35 Burst results for "Russian Government"

BBC Reporter Leaves Russia After Credentials Withdrawn

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:30 min | Last month

BBC Reporter Leaves Russia After Credentials Withdrawn

"Bbc's moscow correspondent sara. Raynsford was forced to leave russia at the end of august when her visa expired. Russian state media said ver- move was in retaliation for the refusal of the uk to grant visas to russian journalists. Bus raynsford antar. Employers believe she was targeted because of her reporting which even saw her heckled live on tv. By the belarusian president alexander lukashenko and his supporters. I'm pleased to say that. Sarah has made. It's back to london and joins me on the line. Now good afternoon to you and a warm. Welcome to the briefing. Sarah is a good i to tell us in your own words. What exactly happened. You say this is about my visa not being extended but actually before. I even found out about that. I was heading back to russia from belarus a story proposing there and i was stopped at the border and i wasn't allowed through by the russian border guards who said that i've been put on an fsp blacklists and being declared a threat to national security in russia and as such i wouldn't be allowed back into the country which is obviously a pretty shocking kind of ten of affairs. I've been living and working. Russia this time for some seven years and before that on an author the two decades basically the entire vladimir putin's presidency so we told that i was a national security threats inbound mentoring. The country was a pretty major step and something i hadn't really seen coming to you. Were allowed to enter the country but just to basically collect your belongings. Well yeah not took twelve hours of pretty intense and forensic negotiations from the bbc. And as i understand it from the british embassy as well Calls to the kremlin and to the foreign ministry to find out what was going on but we still don't know the obviously doesn't disclose details when it designated security threats We don't really know why this happened near the official line. That i'm getting from the foreign ministry. Is that this is retaliation for a russian journalist who was denied. Leave to remain in the uk but that case was a two years ago and at the time nobody made any fuss tool and in fact when the foreign ministry will questions Live on air by an independent tv channel. About who exactly. There's journalist was what their name was. Even what agency. They worked for performance. You spokeswoman was weaving ducking and diving and wouldn't even name the reporter so it's quite weird case to be considered retaliation for this is obviously the russian government going after the bbc but it also feels pretty personal to

Russia Raynsford Raynsford Antar Foreign Ministry Russian Border Guards Alexander Lukashenko Sarah BBC Moscow Sara UK Vladimir Putin London British Embassy Russian Government
Russia Is Already Cozying up to the Taliban as Kabul Spirals

Rusted Culture Podcast

01:56 min | 2 months ago

Russia Is Already Cozying up to the Taliban as Kabul Spirals

"An article here that's called. Russia is enjoying america's failure and cozying up with the taliban in the first thing about this is this is just going to clarify how much russia wanted the united states out of afghanistan in. It really begs the question folks. It really begs the question. How much was russia involved in making this reality in getting the us out of afghanistan. So this is what's going to clarify the intent as if we didn't already know right so take a look at this again. This is coming from the daily beast in it says russian government officials and state news outlets describe the takeover as a total defeat for the mightiest nation on earth appearing on the state. Tv show sixty minutes. Evidently they've got their own on monday. Political scientists only met vitchev asserted that the us withdrawal from afghanistan was beneficial for the russian federation. He said russia's authority is on the rise the situation as beneficial for us america no longer matters. He added that russia should continue to quietly strangle the united states. Which is what. Putin is already doing. Essentially that's that's the whole intent of what they're doing quietly strangle the united states. So take a look at this. They go on to quote here. Nikita ish chanko spokesman at the russian embassy in kabul told the state media channel russia. Twenty four on sunday that moscow had no intention of evacuating the diplomatic mission. The situation in kabul is tense but there is no war in the city. There are no threats to the embassy. No evacuation is required.

Russia United States Afghanistan Vitchev Taliban Us America Nikita Ish Chanko Putin Kabul Russian Embassy Moscow
Biden Holds Meeting on Major Ransomware Attack

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 3 months ago

Biden Holds Meeting on Major Ransomware Attack

"U. S can counter this wave of RANSOMWARE attacks. President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris will lead an interagency meeting today to discuss the administration's efforts to counter ransomware attack Friday claimed by a Russian linked gang targeted Miami based Software company Cassia and the program that manages it infrastructure for client companies. On Tuesday, White House press secretary Jen Psaki said the U. S could respond if Russia won't rain in bad actors within its borders. If the Russian government cannot Will not take action against criminal actors residing in Russia. We will take action or reserve the right to take action on our own. Mike Grossi, a Washington The majority of the votes have been counted in

President Joe Biden Vice President Kamala Harris Jen Psaki Cassia Russian Government Miami Russia White House U. Mike Grossi Washington
Software Supplier Kaseya Is Latest Victim of Ransomware Attack

Music & The Spoken Word

00:37 sec | 4 months ago

Software Supplier Kaseya Is Latest Victim of Ransomware Attack

"That software company is hit with a cyber attack that may have compromised thousands of companies. More from CBS's Lana Zach. The hackers reportedly targeted a software supplier called Cassia, using the company's corporate network and what is called a supply chain ransomware attack. Cassia alerted its customers to immediately shut down their servers to avoid being compromised. A security firm is blaming the same Russian linked group revel that is believed to be responsible for the Ransomware attack on a U. S meat supplier. Last month, President Biden was asked about the situation. The initials thinking was It was not Russian government. Um, but we're not sure

Lana Zach Cassia CBS President Biden Russian Government
Biden Revokes and Replaces Trump Order That Banned TikTok

The CyberWire

01:19 min | 4 months ago

Biden Revokes and Replaces Trump Order That Banned TikTok

"Cyber scoop reports that sentinel one believes it knows roughly speaking who hacked into russian government networks last year it was the security firm says chinese espionage services and not one of the five is the espionage group they call the thunder cats gets the credit sentinel labs reports and it bases its conclusions on what it regards as decisive code similarities to campaigns the abt has earlier used against targets in southeast asia. Sentinel one researcher. One andres guerrero sawday told cyber scoop quote. The idea of chinese targeting of russian government and vice versa should not shock us sino. Russian relations are complex and involve hot button issues like a shared border diplomatic and economic interests and quote. What is relatively unusual is russia's decision to publicly call out a hostile espionage operation diplomatic signaling by press release is more common in the west you as president biden this morning issued an executive order that effectively rescinds his predecessors bands of we chat and tiktok while acknowledging an ongoing emergency. The new executive order directs engagement security reviews and data protection instead of outright bans.

Andres Guerrero President Biden Asia Russia
Meat Producer Ransomware Attack Disrupts Global Production

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 5 months ago

Meat Producer Ransomware Attack Disrupts Global Production

"A ransomware attack on the world's biggest meat processing company is disrupting production worldwide it comes weeks after a similar incident shut down a U. S. oil pipeline and left some people scrambling for gas this time the target was GBS of Brazil which has extensive facilities in the U. S. processing any impacts on supply and the president has directed the administration to determine what we can do to mitigate any impacts White House spokeswoman Corinne John Pierce says the by the administration's talking directly with the Russian government after J. B. S. said the attack came from a group likely based in Russia the company says the hackers affected servers in North America and Australia Sager made Ghani Washington

Corinne John Pierce Russian Government U. Brazil J. B. S. White House Russia North America Sager Australia Ghani Washington
What Have The Russians Got On Hunter Biden?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:14 min | 5 months ago

What Have The Russians Got On Hunter Biden?

"100. Biden's laptop is out there and has been out there and his potential blackmail material on it, knowing he's been paid off by people who we know where corrupt and businesses that we know we're trying to influence his dad. What else is out there that foreign governments may have, especially the Russian government, where Joe Biden seems to be doing an awful lot of pro Russia stuff like Okaying the Nord stream to pipeline so that the Russians can engage in international blackmail in the energy business. Why would job I don't know. I'm just curious have anything to do with the 3.5 million his son got paid, but that by the corrupt Moscow mayor and his wife, and they paid to his companies that have anything to do with that the 3.5 million anything I don't know. I'm just asking these are the questions the media is supposed to ask. I thought, I mean, they are public figures correct was supposed to ask this stuff. So Giuliani has a really good question. Like Hey, what about potential blackmails? Anybody thought of that? Check this out. It's the Biden crime family 30 years of shaking people down and selling his office. They accumulated millions. That's disgusting. Worst than that, though, is everybody knows it and they get away with it. Nearly 2.5 million from Russia. You think that might have affected his decision on the pipeline? I don't know if I have the hard drive one, right? What do you think Russia has on

Russian Government Biden Joe Biden Russia Moscow Giuliani
Microsoft Says Russian Hackers Launched New Global Attack

All Things Considered

02:07 min | 5 months ago

Microsoft Says Russian Hackers Launched New Global Attack

"Russian hack of the U. S government by a group that may have already broken into government systems, which Raises the question. Why does this keep happening? Earlier today, Microsoft announced that hackers linked to Russian intelligence infiltrated an email account at the U. S Agency for International Development or U S. A. I. D Hackers then use that account to target as many as 150, other government development and human rights organizations globally. Chris Painter is president of the Global Forum on Cyber Expertise and joins us now welcome. Maybe her So Microsoft Cyber Security officials attributing this attack to a Russian based group called Nobel Liam and says that they've also seen some overlap with another Russian group called Cozy Bear, which was behind the solar winds attack last year. I mean, how do experts determine who's responsible? Well, they look at a range of things, and I think Microsoft looked at what the tactics and procedures of this group did followed. Some of the electronic evidence also looked at motives. And we certainly have seen Askew mentioned no shortage of Russian government sponsored malicious activity online. And this is just the latest chapter of that, right. OK, So what was the key weakness that these hackers exploited in this case like like? Was it a pretty sophisticated breach? Well, unlike the solar winds attack an intrusion that was very sophisticated, not really seen before. This one is really old school. It seems to be the same actors. The cozy bear actors as they're called. Bear because it's Russia, and they've been involved in election interference activity, so it went activity. But here they basically used what's called fishing. Which is this simply sending out false emails pretending to be from in this case, US the idea Government agency. Two people. People think those emails or trusted because they look like they're from that agency. They click on them. They click on a little length that talks about something that's in that email In this case, it was reported about election interference. And that downloads some malicious code. Some malware as they called it

U. S Government U. S Agency For International Chris Painter Global Forum On Cyber Expertis Microsoft Nobel Liam Russian Government Askew Russia United States
SolarWinds Back in the Headlines

Techmeme Ride Home

02:05 min | 5 months ago

SolarWinds Back in the Headlines

"Microsoft reporting that the solar winds hackers are back and they've hacked e mail systems used by the state department's international aid agency in order to attack human rights groups and other organizations critical of russia's president vladimir putin remember. We don't know how long the solar winds hackers were in the various systems. They penetrated last year. And we don't know what sort of booby traps and heidi holes. They installed for themselves for later use. Perhaps this is that coming home to roost quoting the new york times. Hackers linked to russia's main intelligence agency surreptitiously seized an e mail system used by the state department's international agency to bro into the computer networks of human rights groups and other organizations of the sort that have been critical of president vladimir putin microsoft corporation disclosed on thursday. The newly disclosed attack was also particularly bold by breaching. The systems of a supplier used by the federal government. The hackers sent out genuine looking emails to more than three thousand accounts across more than one hundred fifty organizations that regularly received communications from the united states. Agency for international development. Those e mails went out as recently as this week and microsoft said it believes the attack are ongoing. The email was implanted with code. That would give the hackers unlimited access to the computer systems of the recipients from stealing data to infecting other computers on a network. Tom burke eighteen vice president wrote on thursday night. The original solar winds attack went undetected by the us government for nine months until it was discovered by a cybersecurity firm. In april president biden said he could have responded far more strongly to the attack but quote chose to be proportionate because he did not want to quote kick off a cycle of escalation and conflict with russia and quote the russian response nonetheless seems to have been escalation. The malicious activity was underway as recently as the past week that suggests that the sanctions and whatever additional covert actions. The white house carried out in response to the solar winds hack part of a strategy of creating seen and unseen costs for moscow has not choked off the russian government's appetite for disruption

International Aid Agency State Department Bro Into The Computer Networks Microsoft President Vladimir Putin Russia Vladimir Putin Agency For International Devel Heidi Us Government The New York Times President Biden Tom Burke United States White House Russian Government Moscow
Colonial Pipeline Paid 75 Bitcoin in Hack

The Tech Guy

02:08 min | 5 months ago

Colonial Pipeline Paid 75 Bitcoin in Hack

"Not Putting gasoline in garbage bags are in store name for that would be foolish fuel. Ish don't do it. People are doing it in the south east guest some people. Don't gosh just can only imagine what happens if that leaks. We it's a drive and bomb a time bomb all because of the ransomware attack on a colonial pipeline which You know and this. Is you watch mainstream media. And they don't have a lot of experience with the ransomware tax of so miss some of the points Won the Ransomware was not actually aimed at the pipeline operating equipment who's aimed at the. It department I you know and And the i in an excess of caution colonial. Shut down the ops but And by the way paid the ransom where they said they didn't but they paid seventy five bitcoin. Pretty sure of that. We can see the dark side wallet. The ransomware attackers bitcoin wallet. And we could see what's came into it and from where seventy five bitcoins on may eighth You know sometimes. I've seen this happen with other tax. The decrypted software. The then gets sent to you by the bad guys is so slow that people restore from backup. Anyway it's like okay. Never mind never mind then. Something weird happened the dark side ransomware gang so this is a couple of other things i've seen. It said it's russians. Yeah it's probably russians but it's not russian government. it's not political. It's just bad guys who happen to live in russia and it may not be russians. That did it because dark side is what we call. And this is a nasty development in the world ransomware ransomware as a service know there's software as a service now has been around for a few years and it's basically web based software

South East Russia
Russia's Navalny Transferred to Prison Hospital as Western Powers Raise Alarms

WBZ Afternoon News

00:53 sec | 6 months ago

Russia's Navalny Transferred to Prison Hospital as Western Powers Raise Alarms

"Leader Alexei Navalny has been transferred to a hospital inside another prison this after his doctor said he could be near death. Vladimir Putin's fiercest opponent has been on a hunger strike for three weeks now, those prison officials say Navalny has agreed to vitamin treatment, although allies say they want that confirmed. Embassies. Karen Travers has more from D. C about the White House reaction. The White House says Russia will be held accountable for whatever happens to Alexey Navalny, the leading opposition figure to Russian President Vladimir Putin. Press secretary Jen Psaki. What happens to Mr Navalny in the custody of the Russian government is the responsibility of the Russian government, and that they will be held accountable by the international community. Asked if Navalny's death would preclude a summit between President Biden and Putin sake said the White House is hoping and praying that is not the outcome and reiterated the administration's call for nerve only to be released. Karen Travers, ABC NEWS

Navalny Alexei Navalny Vladimir Putin Russian Government Karen Travers Alexey Navalny Jen Psaki Mr Navalny White House Russia President Biden Putin Abc News
White House: Russia Will Face Consequences if Navalny Dies in Prison

America's First News

02:20 min | 6 months ago

White House: Russia Will Face Consequences if Navalny Dies in Prison

"National security advisor Jake Sullivan told CNN Russia will pay if Putin critic and main opposition leader Alexei Navalny dies in prison. We have communicated to the Russian government that what happens to Mr Navalny in their custody is their responsibility, and they will be held accountable by the international community in terms of the specific measures that we would would undertake. We're looking at Variety of different costs that we would impose. And I'm not going to telegraph that publicly at this point, but we have communicated that there will be consequences if Mr Navalny dies, so you've communicated that, But at the top there, President Biden apparently didn't mention Navalny in his call with Putin this week. He certainly didn't say anything about it publicly and his remarks on Thursday, and Russian state media is touting. This is proof that Biden has given up on the issue so Why isn't President Biden demanding Navalny's release? Or at least again, at least getting him a doctor at every single opportunity? Way actually have made the judgment that direct communication to the Russian government on this issue. Including both how we see it. How our allies and partners see it and what might unfold. Should something terrible happened to Mr Navalny? Should he looked terrible Things, of course have already happened to him, but should he pass away? We have judged that rather than just make general statements publicly, the best way to deal with this issue is privately on through diplomatic channels direct to the uppermost levels of the Russian government. Let me ask one specific question. Is the potential summit with Vladimir Putin on the table if Alexei Navalny passes away in prison. Not gonna get into hypotheticals in large part Danna because there isn't currently a summit on the books. It's something we're talking about, and that's some it would have to take place, of course in the right circumstances. In a way that could actually move the relationship forward, But I'm not gonna get into hypotheticals about when or whether the summit would likely occur. No Bonnie, who's had been on a hunger strike since March. 31st on Friday, described Threats to force feed him using straitjacket and other pleasures.

Mr Navalny Russian Government President Biden Navalny Alexei Navalny Jake Sullivan Putin Russian State Media CNN Russia Biden Vladimir Putin Bonnie
US Warns Russia of 'Consequences' if Putin Critic Navalny Dies

WGN Programming

00:38 sec | 6 months ago

US Warns Russia of 'Consequences' if Putin Critic Navalny Dies

"I'm Julie Walker. Supporters of jailed Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny are calling from massive protests following reports about his failing health. Opposition leaders started a hunger strike three weeks ago after jail officials refused to let him see his own doctor. National Security advisor Jake Sullivan says the Biden administration has made it clear to Russia that there will be consequences if it allows no volley to die in prison. We have communicated to the Russian government that what happens to Mr Navalny in their custody is their responsibility, and they will be held accountable by the international community in terms of the specific measures that we would would undertake. We're looking at a variety of different

Julie Walker Alexei Navalny Jake Sullivan Biden Administration Russian Government Mr Navalny National Security Russia
Sullivan: 'There Will Be Consequences' if Navalny Dies

NEWS 88.7 Programming

01:05 min | 6 months ago

Sullivan: 'There Will Be Consequences' if Navalny Dies

"Julie Candler with the BBC news. United States. National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan has said there'll be consequences if the Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, dies in prison. To Sullivan said Washington had communicated this to Moscow. U. S and the European Union. Both say they hold Russia accountable for his safety from Los Angeles. Peter Bo's reports. Jake Sullivan said the U. S was looking at a variety of different costs. As he put it, there will be imposed. Should Alexey Navalny die. Without going into specifics. He said the White House had made his position clear, communicating directly through diplomatic channels with the uppermost levels of the Russian government. Said Moscow will be held accountable by the international community for what happened to Mr Navalny. On Saturday, President Biden said the Russian opposition leaders situation was totally unfair. Supporters of Alexei Navalny in Russia have called for renewed street protests across the country on Wednesday evening. Before that, his life hangs by a thread. He's been on hunger strike for nearly three

Alexei Navalny Julie Candler National Security Advisor Jake Peter Bo Jake Sullivan Alexey Navalny Moscow Russian Government BBC Sullivan European Union Russia Mr Navalny United States U. President Biden Washington Los Angeles White House
Navalny's allies call for major protest across Russia

Lifestyles Unlimited

00:29 sec | 7 months ago

Navalny's allies call for major protest across Russia

"Leader Alexei Navalny is calling for a day of massive protests across the country. Navalny, who remains behind bars, is asking supporters to sign up on an interactive map and once 500,000 people agree to take part a date for the event will be set. Navalny was jailed in January after returning to Russia from Germany, where he was treated for five months after being poisoned with a nerve agent. Navalny blames the Russian government for that poisoning, but the Kremlin denies any involvement. She was

Navalny Alexei Navalny Russian Government Russia Germany
US-Russia Tension Rising as Biden Calls Putin 'Killer'

Rick Roberts

00:41 sec | 7 months ago

US-Russia Tension Rising as Biden Calls Putin 'Killer'

"Tensions between the U. S and Russia are increasing after President Biden called Russian President Vladimir Putin a killer. In an interview with ABC is George Stephanopoulos. This week, White House Press secretary Jen Psaki assures that President Biden will use all the tools at his disposal to respond to Russia's malpractice is some of the responses may be seen. Some may be unseen. And of course, the president reserves the right to respond in a manner and time of his choosing, as any president would, But he did make clear that they're the Russian government pay a price. The comments come after a declassified intelligence report from the director of National intelligence is office suggests President Putin authorized operations to help former President Donald Trump win

President Biden Jen Psaki Russia President Putin George Stephanopoulos U. ABC White House Russian Government National Intelligence Donald Trump
Moscow court rejects opposition leader Navalny's appeal

All Things Considered

00:55 sec | 8 months ago

Moscow court rejects opposition leader Navalny's appeal

"The sentencing of opposition leader Alexei Navalny. Clearing the way for the Kremlin critic to spend more than 2.5 years in jail for Moscow, Charles Maynes has more Court shortened of all these prison time by six weeks but upheld in earlier decision that found Navalny had violated his parole from a suspended sentence dating back to 2014 of only has long argued that initial conviction was issued to disqualify him from public office. He also noted the alleged parole violations occurred while he was in Germany recuperating from a near fatal poisoning attack he blames on the Russian government. While in a separate trial held later in the day, the Volney was found guilty of slander and issued a fine for insulting a World war. Two veteran who participated in a pro Kremlin promotional video of only argues the case was fabricated to smear his name in the court of public opinion or reverence for the Soviet war effort against Nazi Germany runs deep. NPR news. I'm Charles Maynes in Moscow.

Alexei Navalny Charles Maynes Navalny Fatal Poisoning Attack Russian Government Moscow Volney Germany Npr News
US condemns 'harsh tactics' used against pro-Navalny demonstrators in Russia

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:39 sec | 9 months ago

US condemns 'harsh tactics' used against pro-Navalny demonstrators in Russia

"Another crackdown against protesters. In russia demanding the release of opposition leader alexei navalny in russia's second largest city saint petersburg police made hundreds of arrests the kremlin has called. These demonstrations illegal vowing to continue cracking down despite international opposition. The us state department has called for the release of navalny and told the russian government to respect the rights of those protesting the volney who returned to russia earlier this month after being poisoned last summer remains in jail now. A court in moscow did reject an appeal by novell news attorneys on thursday to release him. He does have another hearing this week. Fox's trae ginks hearing. Tuesday could result in nevada. Going to prison for many years.

Alexei Navalny Russia Us State Department Navalny Russian Government Saint Petersburg Volney Novell News Moscow Trae Ginks FOX Nevada
"russian government" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"russian government" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Better results, So we want a press on stay the course and do Maura of this Atlanta Mayor Kesha Lance bottoms defending her city's masked mandates in the face of a lawsuit by Governor Brian Camp wants to block the city from enforcing the requirement, which the mayor says is grounded in science scientists are telling us is that the right thing to do is wear a mask with health care professionals are telling us Is that they are being overrun in our hospitals. The US recorded more than 77,000 new infections yesterday. Russia denies hacking Covert 19 vaccine files being conducted in the West American, Canadian and British intelligence insisted did happen. They blame hackers with ties to the Russian government. Matthew Schmidt, national security professor at the University of New Haven. This is another example. That the Russian government is weak. That under Vladimir Putin, the government has not built a robust society that can do broad scale high level science. And so it must steal that science from the West in this case through the deployment of malware Although it's still lags last year's robust pace, home construction was up sharply last month rose 17.3% from May. On Wall Street stock futures, pointing to a higher open. Dow futures up 122 points. SNP futures 18 points higher. More on these stories, a townhall dot com In these challenging times..

Russian government Vladimir Putin Kesha Lance Maura US Atlanta Matthew Schmidt Brian Camp Russia University of New Haven professor
"russian government" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"russian government" Discussed on KTOK

"With the Russian government to influence the election is that true in any way shape manner or form Julian Assange's answer that is absolutely false and if you read their statements carefully goes on to give a more detailed as I put this up on Twitter if you want to watch the whole interview and then I go back again can you say to the American people unequivocally you didn't get this information about the DNC Podesta's emails can you tell the American people a thousand percent he did not get it from Russia yes meeting go to Russia or anybody associated with Russia answer we can say and we have said repeatedly over the last two months that our source is not the Russian government is not a state party and I I went back even more times asking Linda how many times I go back on this thing I went back again and again and again now here's my point okay they want to go after Juliana signage but the espionage act I might all hello Hillary is top secret classified our information on her secret server why don't we go after her how come we have this dole justice system we have somebody that we know bought and paid for a dirty Russian dossier to influence the twenty sixteen election all the things they're saying I guess it's in this extradition hearing about Julian a son Lee's Julian a son I did ask him at one point how does he view himself you know do you think you are a journalist what we know what is what do you think your role is armed and I hear but I asked about other things have you ever talked any surrogates of the trump campaign now have you ever talked to put no trump no any of his targets now not one no his report you may have talked to somebody is associated with the campaign Roger stone no that's false I mean we asked all the questions and then I said well how do you view yourself are you a journalist you view this as reporting and his answer was well there's a difference which is our materials better presented etcetera etcetera he likes to put out a whole information is what are you saying here the public responded to it more than say The New York Times that's interesting The New York Times and I think it has everything to do with the Pentagon paper case and and that's what the Washington post and The New York Times the Pentagon papers a series of documents put together about the Vietnam War and the publishing of a series from page articles based on the information that came from the Pentagon papers is a landmark six three decision of the U. S. Supreme Court this was a big deal ruling that the government had failed to prove there was any harm to national security in the publication of papers justified under the first amendment's protection of freedom of the press well this Hillary Clinton get that we have a dual justice system that is the biggest problem.

Russian government
"russian government" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"russian government" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"With the Russian government to influence the election is that true in any way shape manner or form Julian Assange's answer that is absolutely false and if you read their statements carefully goes on to give a more detailed as I put this up on Twitter if you want to watch the whole interview and then I go back again can you say to the American people unequivocally you didn't get this information about the DNC Podesta's emails can you tell the American people a thousand percent he did not get it from Russia yes meeting go to Russia or anybody associated with Russia answer we can say and we have said repeatedly over the last two months that our source is not the Russian government is not a state party and I I went back even more times asking Linda how many times I go back on this line I went back again and again and again now here's my point okay they want to go after Juliana signage for the espionage act I might all hello Hillary is top secret classified our information on her secret server why don't we go after her how come we have there's still justice system we have somebody that we know bought and paid for a dirty Russian dossier to influence the twenty sixteen election all the things they're saying I guess it's in this extradition hearing about Julian the son lease Julian a son I did ask him at one point how does he view himself you know do you think you are a journalist what we know what is what do you think your role is armed and I hear but I asked about other things have you ever talked any surrogates of the trump campaign now have you ever talked to put no trump no any of his targets now not one no this report you may have talked to somebody is associated with the campaign Roger stone no that's false I mean we asked all the questions and then I said well how do you view yourself are you a journalist you view this as reporting and his answer was well there's a difference which is our materials better presented at center at center he likes to put out a whole information is what are you saying here the public responded to it more than say The New York Times that's interesting The New York Times and I think it has everything to do with the Pentagon paper case and and that's when the Washington post and The New York Times the Pentagon papers a series of documents put together about the Vietnam War and the publishing of a series from page articles based on the information that came from the Pentagon papers is a landmark six three decision of the U. S. Supreme Court this was a big deal ruling that the government had failed to prove there was any harm to national security in the publication of papers justified under the first amendment's protection of freedom of the press well this Hillary Clinton get that we have a dual justice system that is the biggest problem news Sean Hannity show talking about what's right for America whether renewed commitment to keep you up to date on the breaking news stories nobody thinks twice about getting a second opinion on a doctor for a lawyer what about.

Russian government
"russian government" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"russian government" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"To it Monday night you want to watch anymore it's just easy to to just press record it's just that I never thought I swear to god I I I mean about probably know how to do it I I just never done it it is it's very consistent with me because I always get weird I don't eat for much of the wife and kids are like plays a tech savvy don't they know okay real cable but you can you see the stealing stuff on the Russian government okay he could tape AMO he so yeah he could say at a press the R. button and then it pops up on the screen and you hit another button select and you record the shows he uses that simple but you're right you make it sound simple but his rockets as it is I don't want to stop once it's there and I also never do this you on never ever ever gonna see me walk out and I know this is on Jewish you never get a single kind of a restaurant with a paper bag I I refused to eat food the next day or days later that I had in a restaurant we heated and I do I do that all the time what do you do I I did take my food usually when I go out to eat with people you want to take it home the reason why I like to go out is because the like to drink what will the socialize with people over a cocktail mixers soul order the food okay I'll continue to drink all right maybe a bite or two because once you start eating the drinking really is over what messes up you're right it does everything you can't do that yeah so I don't do it so I get get the food in a bag okay continues find of I don't drink and then when I was drinking a unit all that makes sense drink anymore so I when I go out to eat I go to eat so what's the principle behind the principales if it's used the food was already been eaten the TV shows only been on the air I I can't I can't go back to it after that I can go back and watch something that's already there to kick a hold and eat something I've already eaten I can't do this okay I feel no drugs no jokes this is a family.

Russian government
"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

"The leader goes on to die in office and so that could very well be the case with Putin he moves over to the State Council and stays there until he dies a natural death in office and then the regime in I guess in forty two percent of cases would persist beyond him In twenty six percent of cases you get a new form of authoritarianism see one a transition from one autocracy to another And only about twenty six percent cases juicy any sort of democratization so I think the the story is generally speaking and we know that person list dictatorships are the least likely to democratize upon their collapse. So you and it makes sense right. Because there's no real the institutional structure in place you know. Putin has done his best to hollow out the institutions sideline competent individual individuals to some degree. And so the the the ground really is not ripe for democracy to take root. What's interesting to me is not very old comparatively speaking I mean he's he's seven sixty seven? Yeah just Google that uh-huh thanks wikipedia. I mean if you look at if we're talking about him potentially dying in office like I don't know what life expectancy is in Russia especially if you are going up slightly yeah and Putin you probably access to nicer things and good medical care better health care than all of us do exactly and you know he wrestles bears and rides horses shirtless. He's he's healthy veto veteran at hockey. That's definitely a real thing that it'd be better at hockey professional players. Sorry John I mean maybe they through the game but if if you look at just for example in the US. The slate of democratic twenty twenty presidential candidates are on average a little bit older. You know we have candidates in in their seventies President trump is that so. I guess I'm just wondering it seems to me looking at Putin it. Oh we've always kind of thought of him as this you know personal like you know personalized tater ship and it was his and his power but if he's trying to set this broader longer term strategic path for Russia Asia and for the regime to persist. It seems like I don't know that that gives me a different view of Putin and I think I thought I had before I thought he was more like a selfish kind of political critical thing but it seems like He. He's a Patriot meal at cares about Russia but it kind of seems like maybe he wants you die like who cares what happens is your shame right. If if if you're selfish leader so I guess I don't know really what my question is but just I got what you're saying. Yeah I don't know if you could just speak to that. Yeah I think I think for Putin he cares a great deal about his legacy. I mean we're talking about him stepping into this father of the Nation Roy. I mean he's been in power our now from in Russia for twenty years he's taken Russia through the tumultuous period of the transition. He's seen living standards particularly in his first. Two terms increased dramatically. Russians are grateful to seek to Putin regardless of the fact that it was driven by oil prices in the early two thousands but Russians up up until now have seen their life quality of life improve and so I think he is in many ways of thinking about the legacy and wanting to ensure that he maintains that reputation of this father of the nation and that in so in that sense he is looking to his own future. All right and that is our show today. I WanNa really think Andrea for coming on Suffering through me mispronouncing your name a few times I know that happens to me a lot of my last name so yes exactly so. I've gotten Byu camp before. which is a real telemarketer? Tell not that they're telemarketers anymore but Look you've new textbook coming out. I do more thing without about so. This has been a long labor of love I've worked on this text book for over two and a half years with co-authors Erica France and Natasha Lynch dot and it's a book on democracy in authoritarian regimes And it basically I mean if folks have been interested in some of the dynamics. Were talking about that characterize authoritarian regimes. This is a great place to go just to read more on that. We talk a lot about the political dynamics that shape autocracies. Why are they wire? Some regimes. long-lasting others are quite short lived. What causes instability? How to regime's transition Shen? We also talk about a lot of the problems in democracies dislo authoritarian ization the slow degradation of democracy so basically trying to look at both democracies and authoritarian authoritarian regimes and characterizing the political dynamics that are shaping the company competition between or mentally working on a big project and democracies authoritize authoritarian izing. So I think you I may have to have a conversation after the show. Anyway I WANNA thank Andrea for coming on the show I want to thank our engineer. Malachi broadus our producer Jackson beer felt belt. And I want to encourage all of you to rates. Subscribe Review Worldly. Wherever y'all get your podcasts? Thanks a lot. She was thanking Russian. Okay well I worked on that..

Putin Russia trump Andrea Google State Council hockey Byu US Nation Roy President John Malachi broadus long labor Suffering engineer Erica France Jackson beer
"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

14:01 min | 1 year ago

"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

"Favorite bookseller? Thanks welcome back listeners. Listeners the team is here talking about Russia's government seeming like it's falling apart but actually strengthening itself With Andrea Long Tiller. Who is an expert at the center for new American Security Freddie and also the host of their wonderfully named Brussel sprouts podcast? Thanks for the plug. I forgot to do that. I'm sorry about that because I really do appreciate the name and also the vegetable in question. It's one of my favorites. I think now it's properly rated but like when we were kids I run boiled them really got a roast them. Warily Trivia Ladies and gentlemen yes sack loves cooking Brussels sprouts. That is true. Them into my Brussel sprouts. The other day they smelled good they did a good job. Roosting Nagy pretty great as I was proud of you. Thank you very much one thing Andrea that you said that I thought was really important. Is the Putin regime is highly personalized. You said that just at the end. What what that means listeners? For those of you who don't spend all your time reading political science it's like I do Is that it's referring to specific kind of authoritarian regime. There are lots of different ones right and a personal list of thornberry regimes that builds up Authority structures power around one individual person rather than a cabal of elites which is like how the Chinese government probably more accurately used to run. Doesn't really anymore. But it used to be more structured around US loose party consensus and group building among Chinese elites rather than just fusion paying on shots now Russia is Putin calling the shots. That's not true not just domestically there are constraints than we alex was talking about but also popularly right it's it's not just the government it's the people and the legitimacy of the regime itself is very tied up and Putin's self image and his projection of strength power and competence. So so what confuses me about this government. Reconstitution is how the regime's legitimacy will be impacted in a world where Putin is no longer the figurehead key leader Bosman in like an obvious and clear terms. Yeah I think that's probably one of the most important questions Sabih asking again like cutting going back to that idea. In a personal dictatorship these leadership transitions are such vulnerable moments for a regime. So in China Y'all L. Before Xi Jinping came along and abolish term limits like you had multiple leaders who could come and go because there was a party and there was an institutionalised mechanism for changing leadership though single-party regimes lasts for an incredibly long time. The the Chinese Communist Party has now been there for seventy years. Think about the pre in Mexico almost seventy a years. Lots of leaders come and go. The Party provides institution that's absent in Russia and I think than the mid the thing for an a highly personalized. WII leader is to try to smooth and manage that in a way that can continue the regime after they leave power so I think this is an attempt by Putin to try to solve that dilemma. He's kind of stepping to the side. Maybe although I mean I think that's the question that I think will be having to watch in that. We don't yet know how this will go in my mind. I would imagine that Putin will still be pulling all of the strings of domestic and foreign policy while trying to allow others others to kind of carry on the legacy of the Putin regime after he leaves so. I don't think we're GONNA see any sort of transition. I think the fact that Putin is staying in the picture To the extent that we expect that he will is in effect trying to legitimize and help Russian citizens imagine a world post Putin so he's trying to smooth transition so it's not so abrupt he's trying to give legitimacy to some of the people and the new structures that he builds so that this regime can can and live on beyond him and I think it's clearly in the interests of all the elites around him for that to happen because they are all invested they all benefit hugely from the perks of this particular regime and so they are all going to cling onto this they have a vested interest in making sure that this continues because they want to continue to benefit from the system system. I also think it's probably why we saw Putin announce The such an unknown figure for the role of prime minister. Yeah this guy who was the head of the federal tax service nobody had heard of this guy. Mikhail Michelin Nobody has heard of him. He was really plucked from relative obscurity and has now launched into the role of prime minister for now and I think in many. I mean that's when you look at these transitions play out and other authoritarian regimes. That's often how they tend to go. These leaders are looking for compromise. Figures they sometimes mistakenly Think they can control and all the other elites also likely can see in him. What they we wanna see in him and think that they'll continue to be able to see you know control and continue to benefit so I think having this kind of unknown candidate Is again the way that we would expect this to happen. like it's not quite as wildest say appointing your dentist like in Turkmenistan For for example you know actually hopping when the leader died. It's like oh just. My dentists can run the country because sure why not. That's a very highly centralized I system. That was a very personalized system. I've done this probably could run the country you don't understand but I'm kind of wondering took follow on that point the State Council body like what is that if he if Putin decides to take the reins of that it's it's also also a pretty like not our body kind of obscure body right like I have never really heard of this as something that you know regular Russia people talk about ever now all of a sudden it's this thing that like. Oh he might run that run the country from there like what is that in. How how does that body function do even know how would function so the so so the that that State Council was created in two thousand by Putin at a time when he was pulling power away from some of the regional governors as kind of A? I don't know I think maybe like a consolation prize for some of these regional governors who are losing power than they were told that they would be able to serve in this advisory role to Putin got. It's totally defunct. It doesn't have any power. It's really kind of sat there lamely for several years but now we see with his announcement in the state of the nation address that he is going to kind of reinvest and vast power into that body. And I think it's I don't know I think this idea for Putin of serving as a senior statesman as this like father of the nation kind of figure our He you know he he can imbed or imbue this new this body With power and rule from there in that kind of father of the nation address. Yes I think you know in my mind. It's unlikely that he would step back into the prime ministership because you do hear from lots of folks that you know this idea that Putin is tired of ruling that he doesn't want to be responsible for the day to day activities a running a government That there would be risks associated with that because it's the prime minister that's often blamed for economic onomic difficulties and other things so a lot of risks a lot of day to day management. That would have to come from the prime ministership. That Putin probably doesn't want to do. But he could kind of create that it would be his to create and he could kind of create that aura. I think of father of the nation and then in that way you know legitimize is this transition. I heard from experts that Putin would rather actually kind of be more hands off the economy going forward and what's focused more on foreign policy because he's still upset with the decision by a video of from twenty eleven to abstain from that. UN Security Council vote allowing the US and others to go into Libya and in the cash. That is there And since then he obviously you know we know about Ukraine and Cetera et CETERA. And so I don't know if you if you buy this argument that taking on kind of maybe a non prime minister role elevating Russia's chairman of the board so to speak would allow him to set the strategic direction for Russia in terms of its global affairs and he can kind of not take blame for economic malaise that seems to be Infecting Russia at this point although he he is given credit for raising the standard of living in Moscow and elsewhere in the country throughout his tenure. Yeah no I think that's right. I think that that he probably would like to play that more. Kind of strategic chick advisor kind of role and maybe. He's taking another page out of the playbook of Xi Jinping you know who's put his what what's that called. The his thought intimate take thought thought she's in pink thought into the Constitution. And you have this kind of larger than life kind of exactly father of the nation kind of role. I think I don't know in my mind if I was betting at this moment. That's what I would guess. And that's that's what I kind of wonder in this sort of broad regime type questions about this. This is Putin trying to affect a long-term transition from a personal regime to a party institutionalized using this kind of security mechanism or using discount social again previously skewer as a mechanism for doing so right to make it not just about himself like I I genuinely am confused. S Two how he sees like does he want to be the mythological figure going forward not doing the stuff day to day stuff that Alex is talking about and a party actually runs the government with no more Putin's anymore anymore. No more strongman just well strongmen in plural but not a strong mandate individual. Yeah so again. The leadership transition is especially precarious for these highly personalized dictatorships. And so when you look at. How all leader's exit office and we can talk about this separately? But there's a death in office. Scenario at tends to be highly actually actually stabilizing and tends to usher in a lot of continuity when a leader dies in office but when a leader exits office and this is kind of based on looking at all leadership transitions in regimes that look most like Russia when a highly personalized longtime leader like Putin exit Exits office by any means other than death in office. The regime team falls with it. Seventy four percent of the time so the regime tends to come down with the leader. Because like what you said. It's all about the leader. You know that the leader in the in the regime are so intertwined that when that leader goes the regime tends to collapse with it and so I'd my guess. Is that guess. He could be trying to organize you know move towards a more institutionalized form of authoritarianism that would help give continuity to this regime. That's going to be a hard track to blaze mixing my analogies in my head at least as trails tracks swallow boise the drug regimen joke. Yes former intelligence. Just on Notre Dame hippie get a AH but the tricky thing is then like how does that happen because Putin is not the head of United Russia so in these other institutionalized regimes teams like the Chinese Communist Party like the pre in Mexico. The the leader is is the head of the party. And it's the party that provides an institutional continuity right now the United Russia as we were saying before is really unpopular. So you know I don't it doesn't feel like he has a lot of options at his disposal currently but maybe that's why he is looking to parliamentary elections in twenty twenty twenty one that he but I guess long story short is I do think he's probably trying to figure out a way how to overcome this dilemma of highly personalized leaders exiting office. And the answer to that has to be a more institutionalized form of authoritarianism than there is. Now what I find interesting about that Is that it. Seems like the long-term Global Direction it would. It seems like intoe the the global movement is the other away right. You're seeing authoritarian regimes become more personalized globally across the world. What accounts for the difference between Russia? And you know the general overall global trump. Yeah you're right that there is a trend. We did a piece on that in on foreign affairs. Myth my co-authors Erica fronts. And Joe Rate we've done a lot of work on this personal ISM and you can link to that in the show notes We we find that you know personal dictatorships as a proportion of all authoritarian regimes are increasing. And they're now the most prevalent form of authoritarianism. Something something like forty percent of all authoritarian regimes are now highly personalized authoritarian regimes. You noted that even in some other forms of socrates like China there is a move towards greater personalism personalism even within these other kinds of systems. So it is. I mean you're exactly right through what you're seeing is Putin is basically bucking the trend in this case but I think it's it's about the preservation hesitation of the regime. And so he I think has has you know rightfully watched from the successes and failures of his peers and predecessors and he is trying to solve this dilemma of personal dictatorship and trying to chart a path so that this regime can live beyond Putin. Just since we've mentioned a couple time that you know these transitions are vulnerable and potentially dangerous. What happens when they fail What what was the outcome? You know Putin is right now. He seems like he'll be successful. What if he's not successful or what? What are we what from examples of other regimes like this? Where they tried to kind of transition package didn't work out? Yeah it's really interesting question again. I have looked at some of the data and so when you have again highly personalized authoritarian regimes that been in power fifteen years and longer and not leader exits in forty two two percent of the cases the regime persists and that means basically I think because I in so many of these cases leader stay on until the very end. They die in office office. In fact the most common outcome about forty percent of all regimes that look like Russia. The leader goes on to die in office and so that could very well be the case with Putin he moves over to the State Council and stays there until he dies a natural death in office and then the regime in I guess in forty two percent of.

Putin Russia Putin exit Exits Party Chinese Communist Party prime minister Andrea Long Tiller State Council US Brussel Brussels Mexico China Alex Chinese government Turkmenistan UN Security Council
"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

13:51 min | 1 year ago

"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

"Favorite bookseller? Thanks welcome back listeners. Listeners the team is here talking about Russia's government seeming like it's falling apart but actually strengthening itself With Andrea Long Tiller. Who is an expert at the center for new American Security Freddie and also the host of their wonderfully named Brussel sprouts podcast? Thanks for the plug. I forgot to do that. I'm sorry about that because I really do appreciate the name and also the vegetable in question. It's one of my favorites. I think now it's properly rated but like when we were kids I run boiled them really got a roast them. Warily Trivia Ladies and gentlemen yes sack loves cooking Brussels sprouts. That is true. Them into my Brussel sprouts. The other day they smelled good they did a good job. Roosting Nagy pretty great as I was proud of you. Thank you very much one thing Andrea that you said that I thought was really important. Is the Putin regime is highly personalized. You said that just at the end. What what that means listeners? For those of you who don't spend all your time reading political science it's like I do Is that it's referring to specific kind of authoritarian regime. There are lots of different ones right and a personal list of thornberry regimes that builds up Authority structures power around one individual person rather than a cabal of elites which is like how the Chinese government probably more accurately used to run. Doesn't really anymore. But it used to be more structured around US loose party consensus and group building among Chinese elites rather than just fusion paying on shots now Russia is Putin calling the shots. That's not true not just domestically there are constraints than we alex was talking about but also popularly right it's it's not just the government it's the people and the legitimacy of the regime itself is very tied up and Putin's self image and his projection of strength power and competence. So so what confuses me about this government. Reconstitution is how the regime's legitimacy will be impacted in a world where Putin is no longer the figurehead key leader Bosman in like an obvious and clear terms. Yeah I think that's probably one of the most important questions Sabih asking again like cutting going back to that idea. In a personal dictatorship these leadership transitions are such vulnerable moments for a regime. So in China Y'all L. Before Xi Jinping came along and abolish term limits like you had multiple leaders who could come and go because there was a party and there was an institutionalised mechanism for changing leadership though single-party regimes lasts for an incredibly long time. The the Chinese Communist Party has now been there for seventy years. Think about the pre in Mexico almost seventy a years. Lots of leaders come and go. The Party provides institution that's absent in Russia and I think than the mid the thing for an a highly personalized. WII leader is to try to smooth and manage that in a way that can continue the regime after they leave power so I think this is an attempt by Putin to try to solve that dilemma. He's kind of stepping to the side. Maybe although I mean I think that's the question that I think will be having to watch in that. We don't yet know how this will go in my mind. I would imagine that Putin will still be pulling all of the strings of domestic and foreign policy while trying to allow others others to kind of carry on the legacy of the Putin regime after he leaves so. I don't think we're GONNA see any sort of transition. I think the fact that Putin is staying in the picture To the extent that we expect that he will is in effect trying to legitimize and help Russian citizens imagine a world post Putin so he's trying to smooth transition so it's not so abrupt he's trying to give legitimacy to some of the people and the new structures that he builds so that this regime can can and live on beyond him and I think it's clearly in the interests of all the elites around him for that to happen because they are all invested they all benefit hugely from the perks of this particular regime and so they are all going to cling onto this they have a vested interest in making sure that this continues because they want to continue to benefit from the system system. I also think it's probably why we saw Putin announce The such an unknown figure for the role of prime minister. Yeah this guy who was the head of the federal tax service nobody had heard of this guy. Mikhail Michelin Nobody has heard of him. He was really plucked from relative obscurity and has now launched into the role of prime minister for now and I think in many. I mean that's when you look at these transitions play out and other authoritarian regimes. That's often how they tend to go. These leaders are looking for compromise. Figures they sometimes mistakenly Think they can control and all the other elites also likely can see in him. What they we wanna see in him and think that they'll continue to be able to see you know control and continue to benefit so I think having this kind of unknown candidate Is again the way that we would expect this to happen. like it's not quite as wildest say appointing your dentist like in Turkmenistan For for example you know actually hopping when the leader died. It's like oh just. My dentists can run the country because sure why not. That's a very highly centralized I system. That was a very personalized system. I've done this probably could run the country you don't understand but I'm kind of wondering took follow on that point the State Council body like what is that if he if Putin decides to take the reins of that it's it's also also a pretty like not our body kind of obscure body right like I have never really heard of this as something that you know regular Russia people talk about ever now all of a sudden it's this thing that like. Oh he might run that run the country from there like what is that in. How how does that body function do even know how would function so the so so the that that State Council was created in two thousand by Putin at a time when he was pulling power away from some of the regional governors as kind of A? I don't know I think maybe like a consolation prize for some of these regional governors who are losing power than they were told that they would be able to serve in this advisory role to Putin got. It's totally defunct. It doesn't have any power. It's really kind of sat there lamely for several years but now we see with his announcement in the state of the nation address that he is going to kind of reinvest and vast power into that body. And I think it's I don't know I think this idea for Putin of serving as a senior statesman as this like father of the nation kind of figure our He you know he he can imbed or imbue this new this body With power and rule from there in that kind of father of the nation address. Yes I think you know in my mind. It's unlikely that he would step back into the prime ministership because you do hear from lots of folks that you know this idea that Putin is tired of ruling that he doesn't want to be responsible for the day to day activities a running a government That there would be risks associated with that because it's the prime minister that's often blamed for economic onomic difficulties and other things so a lot of risks a lot of day to day management. That would have to come from the prime ministership. That Putin probably doesn't want to do. But he could kind of create that it would be his to create and he could kind of create that aura. I think of father of the nation and then in that way you know legitimize is this transition. I heard from experts that Putin would rather actually kind of be more hands off the economy going forward and what's focused more on foreign policy because he's still upset with the decision by a video of from twenty eleven to abstain from that. UN Security Council vote allowing the US and others to go into Libya and in the cash. That is there And since then he obviously you know we know about Ukraine and Cetera et CETERA. And so I don't know if you if you buy this argument that taking on kind of maybe a non prime minister role elevating Russia's chairman of the board so to speak would allow him to set the strategic direction for Russia in terms of its global affairs and he can kind of not take blame for economic malaise that seems to be Infecting Russia at this point although he he is given credit for raising the standard of living in Moscow and elsewhere in the country throughout his tenure. Yeah no I think that's right. I think that that he probably would like to play that more. Kind of strategic chick advisor kind of role and maybe. He's taking another page out of the playbook of Xi Jinping you know who's put his what what's that called. The his thought intimate take thought thought she's in pink thought into the Constitution. And you have this kind of larger than life kind of exactly father of the nation kind of role. I think I don't know in my mind if I was betting at this moment. That's what I would guess. And that's that's what I kind of wonder in this sort of broad regime type questions about this. This is Putin trying to affect a long-term transition from a personal regime to a party institutionalized using this kind of security mechanism or using discount social again previously skewer as a mechanism for doing so right to make it not just about himself like I I genuinely am confused. S Two how he sees like does he want to be the mythological figure going forward not doing the stuff day to day stuff that Alex is talking about and a party actually runs the government with no more Putin's anymore anymore. No more strongman just well strongmen in plural but not a strong mandate individual. Yeah so again. The leadership transition is especially precarious for these highly personalized dictatorships. And so when you look at. How all leader's exit office and we can talk about this separately? But there's a death in office. Scenario at tends to be highly actually actually stabilizing and tends to usher in a lot of continuity when a leader dies in office but when a leader exits office and this is kind of based on looking at all leadership transitions in regimes that look most like Russia when a highly personalized longtime leader like Putin exit Exits office by any means other than death in office. The regime team falls with it. Seventy four percent of the time so the regime tends to come down with the leader. Because like what you said. It's all about the leader. You know that the leader in the in the regime are so intertwined that when that leader goes the regime tends to collapse with it and so I'd my guess. Is that guess. He could be trying to organize you know move towards a more institutionalized form of authoritarianism that would help give continuity to this regime. That's going to be a hard track to blaze mixing my analogies in my head at least as trails tracks swallow boise the drug regimen joke. Yes former intelligence. Just on Notre Dame hippie get a AH but the tricky thing is then like how does that happen because Putin is not the head of United Russia so in these other institutionalized regimes teams like the Chinese Communist Party like the pre in Mexico. The the leader is is the head of the party. And it's the party that provides an institutional continuity right now the United Russia as we were saying before is really unpopular. So you know I don't it doesn't feel like he has a lot of options at his disposal currently but maybe that's why he is looking to parliamentary elections in twenty twenty twenty one that he but I guess long story short is I do think he's probably trying to figure out a way how to overcome this dilemma of highly personalized leaders exiting office. And the answer to that has to be a more institutionalized form of authoritarianism than there is. Now what I find interesting about that Is that it. Seems like the long-term Global Direction it would. It seems like intoe the the global movement is the other away right. You're seeing authoritarian regimes become more personalized globally across the world. What accounts for the difference between Russia? And you know the general overall global trump. Yeah you're right that there is a trend. We did a piece on that in on foreign affairs. Myth my co-authors Erica fronts. And Joe Rate we've done a lot of work on this personal ISM and you can link to that in the show notes We we find that you know personal dictatorships as a proportion of all authoritarian regimes are increasing. And they're now the most prevalent form of authoritarianism. Something something like forty percent of all authoritarian regimes are now highly personalized authoritarian regimes. You noted that even in some other forms of socrates like China there is a move towards greater personalism personalism even within these other kinds of systems. So it is. I mean you're exactly right through what you're seeing is Putin is basically bucking the trend in this case but I think it's it's about the preservation hesitation of the regime. And so he I think has has you know rightfully watched from the successes and failures of his peers and predecessors and he is trying to solve this dilemma of personal dictatorship and trying to chart a path so that this regime can live beyond Putin. Just since we've mentioned a couple time that you know these transitions are vulnerable and potentially dangerous. What happens when they fail What what was the outcome? You know Putin is right now. He seems like he'll be successful. What if he's not successful or what? What are we what from examples of other regimes like this? Where they tried to kind of transition package didn't work out? Yeah it's really interesting question again. I have looked at some of the data and so when you have again highly personalized authoritarian regimes that been in power fifteen years and longer and not leader exits in forty two two percent of the cases the regime persists and that means basically I think because I in so many of these cases leader stay on until the very end. They die in office office. In fact the most common outcome about forty percent of all regimes that look like Russia..

Putin Russia Putin exit Exits Party Chinese Communist Party prime minister Andrea Long Tiller US Brussel Brussels Mexico China Alex Chinese government State Council Turkmenistan UN Security Council
"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

"And you already saw even just even before Putin's State of the Nation Address. There were already some inklings of I was reading some news reports. About how the Kremlin is creating a lot of new opposition parties with celebrity figures. And other things I think looking ahead to the twenty twenty one election because then it helps divide votes for for the opposition across many parties so that no one opposition party can gain enough traction. So it's already in their mind and I just want to quickly highlight this point because because sometimes I always like to highlight it. 'cause I always feel like we forget that dictators have politics to Ray and Putin actually really hasn't there's a book I love called all the Kremlin's man by Mikhail Sagar and it's a brilliant book because what it shows that they're you know Putin is of course the power player in Russia and the system is his. He's in control but but there really are a lot of elites that people around him that have helped create who he is and the image of who he is and how the state runs and he's got a control them he's got to work with them and he's got he's gotta deal with this kind of stuff and so the you know. Yes Putin's doing this early. Obviously he seems like he's going to be in control but he has to actually think through every single move because of as you mentioned how vulnerable the state will be without him but also because of all these other powerful people he has to account for and both work with keep it bay. It's Putin cannot do anything he really wants. I mean he he can to a certain extent but he really has to be careful and so. That's why I mean impressed. I always feel bad sort of handing it to him but I am kind kind of impressed with this but I am. I am kind of because we haven't gone wondering for a long time. What was it going to look like what move was going to pick? I like we all recited. That drill tweet spend way too much time on twitter ladies and gentlemen but it does it really does seem like picked the right move. Of course time will tell so. I wanted to ask quickly there. Was this weird crazy kind of side story that I read. That wasn't super well explained in some of the articles I read and if you go onto vox dot COM Our colleague Jen Kirby frequent worldly guests has a great piece explaining some of this. But it's GonNa talk about it. There was another option that people thought that Putin might take and just kind of want to tease this out really quickly before we go on. and which was the deal with Belarus and that he might essentially create a new country and just be president of that instead. Can you talk through. Like what like he was. Just GonNa make a union union with Belarus. And just I'll just go run that instead. Yeah there was a lot of speculation and I think a lot of Kinda russia-watchers. FSU watchers were watching. Yeah uh-huh we're kind of watching that in peripheral view. Some people started to get a little nervous because the rhetoric around that started really heating up in the last six months or so and so it is exactly so you said that all of a sudden that there would be this new union state that Russia and Belarus would combine into one and then that of course would necessitate a new constitution sort of new legal legal mechanism and then Putin can then use that as a way to extend term limits so that was definitely one of the options that was floating around and now I mean obviously that's something that Lukashenko as a dictator too and he has interest rate. Wants to you know. He has a son to whom he could hand power one day and so you know he has his his own interest too and he has been playing hardball so to speak and pushing back at every with every lever which are limited but with every lever that he has available to try to us to fend that off and I think it looked like that wasn't going to be a feasible option for the Kremlin and and they've moved on dot. It could just take it right if they want to. Oh that's kind of what I was thinking. You know that kind of leads to my next question. which is there's been a lot of talk in the past decade or so of Putin wanting to reconstitute the former Soviet Union right that he wants to kind of return to this? I don't really want to use the word glory. I don't know if I would call the union a glorious period but I'm American so that's probably why But the idea that he would essentially create this union with Belarus. I ain't got a lot of people's minds was a little like wait. What wait what another literal like Soviet Union? And so my question is you know. What does this mean in terms of going forward if Putin is making these moves if he's going to be in power for the foreseeable future I guess in the broader sense not just Russia but in terms of geopolitics? It you know. We saw the seizure of Crimea and the war in Ukraine gene. Donbas at is are we likely to see more of that more expansion obviously. I know that you can't leave predict Putin's going to do but or you know or my the other thought is like what was that mostly to shore up his power and he's like done now now he feels like he's in a good position just kind of wonder your thoughts on that yeah. I'm always cautious about drawing a straight line between Putin's domestic popularity and his foreign actions abroad. There are a lot of people who will make that argument that then like what he did in Crimea was so hugely popular. That maybe maybe he learned the lesson that those types of Adventurous foreign policies are away to rally public support But I think in many ways Ukraine was unique You didn't see any similar bounce in his public approval when he intervened in Syria for example. But I would also kind of caution against this notion that Putin in is you know expansionist and looking to reconstitute the Soviet Union I think instead what we see from him. He is incredibly opportunistic he because he is such a highly personalized dictator. There's very few constraints on his power. Although to your point earlier noman rules alone and he has constituents that he has to keep happy but relative to other leaders he has very few constraints on his power and that gives him the latitude to be able to act opportunistically as he sees opportunities arise. That said. I think we're in. We've seen Putin willing. I'm to use. Military Force are in cases where he is looking to stam in his mind what. He views as geopolitical loss. When Putin views was that he is losing that something that he believes is his? That's when he's willing to take his most risky assertive foreign policy so obviously Ukraine exactly. I mean Ukraine Crane is the poster child of that. I mean he sees Ukraine as you know that is firmly within Russia's sphere of influence. It is of extreme importance. Geopolitically it's the buffer state on his border to lose Ukraine to the West would have been You know intolerable and so when it looked like that was up for grabs. That's when he's willing to intervene similar with Syria Korea. He'll Lon long standing interest there. He was really interested in pushing back against what he saw as you ask unilateralism. He doesn't wasn't willing to tolerate anymore. Western led regime gene change and so he wanted to insert Russia to shore up with SHARLA. Saad so I think it's it's not that he is just out looking to expand Russian boarders. He wants to stem geopolitical us. The case of Belarus's interesting though because you could imagine a situation where you had. Mass demonstrations protests in Belarus. And if it looked like an opposition was gonNA come to the helm I would put Belarus at the top of my list of most at risk. For where you could see Russian intervention if it looks like Belarus is is turning away from Russia's sphere of influence so we are going to take a quick break when we come back. We're going to talk about the changes to the Russian system in context of other authoritarian regimes and sort of the the broader move towards authoritarianism globally and the stability of the states. I'm Jillian Weinberger hosted the impact podcast from vox about how powerful people affect the rest of us this season. We're looking at the big ideas from all the people running for President in twenty twenty hip opioid crisis head on public option. Move Away from Basel to Energy Efficiency Agency and it's got to be a Great Wall and it's going to work. A lot of those ideas have actually been tried before like that. Wall trump wants to build the GAL. Arizona has had one on its border for decades. I don't understand why individual people have a right to have a fence and yet a country can't Senator Warren's proposal to the OPIOID crisis it's based on what we did to fight the AIDS epidemic..

Putin Belarus Russia Ukraine Soviet Union president Syria Ukraine Crane twitter Arizona Mikhail Sagar Crimea Jen Kirby Jillian Weinberger Ray FSU dot Senator Warren
"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

"And you already saw even just even before Putin's State of the Nation Address. There were already some inklings of I was reading some news reports. About how the Kremlin is creating a lot of new opposition parties with celebrity figures. And other things I think looking ahead to the twenty twenty one election because then it helps divide votes for for the opposition across many parties so that no one opposition party can gain enough traction. So it's already in their mind and I just want to quickly highlight this point because because sometimes I always like to highlight it. 'cause I always feel like we forget that dictators have politics to Ray and Putin actually really hasn't there's a book I love called all the Kremlin's man by Mikhail Sagar and it's a brilliant book because what it shows that they're you know Putin is of course the power player in Russia and the system is his. He's in control but but there really are a lot of elites that people around him that have helped create who he is and the image of who he is and how the state runs and he's got a control them he's got to work with them and he's got he's gotta deal with this kind of stuff and so the you know. Yes Putin's doing this early. Obviously he seems like he's going to be in control but he has to actually think through every single move because of as you mentioned how vulnerable the state will be without him but also because of all these other powerful people he has to account for and both work with keep it bay. It's Putin cannot do anything he really wants. I mean he he can to a certain extent but he really has to be careful and so. That's why I mean impressed. I always feel bad sort of handing it to him but I am kind kind of impressed with this but I am. I am kind of because we haven't gone wondering for a long time. What was it going to look like what move was going to pick? I like we all recited. That drill tweet spend way too much time on twitter ladies and gentlemen but it does it really does seem like picked the right move. Of course time will tell so. I wanted to ask quickly there. Was this weird crazy kind of side story that I read. That wasn't super well explained in some of the articles I read and if you go onto vox dot COM Our colleague Jen Kirby frequent worldly guests has a great piece explaining some of this. But it's GonNa talk about it. There was another option that people thought that Putin might take and just kind of want to tease this out really quickly before we go on. and which was the deal with Belarus and that he might essentially create a new country and just be president of that instead. Can you talk through. Like what like he was. Just GonNa make a union union with Belarus. And just I'll just go run that instead. Yeah there was a lot of speculation and I think a lot of Kinda russia-watchers. FSU watchers were watching. Yeah uh-huh we're kind of watching that in peripheral view. Some people started to get a little nervous because the rhetoric around that started really heating up in the last six months or so and so it is exactly so you said that all of a sudden that there would be this new union state that Russia and Belarus would combine into one and then that of course would necessitate a new constitution sort of new legal legal mechanism and then Putin can then use that as a way to extend term limits so that was definitely one of the options that was floating around and now I mean obviously that's something that Lukashenko as a dictator too and he has interest rate. Wants to you know. He has a son to whom he could hand power one day and so you know he has his his own interest too and he has been playing hardball so to speak and pushing back at every with every lever which are limited but with every lever that he has available to try to us to fend that off and I think it looked like that wasn't going to be a feasible option for the Kremlin and and they've moved on dot. It could just take it right if they want to. Oh that's kind of what I was thinking. You know that kind of leads to my next question. which is there's been a lot of talk in the past decade or so of Putin wanting to reconstitute the former Soviet Union right that he wants to kind of return to this? I don't really want to use the word glory. I don't know if I would call the union a glorious period but I'm American so that's probably why But the idea that he would essentially create this union with Belarus. I ain't got a lot of people's minds was a little like wait. What wait what another literal like Soviet Union? And so my question is you know. What does this mean in terms of going forward if Putin is making these moves if he's going to be in power for the foreseeable future I guess in the broader sense not just Russia but in terms of geopolitics? It you know. We saw the seizure of Crimea and the war in Ukraine gene. Donbas at is are we likely to see more of that more expansion obviously. I know that you can't leave predict Putin's going to do but or you know or my the other thought is like what was that mostly to shore up his power and he's like done now now he feels like he's in a good position just kind of wonder your thoughts on that yeah. I'm always cautious about drawing a straight line between Putin's domestic popularity and his foreign actions abroad. There are a lot of people who will make that argument that then like what he did in Crimea was so hugely popular. That maybe maybe he learned the lesson that those types of Adventurous foreign policies are away to rally public support But I think in many ways Ukraine was unique You didn't see any similar bounce in his public approval when he intervened in Syria for example. But I would also kind of caution against this notion that Putin in is you know expansionist and looking to reconstitute the Soviet Union I think instead what we see from him. He is incredibly opportunistic he because he is such a highly personalized dictator. There's very few constraints on his power. Although to your point earlier noman rules alone and he has constituents that he has to keep happy but relative to other leaders he has very few constraints on his power and that gives him the latitude to be able to act opportunistically as he sees opportunities arise. That said. I think we're in. We've seen Putin willing. I'm to use. Military Force are in cases where he is looking to stam in his mind what. He views as geopolitical loss. When Putin views was that he is losing that something that he believes is his? That's when he's willing to take his most risky assertive foreign policy so obviously Ukraine exactly. I mean Ukraine Crane is the poster child of that. I mean he sees Ukraine as you know that is firmly within Russia's sphere of influence. It is of extreme importance. Geopolitically it's the buffer state on his border to lose Ukraine to the West would have been You know intolerable and so when it looked like that was up for grabs. That's when he's willing to intervene similar with Syria Korea. He'll Lon long standing interest there. He was really interested in pushing back against what he saw as you ask unilateralism. He doesn't wasn't willing to tolerate anymore. Western led regime gene change and so he wanted to insert Russia to shore up with SHARLA. Saad so I think it's it's not that he is just out looking to expand Russian boarders. He wants to stem geopolitical us. The case of Belarus's interesting though because you could imagine a situation where you had. Mass demonstrations protests in Belarus. And if it looked like an opposition was gonNA come to the helm I would put Belarus at the top of my list of most at risk. For where you could see Russian intervention if it looks like Belarus is is turning away from Russia's sphere of influence so we are going to take a quick break when we come back. We're going to talk about the changes to the Russian system in context of other authoritarian regimes and sort of the the broader move towards authoritarianism globally and the stability of the states. I'm Jillian Weinberger hosted the impact podcast from vox about how powerful people affect the rest of us this season. We're looking at the big ideas from all the people running for President in twenty twenty hip opioid crisis head on public option. Move Away from Basel to Energy Efficiency Agency and it's got to be a Great Wall and it's going to work. A lot of those ideas have actually been tried before like that. Wall trump wants to build the GAL. Arizona has had one on its border for decades. I don't understand why individual people have a right to have a fence and yet a country can't Senator Warren's proposal to the OPIOID crisis it's based on what we did to fight the AIDS epidemic..

Putin Belarus Russia Ukraine Soviet Union president Syria Ukraine Crane twitter Arizona Mikhail Sagar Crimea Jen Kirby Jillian Weinberger Ray FSU dot Senator Warren
"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

13:36 min | 1 year ago

"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

"So you may have seen a strange and totally disturbing headline this week. Just that the entire Russian government resigned Including Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev and a whole host of other top level officials. Now this doesn't mean that Vladimir Putin's regime gene is over in fact quite the opposite. We're GONNA talk about this week on worldly part of the VOX media. podcast network are the ways in which should setting up plan for succession for someone coming after Vladimir Prudent for Putin to take over in a different role. I'm ZAC beach in here. Is Always with generalize outward hit him. Hey what's going on. We are also here with dre. Kendall Taylor Taylor who is a senior fellow at the Center for new American Security very well-known Russia expert and particularly authored a paper on regime succession. Some really happy. Happy that she's here happy to be with you so I have to tell you guys. I was running a little bit late this morning. And part of that is that I had a dream last night. That and this is real. This is all real That I shot Vladimir Putin accidentally well visiting Russia and it didn't go over well with the Russian government and it was quite disturbing and so overslept alarm and kind of freaked out. I think even over. We're preparing for the PODCAST. A podcast stress the Russians. Back by making you late somehow in your dream no. I was just so stressed out when I woke up. Because because I'd difficulty differentiating reality dreamland. That I like overslept by alarm I looked at I was like okay. What's going on and then filled later? So you shooting. Putin could be a reality for you and your mind. It seems like I was in a shootout John. Krasinski was there. It was really cared that you didn't actually shoot Putin power correct. That's actually the thrust of this episode shows our guest Andrea. I want to start with you. Tell US exactly what these reforms reforms quote Putin proposed this week might do I think the most important change was Putin's announcement about pretty radical changes to the constitution That would shift power away from the presidency towards the parliament. I think quite notably he also talked about strengthening this kind of relatively sleepy almost defunct a funk State Council which I think gives some clues about maybe what Putin is planning so basically. He's announce these constitutional changes not only. Did he shift power or away from the president towards the parliament but there were some other rules about any future. President can only serve two terms so at the end of the twelve years. That's it taking away. Those consecutive terms as we know Putin served two terms stepped out and then was back that will be no more and there was another interesting reform to that. Talked about about Any future president has to have had lived in Russia for twenty five consecutive years. Not hold any resident permits. So he's basically saying no. The future president in Russia will not be Alexei. Navalny or Koepke or anyone like that so in many ways just like you said these changes should be interpreted as setting up Putin Hooton to continue to rule Russia for the foreseeable future. Okay and that's kind of what I wanted to know is like if you look at this on paper. It seems like you know he's Setting up term limits. So it looks like he would then be kicked out. He's expected to. He's supposed to step down in two thousand twenty four that's when his term is up and he's giving more power word of the parliament. Can you kind of just explain 'cause like when I just look at this on paper. It looks like he's giving away power right. It looks like he's you know. Moving power away from the presidency toward for the parliament telling the parliament that they can pick new prime minister. You just kind of explain how that actually may extend his power. Because I think just looking at it. It's a little confusing. Yes so we would the one thing that we were all expecting that Putin would do something. I think. That's the timing of this caught everyone by surprise rave but we've known for a long time that Putin's his consecutive term limits expired twenty twenty four so he was going to have to do something people expected he would do something that would enable him to continue to rule and so now he's creating a Russia currently under this nineteen ninety-three constitution has a very strong executive branch. It's a very very strong presidential system. The previous President Boris Yeltsin wasn't really able to ever to fully leverage the powers that that constitution gave him but Putin obviously has been quite effective at fully exploiting the powers that are are pro allowed under the nineteen ninety-three constitution so Putin now is basically saying like there will never be another president as strong as I am and so he you know. Oh He's come a long he has taken Russia out of that. Very turbulent transition wave after the fall of the Soviet Union and he basically wants to to create a system that is less allows for less concentration of power So no one can really benefit the way that he did He is then changing and shifting power towards the parliament and I think than the expectation would be that President Putin would shift he would move over and serve of either as prime minister or he would take over as head of the State Council and I think the the thing. That's interesting is that there is some precedent for this. And so you if you look at Turkey you for example I was Kinda thought about this as like an Air John but in reverse Amazon had served as prime minister for something like eleven years and then through change the constitution to make for a strong presidential system step down as prime minister was elected to President and now he's able to continue to rule there so that's one one option he's moved powers president. Putin now has moved these powers towards the parliament so he could step in his prime minister or I think the most likely option in my mind seems names that he will step into this role as head of the State Council and be able to rule from there and again. There's another precedent when you look Kazakhstan and so that's something that we saw just as recently as twenty eighteen and I think was probably something that Putin was watching very closely and so they are nozzle by was president for almost thirty years. changed his constitution to empower. This new you know. He stepped in as head of the Security Council empowered that gave it more powers stepped in in there and allowed his successor to rule so I think he was watching that quite closely. He's basically setting up a new system shifting power to an area where he would be able to. Let's stop in and continue to control an influence domestic and foreign policy. I don't know until the end. No like the obvious question or at least that I have thinking about this is is why doesn't Putin. Just change the constitution to get rid of term limits and stay informal power and my understanding is that there are real concerns about popular backlash in that world right. He is at a relatively low ebb. popularity-wise Americans are used to thinking of Putin is being spoiler strongman but in actuality the economy's not doing very well. Well it seems like just cemented. His time as a fallen authoritarian would risk some kind of more direct backlash from the Russian populations that wrong. No I think that's exactly right even stepping back before yesterday I mean there were. He basically had a couple of options disposal. That would allow him to stay on one option. One would be he could pick a successor handpicked. Someone step down fade into the to the background in allow successor to run in elections and continue on That's a model. We've seen in some authoritarian regimes. It hasn't worked out that well. There are some really cool political science research that shows when an incumbent authoritarian regime doesn't actually stand in elections that the opposition than has a much higher chance of winning so we saw that for example in Kenya when Moi stepped down his chosen successor Kibaki lost elections Another highly personalized authoritarian regime in Ghana. Jerry Rawlings did the same thing. His handpicked successor. reince stepped in ran in elections in lost their so. That is something that looks like. That's probably not in the cards for Putin. The the the other option that as is as you rightly said is that he could have just abolish term limits. And that's what we saw in China Xi Jinping. He did that very early in his term to set up the situation where he could be ruler for life and and it is interesting. That honestly what. I expected what happened. I thought that Putin would find a way to change term limits in stay on In part because there's also kind of a global trend towards that happening we're seeing leaders across Africa and also all across the globe. There's been an increasing incidence of leaders who using referendum or other kind of legalistic mechanisms demonstrating that it's the will of the popular vote to legitimize the action that they are extending term limits so in in all honesty. That's what I thought would happen but this is another what we're seeing now. This shifting powers to a different is a constitutional change of another kind. That seems I think. Think a little bit less outrageous a little less egregious probably from popular perspective. It is interesting that Putin van will take this to a referendum. We've heard now. Oh By may first. Because he is he he does want to try to legitimize these actions but I think the the term limit extensions probably would have been seen by Russians Russians as unacceptable. He did face when he stepped back into office. In twenty twelve those huge street protests. And so I think that was probably top of mind for him too so the timing of this. This actually is what's fascinating to me because basically anyone who's the thing about this including you came early right and so I think one of the reasons that I should say before I continue is that I talked to a friend of ours read standish who's a journalist Moscow so anything I say the smartest probably likely because of him But the the doing this early was one to to stop a popular backlash to make sure that there weren't those big protests that we've seen so far but another one is that he's trying to set the table Oh for the important Duma elections in twenty twenty one the lower being the president. It's a lower house of parliament and where that's where they're going to need to ratify a lot outta these changes and so having a year plus ish to work on this to signal that this is what Putin wants the kind of system emme wants. It gives him time to lean on a lot of these lawmakers which shouldn't be that hard gas but also to just kind of set the table for what's happening And I'm also wondering 'cause there have been some reports of infighting within the government that there have been some elites who have been trying to. I've been thinking about well. What does life after Putin look like? And they've been sort of jockeying and fighting for position and maybe trying to get ahead and I wonder if this is Putin like slapping his kids you know and just stop it. I'm going to be here for a while and you guys need to stop infighting and just kind of get along with the package. It's it's I mean Putin is a smart tactician. This seems like a really good sort of just political move and also public relations move And I think he's learned the lessons lessons of the past couple of years. Yeah I think it's incredibly smart it. It seems like it's relatively well played and now it seems obvious. You know obviously hindsight that this was something that is planned in part because because of the the way that it latches up with the Duma elections like you mentioned but there is something to be said that the timing came as a total surprise that what happened the substance of what happens opens isn't necessarily surprising but the timing. I think caught almost everybody by surprise. And you are right to note that this is taking place amid the context of a lot of in-fighting. I mean I think you can kind of think back to what it was like In around two thousand eight when no one knew what Putin was going to do them. The level of infighting is really intense hence. And there's been a lot of as you said elites jockeying for position using laws going after each other trying to eliminate opposition so the elite infighting has been intense and and also the public dissatisfaction. When you look at Putin's public approval ratings are down back towards the sixties down from upper eighties after the sixties? That's love love. Hello or the illegal annexation of Crimea. His public approval rating was in the high eighties. And so in this you know he's down around sixty three percent at the moment and so having kind kind of this elite intense in-fighting high levels of public dissatisfaction. I think when you look forward. I don't think that any of that was going to is likely to get any better. So certainly from an economic economic perspective Russia's economy is expected to grow more than one two percent of GDP. So I think if you're Putin you're looking forward. None of the elites are jockeying because there's all of of this uncertainty looming about what his future is going to be. The economy isn't gate set to to improve by any means. And so he does it now. I think to avoid having the pressure build up to twenty twenty four. If you're in authority leader particularly a highly personalized one like Putin leadership transitions and succession are really scary. Times and they have to be managed carefully and so to do it now. I think is in large part because because of the context of the discontent from the from the public and it is interesting. Like you said gives Russia time Putin time ahead of the twenty twenty one Duma elections because those those I think now will be a really are key I right now. The United Russia the party that Supports Putin Putin isn't the head of the party which I think is really interesting but kind of brush off a little bit because their popularity is suffering as well but it you know right now they hold a two thirds majority in the Duma which allows them to do all sorts of things and so I think having that majority continue in twenty twenty one is going to be critical for allowing Putin's plans to unfold smoothly early..

President Putin Putin Hooton Putin van president Russia prime minister President Boris Yeltsin Dmitry Medvedev Kendall Taylor Taylor Russian government senior fellow Jerry Rawlings United Russia Krasinski funk State Council Kazakhstan Andrea Soviet Union
"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

13:36 min | 1 year ago

"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

"So you may have seen a strange and totally disturbing headline this week. Just that the entire Russian government resigned Including Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev and a whole host of other top level officials. Now this doesn't mean that Vladimir Putin's regime gene is over in fact quite the opposite. We're GONNA talk about this week on worldly part of the VOX media. podcast network are the ways in which should setting up plan for succession for someone coming after Vladimir Prudent for Putin to take over in a different role. I'm ZAC beach in here. Is Always with generalize outward hit him. Hey what's going on. We are also here with dre. Kendall Taylor Taylor who is a senior fellow at the Center for new American Security very well-known Russia expert and particularly authored a paper on regime succession. Some really happy. Happy that she's here happy to be with you so I have to tell you guys. I was running a little bit late this morning. And part of that is that I had a dream last night. That and this is real. This is all real That I shot Vladimir Putin accidentally well visiting Russia and it didn't go over well with the Russian government and it was quite disturbing and so overslept alarm and kind of freaked out. I think even over. We're preparing for the PODCAST. A podcast stress the Russians. Back by making you late somehow in your dream no. I was just so stressed out when I woke up. Because because I'd difficulty differentiating reality dreamland. That I like overslept by alarm I looked at I was like okay. What's going on and then filled later? So you shooting. Putin could be a reality for you and your mind. It seems like I was in a shootout John. Krasinski was there. It was really cared that you didn't actually shoot Putin power correct. That's actually the thrust of this episode shows our guest Andrea. I want to start with you. Tell US exactly what these reforms reforms quote Putin proposed this week might do I think the most important change was Putin's announcement about pretty radical changes to the constitution That would shift power away from the presidency towards the parliament. I think quite notably he also talked about strengthening this kind of relatively sleepy almost defunct a funk State Council which I think gives some clues about maybe what Putin is planning so basically. He's announce these constitutional changes not only. Did he shift power or away from the president towards the parliament but there were some other rules about any future. President can only serve two terms so at the end of the twelve years. That's it taking away. Those consecutive terms as we know Putin served two terms stepped out and then was back that will be no more and there was another interesting reform to that. Talked about about Any future president has to have had lived in Russia for twenty five consecutive years. Not hold any resident permits. So he's basically saying no. The future president in Russia will not be Alexei. Navalny or Koepke or anyone like that so in many ways just like you said these changes should be interpreted as setting up Putin Hooton to continue to rule Russia for the foreseeable future. Okay and that's kind of what I wanted to know is like if you look at this on paper. It seems like you know he's Setting up term limits. So it looks like he would then be kicked out. He's expected to. He's supposed to step down in two thousand twenty four that's when his term is up and he's giving more power word of the parliament. Can you kind of just explain 'cause like when I just look at this on paper. It looks like he's giving away power right. It looks like he's you know. Moving power away from the presidency toward for the parliament telling the parliament that they can pick new prime minister. You just kind of explain how that actually may extend his power. Because I think just looking at it. It's a little confusing. Yes so we would the one thing that we were all expecting that Putin would do something. I think. That's the timing of this caught everyone by surprise rave but we've known for a long time that Putin's his consecutive term limits expired twenty twenty four so he was going to have to do something people expected he would do something that would enable him to continue to rule and so now he's creating a Russia currently under this nineteen ninety-three constitution has a very strong executive branch. It's a very very strong presidential system. The previous President Boris Yeltsin wasn't really able to ever to fully leverage the powers that that constitution gave him but Putin obviously has been quite effective at fully exploiting the powers that are are pro allowed under the nineteen ninety-three constitution so Putin now is basically saying like there will never be another president as strong as I am and so he you know. Oh He's come a long he has taken Russia out of that. Very turbulent transition wave after the fall of the Soviet Union and he basically wants to to create a system that is less allows for less concentration of power So no one can really benefit the way that he did He is then changing and shifting power towards the parliament and I think than the expectation would be that President Putin would shift he would move over and serve of either as prime minister or he would take over as head of the State Council and I think the the thing. That's interesting is that there is some precedent for this. And so you if you look at Turkey you for example I was Kinda thought about this as like an Air John but in reverse Amazon had served as prime minister for something like eleven years and then through change the constitution to make for a strong presidential system step down as prime minister was elected to President and now he's able to continue to rule there so that's one one option he's moved powers president. Putin now has moved these powers towards the parliament so he could step in his prime minister or I think the most likely option in my mind seems names that he will step into this role as head of the State Council and be able to rule from there and again. There's another precedent when you look Kazakhstan and so that's something that we saw just as recently as twenty eighteen and I think was probably something that Putin was watching very closely and so they are nozzle by was president for almost thirty years. changed his constitution to empower. This new you know. He stepped in as head of the Security Council empowered that gave it more powers stepped in in there and allowed his successor to rule so I think he was watching that quite closely. He's basically setting up a new system shifting power to an area where he would be able to. Let's stop in and continue to control an influence domestic and foreign policy. I don't know until the end. No like the obvious question or at least that I have thinking about this is is why doesn't Putin. Just change the constitution to get rid of term limits and stay informal power and my understanding is that there are real concerns about popular backlash in that world right. He is at a relatively low ebb. popularity-wise Americans are used to thinking of Putin is being spoiler strongman but in actuality the economy's not doing very well. Well it seems like just cemented. His time as a fallen authoritarian would risk some kind of more direct backlash from the Russian populations that wrong. No I think that's exactly right even stepping back before yesterday I mean there were. He basically had a couple of options disposal. That would allow him to stay on one option. One would be he could pick a successor handpicked. Someone step down fade into the to the background in allow successor to run in elections and continue on That's a model. We've seen in some authoritarian regimes. It hasn't worked out that well. There are some really cool political science research that shows when an incumbent authoritarian regime doesn't actually stand in elections that the opposition than has a much higher chance of winning so we saw that for example in Kenya when Moi stepped down his chosen successor Kibaki lost elections Another highly personalized authoritarian regime in Ghana. Jerry Rawlings did the same thing. His handpicked successor. reince stepped in ran in elections in lost their so. That is something that looks like. That's probably not in the cards for Putin. The the the other option that as is as you rightly said is that he could have just abolish term limits. And that's what we saw in China Xi Jinping. He did that very early in his term to set up the situation where he could be ruler for life and and it is interesting. That honestly what. I expected what happened. I thought that Putin would find a way to change term limits in stay on In part because there's also kind of a global trend towards that happening we're seeing leaders across Africa and also all across the globe. There's been an increasing incidence of leaders who using referendum or other kind of legalistic mechanisms demonstrating that it's the will of the popular vote to legitimize the action that they are extending term limits so in in all honesty. That's what I thought would happen but this is another what we're seeing now. This shifting powers to a different is a constitutional change of another kind. That seems I think. Think a little bit less outrageous a little less egregious probably from popular perspective. It is interesting that Putin van will take this to a referendum. We've heard now. Oh By may first. Because he is he he does want to try to legitimize these actions but I think the the term limit extensions probably would have been seen by Russians Russians as unacceptable. He did face when he stepped back into office. In twenty twelve those huge street protests. And so I think that was probably top of mind for him too so the timing of this. This actually is what's fascinating to me because basically anyone who's the thing about this including you came early right and so I think one of the reasons that I should say before I continue is that I talked to a friend of ours read standish who's a journalist Moscow so anything I say the smartest probably likely because of him But the the doing this early was one to to stop a popular backlash to make sure that there weren't those big protests that we've seen so far but another one is that he's trying to set the table Oh for the important Duma elections in twenty twenty one the lower being the president. It's a lower house of parliament and where that's where they're going to need to ratify a lot outta these changes and so having a year plus ish to work on this to signal that this is what Putin wants the kind of system emme wants. It gives him time to lean on a lot of these lawmakers which shouldn't be that hard gas but also to just kind of set the table for what's happening And I'm also wondering 'cause there have been some reports of infighting within the government that there have been some elites who have been trying to. I've been thinking about well. What does life after Putin look like? And they've been sort of jockeying and fighting for position and maybe trying to get ahead and I wonder if this is Putin like slapping his kids you know and just stop it. I'm going to be here for a while and you guys need to stop infighting and just kind of get along with the package. It's it's I mean Putin is a smart tactician. This seems like a really good sort of just political move and also public relations move And I think he's learned the lessons lessons of the past couple of years. Yeah I think it's incredibly smart it. It seems like it's relatively well played and now it seems obvious. You know obviously hindsight that this was something that is planned in part because because of the the way that it latches up with the Duma elections like you mentioned but there is something to be said that the timing came as a total surprise that what happened the substance of what happens opens isn't necessarily surprising but the timing. I think caught almost everybody by surprise. And you are right to note that this is taking place amid the context of a lot of in-fighting. I mean I think you can kind of think back to what it was like In around two thousand eight when no one knew what Putin was going to do them. The level of infighting is really intense hence. And there's been a lot of as you said elites jockeying for position using laws going after each other trying to eliminate opposition so the elite infighting has been intense and and also the public dissatisfaction. When you look at Putin's public approval ratings are down back towards the sixties down from upper eighties after the sixties? That's love love. Hello or the illegal annexation of Crimea. His public approval rating was in the high eighties. And so in this you know he's down around sixty three percent at the moment and so having kind kind of this elite intense in-fighting high levels of public dissatisfaction. I think when you look forward. I don't think that any of that was going to is likely to get any better. So certainly from an economic economic perspective Russia's economy is expected to grow more than one two percent of GDP. So I think if you're Putin you're looking forward. None of the elites are jockeying because there's all of of this uncertainty looming about what his future is going to be. The economy isn't gate set to to improve by any means. And so he does it now. I think to avoid having the pressure build up to twenty twenty four. If you're in authority leader particularly a highly personalized one like Putin leadership transitions and succession are really scary. Times and they have to be managed carefully and so to do it now. I think is in large part because because of the context of the discontent from the from the public and it is interesting. Like you said gives Russia time Putin time ahead of the twenty twenty one Duma elections because those those I think now will be a really are key I right now. The United Russia the party that Supports Putin Putin isn't the head of the party which I think is really interesting but kind of brush off a little bit because their popularity is suffering as well but it you know right now they hold a two thirds majority in the Duma which allows them to do all sorts of things and so I think having that majority continue in twenty twenty one is going to be critical for allowing Putin's plans to unfold smoothly early..

President Putin Putin Hooton Putin van president Russia prime minister President Boris Yeltsin Dmitry Medvedev Kendall Taylor Taylor Russian government senior fellow Jerry Rawlings United Russia Krasinski funk State Council Kazakhstan Andrea Soviet Union
"russian government" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

14:39 min | 2 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on KGO 810

"I quote the Russian government perceived it would benefit from a trump presidency and work to secure that outcome do I have that statement right I believe so doctor Miller this attack on our democracy involved as you said two operations first a social media disinformation campaign this was part of a targeted campaign to spread false information on places like Twitter and Facebook is that correct that's correct Facebook estimated as per your report that the Russian fake images reached a hundred and twenty six million people is that correct I believe that's a seller we record director who did the Russian social media campaign ultimately intended benefit Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump Donald Trump the second operation directly to say Donald Trump but there were instances where Hey Hillary Clinton was subject to much the same behavior the second operation in the Russian attack was a scheme what we call the the how can dump to steal and release hundreds of thousands of emails from the Democratic Party and the Clinton campaigns that a fair summary that is did your investigation find that the releases of the hacked emails were strategically timed to maximize the impact on the election I'd have to refer you to the our report on that question page thirty six I quote the release the documents designed and time to interfere with the twenty sixteen U. S. presidential election Mr Miller which presidential candidate was Russia's hiking and dumping operation designed to benefit Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump Mr Mr trump smaller is it possible that the sweeping and systematic effort by Russia actually had an effect on the outcome of the presidential election those issues are being or have been investigated by other entities hundred twenty six million Facebook impressions fake rallies attacks on Hillary Clinton's health would you rule out that it might have had some effect on the election Mecca speculate your report describes a third Avenue of attempted Russian interference that is the numerous links and contacts between the trump campaign in individuals tied to the Russian government is that correct I could you repeat the question your report describes what is called a third Avenue of it Russian interference and that's the links and contacts between the trump campaign an individual's tied to the Russian government let's bring up slide one which is about George Papadopoulos and it reads on may sixth twenty sixteen ten days after that meeting with Masood much discussed today Papadopoulos suggested to a representative of a foreign government that the trump campaign had received indications from the Russian government that I could assist the campaign through the anonymous release of information that would be damaging to Hillary Clinton and director that's exactly what happened two months later is it not well I can speak to the surface you have on the screen as being accurate from the report but not the second half your question with Willis second half just to refer to page six of the report is that on July twenty second through wikileaks thousands of these emails that were that were stolen by the Russian government appeared correct that's on page six of the report this is the wikileaks posting of those you know I I can't find it quickly but I please continue okay so just to be clear before the public or the FBI ever knew the Russians previewed for a trump campaign official George Papadopoulos that they had stolen emails that they could release anonymously to help Donald Trump and hurt Hillary Clinton is that correct I'm like I speak to to to that director rather than report this contact with Joseph Masood and the notion that there was dirt that the campaign could use rather than report that to the FBI that I think most of my constituents would expect an individual to do Papadopoulos in fact lied about his Russian contacts to you is that not correct that's true we have an election coming up in twenty twenty director if a campaign receives an offer of dirt from a foreign individual or government generally speaking should that campaign report those contacts should be it I can be depending on the circumstances across I I will yield back the balance of my time miss Conway the smaller did anyone ask you to exclude anything from your report that you felt should have it in the report I I I I don't think so but it was a it's it's not a small report Michael come away no one has which is for the Texas northwest on the most likely should within their that you were not that I can recall the announcement Sanders reckless thank you thank the gentleman for yielding good afternoon director Mahler in your may twenty ninth press conference again in your opening remarks this morning you made it pretty clear you wanted the special counsel report to speak for itself John Nash said if your friend of complicated from ten that the authors in mind which is a will not comment on any other conclusions or hypotheticals about the president now he spent the last few hours of your life from Democrats trying to get you the answer all kinds of hypotheticals about the president and I expected it may continue for the next few hours of your life I think you've stayed pretty much true to what your intent and desire was but I guess regardless of that the special counsel's office is closed and it has no continuing jurisdiction or authority so what would be your authority or jurisdiction for adding new conclusions or determinations to the special counsel's written report as for the latter I don't know or expect changes in conclusion so we have included in our in our report so to that point you address one of the issues that that I needed to which was from your testimony this morning which some consider it as a change to the written report you talked about the exchange the you had with congressman Lou I wrote it down a little bit different I want to ask you about it so that the records perfectly clear I recorded that he asked you quote the reason you did not indict Donald Trump is because of the well see opinion stating you cannot indict a sitting president to which you responded that is correct that that response is inconsistent I think you'll agree with your written report I want to be clear that it is not your intent to change a written report it is your intent to clarify the record today as I started to today this afternoon and added either a footnote or endnote what I want to clarify is the fact that we did not make any determination a with regard to culpability in any way we did not start that process down down the road terrific thank you for clarifying the record the stated purpose of your appointment as special counsel was to insure a full and thorough investigation of the Russian government efforts to interfere in the two thousand sixteen presidential election as part of that full and thorough investigation what determination and special counsel office make about whether the steel dot CA was part of the Russian government efforts to interfere in the two thousand sixteen presidential election Gary comes to Mister Steele I defer to the department of justice well first full director I I very much agree with your determination that rough for Russia's efforts were sweeping and systematic I think it should concern every American that's why I want to know just how sweeping and systematic those efforts were I want to find out if Russia interfered with our election by providing false information through sources to Christopher steel about a trump conspiracy that you determine didn't exist well I has again I'm not gay discuss the issues regarding Mister Steele as the I in terms of a portrayal of the conspiracies we return to indictments and computer crimes arena of a one G. R. U. and another active measures in which we lay out in excruciating detail I am what occurred in those two and I rather large conspiracies I I agree with respect to that but why this is important is an application three renewal applications were submitted by the United States government to spy or surveil on trump campaign Carter associates are part of page and on all four occasions the United States government submitted the steel dossier as a central piece of evidence with respect to that now the basic premise of the dossier as you know was that there was a well developed conspiracy of cooperation between the trump campaign and the Russian government but the special counsel investigation didn't establish any conspiracy correct well I I what I can tell you is that the defense that you are characterizing here now is part of another matter that is being handled by the department of justice which you did not establish any conspiracy much less a well developed one and again I may pass on that question the special counsel did not charge card page with anything correct social council did not all right of my time is expired I yield back this tool director Mauler I'd like to turn your attention to the June ninth twenty sixteen trump tower meeting slide to which should be on the screen now is part of an email chain between don junior don Donald Trump junior and a publicist represent every single Democrat from Alabama email exchange ultimately led to the now infamous June ninth twenty sixteen meeting the email from the publicist to Donald Trump junior reads in part the crown prosecutor of Russia offer to provide the trump campaign with some official documents and information that would incriminate Hillary and her dealings with Russia and is a part of Russia and its government support of Mr trump in this email Donald Trump junior is being told that the Russian government wants to pass along information which would hurt Hillary Clinton and help Donald Trump is that correct now some juniors response to that email is flight three he said and I quote it is what you say I love it especially later in the summer then dollar junior invited senior campaign officials Paul man a fort in and Jared Kushner to the meeting today not this email exchanges that characterization which isn't it against the law for a presidential campaign to accept anything of value from a foreign government generally speaking yes but there is a hired killing the cases are circles or unique we say in a page a hundred eighty four and volume one the federal campaign finance law prop broadly prohibits foreign nationals from making contributions etcetera and then you say that foreign nationals may not make a contribution or donation of money or anything of value it said clearly in the report itself thank you now let's turn to what actually happened at the meeting when Donald Trump junior and the others got to the June ninth meeting they realize that the Russian delegation didn't have the promised cortical dirt in fact they got upset about that did they not Hey generally yes you say in volume a one page a hundred eighteen that truck junior asked what what what are we doing here what what what do they have on Clinton and during the meeting Kirschner actually text manifold saying it was quote a waste of time in quote is that correct I believe it's in the report along the lines you specify so to be clear top trunk campaign officials learned that Russia wanted to help Donald trump's campaign by giving him dirt on his opponent truck junior said loved it then he and senior officials held a meeting with the Russians to try to get that Russian help but they were disappointed because a dirt wasn't as good as they had hoped so to the next step did anyone to your knowledge in the trump campaign ever tell the FBI of this offer I don't believe so Donald Trump junior tell they'll be either they received an offer of help from and that's about all say on on this aspect of it would you be to star that if if they had reported it to the FBI or anyone in that campaign during the course of your two year investigation you would've been covered touch up I would hope yes yes Sir is it not the responsibility of political campaigns to inform the F. B. I. if they receive information from a foreign government I would think that that something they wanted to do well not only did the campaign not tell the FBI they they sought to hide the existence of the June ninth at meeting for over a year is that not correct on the general characterization I would question it Hey if you're referring to later Hey edition of a reply that flowed from the media then no what I'm suggesting is eve said and volume two page five on several occasions the president directed aids not to publicly disclose the email setting up the jet the June nine meters attacker thanks I'm sorry given this illegal assistance by Russians you chose even given that you did not charge Donald Trump junior or any of the other senior officials with conspiracy is that right correct and while in there when you're talking about if you're talking about other individuals you're talking about the attendees yes that's right nine if that's right so Mr Miller even though he did not you didn't charge him with conspiracy don't you think the American people would be concerned that these three senior campaign officials eagerly sought a foreign adversaries helped to win elections and don't think that reporting that it's important that we don't set a precedent for future elections I can't accept that characterization well listen I think that it seems like a betrayal of American values to me Sir that someone with if not being criminal is definitely an ethical and wrong and I would think that we would.

Russian government doctor Miller twenty sixteen ten days twenty second nine meters two months two year one G
"russian government" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Is Russian government links to and context with the Trump campaign, the office identified multiple context links in the words of the appointment order between Trump campaign, officials and individuals with ties to the Russian government. The office investigated whether those contacts constituted a third avenue of attempted Russian interference with or influence on the twenty sixteen presidential election in particularly investigation examined, whether these contacts involved resulted in coordination or conspiracy with the Trump campaign and Russia, including with respect to Russia, providing assistance to the Trump campaign in exchange for any sort of favorable treatment in the future based on the available information. The investigation did not establish such coordination this section. Describes prince the principal links between the Trump campaign and individuals with ties to the Russian government including. Ding some contacts campaign officials or associates that have been publicly reported to involve Russian context, each subsection begins with an overview of the Russian contacted issue and then describes in detail the relevant facts, which are generally, presented in chronological order, beginning with the early months of the campaign, and extending through the post-election transition period, a campaign period, September twenty fifteen to November eight twenty sixteen Russian government connected individuals in media entities began showing interest in Trump's campaign in the months after he announced his candidacy in June twenty fifteen because Trump status as a public figure at the time was tributed in large part to his prior business and entertainment dealings is off his investigated whether a business contact with Russia, linked individuals and entities during the campaign, period, the Trump Tower Moscow project led to or involved, coordination of election assistance outreach from individuals with ties to Russia continued in the spring and summer of two thousand sixteen. When Trump was moving forward, and eventually becoming the Republican nominee for president as set forth below the office, also evaluated a series of links during this period outreach to, to Trump's then recently named foreign policy advisers, including Representative that Russia had quoted dirt on Clinton in the form of thousands of emails, dealings of the DC based think tank that specializes in Russia and and has connections with its government a meeting and Trump Tower between the campaign in a Russian lawyer promising dirt on candidate Clinton that was part of Russia and its governments support for Trump events at the Republican national convention post-convention contacts between the Trump campaign officials in Russia's ambassador to the United States and contacts through campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, who had previously worked for a Russian oligarch, and a pro Russian political party in Ukraine. One Trump Tower Moscow project. This is page sixty seven now. The Trump organization has pursued and completed projects outside the United States as part of its real estate portfolio. Some projects have involved, the acquisition ownership through subsidiary corporate structures of property. In other cases, the Trump organization is executed licensing deals with real estate, developers and management companies often local to the country where the project is located between at least twenty thirteen and twenty sixteen. The Trump organization explored a similar licensing deal in Russia involving the construction of Trump branded property in Moscow, the project commonly referred to as a Trump Tower Moscow or Trump Moscow project anticipated, a combination of commercial hotel, and residential properties all within the same building twenty thirteen in June of twenty sixteen several implies of the Trump organization, including then president of the organization, Donald J Trump pursued a Moscow deal with several Russian counterparties from the fall of twenty fifteen until the middle of twenty sixteen Michael Cohen spirit of the trumps. Organizations pursuit of Trump Tower Moscow project, including by reporting on the projects status to candidate Trump in other executives in the Trump organization, a Trump Tower Moscow, venture with the crocus group twenty thirteen to twenty fourteen the Trump organization in the crocus group, a Russian real estate conglomerate owned and controlled by era's, a galore of began discussing a Russian based real estate project shortly after the conclusion of the twenty thirteen Miss Universe pageant in Moscow. Donald J Trump junior served as the primary negotiator on behalf of the Trump organization 'em aguilara Lara of the son of Arras, Agoura, and Iraq, ply- Ike cov-, Velez represented, the crocus group during the Goshi with the occasional assistance of Robert Goldstone in December twenty thirteen Cavaliers AA and Trump junior negotiated and signed preliminary terms of an agreement for the Trump Tower. Scout project on December twenty third twenty thirteen after discussions with Donald J Trump, the Trump organization agreed to accept in arrangement, whereby the organization received a flat three point five percent commission on all sales with no licensing fees, or incentives,.

Trump Trump Tower Moscow Donald J Trump Trump Tower Russian government Ukraine Moscow United States president Robert Goldstone Paul Manafort Clinton prince Iraq Cavaliers
"russian government" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"To its conclusion. Thanks rod. Yeah. Also like to thank special counsel, Robert Muller for his service and the thoroughness of his investigation, particularly his work, exposing the nature of Russia's attempts to interfere in our electoral process. As you know, one of the primary purposes of the special special counsel's investigation was to determine whether President Trump's campaign or any individual associated with it conspired or coordinated with the Russian government interfere in the two thousand sixteen election volume. One of the special counsel's report describes the results of that investigation. As you will see the special counsel's report states that his quote investigation did not establish that members of the Trump campaign conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in its election interference activities. I am sure that all Americans share my concern about the efforts of the Russian government interferes in our presidential election. As the special counsel report makes clear the Russian government sought to interfere in our election process. But. But thanks to the special counsels thorough investigation. We now know that the Russian operatives who perpetrated these schemes did not have the cooperation of President Trump or the Trump campaign or the knowing assistance of any other American for that matter that is something that all Americans can and should be grateful to have confirmed. The special counsel report outlines two main efforts by the Russian government to influence the two thousand sixteen election. I the report details efforts by the internet research agency, a Russian company with close ties to the Russian government to so social discord among American voters through disinflation and social media operations following a thorough investigation of this information campaign special counsel brought charges in federal court against several Russian nationals and entities for their respective roles. In this game, those charges remain pending and the individual defendants remain at large. But the special counsel found no evidence that any American including anyone associated with the Trump campaign conspired or coordinated with the Russian government or the IRA in this illegal scheme. Indeed. As the report states, quote, the investigation did not identify evidence that any US person knowingly or intentionally coordinated with the IRA's interference operation, unquote. Put another way the special counsel found no collusion by any Americans in IRA's illegal activities. Second. The report details efforts by the Russian military officials associated with the GRU the Russian military intelligence organization to hack into computers and steal documents and emails from individuals associated with Democratic Party and Hillary Clinton's campaign for the purpose of eventual eventually publicizing these documents..

special counsel Russian government President Trump IRA rod Robert Muller Hillary Clinton Democratic Party US Russia
"russian government" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Between Trump Villemin. Russian government was exits wiser of Trump, Mr Flynn. It was the Russian singer, very famous singer. Who Mr Flynn on the beach in Brooklyn? Russian caffeine. Yes. It's the Brighton Beach you, okay? And the Russian district this what was discussed they discussed many things. Interesting. Interesting thing is they use a special they use the special password before before meetings allusion each other. They say whether it's Gutman's Airbus. Whether trains is good. In where? John, Jerry, Buss care. There is a name of a street in on this. Did you did you hear? Yes, I did. So it's a street in Odessa. No word is whether it's good on. Jerry Buss of sky ya. Okay. I'll have my staff. Follow up to get spelling and more details on this. And the second part of their best work was it rains again on Brighton Beach. It rains again on Brighton area. This idiot is taking all those down. Slain all those compromising materials will never released. The Trump will can solo Russian things. Okay. Well, obviously, we would chance to get copies of those please. So we will try to work with the FBI to figure out along with your staff how we can obtain copies of those cowardly Schiff colluding with a Russian parents out. It was a Russian Russian hoax. Ter- totally sucky. Given what is the nature of the camera the pick the naked Trump, naked Trump, and I'm like oh. And as Vladimir seeing them. Yes. But of course, of course. What a dope. I wonder this idiot won't come on our show. All right. But we got a lot to get. And then they wanna Ecorse they wanna stack the supreme court. We got a little diversion. You know, I actually when I called my mechanic and asked the app and the be from Russia, and I said, would you be able to take out the p p p in my car, and he goes, the well the nature of the problem? My want the to go. Of course, of course, the naked make it complicated. I. Donald trump. Right. See every the paper, you know, don't put it in the naked pick the top. And we'll do.

Donald trump Trump Villemin Brighton Beach Russian government Trump Jerry Buss Mr Flynn caffeine Brighton Brooklyn Odessa Gutman FBI Ter Vladimir Schiff Russia John
"russian government" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Muller's alleged that the Russian government gave it to WikiLeaks. But we don't know with stone. Trump would they also aware of all of this to that here. Are you aware? Do you get that from? That they were aware that the Russian government gave it to them. He just throws that out there. Now, this is a guy who's not only to host of meet the press. He's the chief political journalist correspondent for NBC news. He just flops it out there. Go ahead. Then we have Jeffrey Toobin. CNN? Cut sixteen go. I think that may be an extremely important use of the passive voice in that indictment was directed. First of all he's supposed to be a lawyer. If a prosecutor a prosecutor's office rights. That stone was directed. What is stone say about being directed? Now, you see stone on TV's bit of a circus clown. But. Does he say he was directed by somebody? Where's the evidence for that? Well, no evidence is established for that other than the allegation. Using those words. In the charge..

Russian government Jeffrey Toobin Trump prosecutor Muller NBC CNN
"russian government" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Muller's alleged that the Russian government gave it to WikiLeaks. But we don't know is for stone. Trump would they also aware of all of this to the year. Also, where do you get that from that they were aware that the Russian government gave it to them? He just throws that out there. This is a guy who's not only the host of meet the press. He's the chief political journalist correspondent for NBC news. He just flops it out there. Go ahead. Then we have Jeffrey Toobin. On CNN. Cut sixteen go. I think that may be an extremely important use of the past voice in that indictment was directed. First of all he's supposed to be a lawyer. If a prosecutor a prosecutor's office rights. That stone was directed. What is stone said about being directed? Now, you see stone on TV's bit of a circus clown. But. Does he say he was directed by somebody? Where's the evidence for that? Well, no evidence for that other than the allegation. Using those words. In the charge. That's it..

stone Russian government Jeffrey Toobin Trump prosecutor Muller NBC CNN