lied to the office and congress about their interactions with Russian affiliated individuals and related matters. Those lies materially impaired the investigation of Russian election interference the office charged. Some of those lies as violations of the federal false statements statute, former national security adviser, Michael Flynn pleaded guilty to lying about his interactions with Russian ambassador Kislyak during the transition period. George Papadopoulos a foreign policy adviser during the campaign pleaded guilty to lying to investigators about inter alia, the nature and timing of his interactions with Joseph Smith sued.

Russian government George Papadopoulos Nettie United States Clinton Michael Flynn congress Joseph Smith WikiLeaks principal official
"russian government" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"russian government" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Muller's alleged that the Russian government gave it to WikiLeaks. But we don't know with stone. Trump would they also aware of all of this to that here. Are you aware? Do you get that from? That they were aware that the Russian government gave it to them. He just throws that out there. Now, this is a guy who's not only to host of meet the press. He's the chief political journalist correspondent for NBC news. He just flops it out there. Go ahead. Then we have Jeffrey Toobin. CNN? Cut sixteen go. I think that may be an extremely important use of the passive voice in that indictment was directed. First of all he's supposed to be a lawyer. If a prosecutor a prosecutor's office rights. That stone was directed. What is stone say about being directed? Now, you see stone on TV's bit of a circus clown. But. Does he say he was directed by somebody? Where's the evidence for that? Well, no evidence is established for that other than the allegation. Using those words. In the charge..

Russian government Jeffrey Toobin Trump prosecutor Muller NBC CNN
"russian government" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"russian government" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Muller's alleged that the Russian government gave it to WikiLeaks. But we don't know is for stone. Trump would they also aware of all of this to the year. Also, where do you get that from that they were aware that the Russian government gave it to them? He just throws that out there. This is a guy who's not only the host of meet the press. He's the chief political journalist correspondent for NBC news. He just flops it out there. Go ahead. Then we have Jeffrey Toobin. On CNN. Cut sixteen go. I think that may be an extremely important use of the past voice in that indictment was directed. First of all he's supposed to be a lawyer. If a prosecutor a prosecutor's office rights. That stone was directed. What is stone said about being directed? Now, you see stone on TV's bit of a circus clown. But. Does he say he was directed by somebody? Where's the evidence for that? Well, no evidence for that other than the allegation. Using those words. In the charge. That's it..

stone Russian government Jeffrey Toobin Trump prosecutor Muller NBC CNN
"russian government" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"What these terrorists were doing were whipping these palestinians up into a frenzy and getting them to crash the border and getting them into scuffles with the israeli defense forces in these scuffles turned violent and deadly and now they're all martyrs and they use this for their cause they're just using these palestinian people as pause at least that's my position but we'll check it out with robert spencer coming up in just a moment here on case supposed to stick around for that oldest living person at one hundred twenty eight they say she's one hundred twenty eight soon to be one twenty nine the russian government says that her name is coco is istanbul lavar is one hundred twenty eight they've got a passport here that says she was born in eighteen eighty nine she says she's one hundred twenty eight she's she recalls a lot of things in this interview i'm reading in the mirror she recalls the scary nazi tanks passing by our home she talks a lot about the you know the the former soviet union and communism and how they didn't treat her all that well she's she's not happy to be alive and it sounds like she's never been happy to be alive she says she has lived a single happy day in her life she says her longevity is punishment hundred perfectly healthy this is depressing well it's just you know she's lived in a very depressed place her whole life she's seen all of these governmental changes and she seemed the worst of humanity and and now you know all of our friends are gone oliver families gone yeah i guess i could see that right but otherwise she appears to be in good health i mean seriously so she is she says i see people going in for sports eating something special keeping themselves fit but i have no idea how i lived until now she let me see in terms of she shut she doesn't eat meat she doesn't like soup she loves fermented milk jerry help us yeah i've heard of it before but i can't remember she loves fermented milk hook so is that what happens after milk goes sour ferments then you can drink it period where you can't drink it and then all of a sudden you can the fermentation process is increasing the shelf life of milk looks yeah.

robert spencer russian government istanbul lavar soviet union milk
"russian government" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"The russian government at the direction of president vladimir putin waged a covert influence campaign to interfere in the twenty sixteen us presidential election with the goal of hurting democrat hillary clinton's candidacy and helping trump's campaign we further assess putin and the russian government developed a clear preference for presidentelect trump the intelligence community report reads noting later that the kremlin aspire to help presidentelect trump's election chances when possible by discrediting secretary clinton house intelligence committee officials said they spent hundreds of hours reviewing raw source material used by the intelligence services in the assessment and said it did not meet the appropriate standards to make the claim about helping trump the officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about the intelligence material leak leak leak conway said there will be a second report just dealing with the intelligence assessment and its credibility now skipping down to the democratic reaction here which of course is the juicy hall cal part democrats have criticized republicans on the committee for shortening the investigation pointing to multiple contacts between trump's campaign and russia and saying they have seen so far too few witnesses to make any judgment on collusion now here's the problem with this narrative coming from the democrats on the committee because look on its face if we're being objective certainly this looks partisan right it's the republicans the republican control committee saying that the republicans sitting president is a okay and he didn't do anything wrong on its face that looks a little shady right from bloomberg special counsel robert mueller's investigation into whether president donald trump obstructed justice is set to be close to completion this is robert mueller this is the special counsel right like this is the guy who's running the show looking into the whole deal who's saying yeah we're about done here it's about closing time he may set aside continuing at bloomberg he makes that aside while he finished his other key parts of his probe such as possible collusion and the hacking of democrats according to current and former us officials that's because mueller may calculate that if he tries to bring charges in the obstruction case the part that may hit closest to trump personally witnesses may become less cooperative and other parts of the probe or the president may move to shut down altogether the.

president us donald trump secretary presidentelect trump bloomberg special counsel robert mueller russian government russia conway trump hillary clinton vladimir putin
"russian government" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"That the russian government was the primary cooperate when it came to the hacking of of the emails of john podesta and the dnc it certainly something that the united states and the russians do to one another and have done to one another for decades and so nobody should put it past putin or the russians to have done it in this case and it certainly also possible that there were people in the trump campaign who became aware after the fact that this was done in who somehow helped to decide how this information was going to be disseminated but i think given the implications that this issue has in terms number one of the relationship between two extremely dangerous nuclear armed powers which is moscow and and and and washington who on many occasions in the past have almost obliterated the planet through an exchange of nuclear weapons and who are in many places in the world at loggerheads with one another as well as the climate in washington in which any kind of interaction with the russians now become something that is a ground for suspicion what i've always says what we have to be very careful as journalists than as citizens to make sure that we don't get ahead of ourselves in terms of the claims that we're making it but we have to adhere to the evidence that is available before we decide that official claims from the cia and the nsa and the fbi agencies with a long history of lying and deceit an error before we accept them is true and one of the things that we've seen over the past year or a year and a half is large media outlets in case after case after case after case acting very recklessly publishing stories that turned out to be completely false that needed to be retracted that got just credited which is the thing that then enables donald trump to try and encourage people not to trust the media so no matter your views on russia and i think it's really dangerous at us and russian relations are probably up their worse point as they've been since the fall of of of the soviet union something that nobody should think is a good thing come despite all the claims that that that trump was going to serve the interest of the russians the.

russian government john podesta dnc united states putin nuclear weapons washington cia media outlets donald trump russia moscow official fbi soviet union
"russian government" Discussed on Trumpcast

Trumpcast

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on Trumpcast

"So while it doesn't difficulty ferry that trump in fact was personally involved you're approved to have this it does uh say that he either knew or should have known what was going on or at least some of what was going on look is this collusion who is not a term with a real meaning in this context is this interaction between the russian government and the trump campaign over things like hacked emails and needing very cooperation between the campaign on the russian government should is seems to be when we say collusion your right it's not it's not a legal term of art but what i mean by it is did the russians intervened in the election in a way that that would have been criminal and did the trump campaign no about it and work with them to make that more effective to help them and are we there yet i mean of we got if you know by that definition have we his is top dopoulos acknowledging collusion well papadopoulos is uh acknowledging that he had conversations with people he believed could be representatives of the russian government and in one case even uh a relative of president unique in which they'd just got dirt by which meant they meant thousands of email about hillary clinton um you know you can say well that's kind of memo or to you know the trump tower meeting where part of emails or jerk was on offer right but i am hit or maybe they weren't here he asked about a but conner nothing came up here.

russian government russians president hillary clinton conner
"russian government" Discussed on The Global Politico

The Global Politico

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on The Global Politico

"The intelligence picture that we were seeing was in emerging picture and so by late summer it was pretty clear that the russian government at the highest levels of the russian government were behind the hacking of the dnc and once that picture became clear then we had to carefully consider what do we do about it my view in the view of others was we have to tell the american public what we know during the election season before the election it would be unforgivable we didn't tell the american public what we know and as a corporate lawyer the analogy that i used in the in the way i think about it is if you see if you're the public issue or of a stock and you see a powerful actor trying to manipulate the price of your stock you have a duty to tell the investing public what you know and so that was something that we had to very carefully considered because those of us in national security in the intelligence community did not want to inject ourselves into the midst of a very heated campaign and it was already being said that it without you know a federal government takeover to offer well you had one of the candidates saying the election outcomes going to be rigged and so we had to think very carefully about how to address this and this was not something you do one morning in a tweet so um we did carefully consider it there was a view.

russian government dnc
"russian government" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"And she's also lobbied against the magnitsky act which is the sanctions on members of the russian government who the us government believes were were kind of involved in the is essentially judicial murder of of sergei magnitsky who is a russian whistleblower she's not somebody who works for the russian government now you could look at that and say while she's just to kind of person acting on her an interest some people have talked to said well actually russian intelligence tends not to send people who all employees of the government's dudes intelligence work for it either they tend to use people who are connected in some different way so i think you can kind of spin that spin that both ways she's she's clearly not a kind of insignificant figure but nor is she a kind of colonel in the kgb this is yet another scandal in president trump's short time in office and you've covered the mall as you said earlier will this latest revelation rumble on in the background as the others have what does it feel different team in some way this one feels a bit different to me i mean that have been lots of different russia stories over the past six months of donald trump's presidency in an even before he took office war that was no evidence of before was kind of active collusion between members of the trump campaign and russian individuals in this case russian individual who is presented as as being russian government lawyer though if a fight us i tried to explain that's not quite accurate description.

murder sergei magnitsky russian government kgb donald trump us president russia six months
"russian government" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on Pod Save America

"So what was juniors response of course quote if it's what you say i love it especially later in the summer junior goes on to set up the meeting with the russian government attorney paul manafort jared kushner and then ford's the entire email chain to manafort an kushner just to make sure they have no plausible deniability fantastic fantastic and just the gut assisted cherry on the on the top of the sunday there uh goldstone the guy who set up the whole thing on the email a checked into the meeting using foursquare because it was the year 2010 ekeus affair with us about it out as my space the last person who still using force rare of the hall thank you know we have the longrunning sad joke on this podcast was if yes elector thinking that a if we if there is an email fell from raw the russian government to trump coordinating hacking of hillary clinton paul ryan was so do nothing and now i use that example as the absolute extreme thing would obviously never happened in lo and behold it us and everything we predicted what happened after that magical pretend email came out has also happened which is entirely publican party shrugging their shoulders and saying no big deal um okay so what is this tell us a number one who tells us without a doubt the trump senior campaign advisers were told that the russian government was supporting trump's candidacy a something that they cast doubt on when it was a concluded by our us intelligence unanimously a it also tells us the trump's senior campaign advisers were willing to collude with a foreign adversary of the united states in order to undermine their opponents campaign.

foursquare russian government paul ryan trump united states attorney jared kushner ford ekeus hillary clinton
"russian government" Discussed on Unfilter

Unfilter

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on Unfilter

"Quote unquote islamic state in syria is mostly backed by the cia which is causing a lot of problems for russia's good buddy assad so there could be that motivation potentially to want to go for the kennedy be less likely to do something stupid there although that has not penned up um but i think i actually think if you look at the history of the clintons and their history of working on behalf of the russian government i would actually think if he's putin such the forty chessmaster the he claimed their own claims him to be he would actually perhaps wanted hillary an office yeah i i thought about that until the dawn junior emails and in seeing the connection with the the you know the the pageant the not the but the big guy with the music star and then i realized this is just one big business deal this is just another big continuation and they all they saw trump possibly knocking off hillary and they wanted to get on the winning side it to make their business dealings more profitable idle no no i i dunno if the comments of the russian government support and the russian we are credible in those emails that's because at because rob is not credible person but at the time though don jr is so inapt right to to are not an at they ever going back to russian government's motivation to to throw the really see hourly trump would have been their their chosen candidate because of his positive stance towards russia here but he would see inwardly if you look behind the scenes they've made a lot of money thanks to hillary area and the and her influence in the state department they played both sides to point and then they decided it probably go on on one side.

syria cia russia assad kennedy clintons rob don jr hillary russian government
"russian government" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

Erin Burnett OutFront

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

"Backed out front and we are following the breaking news presidenttrump's eldest son donaldtrumpjr speaking out after releasing the bombshell emails about his meeting with the russian lawyer over alleged damaging information about hillaryclinton the supposedly it was said was being provided by the russian government in now donaldtrumpjr is admitting that he would have done things differently front nownationalsecuritycorrespondentthenewyorktimesmatthewrosenberg former whitehouse ethics lawyer under presidentgeorgewbushrichard painter and former attorneygeneral for the state of virginiacancuncinellimatt let me start with you here donaldtrumpjr saying now in retrospect t would do things differently how significant is it that he would actually admit that i am anger is significant i do however wonder and and i would certainly ask myth are sitting here with him as it did not occur to you or anyone with you at the time that it was a country that that many people in our government in our country gets that our adversary was reaching out to you to provide you dirt help you defeated domestic political opponent why that wasn't questioned at the time and and and what exactly you thought you might get from them and why he thought it was okay to get it i mean it does it there's a bizarre story and cannot question not only by donaldtrumpjr but by the fact that jaredkushner was in the room paulmanafort was in the room it doesn't appear that anybody questioned this or the source andi say that because paulmanafort of course is an incredibly experienced political hand.

donaldtrumpjr russian government
"russian government" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

Anderson Cooper 360

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

"This meeting was the newyorktimesi revealed on saturday keeping a modest for starters they expose his prior accounts of the meeting is simply untrue he wasn't as he i said motivated to meet this woman out of concern for russian orphans he certainly did contrary to how he described it on saturday discussed politics the woman though unnamed was not offered up simply some random acquaintance of our friend as he i suggested she was described as a russian government attorney with information from the russian government she did not as some trump surrogates have suggested on this program just last night just get walked into trumptowerone of the males discusses arrangements for notifying security she was coming much would donaldtrumpjr has said and much of how he's characterize the meeting is revealed to be untrue by his own email chain more important though is what today's revelation does to the longrunning long larger narrative about donaldtrump senior people close to him and russiai have nothing to do with russia to the best of my knowledge no person that i deal with us this administration disagrees with all of this stories that claimed that the president and his campaign colluded with russia in any capacity of course not why would there be any contacts between the campaign chris the the the this is all a distraction absolutely not at that but the president elect lack right as conversation never happened thursday no connection between um the president or the staff year and in anyone doing anything with russiai mean this is time and time again lie after lie you noticed you won't say welli say this we hear experts you know his house cat at home once said that this is what's happening with the russiansit's disgusting it's so phony i was donaldtrumpjr after he had that meeting everything just heard either gets dented or contradicted by these emails no contact with russians not true no politicallymotivated contact with russians not true no politically motivated content contact with the russians who have ties the russian government not true at least owns from junior believed this attorney had caused the russian government in fact these emails again in very plain englishenglish lay out even more politically motivated contact with the russian individual with claims of ties to the kremlin promising information that would help achieve what is billed as the russian goal of hurting hillaryclinton and helping donaldtrumpit is the.

attorney russian government russia president welli kremlin