28 Burst results for "Russian Empire"

"russian empire" Discussed on Evangelism on SermonAudio

Evangelism on SermonAudio

04:36 min | 2 weeks ago

"russian empire" Discussed on Evangelism on SermonAudio

"Churches had to be registered with the government bought there was the opportunity for some degree of peace. The faith of Thomas spurgeon and William fettler was being honored by God. Before left London, the lord raised up a businessman, a real estate fella who had made a lot of money, fellow named Charles Phillips, and he hearing about what might take place in Latvia and Russia said I'm going to finance you. The man who had no money, and now he has nearly unlimited resources. Because he said, I'm going to go for you, God. I'm going to represent you. I'm going to trust you. Everything about ism ministry and Latvia and Russia was predicated on faith. He set sail out in the steerage, but set sail for Riga and as he returned to his homeland stepping off the boat, there were Russian police there to arrest him. The police said, everyone, your age, must serve in the army for 5 years. You have not served your time in the military. Therefore, you're under arrest. And William reached into his pocket and pulled out his English baptist ordination papers. And inexplicably those police were bedazzled by it and said, oh, okay. And they didn't arrest him. Eventually, he traveled to St. Petersburg, where there wasn't a single baptist church. But soon he was meeting with 300 students. Giving to them the word of God. And I'm condensing a whole lot of material here. Shortly after that, Russian aristocrats started coming to hear him preach. The rich people in St. Petersburg, and that's where all the rich were at that point in time. The people of power were coming to hear this boy preach this really radical doctrine that they never heard in the orthodox church. And some of these people were being saved. And with those connections, fettler was eventually saved from death in Siberia. As things quickly deteriorated. My faith, bettler began to rent larger and larger auditorium. After two years, he was renting 12 sites at the same time. And he would preach to a thousand in this building, and then rob to another building where there were 500 waiting to hear him preach. And then to another third meeting that evening, where there were people praying for the earlier meetings. 12 different meeting places. His congregations were not registered with the government, and as such were illegal, and vulnerable. But by faith, fetler continued his work of evangelism, sacrificing himself in many ways, including just wearing himself out going from place to place, preaching. He stepped out by faith once again, and then proposed to his friends that they build an edifice for the largest evangelical church in the Russian Empire. They built a building. By 1911, it was completed. It would hold approximately 3000 people. At that point, butler's faith directed him into the heart of Russian orthodoxy. Moscow. And by the way, the gospel he preached was the exactly the same as our own. He declared over and over again the utter sinfulness of man. And the absolute sovereignty of God over Salvation. Nothing but the perfect atoning sacrifice of Christ can meet the spiritual deadness of the human heart.

Thomas spurgeon William fettler ism ministry Latvia Charles Phillips Russia St. Petersburg fettler bettler Riga London fetler army William Siberia rob Russian Empire butler Moscow
"russian empire" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:45 min | 7 months ago

"russian empire" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"The finance HR and planning system for a changing world. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm juana summers. And I'm Ari Shapiro, Russia has increased its aerial assault on southern Ukraine recently. It's been firing missiles at areas outside of the Donbass, hitting food storage facilities in the city of Nikolai. And just hours ago, at least 21 people were killed and dozens were injured when Russian missiles struck a residential tower and recreation center, just outside the city of Odessa. And Peter granite's reports. The sun and the beach has a red skull and crossbones, warning of landmines laid to prevent an amphibious landing by Russians. That doesn't stop a dozen or so people from hopping the fence to catch the sun on a beautiful, hot afternoon. One of them is an older man named vasili. He doesn't give us his last name. You sense he's a little embarrassed for breaking the rules. Sometimes I worry, he says, sometimes I don't. If I worry all the time, I should live in a bomb shelter. While he may sound carefree, others are frustrated. Slava bielski has a beer in hand as he takes in the beach and waves. Which is which people are tired from the war, he says, people want to live their normal lives. Volodymyr dubovik is the director of international studies at Odessa mechnikov university. He says Russia's desire to capture Odessa is cultural, historic, and economic. To the psyche. I mean, for they are understanding of the Russian world in Ukraine. There's no place, but Odessa. The city is Russian speaking. It's port made it one of the biggest cities in the Russian Empire. In many Russians vacationed here and did business here before the war

NPR news juana summers Ari Shapiro Ukraine Peter granite vasili Odessa Nikolai Slava bielski Volodymyr dubovik Odessa mechnikov university Russian Empire
Ilan Berman Describes Why Russia 'Needs' Ukraine

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

00:27 sec | 8 months ago

Ilan Berman Describes Why Russia 'Needs' Ukraine

"And there's really not a lot of understanding about why Russia cares so much about Ukraine. Why Ukraine really occupies why Ukraine is as the kids say living rent free and Vladimir Putin's head. But the reason is because Ukraine is the wellspring from which the Russian imperial impulse sprang. Without Ukraine, without Kievan Rus', there's no Russian Empire. So you can not be a new Russian Empire without subjugating Ukraine

Ukraine Vladimir Putin Russia
"russian empire" Discussed on Revolutions

Revolutions

06:09 min | 9 months ago

"russian empire" Discussed on Revolutions

"Now when we speak of Russia or Soviet Russia, what we are talking about is a thing called the Russian Soviet Federated socialist republic, or. But it's not simply a Russian SSR. Because the Russian Soviet Federated socialist republic was itself technically a federal union of many different recognized subunits. At this point, fully 22% of the population of this thing we call the RSF SR was not ethnically or culturally Russian. As a matter of practical administration and sound politics, the communist leaders in Moscow were willing to recognize the autonomy of various minority nationality groups, even if they were not willing to grant them the kind of full independent status that they granted the Belarusians, Ukrainians and trans caucasians, which is to say the Georgians Armenians and Azerbaijani. As Moscow's reach, extended beyond central Russia proper following Red Army victories in the Civil War, they created zones of ethnic autonomy, mostly as a means of inducing the local population to accept Moscow's ultimate authority and not rise up in revolt against them. Larger regions would be called autonomous socialist Soviet republics, was smaller carve outs called autonomous a blast. So for example, some of the most important of these ethnic enclaves were the Muslim populations of the Euro steps north of the Caspian Sea. Specifically, the bashkir and Tatars. The bashkir were awarded the bashkir autonomous Soviet Socialist republic in 1919. It was a reward for abandoning admiral kolchak at a key moment in the Russian Civil War, and the following year the Tatars were given the same status. They were granted the tatar autonomous Soviet Socialist republic. A similar process was carried out in what was then collectively referred to as turkestan. On area encompassing a huge population of Turkic peoples who had been relative latecomers to the Russian Empire. For several years they were organized into a single large turkestan autonomous Soviet Socialist republic, a constituent part of the RSF SR, but whose single umbrella covered a multiplicity of nationalities. So the turkestan autonomous Soviet Socialist republic would soon be divided into now recognizable states, like Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, and Turkmenistan. By the early 1920s, some 30 of these autonomous ethnic subdivisions had been created. So at least on paper, the Russian Soviet Federated socialist republic was a union of all these autonomous zones and republics, with Russia proper simply being the largest subdivision, merely the first among equals. If you catch my draft. Because despite many lofty promises from Moscow about autonomy, that autonomy was severely curtailed. And for example, the boundary of the autonomous tatar republic was drawn specifically to exclude 75% of the tatar population, but include a large population of Russians to make sure that autonomy from Moscow was never taken too seriously. So coming back around now to March 1921. We get a real sense of where Soviet Russia sits in the world. They had by now signed formal treaties of mutual recognition with Poland, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Finland, Ukraine, and Belarus, and the three transcaucasian republics, and then in February 1921, they added a couple more. A pact with the government in Afghanistan and a treaty of friendship with a short lived revolutionary government in Iran. Then, on March 16th, 1921, we get another big deal kind of in the history of diplomacy. A treaty of friendship between Russia and turkey..

Russian Soviet Federated Moscow Russia RSF admiral kolchak Red Army Caspian Sea tatar republic Tajikistan Turkmenistan Kyrgyzstan Uzbekistan Lithuania Latvia Estonia Belarus Poland Finland
"russian empire" Discussed on Revolutions

Revolutions

04:07 min | 9 months ago

"russian empire" Discussed on Revolutions

"Once the capital was taken a Georgian SSR was proclaimed, and it would now sit alongside the Armenian SSR and the Azerbaijani SSR. So that brings us back to our pivotal month of March 1921. When the communists completed their takeover of the Caucasus. The menshevik government and their armed forces had retreated to batum, a port on the Black Sea in the extreme southwest of the country. Here they planned to base their resistance campaign to the communists, but by now they found themselves back into their old historical position. Stuck between two much larger regional powers. On March 16th, the Turks announced that they plan to annex batoon for themselves, and they sent up a garrison to occupy the city. But for all their resistant hostility to bolshevism, the mensheviks concluded it would be better for the city to fall to the communists than to the Turkish nationalists. So the 10,000 men menshevik army disarmed the would be Turkish garrison and opened the doors instead to the Red Army. Then menshevik government ministers, officials, military commanders and refugees, boarded French and Italian ships that carried them west across the Black Sea to Constantinople, which was by now positively overflowing with Russian refugees of every shape, size, and ideology. Now from Moscow's perspective, a communist takeover of Georgia may have been preferable to the alternative, which is leaving the menshevik government in place. Before the invasion, western socialists who were opposed to communism had called menshevik Georgia the only true socialist government in the world, a deliberate snub of Soviet Russia. Now they would use the invasion as proof of insatiable communist aggression. Moscow had, after all, signed a treaty not even one year earlier pledging to respect the independence of Georgia. The invasion was clear proof of the value of such communist promises. Inside Georgia, this invasion had done very little to curry favor with a local population that wasn't inclined towards bolshevism in the first place. In July 1921, Stalin returned to his old hometown stomping ground into Tbilisi, and was greeted with undisguised hostility. When he tried to address a mass meeting they heckled him shouting murderer and traitor. One got up and said, who asked you to come here? What happened to our treaty? At the order of the Kremlin blood is shed here and you talk a friendship? So so, he said, referring to Stalin by the name Stalin had used when he was down here in Georgia operating Bolshevik bank robberies. You give us a good laugh. Humiliated, Stalin ordered check agents to arrest about a hundred social Democrats in mensheviks. Because, while the mensheviks may have made the mistake of allowing political freedom to the communists, the communists were not about to return the favor. As you may have noticed, it's not exactly Communist Party policy to allow people to get in their way. And with that in mind, they completely ignored local opinion and formed the three Caucasian republics into a single entity called the federative union of socialist Soviet republics of transcaucasia. A union, none of the three member groups were particularly happy about, but about which there was very little they could do. With the conversion of the Caucasian states into SSR's. And then their merger into this single thing that we call the transcaucasian means that we now have are four initial signatories of the union of Soviet Socialist republics in place. When the time comes in December 1922, Russia will sign a treaty of union with the ostensibly independent, Belarusian SSR, Ukrainian SSR, and transcaucasian. So where I want to end today is by answering the question, okay, we understand these other three units, but what do we mean when we talk about Russia now? What is the Russian component of the coming USSR? Because believe me, it was not then and is not now. A simple thing..

Georgia menshevik government Black Sea menshevik army Stalin Moscow Caucasus Red Army Bolshevik bank Constantinople Tbilisi Russia federative union of socialist transcaucasia Communist Party SSR USSR Ukrainian SSR
"russian empire" Discussed on Revolutions

Revolutions

03:45 min | 9 months ago

"russian empire" Discussed on Revolutions

"And shortly after the Congress, the Red Army made their next move in the Caucasus to ensure that that vital region stayed in the Russian orbit. Not really quitting the European colonial mentality. In November 1920, Stalin told pravda, the importance of the Caucasus for the revolution is determined not only by the fact that it is a source of raw materials, fuel and food supplies, but also by its position between Europe and Asia, and in part between Russia and turkey. As well as the presence of highly important economic and strategic roads. So, though the ideologies and justifications changed, the mentality didn't change very much at all. The Soviets saw an opportunity as Armenia had become embroiled in a border war with turkey that was founded on generations of mutual ethnic hatred, most grossly expressed by the Armenian Genocide, where, between 1915 and 1917, the Turks brutally drove somewhere between 600,001.5 million Armenians to death. With the Armenians on the brink of defeat to the Turks, the Red Army marched over from Azerbaijan and issued a blunt ultimatum to the Armenian government in late November. Surrendered to us or surrendered to the Turks. Viewing the Soviets as the lesser of two evils, the government surrendered. And the Armenian Soviet Socialist republic was proclaimed in its place. With Red Army backed SSR's proclaimed in Azerbaijan and Armenia, this meant that Georgia, the last of the independent Caucasian states, was now surrounded. A Georgia was a harder not to crack for the Russian communists, because if you'll remember from way back when we introduced young Stalin, Georgia was one of the only places where the mensheviks had a real strong popular base of support. Georgia was not now, nor had it ever been friendly to the Bolshevik party. Shortly after the Red Army moved into Baku, Georgian communists had attempted a coup in Tbilisi, but it had been easily deflected by the menshevik government. Moscow considered Georgia to be a resilient enough opponent that on May 7th, 1920, they signed a treaty recognizing Georgia's sovereign independence. But it's very clear the Russian communists signed this treaty only as a delaying tactic to lull the Georgian mensheviks into complacency. One of the few demands they put into the treaty was that the mensheviks agree to not outlaw the Georgian Communist Party. That they would be allowed to freely organize assemble and publish. After the mensheviks agreed, the Georgian Communist Party set about doing everything it could to overthrow the mensch of it government. And they were aided by the diplomatic course and by Moscow. Subversive activities were regularly concocted right inside the Russian embassy into Tbilisi. But Georgia was a tough nut to crack, and the local communist subversion wasn't really getting them anywhere. So by January 1921, local leaders convinced two key members of the Politburo, Stalin and Trotsky, the taking over Georgia was going to require external force. And in fact, local communists in the region actually sent Red Army units over the border into Georgia a few days before they received official permission to do so. They sent the Red Army units in there to stage a phony, local uprising that would then call for Red Army assistance. So on February 14th, Lenin and the Politburo gave their final permission for the invasion that had kind of already started, and the Red Army proceeded to roll across the border into Georgia from the north and from the east. By the end of February the menshevik leaders evacuated to Tbilisi and allowed the Red Army to occupy the capital city to avoid it being shelled..

Red Army Georgia Caucasus Stalin Armenian government Georgian Communist Party Armenia Armenian Soviet Socialist repu Azerbaijan turkey pravda menshevik government Tbilisi Soviets SSR Bolshevik party Congress Russia Moscow Asia
"russian empire" Discussed on Revolutions

Revolutions

03:00 min | 9 months ago

"russian empire" Discussed on Revolutions

"Here there opens up before us and undoubted possibility, not merely of a lengthy weight to see how events develop in Europe, but of conducting activity in the Asian field. The road to India may prove at this given moment to be more readily passable and shorter for us. The road to Paris and London lies via the towns of Afghanistan, the Punjab and Bengal. The idea of reorienting international communist revolution around anti colonial campaigns of liberation became a real possibility, now that the western land bridge through Poland to Germany was closed, and now that the defeat of the Russian whites left the red in a commanding position on the Eurasian continent. So in September of 1920, the Soviets used their position in Azerbaijan to host the first of what they called, the Congress of the peoples of the east. Formally, held under the auspices of the common turn. As many as 1900 delegates congregated in Baku for this Congress. Most of them came from the northern and eastern Mediterranean territories that had been under the auspices of the Ottoman Empire, but many came from as far afield as India and China. They gathered in a somewhat chaotic assembly of different languages and nationalities, where speeches had to be immediately translated into a few common languages, most especially Turkic and Persian. Few of the delegates were communists and any meaningful sense, but zenobia, and the other common turn leaders hoped to pitch Soviet communism as a friend, ally, and supporter of the anti colonial struggles that all of them had in common. In zenobia's keynote speech, he said, comrades, brothers. The time has come now when you can set about organizing a true people's holy war against the robbers and oppressors. The communist international turns today to the peoples of the east and says to them, brothers, we summon you to a holy war. In the first place, against British imperialism. Now, an avowed atheist communist invoking the language of holy wars to a mostly Muslim audience is not exactly orthodox Marxism. But they did share a common enemy in Western European colonial oppression. And so for now it hardly mattered if you waged war against western imperialism on behalf of Marx or Muhammad, what mattered was waging war on western imperialism. Now ultimately this Congress of the peoples of the east turned out to be a one off event, that the Russians struggled to build much of a movement from. But it did set the tone for a more explicitly anti colonial liberation Marxism that would spread throughout the colonized world in East Asia, India, Africa, the Caribbean and South America. A brand of Marxism that would become more sharply pronounced as many local groups concluded that the Russians were as unable to quit their European colonial mentality as any of the western capitalists..

zenobia Congress India Bengal Punjab Soviets Baku Azerbaijan Afghanistan Poland Paris Europe Germany Mediterranean London China Marx Muhammad East Asia South America
"russian empire" Discussed on Revolutions

Revolutions

03:57 min | 9 months ago

"russian empire" Discussed on Revolutions

"The Anglo Soviet trade agreement was just that it was a trade agreement that regulated economic commerce between the two countries. And in no time British investments and exports were flooding into the devastated Russian economy, and in fact these investments and exports were a vital part of making the NEP work. But it was not yet an official political agreement. The British still withheld official political recognition from the Soviet regime. But it amounted to de facto recognition, and it signaled to the rest of the world that the post World War I diplomatic tables were going to have to have a seat for Soviet Russia. So leaving our western facing orientation, I now want to turn our attention south. Specifically to a former part of the Russian Empire I have long neglected, the Caucasus. Now, there are good reasons that I neglected the caucuses. Set well behind the front lines of the Russian Civil War off to the north, and with only the collapsing Ottoman Empire to their south, Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia, all enjoyed autonomous independence through the spring of 1920. But with the Red Army having defeated both admiral kolchak and general denikin by early 1920, and with the foundation of Atatürk's post Ottoman Empire grand National Assembly of turkey in April 1920, the people of the Caucasus once again found themselves squeezed between larger neighbors, who had political economic and territorial designs on that autonomous independence. Azerbaijan was the first to fall. In the spring of 1920 the Russians 70,000 man 11th army started moving south towards the Caucasus. With the much smaller Azerbaijani army caught up with flare ups on their border with Armenia, the Red Army simply marched across the border and captured the critical Baku oil fields in late April 1920. They pulled this off pretty much without a fight, partly because the British and nationalist Turks were currently embroiled in the Turkish war of independence. So Russia's two great geopolitical rivals in the region were currently focused on the allied occupation of Constantinople which commenced in March of 1920. Now the British had demonstrated some interest in taking the Baku oil fields for themselves as the victorious Allies of World War I divvied up the world's colonized resources, but ultimately they would conclude it wasn't worth the risk or the hassle. They obviously made no effort to stop the advancing Red Army, and they withdrew their last lingering forces from the area completely by July of 1920. The Turks, meanwhile, saw the Russians as potential allies in their anti colonial war against the British and hoped the caucuses could serve as a conduit for supplies and guns coming down from Russia. So when the Red Army rolled into Azerbaijan, the local Turkish population rose up to support their invasion and occupation. As would happen with Belarus and Ukraine, Azerbaijan would soon be reconstituted as an SSR. The Azerbaijani, Soviet Socialist republic. The move south into Azerbaijan was followed quickly by the stalling out of the Russian advance west into Poland. Following the battle of Warsaw, many high ranking communists really started coming around on the idea that a frontal assault on Western Europe was impossible. But instead of just giving up, they saw huge opportunities to destabilize the western capitalists, not by staging insurrections in Berlin or Paris, but by going after their colonial possessions in central, southern and East Asia. As early as August 1919, Trotsky had said, there is no doubt at all that our Red Army constitutes an incomparably more powerful force in the Asian terrain of world politics than in the European terrain..

Caucasus Red Army Azerbaijan admiral kolchak general denikin foundation of Atatürk's post O Armenia Azerbaijani army Russia Baku Georgia Constantinople Soviet Socialist republic Belarus Warsaw Poland Western Europe Berlin East Asia Paris
"russian empire" Discussed on Revolutions

Revolutions

05:50 min | 9 months ago

"russian empire" Discussed on Revolutions

"The Polish republic had gone into the war envisioning the rebirth of the great Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth. Soviet Russia had gone in believing they would drive the communist revolution all the way to Warsaw as a mere prelude to launching themselves into Western Europe. Now because neither side had really won the war, neither side got what they really wanted. Poland and Russia signed a treaty that left both well short of their respective territorial ambitions. Both recognized the independence of the Baltic states, and they drew a line through Belarus and Ukraine. Giving the poles the western bits and recognizing the eastern parts as independent sovereign states. In the big picture, this means that the boundaries of Soviet Russia are not going to be anywhere near the boundaries of the old Russian Empire, which, in addition to encompassing the Al Baltic states, had extended all the way to Warsaw. So at the end of the day, most of what the Russians had renounced during the treaty of Brest litovsk remained renounced. At least, for the time being. Now this brings us though to the status of Ukraine and Belarus in the new order of things. A question that was debated at the tenth party Congress. Although that debate got lost in the shuffle a bit because they were much bigger things going on. The leadership of the Communist Party had decided not to annex these territories directly. But instead to recognize them as independent national republics. Specifically, as Soviet Socialist republics. This was about to political reality as commissar of nationalities Joseph Stalin said to critics who claimed there was no such thing as a Belarusian or Ukrainian national identity to recognize. Stalin said, here I have a written note to the effect that we, communists, supposedly artificially forced a Belarusian nation. This is false because a Belarusian nation exists, which has its own language different from Russian, and that the culture of the Belarusian nation can be raised only in its own language. Such speeches were made 5 years ago about Ukraine, concerning the Ukrainian nation. Clearly, the Ukrainian nation exists, and the development of its culture is a duty of communists. One can not go against history. Lenin in particular was very concerned about Russian chauvinism, creeping into the Communist Party. Russian chauvinism that often presented in the language of doctrinaire left wing ideology, but which in practice seemed little different from the attitudes of tsarist colonial officials. Now as with all things Lenin, his opinions were driven by strategic and tactical concerns that is how do we grow the influence of Soviet communism throughout the world? But, for example, he had been very critical of the communist officials who had failed to establish any kind of popular base in Ukraine during the Civil War period. The quote unquote Ukrainian Communist Party had not been founded in Kyiv, but Moscow, and it was composed almost entirely of ethnic Russians. They had come into Ukraine as Russians speaking and acting as Russians and effectively denying Ukrainian language and culture existed. Now they dress this up in language of class conflict and international solidarity and rejecting bourgeois nationalism, but to the local Ukrainians, these Russian communists looked very different from the old tsarist officials. So twice the Ukrainian Communist Party had followed the Red Army into Ukraine and twice gotten themselves kicked right back out again. The third time they came into Ukraine after the Red Army rolled back to Nikon for the last time by the end of 1919, Lenin issued explicit instructions to recruit ethnic Ukrainians speak the Ukrainian language, foster and.

Belarus Polish republic Lithuanian Commonwealth Warsaw Al Baltic Brest litovsk Communist Party Western Europe Baltic Lenin Poland Joseph Stalin Ukrainian Communist Party Stalin Congress Kyiv Moscow Red Army Nikon
"russian empire" Discussed on Revolutions

Revolutions

05:24 min | 9 months ago

"russian empire" Discussed on Revolutions

"And welcome to revolutions. Episode 10.95, Russian Empire, Soviet empire. March of 1921 is quite the pivot point to the Russian Revolution. Maybe not quite at the same level as October, 1793 is to the French Revolution. But as with October 1793, you can dang near tell the whole story of the Russian Revolution just by focusing on the events of this one single month. Now it doesn't quite get you everything the way October 1793 does, but there is a lot packed in here. On the domestic front we've got the kronstadt rebellion that we talked about two weeks ago, a story about competing visions of the meaning of the revolution, which pitted against each other not implacable enemies, but former close friends and allies from the heady days of 1917. Then last week we talked about the tenth Congress of the Communist Party, which politically cleared the way for the uppermost ruling click of the party to build a walled off internal dictatorship to match the walled off external dictatorship, they were building throughout Russia. Economically, we have the unveiling of the new economic policy, which was a huge shift that can only be understood by explaining the wise and House of war communism, the crisis of massive peasant revolts sweeping the Russian countryside, and the failure of the international proletarian revolution to materialize after World War I. And all of that is just on the domestic side of the ledger. Today we will turn to the international scene and find that just as March 1921 is an epicenter for really important internal affairs, it was also an epicenter for really important external affairs. On almost every front, Soviet Russia's place in the world solidifies here with a series of treaties and diplomatic agreements, with historical rivals like Poland and turkey, ideological rivals, like the arch capitalist British, as well as new nominally independent entities that wind up serving as little more than puppet states controlled by Moscow. The tenth party Congress also set the tone for a debate inside the Communist Party about how to deal with non Russian nationalities in their sphere of orbit. This debate pitted those who believed in a great centralized communist zone as the only way to survive in a world still run by capitalist imperialism, and those who believe that ignoring national identity and the powerful aspirations for national self respect and self determination was probably a recipe for disaster. So what I want to do today is go around the horn of the old Russian Empire. To lay out explicitly where everyone stands in relation to everyone else, as the reality of the post revolution, post World War I post Civil War international scene are fully revealed and solidified here in the spring of 1921. Geographically, we'll start up in the northwest with some of the territories of the old Russian Empire that the Russian communists would not be bringing into their fold. The republic of Finland, for example, had declared its independence in 1917, a declaration loudly and repeatedly recognized by the Bolsheviks. Though the white faction that won the Finnish Civil War was of course no great friend of the Russian reds,.

House of war communism Russia Communist Party Congress turkey Moscow republic of Finland
"russian empire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:04 min | 10 months ago

"russian empire" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Well They say that Ukraine is not a separate country that it's another Russian Orthodox dominated country But from a strategic standpoint it is the nation on the north shore of the Black Sea And dugan says that Eurasia as he calls the future Russian Empire Eurasia has to have complete control of the Black Sea And what would happen in Asia in that point because Russia and China have fairly good relations or they're pretty close Yeah dugan does not believe that Eurasia the great Russian Empire will be complete until China has been basically destroyed that if only Hitler had never invaded Russia then together Russia and Germany and Japan could have formed a fascist alliance that would have dominated the world with Russia as the strongest partner from as he puts it from Dublin to Vladivostok I just wonder with that sort of ideology driving Putin How do you or how does anyone negotiate with that Well it's tough I mean it's clear it's delusional thinking it's messianic Apocalyptic It's highly religious We're seeing all these qualities and Putin lately to a degree that we haven't seen before this idea that he's on a religious mission to basically universalize the Russian Orthodox faith through power and violence As I said at the end of the column it's a delusion but when dictators with nuclear weapons have delusions we have to pay attention to them That's David van Dre Lee columnist for The Washington Post Thank you for being with us Thank you so much Deadly tornadoes swept through parts of the Midwest and the south in December entire neighborhoods in western Kentucky were wiped out Hundreds of people are still displaced and grieving the loss of loved ones personal items and life as they knew it One initiative started by a folk singer is helping to replace musical instruments and it's given away more than 700 so far from W E Ku sherri Lawson reports Behind large white garage doors that a warehouse turned music venue and Dawson springs Kentucky Sterling Wallace and his wife Karen stand in awe They've just been handed a guitar to replace one of theirs that was.

Eurasia Russia dugan Black Sea Putin China Ukraine Vladivostok David van Dre Lee Hitler Asia Dublin Germany Japan The Washington Post Midwest Kentucky sherri Lawson Dawson springs Sterling Wallace
"russian empire" Discussed on podcast – Lawyers, Guns & Money

podcast – Lawyers, Guns & Money

03:57 min | 11 months ago

"russian empire" Discussed on podcast – Lawyers, Guns & Money

"It's Russia being resilient is actually being strong and Russia is showing at the west can break it and still remains an indispensable power in the international order. When Russia, I have desperation, is now working much more closely with China and alternative Juan payment systems or rupee payment systems with India and expediting that kind of multi polarity. Russia shows it as itself as a great power within a multipolar order when it's committing acts of aggression as the show itself as a peacemaker and an arbiter. I mean, all these things, you know, which don't seem to make much sense in terms of what they're actually doing on the ground, they do make sense in terms of building different planks of a Russian great power narrative. It's a country that can be the sovereign. You can remain in town regardless of what the west resident is an important power and a multipolar world order and also as a constructive player to some extent on the world stage and it has its fear of influence. So Putin has internalized those four aspects of great power status throughout his time in charge and now we're just seeing him kind of continuing to replay that same narrative in that same movement. So I think that he's defining great power status. It is own contacts and linking it to relevant precedents in Russian imperialist or semi history. So the notion of the Soviet Union having a network of satellites or the notion of the great patriotic war and Russian resilience, Russia being able to survive. The notion of the Russian Empire being a great panel in the concert of Europe. There's a multi polarity. These were the Soviet multipolar discourses that we saw coming forward at the more at the elite level. These are things that he's trying to tie it to. He ties it to historical precedents, but actually he's definitely show a great power status. He's very much his own thinking. We're thinking of those close down..

Putin Russian Russian Empire Europe Russia India Soviet Union China Soviet four aspects
"russian empire" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

01:56 min | 11 months ago

"russian empire" Discussed on WCPT 820

"His greatest respect and I would even say of love by our president towards the Ukrainian people Yeah that's how you say love is with a bomb on a maternity hospital On Friday one pundit said Jennifer Psaki statement that no matter what Putin does in Ukraine whether he uses biological weapons or drops a nuclear bomb the United States won't get involved Shan Psaki said nothing of the sort of course The show proceeded to then broadcast a clip of Donald Trump blaming Biden for alleged inability to communicate with Putin and then they played a clip of Tucker Carlson in everyday occurrence in Moscow's tightly controlled media Isn't that nice How are useful idiots are so very very useful to them In recent days Russian state television requests from orwellian lies to kafkaesque nightmares as pundits started to promote the idea of executing Ukrainians resisting Putin's war of aggression by hanging They also said that we should be thinking about reparation There will be paying reparations in the U.S. Caused by the sanctions and the war itself the return of all Russian properties those of the Russian Empire We're going to give the entire Russian Empire back Right yeah And the Soviet Union and current Russia one pundit said are you including Alaska and fort Ross and the other point It said yes that was my next point as well as Antarctic We discovered it so it belongs to Arctic And we'll be giving that all back Alaska and okay Okay One of the pundits they say may have been blinded by rage after the recent seizure of his two Italian villas He said you took our money you're the thieves are short with you a bullet to the head Okay so they're just openly threatening America with bullets to the head and nuclear strikes and we're going to pay reparations and also give them Antarctica And Alaska but also the entire room I presume along with Yukon Cornelius and everyone that might be on any icebergs out there.

Putin Jennifer Psaki Shan Psaki Tucker Carlson America Donald Trump Ukraine Biden Moscow Alaska fort Ross Soviet Union Russia Antarctica Yukon Cornelius
Democrats Float the Political Strategy of 'Moral Price Gouging'

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:39 min | 11 months ago

Democrats Float the Political Strategy of 'Moral Price Gouging'

"Interesting political strategy that now the Democrats are floating, which is basically moral price gouging. That they believe people are going to be happy paying higher prices. They'll be ecstatic going into debt because it's going to hold Russia accountable for what they're doing in Ukraine. Well, of course, oil prices were going up before this. This is one of the reasons why Putin invaded in the first place, oil was around 75 to $80 a barrel. Now it's hovering around a 110, a $120 a barrel. Some people are saying $300 a barrel oil, unthinkable. Well, this new CNN reporter has come out and said, listen, Americans, they're going to be really happy paying more at the pump. In fact, they're going to look at as their tithe. Their tithe against the evil Russian Empire. The same way that people bought war bonds in World War II. These people are going to be ecstatic. They're going to be cheering. They're going to be thankful that when they buy gas that they can't afford, it's going to hold Putin in check. Even though the higher price of oil helps Putin's regime. Play cut 63. But as you mentioned, people we've spoken to over the last couple of weeks, they're okay paying higher prices if it means holding Russia accountable for what they are doing in Ukraine. But these prices are likely going to creep higher Kate. We'll see how they feel in the next week or so, Kate. And the big question and the big unknown is do any of these moves change Putin's behavior change the way no, it does the opposite the higher the price, the more Putin wants to invade because then he gets to sell his oil reserves for more money. It's actually a reverse incentive. It's a perverse incentive. For Putin, because then he wants to actually invade. Stephen

Putin Ukraine Russia CNN Kate Stephen
Beware of the Global Woke Empire

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:57 min | 11 months ago

Beware of the Global Woke Empire

"The tension right now is between Ukraine's alleged government stood up by the global woke empire. And Putin's aggression. And let me be very clear, the global woke empire, we're going to coin that term, by the way, the gwa, because there's the globally, there's a World Economic Forum. I like the GW, the global woke empire, where they want to almost evangelistic bring the transgender ideas, all this nonsense into new places, is up against a another source part of evil, Putin's alleged Russian Empire. Now, Ukraine's secret weapon. Ukraine's Trump card is not a nuclear reactor. Ukraine's way that they think they can win this conflict is not better AirPower. Ukraine has a secret weapon, and it's this. The Ukrainian government, not the people of Ukraine, they believe they can propagandize the west to fight on their behalf. They believe they can create narratives, tell stories, zelensky is doing his best Quentin Tarantino routine. Zelensky is trying his best to create a film. Might be out of order like Pulp Fiction, it might be really bloody like reservoir dogs. Might have a lot of swear words like Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, but the point is that it's going to tell a story. And the story that zelensky wants to tell, and you can't totally blame him for this, by the way. His country is under attack, but we must know what we're consuming. That's the point. I'm actually not criticizing a country for wanting to make it seem like things are going better than they are. As the famous quote says, the first casualty in war is truth. Is that in a kind of perverse way, Ukraine is incentivized to escalate this

Ukraine Putin Zelensky Ukrainian Government Quentin Tarantino Hollywood
Why Has Russia Set Their Sights on Kyiv? Konstantin Kisin Explains

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:14 min | 11 months ago

Why Has Russia Set Their Sights on Kyiv? Konstantin Kisin Explains

"Let's start with trying to cast away illusions as to what's going on. I've heard from those who have connections to the region that it's not obvious. Not all ethnic Russians in Ukraine are pro Vlad and not all ethnic Ukrainians are ready to grab an AK and shoot Russians. It's more complicated than that. Will you explain why Ukraine? Why the mythos of rodina of the motherland of rouge people is so intimately tied with Kyiv. This isn't just stopping EU and NATO membership for zelensky. This is a deeply historically and the nation itself has deep propaganda value for the Kremlin does it not. Well, the history of Russia of the modern Russian state originally dates back to the 9th century when a bunch of Vikings came over and they started essentially a trading post or a colony in what now since then has become Kyiv. And that is where the entire history of that part of the world originates from. And since then there have been various historic shapes, shape shifting and changes and borders and all sorts of things. And Ukraine has always been a piece that has been disputed by a bunch of local empires, whether that was the Russian Empire, whether it was the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, where there was Poland, all of these nations had had an influence in that region. And Ukraine had always been fought over by the different sides. But of course, there are other things and one of the reasons I was able to predict that the invasion would happen that it wouldn't be limited to the two breakaway so called breakaway regions in the east was because Vladimir Putin told us exactly how he sees it and I encourage all of your viewers and listeners to go and find a good translation of the speech he gave on the eve of the invasion. Because in it, he lays out exactly his vision and his vision is very simple. He believes that at some point during the existence of the Soviet Union, weak leaders like Vladimir Lenin and Nikita Khrushchev and others made a series of weak decisions that split the Russian people that split off a piece of the Russian nation and glued it together as he says with portions of what used to be Poland and Hungary in the

Ukraine Zelensky Kyiv Vlad Nato Vikings EU Russia Lithuania Poland Vladimir Putin Vladimir Lenin Nikita Khrushchev Soviet Union Hungary
Sen. Cotton: Vladimir Putin's Intention Is Being 'the Next Great Czar'

Mark Levin

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Sen. Cotton: Vladimir Putin's Intention Is Being 'the Next Great Czar'

"The killing people they're destroying the infrastructure of Ukraine It's all out war against this country We have NATO countries right on the border Serious Eastern European NATO countries Romania Hungary Poland you've got the Balkan states You've got others And can you imagine Latin repute and he takes over Ukraine here he is sitting on the border and what's he going to do for the next ten years sit there and pick his nose What's he going to do So I think we should add that he also has de facto control of Belarus as well The main effort against Kyiv is coming from Belarus not technically Russian territory but I think now it's fair to say especially over the last year when he helped Alexander Lukashenko to Bela Russian dictator still the election that Belarus is de facto now part of Russia once again And this is part of Vladimir Putin's long-term ambitions Mark As you know this is nothing to do with Ukraine membership in NATO that was not somehow approaching There is no relevant deadline There's no plan even for Ukraine to join NATO It wasn't about military exercises on Ukrainian soil We don't conduct those If you just listen to what Vladimir Putin said Monday night in that speech Well for that matter Mark as I'm sure you did read the essay he published last summer which is entitled on the historic unity of the Russians and the Ukrainians You can see that this is all about reassembling the greater Russian Empire that he has the ambition to become the next great Tsar in the mold of Peter the great or Catherine the Great And he can not in his mind be either Russians are have greater Russia without Belarus and Ukraine

Ukraine Russia Border Serious Eastern Europea Nato Vladimir Putin Alexander Lukashenko Hungary Romania Kyiv Poland Mark Catherine Peter
"russian empire" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"russian empire" Discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"The Dennis prager show. Hi, everybody. Dennis prager here. Okay. The reflecting the world of fear and irrationality on kids, and of course I spent the first the first two segments on Putin. And the notion that the Russians are paranoid about invasions because of Napoleon and Hitler. You know who should be a paranoid about invasions in Europe? Everybody who's near Russia. It is the most, it is so cockamamie. And by the way, people like people who respect hold that view. You know, they're not defending they're not defending Putin. Latvia should be paranoid, Lithuania, Estonia. Hungary. Poland. And if you want me to go damage in Europe, believe me, I can. I traveled to so many times from north to south and south to north. The man wants to reconstitute the Russian Empire. That's what he wants to do. A psychopath is the head of Russia. Now what can I tell you? Reconstitute the Russian Empire. Because it went so well for the people under the tsars. Great time to be alive. Or the Soviets for that matter. It's really something. Okay, let's see. We have a lot of glennon Phoenix says that now I agree with me or being a mistake if we went into Ukraine. I didn't even hint that we should go into Ukraine. So I don't know why you would say that. Okay. However, if we were energy independent, it would be far better situation. All of Russian money comes from energy, is even it is even the third largest supply of energy to the United States. Forget to Europe. Under the last president, utterly irrationally hated by vast numbers of Americans. This country became energy independent. But people couldn't get over their own personal disgust with Donald Trump as a person. That was more important than what was good for America. Their disgust with Donald Trump as a person. Which I think was overstated in any event, but it doesn't matter. Let's say he was disgusting. Okay. I am more interested in America than I am in whether my president is lovable likeable admirable as an individual. That's forgot to decide. My decision is what is good for this country and the world. He was great for this country and great for this world. Yesterday proved it..

Dennis prager Putin Europe Russia Napoleon Ukraine Hitler Latvia Lithuania Estonia Hungary Poland Donald Trump Phoenix America
Putin Is Nostalgic for the Russian Empire

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:09 min | 1 year ago

Putin Is Nostalgic for the Russian Empire

"Reflecting the world of fear and irrationality on kids, and of course I spent the first the first two segments on Putin. And the notion that the Russians are paranoid about invasions because of Napoleon and Hitler. You know who should be a paranoid about invasions in Europe? Everybody who's near Russia. It is the most, it is so cockamamie. And by the way, people like people who respect hold that view. You know, they're not defending they're not defending Putin. Latvia should be paranoid, Lithuania, Estonia. Hungary. Poland. And if you want me to go damage in Europe, believe me, I can. I traveled to so many times from north to south and south to north. The man wants to reconstitute the Russian Empire. That's what he wants to do.

Putin Napoleon Hitler Europe Russia Latvia Lithuania Estonia Hungary Poland
"russian empire" Discussed on Revolutions

Revolutions

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"russian empire" Discussed on Revolutions

"10.84, the end of the old world. With the treaty of Brest Lee task, securing their eastern front and ensuring vital supplies from the Ukrainian breadbasket, Germany threw everything it had into one final offensive push on the western front in the spring of 1918. They believed this final push was the only way to win a war, they were clearly on the verge of losing. But by the summer of 1918, this last great push stalled out, and the allies spent the final hundred days of World War I pushing the Germans back through a series of rolling defeats. By the fall of 1918, the Central Powers finally burst like rotten pumpkins and collapsed into a messy heap. The Bulgarian signed an armistice on September 29th, the Ottomans on October 30. The austro-hungarian empire signed their arms dis on November 3rd, and then finally, the Germans signed on November 11th, 1918. This is the famous 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month that ended World War I. By the time these armistices were signed, though, the internal cohesion of the Central Powers was already shattered. The autumn of 1918 was the graveyard of the old world. World War I had already taken down the Roman dynasty in the Russian Empire, and it now claimed its imperial counterparts. I neglected to mention this at the time, but old emperor Franz Josef, who had been put on the Austrian throne as a teenager during the neo absolutist reconsolidation following the revolution of 1848, died in November 1916 at the age of 86 after 68 years on the throne. His grand nephew Charles succeeded him, just long enough to oversee the dissolution of the austro-hungarian empire. With the allies having made national self determination for the people living under the dominion of the Central Powers, one of their principal tenets of any post war peace, the nationalities living in those dominions started taking matters into their own hands. They started fulfilling the dreams first conceived during the heady days of 1848. On October 28, Czechoslovakia was proclaimed on October 29, the state of slovenes Croats and Serbs which proclaimed on its way to union with the kingdoms of Serbia and Montenegro to create the kingdom of Yugoslavia, which was proclaimed on December 1st. On November 6th, poles declared the republic of Poland in Kraków, putting an independent Poland back on the map for the first time since the great partitions..

Central Powers Brest Lee Germany Russian Empire Franz Josef Charles Czechoslovakia Montenegro Serbia Yugoslavia Kraków Poland
"russian empire" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"russian empire" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

"Louis for the monitor. In the first of two stories today about caring for the creatures that share this planet, we find progress in a Hong Kong ban on ivory. Habitat protection efforts in Costa Rica, Brazil, and a new ten nation alliance to conserve areas of the Indian Ocean. You can find the full roundup of this week's points of progress by Erica page in today's issue. Next, we profile a woman whose compassion for pets and her determination to confront the status quo. Led to pioneering animal protection laws in California and beyond. If you think twice about leaving your pet in the car while you run an errand, just for a minute, even on a cool day, Judy mancuso has something to do with that. She is an animal rights pioneer in California without size success, creating the legal foundation for the animal welfare revolution. In the past 20 years, this mancuso has helped pass nearly 20 animal protection laws in California. From outlawing animals in hot cars and fur trapping to mandatory microchipping of shelter animals. Many of those laws were replicated across the nation. The parent of two dogs and four cats, the doctor from shelters, started her work helping rescue pets lost in Hurricane Katrina. But says one legislative aid, she has evolved from a nice lady neophyte to a real threat in her lobbying. She works through her small organization, social compassion in legislation, and her work model favors the gladiatorial arena of political battle over incremental grassroots work. You can talk to people until you're blue in the face, says miss mancuso. But passing laws is where I'm going to get the greatest bang for my buck. This story was reported by shante Griffin in Laguna Beach, California for the monitor. Now, commentary from the monitor's editorial board on Putin's moves against Ukraine. Russian troops are poised to invade Ukraine, and yet many experts disagree on why. As president Vladimir Putin wants to restore the Russian Empire, prevent Ukraine from joining NATO, split Europe from the United States. Well, now add another theory to the mix. Based on a new report from corruption watchdog transparency international, 7 countries in the former Soviet Union, from Estonia to Uzbekistan, have made significant reforms toward honest and clean governance in the last few years. Not so in mister Putin's Russia. And the reports ranking of countries on perceptions of corruption Russia score has worsened. It may be only a matter of time before Russian citizens wonder why so many neighbors are moving towards civic equality. Transparent government, and other essentials for curbing corruption. Ukraine's moves toward democratic ideals since 2014 may be driving mister Putin and its progress. Many nations have rallied behind Ukraine and are sending arms and money. They would only do so knowing that Ukrainians reject corruption as a social norm. And that also sends a strong signal to Russians to do the same. That's our news. We find the full length versions of these stories in today's issue or at CS monitor dot com slash daily. Thanks for joining us. Come back tomorrow. We're working on a story about black LGBTQ Christians, sharing stories about their faith.

Erica page California Judy mancuso legal foundation for the anima Ukraine miss mancuso shante Griffin Indian Ocean mancuso mister Putin Rica Hong Kong Costa Brazil Louis Hurricane Katrina Laguna Beach Russian Empire Vladimir Putin Putin
"russian empire" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"russian empire" Discussed on WTOP

"Deadly serious about some kind of attack on Ukraine and that 30 years after the end of the Cold War he's trying to recreate a Russian Empire perhaps to distract from Russia's own domestic problems That is CBS News correspondent Holly Williams Moscow for its part is dismissing the British claim as disinformation and urged London to in its words stops running nonsense The FDA has approved use of the antiviral drug Remdesivir as an outpatient medication the medication has been widely used for hospitalized COVID patients Now after hundreds of unvaccinated patients were studied the drug has been approved for high risk COVID patients who are not sick enough to be hospitalized New York Times reports the expanded approval of Remdesivir will worsen treatment shortages in large part because it's difficult to administer The treatment is an IV infusion over three consecutive days usually at a hospital or clinic It is hard to believe it has been two years this week since the first COVID case was detected in the United States two years later the concern is for the kids hit by COVID Kansas City's children's mercy hospital set a record with 32 hospitalized children 14 of them are under the age of two and three are in the ICU It's sad You know it's so unnecessary Many are unvaccinated of course not yet eligible to get a shot That a CBS is Michael George reporting Another setback for the Biden administration when it comes to vaccine mandates a federal judge in taxes issued a nationwide injunction Friday that blocks a White House mandate that required federal workers to get a COVID vaccine if they didn't have a qualifying exemption Just ahead Arizona Democrats censure their senior U.S. senator four 34 All of us have felt the effects of isolation during this pandemic So we can understand the little how some veterans feel But they will feel.

Holly Williams COVID CBS News Ukraine children's mercy hospital Moscow Russia FDA New York Times Biden administration London Michael George Kansas City U.S. CBS White House Arizona
"russian empire" Discussed on Revolutions

Revolutions

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"russian empire" Discussed on Revolutions

"Pushed by a desire to get as far away from the trenches as possible, and pulled by the promise of radical land redistribution back in their home villages. So the Russian Empire was just disintegrating. An American observer said that when it came to the Russian government needing to sign a peace, it was indeed urgent and active. But it was much the case of a man blowing with his breath in the same direction with a full grown, natural tornado. The Russian army was going home, and even if Lenin and Trotsky wanted to keep fighting, there was no way they could have made that army keep fighting. Lenin considered peace essential to the long-term stability of his regime. If he tried to keep the Russian army in the field, he said, the peasant army, unbearably exhausted by the war, will overthrow the socialist workers government. But though the Russians needed a peace because they didn't really have an army to continue the war. The Bolshevik negotiators were not in Brest to sign peace at any price. The main sticking point was what to do about the territory currently occupied by the armies of the Central Powers. The Bolshevik government had issued the declaration of the rights of the peoples of Russia just a few weeks earlier, which promised everyone autonomy and self determination. The Bolshevik negotiators at brassy task insisted that peace with Germany meant the mutual evacuation of all occupied territories on all sides and recognition of the right of all peoples to determine their own fates. And though the immediate sticking point was territory in Poland in the Baltic. The biggest issue loomed just in the background. Ukraine. Ukraine was a vital importance to the Russian Empire. Ukrainians made up the single largest block of non Russians in the empire just about 30 million people. Making them a majority of the population and a half dozen provinces down in the southwestern corner of the empire. More importantly, Ukraine accounted for like 75% of all the coal produced in the Russian Empire, 66% of its iron ore, 75% of its magnesium 66% of its salt, 80% of its sugar, and 90% of all wheat exports. It was a vital part of the Russian Empire's economy. And for all the talk about autonomy and self determination, both the Russians and Germans saw Ukraine as a vital part of their post war economies. The Germans had been cultivating Ukrainian separatists since the beginning of the war, hoping to turn a nominally independent Ukraine into a German client state. After the February revolution, a group of Ukrainian leaders formed what they called the RADA. Self appointing themselves as the legitimate leaders of Ukraine. They spent the next 6 months in occasionally hostile relations with the various Russian provisional governments. In fact, one of the proximate causes for the cadets quitting kerensky's government over the summer was that kerensky recognized the legitimacy of the RADA's authority in Ukraine. Now that the Bolsheviks were in charge, the wheel of revolution turned again, and with the declaration of the rights of the peoples of Russia in hand, the RADA prepared to declare independence. But not so fast. While Lenin and Trotsky very publicly proclaimed that they had no problem with the people of Ukraine charting their own destiny. The self organized RADA wasn't necessarily the true voice of the people. And while the countryside was almost universally Ukrainian, the cities and larger towns were very much more ethnically mixed. The population of Kyiv, for instance, was actually a majority Russian and Jewish..

Ukraine Russian army American observer Russian government Lenin peasant army Bolshevik government Trotsky army Central Powers Brest kerensky RADA Russia Baltic Poland
Life Is Not a Game: The Story of Ossip Bernstein

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

02:01 min | 1 year ago

Life Is Not a Game: The Story of Ossip Bernstein

"Life is not a game sure there are winners and losers but the stakes are far higher than we might realize. Just ask us at bernstein. Bernstein was born in the ukraine in eighteen. Eighty two back when his hometown was part of the russian empire in nineteen o six. He received his doctorate in law from heidelberg university and became a practicing financial lawyer shortly after that bernstein saw great success in his legal career. Earning a comfortable living for himself and his family unfortunately as he would come to learn several times in his life considerable gains were often followed by immense losses. But it wasn't his fault. He wasn't the gambler and he didn't play the stock market. Although he did enjoy the final game chess to be specific he picked it up in law school and found that he had a talent for it one year after he started playing. He was entering competitions all over europe june of nineteen ninety-two his win at the general chess federation of berlin earned him a master title kicking off a spree of tournaments with varying results. Sometimes he placed first or second other times he tied for third or fourth yet. The more he played the more of a reputation he built for himself and he was also outspoken against certain players. Such as jose coppa blanca. Who beat him several times over the years but there was something fascinating about this up and coming wonderkid chess champions and enthusiasts alike spoke highly of him and his name appeared on high profile lists although not always in a good way the bolshevik revolution of nineteen seventeen brought a lot of turmoil to russia with lenin's red army overthrowing the government and setting up its own capitalists and their enablers were rounded up for contributing to the plight of the workers and among them was awesome bernstein. Us wasn't a banker but as a financial lawyer certainly helped them get richer oftentimes on the backs of the most vulnerable. He was practicing in odessa ukraine when he was arrested by the bolshevik secret police in nineteen eighteen.

Bernstein Heidelberg University General Chess Federation Of Be Ukraine Chess Jose Coppa Blanca Europe Red Army Lenin Russia Odessa United States Bolshevik Secret Police
The Hope and History of the Esperanto Language

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:21 min | 1 year ago

The Hope and History of the Esperanto Language

"I really did not know all that much about esperanto. When i got into this aside from the fact that it's a language that was intentionally created to be easy to learn. Somehow i associated with a nine hundred and sixty s and although that was one of its peak in popularity but it's also a way older language than that. The other big thing that i associated with esperanto was the scene in twin peaks. Where gordon cole goes to talk to shelley at the double our diner and says he's going to engage in some counter esperanto and that was just my whole my whole knowledge of esperanto and that right there mine was largely from anna maniacs. Yeah because that's how it's it's usually referenced as like a casual side mention in pop culture. Yeah yeah so. We're having. I mean we're we're talking about this fun context in this moment but parts of this episode are really really tragic because we're talking about a language that was developed by a jewish man. Living in the russian empire in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and the speakers of that language were persecuted and even killed under fascist and totalitarian regimes into and after world war two but at the same time this is also a profoundly hopeful and idealistic story. Because it's one that's about trying to bring the whole world together. Through a shared second language

Gordon Cole Anna Maniacs Shelley
Eadweard Muybridge, the Man Who Captured Time

The Past and the Curious

09:09 min | 3 years ago

Eadweard Muybridge, the Man Who Captured Time

"Edward Mobridge was born in eighteen thirty and kingston upon teams in England. His birth name was Edward Muggeridge but as he marched through the circumstances dances life he would change his name many times. Such a thing was pretty uncommon in the eighteen hundreds but he was pretty uncommon man. His hometown town was the historical site of coronations where the early British kings were crowned and ceremony and the earliest of. These monarchs were Saxons and perhaps inspired by that the young man would change his name to Mobridge and adopt the old spelling of his first name. Edward The vowel heavy spelling E. A. D. w. e. a. a- are D-. It looks like eat weird but sounds like Edward seeking adventure. He left for America at the age of twenty two telling his grandmother that if he didn't succeed and the lofty goals he had for his own life. He'd never retired. He arrived in New York with a bunch of extra bells and his name and little else he. He worked there for a bit but was thirsty for more. So he left for California soon after it was eighteen fifty-five during the gold rush when scores of people headed west to mind for the valuable metal. He sought his fortune through other means. Though he opened a bookstore in San Francisco the city was growing in the people had money need to spend by most accounts he was mild mannered and his business was pretty successful in the bustling city in eighteen. Sixty he made plans to head back to Europe for. We're a visit and to do some business. But he missed the boat so instead he booked passage on a Coniston goggin across the American continent to head head back east and from there he would sail to his native England. Kind of still go. aggies were the common covered wagon that you see all of the images of westward travel. It was was a fateful trip and the first time that a horse would fundamentally alter his life. These wagons were pulled by horses. The one carrying Mobridge was pulled by a team of six six mustangs but somewhere in Texas the horses pulling his wagon broke loose and started off leaving the wagon cascading on a high narrow trail above Iraqi fall. The driver couldn't get control and the WAGGON tumbled loaded with passengers and their belongings thinking quickly as the accident that was unfolding. Edward tried to cut an escape hole in the wagons cover but in the commotion he was thrown from the vehicle and hit his head on a rock. During the fall he recovered from the head injury in Arkansas. For three months though he had no recollection of the accident. One of the other passengers had to tell oh him what had happened. In addition to some memory problems he now saw everything in a disorienting. Double Vision Edward also displayed definite personality. Finality changes it was a brain injury. And as you might guess these can have a great impact on a person in his case. The injuries came with aggressive episodes. Grandiose thinking and general unusual behavior the people who had known him before noticed a distinct difference in his personality. After recuperating more New York he headed back to England where he stayed for several years when he returned to America in eighteen sixty seven. He considered himself photographer having learned a lot about the new art form and he had acquired some very nice equipment which he had brought with him. It was still a developing art. In fact the I photograph in history was made in France just four years before Edward was even born. By the time he was working eighteen sixties. The technology was still very limited mid and far from the powerful cameras that we carry in our pockets every day. Edwards equipment filled an entire horse cart in addition to the new career as a photographer he also sported an enormous beard and he called himself by a host of new names including Helius. This was not not the same old Edward. His photography made an impact on the world. He had a definite fascination with stopping time. Just a few years after a man named Matthew Brady Changed America by photographing not just the people of the civil war. But the battle scenes and carnage mobridge was documenting in beautiful detail. Some of America's because most amazing and mysterious natural sites. If you've never been to Yosemite Valley you still probably heard about it's staggering beauty. This led to it being being among the first of the land to be designated as national parks but before it welcomed hordes of tourists to gaze at its beauty weighbridge made some of the first and certainly some of the best photographs of the amazing land. Some of them are so amazing. They look like epic landscape paintings soon. Everyone wanted a piece of Edward. Helius Komo Abridge the same year. He came back to America. The Secretary of State William seward negotiated a deal to buy Alaska Lasca from the Russian Empire. But for years this was called seward's icebox or seward's folly because most people thought it was a costly mistake to buy the enormous swath of northern land in an effort to convince people of its value. The government hired Mobridge to join an expedition travel with his immense. It's photo equipment and a darkroom and photograph the Land Resources and native people of the territory. They are some of the most important documents we have of that time time period still today but it was back in California that his fame truly solidified and it was largely. Thanks to a man who would give his name to Stanford University his name was Leland Stanford and he had a problem he was a robber Baron and oh this was a problem for a lot of other people. This wasn't a problem as so called robber. Baron he like several other industrialised of the late eighteen. Hundreds was rich and powerful but he had gotten that way through some pretty shady and morally questionable ways used political influence and connections to get rich not to mention taking advantage of many less fortunate people he had been the governor head of the railroad a Horse Breeder and he owned what was at the time the largest winery in the world on his gigantic estate. He raised eight hundred racehorses. Feeding these horses alone wasn't expensive task in order to do so. He also operated a a sixty acre carrot farm just for food so you may ask yourself what does a guy like this. Have to worry about Mr Muggeridge. I I have a problem. That's not my name. Mr Mobridge have rows riot again. I have gone long again call me. He Leo's Leo's that's right heels as in the ancient Greek personification of the sun being okay. Okay Helius so I have this theory and it's more than a hunch but I just can't prove it and I may or may not have bet money on it so I I need an answer. So how can he LEO's help. Well he'll ios this concerned horses. You see I believe when a horse runs at some point in its stride dried all four of its speed are above the ground so at some point the horse has touching absolutely nothing yet still moving forward but it happened so quickly that I can't be certain. Do you understand yeah. He Leo's digs that. You want me to prove it with Pictures Helius. I'd like that very much which it's going to cost you. Some money got plenty. Don't worry. Coup crackle added now it was actually a pretty common disagreement of the time and Leland with his stable full of horses and pockets. Full of cash was in a unique position to solve it he just needed. Someone like mobridge invest best craziest and most creative photographer in the public eye to solve technical issues when a horse ran. was there ever a moment when all four of its feet were off of the ground many people believed it could not possibly be true. The first tries to capture the airborne image. Each were failures. It was impossible with the cameras of the day to catch the fast horse. At just the right time the beast was just a blur so they went back to the drawing board. The project was derailed by mobridge being the defendant in a murder case which is another story entirely but once that was over they got back to work. More bridge hung white sheets up along the race track. And whiten the track itself with chalk powder this would reflect any an all light which he knew would help. The camera. Camera capture a clear image of the fast horse next. He designed a camera with quick shutter speed. It may have been the first of its kind as most cameras needed a long Exposure to whatever was being photographed people would have to sit still early photographs. So that they didn't show up as a blur that would not work with a galloping horse.

Edward Mobridge Edward America Mobridge Edward Muggeridge LEO England Leland Stanford California New York William Seward Coronations Saxons Europe Arkansas Coniston Goggin E. A. D. Baron Texas San Francisco
Report reveals no-deal Brexit impact – here's what you need to know

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

03:49 min | 3 years ago

Report reveals no-deal Brexit impact – here's what you need to know

"Have to remember about Putin that he feels and there's always felt that the western intelligence services were undermining inning his authority and interfering with his efforts to rebuild the Russian empire and so this is his revenge he he saw the weakness in the in the Western in systems and he went after them and the first and biggest target well not I but the biggest target was the United States he used on US techniques that leave us in the Baltic republics and other places and they were very successful the UK right now is a mess if it's not a mess it'll do till the mess gets. Let's hear will we look back on Brexit as the first probing of the Russians to see if they could not affect a democracy you and the Atlantic Alliance. I think they didn't have to do that much work in on Brexit. They did try to influence the brexit situation but I don't think that they had really prepared for it that much because nobody really had seen it coming. I mean when when David Cameron called for this referendum although he said he would do it. It was one of those things that people go do it. I'm sure it's going to do it then he does. It and he was sure that everybody would vote. Let's stay in Europe at least most people would but no the result it comes out and it's based on all kinds of things resentment of rural populations fears of migration this kind of thing thing and the Russians the Russians tried to feed that were they really went into went to work on the United States that that we see very very clearly from the Miller report this whole idea now that somehow the mullahs report was some fabrication irrelevant. It's very clear it's very very detailed. It's very unequivocal. The Russian set out to have a profound effect on the elections in two thousand sixteen team. I don't think they thought that trump would win but they thought they could undermine the authority and the credibility the legitimacy of of Hillary Clinton by the Guide to games that they played and then when they saw that trump could win of course they put as much effort as they could into into supporting it before we send you back to the Schanzer Leeza at the conclusion of your brief trip home. If I begged you to end on a hopeful note maybe an post markle Germany. You may be in Europe. Where would it be. Where do you find hope well. I think their frustrations in every every one of the countries I think think that Emmanuel macron although the president of France where I live. I think that he is trying to do the right things. I think he is a Democrat although he his authority is very powerful but I think that he understands the kinds of things that we're discussing miracle also although she's on her way out. She's is a lame duck. She's still a powerful influence for democracy we saw in. Spain people have been hanging onto democratic institutions country. Still Remembers Fascism for what it really was and I think there are signs of resistance many signs of resistance and people a lot of people thought that the European Parliamentary Elections a few months ago would be swept by these far right parties and that didn't happen in in fact the parties that are on the rise are the green parties in Europe because in Europe unlike in the United States the environment climate change those are huge and vital issues for voters at many levels but particularly for the young people of Europe and they just basically don't want to inherit a world. That's we'll. They'll be burned

Europe United States Emmanuel Macron David Cameron Putin Brexit UK Atlantic Alliance Hillary Clinton Spain Germany Schanzer Leeza Mullahs President Trump Miller France
Europe's Balkan dilemma

FT World Weekly

14:18 min | 3 years ago

Europe's Balkan dilemma

"Today, we're looking at the Balkans, an area that dominated international attention twenty years ago after the wars in Bosnia and Kossovo. But it slipped from the headlines in recent years. Joining me to discuss the region, and at some certain prospects are the T euro penatta, Ben home, an Fokin correspondent, Valerie Hopkins. Ben the F T this morning described the Balkans as the most volatile region in Europe. Why would he say that? Because historically, it has been a region that has been full tired of by competing power blocks. You know, the ultimate empire the Austro-Hungarian empire the Russian empire and that has left kind of overlapping, national, and ethnic and religious divisions. And we are still living with the legacy of that, and sort of overlaid by an incomplete transition to democracy and the rule of law after communism and. Then probably on top of all of that you have corruption. It's deeply rooted. So Ben before we continue. Let's just define the region. How big is it? And how significant so we're talking about the western Balkans region roughly twenty million people about the population of the Netherlands, but with a really tiny economy, about the size of Slovakia's. And we're talking about Serbia Montenegro Bosnia Herzegovina Albania, north Macedonia, and Kosovo, of course. So it's a pretty small number of people with a pretty small combined GDP. It's not significant, but it's always been a source of instability as we've known for the last century. Valerie, Ben referred to this as a kind of incomplete process and some of the countries in the regions, maybe all of them have hurt. The delta Modeste nation will be joining the EU I'm thinking, particularly of north Macedonian Albanian, but they're finding very hard. Yes. Well, that's true. They've been hoping to join but also the e u has been hoping for them to join I mean for the first time this was articulated in two thousand three in there. I e you some. In Thessaloniki, all of the countries of the western Balkans were promised a credible path to accession we're given unequivocal support from the Member States and one year ago after north miss Adonia and underwent quite comprehensive changes north Macedonia, to its name, and two other reforms and L Bainian committing to a very onerous judicial reform were promised that they would get a green light this year. And as we saw yesterday that decision was punted again, for a couple of months, at least until October and from their point of view, how much of a disastrous. Well, it's quite a big disaster. I mean, enormous Adonia which recently changed its name in order to end a decades long conflict with Greece over their name, which Athens believed implied territorial desire over the Greek region of the same name, the whole public support for the agreement and public support for the government is riding on the guarantees towards progress towards the EU that are written into that. So north Macedonia, has moved forward in terms of its NATO membership. Several countries, I think, have already ratified the NATO accession protocol for them. But, you know, the European Union membership is what the public really wants and at a certain point, it may become untenable for the leaders of the country to stay in power if they can't deliver on what was promised them, and that would be a disaster for them. And for Europe. Yeah. Mean Ben you've been pretty critical of the youth decision. What's the argument for saying the eaves being sources that it had a unique? Novo paternity to put these two countries move firmly on the path of judgement. EU rules values and sort of binding them into the EU orbit, we have to remember that sort of enlargement process. If you just put aside the various problems that we've experienced over the is in the grand sweep of history. It's been a remarkable success for the EU it stabilized the region, it's brought prosperity and it's dissolved the division between eastern western Europe and the argument just to recap for those who don't totally recall took the EU from what fifteen countries to now. Twenty eight to twenty eight. Yeah. And so, in argument is probably the most effective European Union foreign policy, and it has helped put countries on the right path, and stabilize democracy and promote reform and promote the rule of law. But perhaps there are now plenty of people in the EU think we've reached the end of that process and the legacy problems from previous enlargements have come back to haunt the EU. Maybe the enlargement the accession process was not rigorous. Enough. And so now there are plenty of people who are having second thoughts about it. Yeah. And I mean just to play devil's advocate, I suppose if you are European politician, you will say, well, sure the future of these countries matters, but as he was saying Elliott's twenty million people in the, you have the rise of populists across Europe and places like France, the Netherlands, Britain's voted for Brexit. And it doesn't appear that accession to countries like, oh, near is popular. So perhaps that wise, not to do it quite possibly. But I mean, I think the calculation has to be how long can you keep these countries on the path to accession without ever actually giving them accession at the end of the day? And that solvency something that the EU has tried with Turkey and it's backfired arguably spectacularly, although you could also blame premise, Erta one, perhaps originally topper one for the kind of backsliding in democracy, and the sort of drift away from the European mainstream, in Turkey, but I mean that is clearly the calculation it would be good for Europe if. If Albany could be put on the path to membership even if it never actually meets the criteria to join fully, and you mentioned Obama. Valerie back from there. Give us a description of where the country is in terms of its economy, and its politics because when I was growing up out, mania was like the most isolated place. It was North Korea Europe. And the idea that it might even be close to joining the paean union in some ways, seems miraculous. Well, indeed, it is. And it's quite far off. But I think, you know, to build on what Ben said many Member States have grown tired of the process and have learned that they need to impose further and further restrictions. We see that many of the countries that have joined in recent decades still have problems with their judicial systems. So we're talking countries like Romania Bulgaria, yes, Hungary. If I may say, so the conditions and the demands that Brussels and the Member States have made on countries, which are hoping to join have actually become much more onerous Albania, my story that I did while I was in Toronto was about the extremely onerous. Writing process that all judges, and prosecutors are being subjected to which has left. The country's supreme court with only two judges. One of them I think is being vetted this week. So it may have only one judge so far, only one judge survived because the two tional court, I believe, has only one judge, which is actually quite stabilizing, on the political. See now as the parliament has moved to impeach the president for calling early elections. And no one in the court can judge on this. I don't wanna get too deep into their politics. But I would like to say to that Albanian has also accepted to host the first FrontEx mission FrontEx being the US Border police agency because during the two thousand fifteen migrant crisis, the EU sort of realized woke up and remembered that actually all of these countries in the Balkan route are inside of Europe that if you have weak states week, police weakens to, to Sion's at that will have consequences for the security and safety of the rest of the block. So there should be more interest in improving those institutions and the best way to do it all. Of the academic work that's been done in the Balkans shows that the carrot of enlargement, and of a real credible accession path is the best way to inspire reforms, but how is the economy doing? And how connected is opening to the rest of Europe, now compared to those days of isolation. I mean silly, anecdote but, you know, I come across our Bainian in London now buildings around the corner. So to some extent, they seem to have been integrated little bit. Well, absolutely. I mean, quite a significant portion of Albanians left the country in the nineties jobs, better opportunities. And I think it's rare to meet now lenient who doesn't speak at least two or three languages. But now, people are coming back business ties between mania and especially Italy, Switzerland UK are very strong and the economy's growing, I think actually in the Balkans. The economies are growing much faster than the EU average about four five percent. They still have a long way to go to catch up, but there's quite a lot of vitality and what about this issue of organized crime, which is thrown at all the countries in the Balkans. But I think particularly. Albania for those sitting in Brussels or elsewhere, saying, do we really want country in that condition inside the EU, how serious is the problem? Well, it is a serious problem. And it you know, it also goes to show that again you can't separate the Balkans. Even with the Albania or north as Donio, anyone not being inside of the EU criminals will always find a way to engage in their activity. It seems to me in some of my discussions with police dodges prosecutors that sometimes this threat is overblown. For instance, the Dutch parliament, several weeks ago passed a Bill asking their government to withdraw visa-free travel for all Baynes, dude organised crime. And then when you go and inject a Dutch officials, they say actually, this is not necessarily for violent crime. A lot of people are trying to get on both. Maybe they're trying to come to the UK but actually they're not necessarily being arrested for trafficking in drugs, or persons Ben turning to the other country. We were talking about north Macedonia that I suppose, makes the point that this is also still an issue. To some extent, war and peace. I mean they had extremely tense relations with Greece for sometime. Yes. They have done over the dispute over the name after the collapse of the former Yugoslavia. And that, of course, has prevented Macedonia, north Macedonia is now 'cause integration into the Atlantic community, the NATO. So I mean, it really was a huge that Ford when Zorn's Iovan Alexis, it press the Greek premier achieve this deal, and it still highly contentious in Greece. And we have a general election next month in Greece, where you are likely to see the return of a center, right? New democracy led government and new democracy has been very, very critical of the naming deal with north Macedonia. It remains to be seen whether they will actually go as far as to block their entry, but I suspect Athens will be a lot less accommodating in the future than it has been over the last couple of years. And if I recall correctly at the time, there was some evidence, which the Cyprus government acted on the Russian espionage Intel. Emergence agencies trying to stoke up opposition to the north Macedonia settlement does that raise. Also, I suppose a subsidiary issue, but crucial one which affects Europe's judgment, which is that to the extent that this area is not integrated with the rest of the EU becomes the sort of floating space. And there is no evidence that not just the Russians but also the Turks and even the Chinese are taking an interest in the western Balkans. Absolutely. I suspect it's possible to maybe overplay, the extent of Russian influence, although it has been substantial an acute in some places such as the authentic your and Montenegro and this attempt to stoke up resistance to the referendum on the name changed Illinois with Macedonia, which the Greeks are pro Russian country, actually expelled him Russian diplomats accusing the spine. The Turks are obviously increasingly involved in Bosnia to governor, and Albanian in Kosova, and the. Please spot an opportunity to extend their influence through commerce and through infrastructure spending. So, yeah, we're replaying centuries of history where this region has been kind of plaything for the great powers. And of course, I suppose it's easier for Europe to ignore to the extent that these above Ling cute problems, but lots of problems as long as it doesn't actually break out into violence. Now I mentioned at the beginning of the program that the broad or can region. We were at war twenty years ago is there danger of the old conference coming bubbling back. Or is it more that we're talking about serious, but subsidiary issues of people flows economic crises organized crime, and so on, is there danger of real all while I think you'd be foolish to rule out the danger of a return to conflict in this area in the sense that forty years ago, you might have done the same thing but history has shown how quickly this place can erupt into. James, and I suspect that remains although I'm sure it has reduced in the last ten twenty years, and there is more at stake for the region's inhabitants. If they have a clear path to e membership, which will bring guarantees of security, and better economic prospects. And the end of the day, I have the firm feeling that it's often corrupt politicians who have their own economic interests at heart, who are perpetuating the kind of ethnic divisions in this region. More than popular convictions. And Valerie euro correspondent on the ground. So how stable or unstable does it seem to you? Well, I do agree with Ben that seemingly innocuous crisis can escalate. And I think that in most of the countries, you really do have this kind of boiling, the frog situation where I is correspondent struggle with sometimes seemingly small jumps in a story, actually could carry larger consequences later. But I think rather than conflict, the major risk is just that the country will empty out with people losing hope. That they will be able to create a better life for their children and grandchildren. For instance, in Bosnia, which is a population of three and a half million in the last three or four years. I think two hundred thousand people left since January some thirty thousand people have already left the country. And that's when I talked to people, it's really a matter of losing hope that they will join the European Union and have a better life. So these countries will suffer catastrophic demographic decline. And western Europe will find if they didn't integrate them, they'll show up on the doorsteps. Well, many of them, actually are getting jobs in western Europe, which are empty, you know, these are educated workers doctors dentists health worker, social workers, so it's not the same as migrant crisis. Most of them are going legally with work permits, but they're leaving their home countries for good. Okay. We'll, we'll have to leave it. Thank you very much indeed, to buttery Hopkins in the studio and to Ben holes. Well that's it for this week until next week. Goodbye.

Europe European Union BEN Macedonia Bosnia North Macedonia Greece Nato Albania Valerie Serbia Montenegro Bosnia Herze Netherlands Athens Valerie Hopkins Brussels Kosovo Adonia Slovakia Member States North Korea