26 Burst results for "Rushton"

"rushton" Discussed on Top Advisor Marketing Podcast

Top Advisor Marketing Podcast

04:35 min | 11 months ago

"rushton" Discussed on Top Advisor Marketing Podcast

"Its it gives you a sense of your. I'm doing something that's helpful. And that just carries on and it's hard to keep it up. The biggest thing is you cannot expect results right away. You can't do anything really for any results you just got to do because you love it and you want to see people get better and i think the days walking into an opportunity because of the name of your firm are limited. I don't think that matters as much anymore as the kind of person you're gonna you are and that will help them. Do your the brand and more advisors need to understand that stop leaning on their firm's name because that's not going to last much longer remember in adviser who had some very fundamental unique in different things that he did but he held himself out as raymond. James your name is raymond james. He's like yeah. But everybody knows raymond. James like before i got into this industry added know raymond james was i love. I love the fact that you're fishing fishing in the waters that you know we're going to provide you because of the niche idea rights. So that's fantastic. But i also love that you're reinforcing. This is very self promoting here But i love that. You're talking about the fact that this is not a quick fix so many financial services professionals and i know that this happens in the 401k world because i saw their booths by the way by leads get in front of the hr directors. I do this for you. And i do this for you when it really is. It's the grind right into if you put that time in and you're pumping out content like you do. That's where everything changes now. Let's talk about content my friend. How often are you putting stuff out you know. I don't have like a very super strict around it. I my goalies was for while to have two podcasts. A week and i one of them was an interview. Podcast one was just me talking. I found that the interview wants to get a lot more traction and actually more entertaining and some really kind of going down that path. More and more. I like to get out. It all started. Honestly the first way that i made this content thing really come together was. I made a promise to myself that i would do this. Thing called thursday thoughts. Every thursday would put a video on lincoln. And that's where it started. I think in january. I was like you know what enough of just once in a while putting a video video like i made a commitment every week. I couldn't go to sleep. Unless i put that video out and sometimes it wasn't midnight and that's where you have to start. You can't expect to be up there. And putting high-quality detail content like genie or alex or the leaders in the industry. You just have to start. And you'll figure it out along the way jake was never. I never thought the end game. I don't know what the end game is..

raymond james jake alex lincoln
Reverse-Engineering the Impact of the British Establishment on Muslims

TMV Podcast

07:10 min | 1 year ago

Reverse-Engineering the Impact of the British Establishment on Muslims

"Welcome to the team podcast brought to you by the Muslim, vibe. I'm hosting possum. And this I'm Rushton in my introduction because the root. Team members of Muslim vibe team and other associated people in the office are not happy about the fact that I'm recording this for whatever reason. So I'M GONNA keep it brief. I'm joined this week by William Burroughs who is a London based research in sociology. He looks at how young Muslims in Europe and North America, navigate, race, class and gender barriers from a D., colonial and restorative perspective. That right I'm. Just reading off his website. William is a an individual who has. Countries the Muslim vitamin the posses made assume videos for us. I'm going to Lincoln description. We talk about them at all the beginning. We also talk in the podcast about white privilege and the current academic project that he's working on. which kind of looks at reverse engineering? What the British establishment has done to Muslims, and how people are able to, and have successfully on a fullback and space themselves. I'm quite a wide ranging discussion I'm hope you enjoy it. Without further ado, because of the rude people in the office to and not allowing me to speak too much on this. Sound policeman. Harris Michael Mercedes with William. William Thank. You thank you for for joining me on this podcast so I guess some people may be familiar with your face that watching this because we've done what you produced a series of of committing documentaries for us. Around some random topics. I'm trying to think back to how it all came together. So I think you got in touch with US maybe a couple of years ago. And and you had at the time I think we shed one of your videos which around? was like this. Robot version of the of the Muslim influence. Oh, yeah, that was Yeah, what working? I haven't seen that because I. Think it's hard to actually. They got that video struggle to find him for it last. What was that? So basically, it was an experiment in the sense that. You know if I can put things this way Assessor Gist, which is my job. My job is to understand. Why do people do certain things and? It's basically like being a psychologist before crowds for movements trends. But at the same time when I started my mic, my studies I as a Muslim academic. There was something that for me like a religious duty. 'cause you know for example if I talk about the topic. Is Between fifteen thousand and twenty thousand words, a chapter of my book or Article but not everyone has the time to re this and necessarily understand will jog on and stuff so I i. consider you know known as? That's minorities. Jala is not valid until it shed. And you know so. How my question for the DOT words. How do I make it? These topics complex topics accessible for most people, and then I got inspired by. Keynote these like age a-plus videos. And I thought yeah, let's try to do some videos. In a similar way, a very short format with like culture, popular references and stuff, but also did some fictions individual. You mentioned actually was one of these experiments. Where basically it's a it's a stop in fiction where I imagine. What if all these influences that we see on Instagram Youtube? There were actually robots designed by Google facebook a for Muslims to abide by the government's guidelines, so that was the NC. How people would respond to such narrative so this. Would you actually I play like a scientist and? A friend of plays like a robot actuaries ten still out for three minutes, and we use like google voice from Google, translate to for the speech and. It was. I felt like when video came out. It definitely started conversations I'm sure it ruffled a few feathers, but also got people thinking and people talking which I'm sure was your kind of Ame behind that in some sense, and then also and I'll probably try and put a link to all the different video that we discussed in this in the in the description, but does also A. Series. That we did on the most imbibed. Within that we, so we sat down. We kind of Map Tau different conversation topics. We wanted to discuss so things like politics white privilege I was actually another one and look at my note masculinity. An. What was that journey like? Because again I the the kind of brief I. Guess We gave to you is that we want? To have pieces on this one conversations to be had around this, but we don't want him to be kind of light. We WanNa go quite deep, and obviously with your kind of academic background as well. We want to really be able to get hawk. Get to the heart of these conversations. And and I think we kind of did that like that. I remember the the white privilege episode was yourself and Two or three other white Muslims that you had that interview. I'd that will combat I believe as well I they were kind of unpacking and exploring in discussing direction, relative privilege, and whatever else and. It's interesting because there was it was very feedback that one person was asking for example why there was only white people on the documentary on the on the mini documentary that we produced. And I guess what was that whole Jenny like like off of the different mini documentary that we wanNA marriage as well. What was your favorite to record in research and and I think you know although these topics are very important for me. Because all of these topics were more or less part of my journey, not only it's not only topics I research in the university this topics that are impacting on my personal life, the life of my friends, and so on and so on, and you know especially when it comes to things like a me, metoo movements who black lives matter. The problem I felt was that lots of men and lots of white Muslims you know when that people expressed that you have these like global movements, so people feel attacked and they take it personally. and. The thing is a some men and also white Muslim understand what comes from?

William Burroughs Google Rushton Europe London Assessor Gist North America Lincoln Jenny Scientist Michael Mercedes A. Series NC
Bayard Rustin

Making Gay History

05:20 min | 1 year ago

Bayard Rustin

"It's been a week of anger, anguish and heartbreak here in New York City. And across the country. Massive protests over George Loyd's murder under the knee of a police officer. had been met with repeated widespread violence by militarized police. The threat of active duty military being deployed to control citizens exercising their constitutional rights. The ongoing drumbeat of white supremacy coming from the White House. The People's House now, an embattled presidency fortress peaceful protesters described as terrorists. From day to day and hour to hour, I've been alternately sickened and heartened. Filled with despair, and then lifted up by the voices of people across the country, demanding revolutionary change because black lives matter. And making a history, we're proud and humbled to stand with them. All black lives matter. LGBTQ black lives matter. On Wednesday afternoon I was sitting at my desk and heard noise I couldn't identify coming through my open window. My partner born and I went outside to see what was going on. Thousands of protesters marching of Ninth Avenue as far as the I could see wearing masks, carrying signs and chanting. They were heading north, and in a few blocks be passing the apartment complex where fired Rushton once lived. He was a principal architect of the march on Washington for jobs and freedom. In August nine hundred and sixty three, a quarter of a million Americans massed in Washington D. C. at the foot of the Lincoln memorial to demand an end to state sanctioned racism. In this revisiting the archive episode, you'll hear buyers Rushton in his own words. In, addition to coordinating the nineteen sixty three march on Washington, fired was one of the organizers of the very first freedom ride through the American south in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty seven. And was mentor to Dr. Martin Luther, King Junior from the time of the Montgomery bus boycott. Barred Rushton was a proud black gay man who paid a high price for proclaiming who he was long before. It was remotely safe to do so. He put himself in harm's way over and over again subjected to attacks by white supremacists who uses race and sexuality to try to destroy him. But not only resisted triumphed. You're about to hear. An interview fired rust and gave on February fifth nineteen, eighty, six a year and a half before he died. The reporter was young peg Byron who was freelancing for DC based GAY newspaper? The, Washington, Blade. Pay conducted the interview in buyers, office and Lower Park Avenue New, York City just across town from where he lived in Chelsea with his partner Walter Naegle. Walter was also buyers assistant, and you can hear the sound of him in the next room through much of the interview. It's thanks to Walter who recorded the conversation and save it for decades in a box under their bed that we're able to hear Byron speak in this rare interview about the impact of his sexuality on his work in the civil rights movement. So, let's join peg Byron admired rusting desk and listen to history from a man who changed its course. To know mind now, let's play all right. Walters doing some research. On me. Therefore, he tapes Manipur. Anybody else does that check on. Wall. With this shows is that. Stop now this is still going. has there ever been Some projects are involved. We're. Not, that being gay was necessarily an issue, but did you ever feel frustration about? I. You know I was an associate adopt live. Luther King's for a number of years. And actually I the person who drew up plans for his southern Christian leadership conference. Given. It was so much pressure on Dr. King's about my game. And particularly I would not be denied. That he set up a committee to explore whether you'd be changes, but To you working again? After eight years, that committee came decision would be dangerous. The Q. Midi seems eight years now. After I had worked for him. He's year. The! J. Edgar Hoover. Began to circulate all kinds of stories about Luther King. One which was? that he wants a friend of mine, hinting that somehow there might be some homosexual relationship going on between us.

Walter Naegle Luther King Principal Architect Washington Byron White House New York City George Loyd Partner Dr. Martin Luther J. Edgar Hoover Murder Lincoln Memorial Officer. Montgomery Manipur Reporter York City
The Broken Brilliance of Matt Hardy

Talk Is Jericho

07:51 min | 1 year ago

The Broken Brilliance of Matt Hardy

"True. Blood was one of the shows that I watch whenever I like had burn out at the end of my wb run. And then once I start started doing some ring of honor and eventually I ended up going back to impact. I wasn't working fulltime. I discovered television. I was a big fan of Dexter True detective later on became big. Love Mind but true. Bought also is a show on joy and following these vampires. Who lived in all these different eras and different time periods and they were like relative to the error and I was like I wish I could like have a character that that's really what I wanna do so I started thinking about it and trying to apply like a the life of vampire who's lived two thousand years to a wrestling character and then what I came up with was like what if something happened to me whereas like this big traumatic incident and ended up being jeff diving off the top of the impact zone. That broke me but like opened up parts of our mind and I use more of my mind than rail human does and like I become conscience of conscious of like where my soul has been in different bodies in different vessels. So it's like you have a soul that lives in a in a vessel a body for so long and then that vessel dies in the news onto the next one and that was my whole motivation behind creating broken matt. It was like more or less from true blood and seeing like vampires live for thousands of years in different time periods. That had different experiences that you had a girlfriend in the thirteen. Hundreds and a girlfriend in the fifteen hundreds or you know the lived at one point through the black plague you know then maybe they lived through. World War Two. You know just just different time periods like that which totally allows you to change up so many things even before left. Tna started doing some of that where I revert back back to the king and gold which was my original vessel which was from Alexandria Egypt. You know which King Tut or something. Yeah exactly I had a whole bunch of ideas of of different things to do and now that I'm here today. W actually have started again now. My vessel zenith was killed off by Kenyan never revealed dish but like Ken Again. Ultimately becomes like a kind of a reference light for an essence that is like events in the. Wbz In some ways and can again you know because like the very end Kennedy Kennedy and then the very end. The Gin is like Megan spelled backwards. Where like a sanctuary? And if you know him from the walking dead like you come in you can have a good life there but like you have to like bow down to him and do whatever he says. And that is kind of the deal. And that's where I created that turn and then abomination was the other thing and that was like an extension from from Ray and I love that I took like Abigail and bray being deleted in the lake of reincarnation and then I got part of Abigail an abomination in the water. Whenever I was being trying to found my broken brilliance and the whole thing I tried to tie in like different universes and I love doing the stuff with Randy Orton at the very end because I was able to tie that in to a different universe which allowed me to come in. Aws as a new character now. My new essence is Damascus is oppose Zenith Zenith died. He was killed by abomination and Kenyon. And now I am in Damascus Damascus. In my vessel and Damascus's as an older more powerful essence the hairs rat obviously and Damascus. From nine ninety nine BC. A lot more vicious on more serious did I. I if I if I was stoned right now I just did. This reminds me of when I was about twelve years old playing dungeons and dragons and we would play for weekends at a time and I would come home am. I would tell my mom all of this stuff. Like you're telling me and she'd be like I don't know what you're talking about. But the nation that you're showing for this is off the charts and this is what I love about your kind of breakthrough like listen. You're accused of broken. Matt was different level. Shit for me that that description years gave like. That's a novel. It's like Frank Herbert in Dune or something like that. How long were you seeing things? Did you put it on paper? Are you coming up with all this? I mean a lot of that really just like I drew stuff for my from television shows. I'll watch you're writing down and coming. This beget sometimes I would. I would try to make it a habit if I came up with something as a really radical trump. Put it in my phone so hidden even like when I said like you know my my primal passengers. That was a big thing with broken matt back in the day and I was even from like Dexter in the dark passenger so like I'm so inspired by that. He falls a song dark passenger by the way. Yeah yeah so many cool things and like Joe Rushton coal from detective an amazing character. There's a lot of things I tried to pull that Mcconnell that was that was the best season yes never even come close. No I mean it was off the charts. So there's definitely things up pool and like there's just so much great content and so much media out there to watch nowadays I'll watch something if I'm very intrigued by show. I'll usually bill to find something that I go. I could apply this to my character in some way and and make it work and the cool thing about broken matt and the broken universe kind of anything is possible especially like the hardy compound is like a property. Were everything's magic so there's really. It's like limitless. There's no bound Jeff live to your no because both live on the same plot of land we have eighty eighty makers in the woods. Yeah in the woods on the best place to be right now during the end all right hang on the gate but I wanna talk a little because like I said when we talked to Broken Matt we talked about his essence but actually talking to Matt Hardy when you filmed all these amazing just short films is the Best Way. I can describe. Wasn't even Vignette and there's so much invention and imagination and I mean obviously revs your wife King maximum his senior. Benjamin like where? Where are you getting ideas to like? It's like a Ralph. This thing like did you see him around. And you'll be great silent. Man Like senior bedroom was huge. I it's incredible how people love that. Shit that's why no they do. I mean is a senior. Benjamin was so great and the funny thing is if you ever meet him. Is that nicest sweetest Guy Alive in existence and like with him just like we have to keep him very limited. You know people say like Oh brother He's recall right said what was in the business. He worked for Carlito's data's he didn't know anything about the business. He was a superintendent in New York. City is what do you ever hear when he was on? Chona's podcast news. I thought that was a Mexican from the. They played from Puerto. Rico oh so. He was a superintendent in New York City building. All kill. He was a super. He was the super of the building. You know took your manager janitor and did all the work in this big ass apartment building queens and it was like he had no idea about wrestling so like literally everything we did. We coached him through so I will do everything. I could distraught. Protect him and make him seem like this guy who's like a gardener which he really is and he has a great passion. Gardner from for for gardening and for having a garden and is as Gardner. Who like has this like mean streak who like likes to do cruel and unusual things to people or prepare the battle for master? Whatever may be and is crazy like we protected them very hard and it worked and he had over huge he got over really is like I said I think there was t shirts involved there was. There's a lot of different Senior Benjamin stuff and It brings me to this. I have to put some ads in here. I got to take care of a sponsor before we continue about senior Benjamin Sponsors Max Health. Matt guys have her be talking about olmecs freeze. Cd ROLE ON FOR MONTHS. Now and that's because it really works. I love it. Take it with me wherever I go. And if you guys are suffering from chronic pain

Matt Hardy Damascus Benjamin Jeff Superintendent Kennedy Kennedy Zenith Zenith Randy Orton Gardner TNA Benjamin Sponsors Max Health Joe Rushton Frank Herbert Abigail Puerto Ken Again Alexandria Egypt Megan AWS
What Worry and Meditation Have in Common

Pep Talks

10:20 min | 1 year ago

What Worry and Meditation Have in Common

"What worry and meditation have in common? We live in a world where people are chronically. Stressed people are activating their sympathetic nervous system that fight or flight response on a regular basis. In fact I believe for many of my clients. They're just living in a chronic state of fighter fighter flight particularly for my clients who grew up in an abusive or dysfunctional homes. I believe that they are living in this place of needing to assess for danger and have a have a very difficult time. Activating their Paris sympathetic nervous system. So the sympathetic nervous system assists us in fighting or fleeing. If we have an animal chasing us we need that sympathetic nervous system to release cortisol and adrenaline to help our body to prepare to fight or to flee we. We need our respiration to increase. We need increased blood flow to our arms and our legs. We need to be able to fight or to run in the Para sympathetic state state. It's referred to as rust and digest because our immune system and our digestive system are activated during the Para sympathetic state. They about it this way. If you are running from an animal is your body really all that concerned about digesting food or fighting Often pathogen when you could die because of this animal chasing you so we were in the Para sympathetic state were in that rest and digest state when were in the sympathetic state were increasing inflammation in our body because we are releasing all of these stress hormones in an attempt to protect ourself. The sympathetic system is extremely important. We needed what we don't need is to be activating it regularly and that is what I believe a probably most all of my clients are doing and what we need to be doing is getting to that Paris sympathetic state because because in that Paris sympathetic state that rest and digest state. Our bodies are able to heal we're able to rewire our brains scenes. Were able to digest. Foods were able to fight off pathogens. That is a state of health when we're in that para sympathetic state and one of the ways that we can activate the para sympathetic nervous system or that Rushton digest system is through meditation and last last month I was encouraging you to think about twenty twenty and what you wanted to do differently this year and one thing I would encourage wjr everybody to include in their life. is meditation meditation. The research is it's it's it's it's amazing what. The research search shows of what meditation does for our bodies it truly is a healing practice. It increases our our immune in system's ability to fight infection. It decreases inflammation in the body and inflammation is at the root of all diseases it assists with sleep. It assists our brains in being able to critically think. In fact I was listening to a podcast with Dr James Gordon. And he indicated that because meditation increases the activity in the frontal CORTEX. We have an increase in judgement self awareness and compassion. I think all of us could use an increase in those three areas in our life life and when I encourage people to meditate frequently what I hear people say is I can't I just can't meditate my. I'm I'm just not able to do it. It is impossible not to be able to meditate. And I mean that in fact if you're someone who worries stories you're meditating. Now it's not healthy meditation nonetheless. It is a form of meditation. So if you're a worrier no more excuses no more excuses. You're able to meditate and and think about that for a minute if you are concerned about a problem if you have something going on in your life and you're just going over it over it at. Let's say you're concerned about losing your job or your concerned -cerned about a relationship or finances if you're just sitting in that and going over it and over and over at. You're meditating right so meditation meditation and there's all sorts of different interpretations of what meditation is. I like to think of it as a way to simply calm the brain that were really working on directing our focus so that we can call the brain. Now I hear some people talk about meditation. As you know blanking linking out the mind I can only speak for myself but I know I'm not capable of blanking out my mind. I am an. I'll use an always here. I'm always just thinking about something so with meditation I think about it as the quieting of the mind. Me Focusing on something that's helping took quiet so for example it could be listening to music. There's by Naral. Sounds which means it's the sounds in one ear is different than the sound another. It reminds me a lot of em Dr. And if you've worked with me directly you know I'm a huge proponent of amd are because it's bilateral movement so with the by Naral sounds. The belief is that it is actually helping to change the brainwaves and helping to calm palm the brain so for me that gives me something to focus on. It gives me something to listen to so that when my mind does wander. I'm able to bring bring back to focus. The sounds that gives me something directly to bring my my focus back to and then work on breathing of course while comparing it with the sounds. If you're a worrier you are sitting. And you're thinking about the problem and you're going over it and over it and over it and think about I mean we really if you've worried about something recently. I bet if you sat for a few minutes you were all in right. You were consumed completely with. What was you were worried about? You weren't distracted by anything. You were all into the worry. We'll that's what we want to do with meditation when you're worrying worrying you're activating that sympathetic nervous system. You're activating that potentially and I think for most individuals they are your activating that sympathetic nervous system. That that fight or flight response you. There's fear associated with it. If you're worrying about something you're fearful of it you're definitely not in that para sympathetic state. So you really think about that for a minute. If you have the ability to sit and be lost in your fear you have the ability to work at being lost in a sound wound or in your breath or even a word if you wanted to focus on one word even saying it over and over is a way to do meditation. Where again with meditation were working on quieting the mind? So if you're thinking about a word and you're it let's say it was joy and maybe you're even saying joy and you're thinking about how it feels in your mouth and you're thinking about how the sound sound wound and how you feel it in your body while you're breathing. That's a form of meditation. Dr Mark Hyman who. I'm a huge fan of. He is a functional medicine doctor and he believes in the body's ability to heal and he also also believes that food is medicine. Which of course I think you know that I believe in that? And he says that meditation is medicine and that it's it's so important for us to take time to work on quieting the mind because it has such a profound effect act on her physical and emotional health. It was interesting. He's he commented that medicine shuts off a pathway or or it blocks something in. It's actually interfering with your biology to stop a symptom. where meditation and food also Soviet? He was referring to meditation. And this moment is actually suggesting to to heal the body. It's working with the body and helping the body to activate its own systems so that it can heal itself and he talked about how one's immune system you know increases how the inflammation decreases. How sleep improves? Because the and and how there's also rewiring of the brain are that that neuropathy of the brain allows the brain to be rewired and over time just as though you can be wired to be a worrier over over time. If you're doing meditation you can rewire your brain to be to be healthier. In fact Dr Hyman was talking into Emily Fletcher. She's an expert in the field of meditation and she explained that meditation neutralizes is the adrenaline and Cortisol. While it floods the brain with dopamine and Serotonin so those feel-good right neurotransmitters metres. Meditation helps to release those so again. We're not with Meta medicine. You're altering those were with meditation. You're actually assisting your body in doing the its own processes that it knows how to do. We've just kind of hijacked it with worry.

Sympathetic Nervous System Inflammation Paris Cortisol Dr Mark Hyman Dr James Gordon Naral Foods Dopamine Rushton AMD Twenty Twenty Emily Fletcher
What Is Dopamine Fasting?

The Psych Central Show

08:28 min | 1 year ago

What Is Dopamine Fasting?

"Welcome to this week's episode of the Psych Central Podcast call into the show. Today we have Dr John Grow Hall. Who is the founder and the editor in chief of Psych Central John? Welcome to the show. Great to be here with Gabe. I'm glad to have you today. We're going to be discussing. A twitter trend called dopamine fasting. Can you explain what that is. Good old dopamine fasting. Yeah that sounds sounds like a fun thing right so dopamine fasten your. It's this idea that by restricting your pleasurable daily activities things that you normally normally enjoy doing on a daily or weekly basis such as drinking alcohol sex drugs gaming even talking to others checking your career. FACEBOOK feed your social media feeds and in some extremes even pleasurable eating that if you cut all that out for twenty four hours for forty the eight hours you are somehow magically going to reset your neuro chemical makeup in your brain. I have a million questions about this is but let's start at the very very beginning. What is dopamine? Dopamine is a neurotransmitter chemical in your brain very very important for how your brain functions it is something that we call as a part of the dopamine motive system system because the dopamine system in the brain functions on both motivation and reinforcement. It's not just a reward system as many people believe. I believe that We most often hear dopamine attached to things talking about drug addiction that when people get addicted to cocaine or some. The mother drug that the screws up their dopamine receptors in their brains and that is very true but more generally dopamine is involved an daily activities in everybody's brain and it is involved in all the activities and behaviors that are around motivation in reinforcement in our lives so when we eat something like a big piece of chocolate cake our brain is flooded with dopamine. And we feel feel-good Dr Grow Hall. I'm I'm not a psychologist. I'm not a therapist. I'm not a researcher and I'm certainly not a neurologist but this just sounds ridiculous to me as just just a regular person the idea that if you don't use part of your brain it just magically become something different. Yeah that's true I. It's not something that's likely to happen because it doesn't speak to. How dopamine actually works in our brain and since? I'm not an expert in dopamine either I had to speak speak to some experts. One of whom was Professor Kim Helman's neuroscience researcher at Carleton University in Canada and we had a long conversation station about dopamine. And how it works in the brain and one of the things that she reminded me. was that in our brains that dopamine is a part of a very dynamic system and what that means is that it is always it doesn't exist in sort of a static state. It responds spawned two levels of stimulation that an individual is exposed to so neural. Transmitters are synthesized on demand as needed did and then they're stored in these little packages in the brain inside the cell ready for release. And if you don't use them they remained stored if you do use them they get used up in your brain and then your brain creates more dopamine. So if you think you're going on a fast for twenty four or forty eight hours of Komo dopamine. You're actually not because your brain is storing up the dopamine anyway for future use. It has absolutely nothing to do with fasting dopamine in the brain. I'm sort of a little confused about this idea of dopamine fasting because you can get pleasure from a lot of different things some of the examples that you gave her obvious things that you give pleasure. You know pleasurable eating sex. We understand those even even a technology fast okay. Technology makes Gabe very very very happy. But you know beating my. GPS makes me happy petting. My dog makes aches me. Happy the workday ending and me walking in the front door knowing that the next several hours our mind to do with as I please those things make me a happy so even if dopamine fasting worked. I'm not quite sure what that would look like. Because don't we get joy from just many different places. Yeah and it speaks to a fundamental misunderstanding of what dopamine is that it's involved in so much more than pleasure. It's involved in both things things surrounding our appetite and eating behaviors as well as stress responses. So it seems to be a signal that's released whenever the an organism needs needs to pay attention and learn about stimuli or signals or other things happening in the environment around them in that way. Dopey looney is far more complex than most people understand it to be and so it's not just about. Oh here's a hamburger. So next time I hey I need to remember. It's sight and smell and taste so next time I I'm hungry I can remember like hey I can hamburger and that will satisfy my need it for to satisfy my appetite but another example is here's a bear so I must remember where I saw this bear so I don't go into the bears territory again the future so I can avoid it and not getting by a bear. I like all examples that have to do with not being eaten by a a bear. I just feel the need to say that Dr Grow Hall. We take it for granted that we live in this civilized world where we drive around and automobiles us and we eat a pre prepared food items from McDonalds Burger King or whatnot and we forget that our bodies and our brains things were developed and spent most of the time being raised in a very very different environment environment where it was fight or flight where you need to worry about where your next meal is coming from. And you need to worry about whether you're going to eat or be eaten. It's only in the past hundred hundred or two hundred years or so where you can say. Oh humans have had a whole heck of a lot more free time to worry about things other than where their the next meal is coming from. What's interesting to me? Is that people believe this because the brain is very very advanced and it's so advanced that you Dr Grow Hall who have an advanced Vance degree in psychology had to find somebody who had you know a more advanced degree in the brain to understand this but the core of this for people to believe this is true. They have to believe that the brain is exceptionally simple and most people don't believe that the brain is exceptionally simple. Why do so you think that people believe that this works? What are they hoping to get out of it? I think there's desire and many people to find something to try. I something that they haven't tried before. That will help fix a lot of the issues that are most important to them on a day to a day basis and today the issue that arises in many people's life is a feeling of being overwhelmed a feeling of being stressed out out and having to reply to all these alerts and notifications that are always bombarding us in our free time or downtime our our time away from work and so this idea that Oh i could just take a break a dopamine fast for twenty four hours Al Comeback and I'll be all refreshed Rushton renewed and my brain will have reset. Its neurotransmitters is very appealing. Because it says hey you need to make a twenty four hour commitment in everything is going to go back to the way. It was five years ago so for people who enjoy thinking that there are quick fixes to long standing difficult difficult issues in a person's life this is very attractive.

Dopamine Dr Grow Hall Dr John Grow Hall Gabe Researcher Founder Carleton University Mcdonalds Editor In Chief Canada Professor Kim Helman Cocaine Looney Rushton Vance
U.S. prosecutors seek information on payments to Trump lawyer Giuliani

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

04:25 min | 1 year ago

U.S. prosecutors seek information on payments to Trump lawyer Giuliani

"Also these criminal cases that are proceeding alongside and in parallel with the impeachment proceedings on Capitol Hill Right and today alongside this Clarion Rian rule of law decision from Judge Jackson in the DC circuit and DC District Court. Today also those criminal cases produce some sort of bonkers headlines including for the man who is apparently still president. Trump's lawyer because Rudy Giuliani is definitely who you would go to for legal legal advice and who you think. The president of the United States should be consulting for his wise advice and guidance. On legal matters at this point Guiliani apparently still the president's lawyer. Keep that in mind when you see the headlines. Today about Mr Giuliani Wall Street Journal was first to have this story today. Federal Subpoenas seek information on Guiliani Lianis consulting business again. These are not subpoenas by Congress in this case. These are subpoenas by a federal grand jury working with federal prosecutors in the Southern District of New York that Federal Prosecutors Office in the Southern District of New York at one point was led by. You Rudy. Giuliani when he was. US Attorney in New York Times have changed. So has Israeli Giuliani now. He's under investigation under what appears to be a serious criminal investigation by the office. He used to lead. As I mentioned the Wall Street Journal was was first to report. This story quickly followed by the Washington Post and CNN and several other outlets ultimately it was Reuters reporter Aaron Rawson who was first to report some of the actual taxed next of these subpoenas that have reportedly been delivered to multiple people associated Guiliani in recent days and weeks. According to Rushton's reporting quote the subpoena requests that recipient provide all documents including correspondence with or related to Rudolph Giuliani Giuliani partners or any related person or entity. See Giuliani partners is Giuliani's consulting company. But the subpoena also seeks documents related to any actual or potential payments or agreements. To or with Giuliani. So if Rustam is right about that being the specific language that's on these subpoenas that have been going out to multiple people in recent days and weeks. There's no doubt that this is not just about people who Rudy Giuliani new. This is about Rudy Giuliani and his firm and money paid to him or promise is to him through his firm. This appears to be a serious active criminal investigation into the president's personal lawyer. One of the president's personal lawyers is is already currently serving a federal prison term. Right now this this would be his current personal attorney who's not currently incarcerated. But how many more of them were. They're going to be in. How many more of them are going to go through this? I mean also. I don't know whether this is a standard thing or not when it comes to subpoenas but the Wall Street Journal and several other outlets that followed all of their reporting today say that one of the striking things about these new subpoenas that have been going out in the Guiliani case in recent days and weeks is not only that they're asking for all of this information very specifically about rudy. Giuliani the president's lawyer. But the subpoenas apparently are also describing which crimes are under consideration by prosecutors in this case again. I don't know if this is normal for a subpoena but according to the Wall Street Journal these subpoenas reportedly list more than half a dozen potential charges is under consideration including obstruction of justice money laundering conspiracy to defraud the United States of America making false statements to the federal government serving as an agent of a foreign foreign government without registering with the Justice Department donating funds from foreign nationals making contributions in the name of another person or allowing someone else to use one's name to make a contribution and plus mail fraud plus wire fried anything else. These grand jury subpoenas not only mentioned Giuliani himself and his consulting firm farm. There are also reportedly asking materials related to America First Action which is the officially endorsed Republican Super Pac that is the chief fundraising entity in support of president president trump's reelection so the president's lawyer the one who's not in prison one who's not in prison is now apparently currently the subject of this serious criminal investigation and the main funding entity the main SUPERPAC associated with the president's reelection. Effort is also the subject of these subpoenas from a federal the grand jury involved in an active criminal investigation in the southern district of New York. Oh so that's not

Rudy Giuliani Rudolph Giuliani Giuliani President Trump Mr Giuliani Wall Street Journal Giuliani Federal Prosecutors Office Guiliani New York United States Donald Trump Dc District Court Guiliani Lianis New York Times Congress Judge Jackson Us Attorney Washington Post
Ruston, Louisiana tornado kills mother and son

Biz 1190 Overnight featuring Bloomberg Radio

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

Ruston, Louisiana tornado kills mother and son

"A tornado killed two people as tore through the northern Louisiana city of Rushton early Thursday, sending trees into houses, ripping roofs off buildings and generally causing local public university to cancel classes tornado was part of a thunderstorm that left a trail of damage from eastern Texas, northern Louisiana Rushton a city of about twenty four thousand appear to get the

Rushton Texas Louisiana Rushton Louisiana
"rushton" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"rushton" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"You have to find ballots and you have to focus on the team. And it's better to have the whole team. It's better to have twenty people that move a little bit in the right direction. Then have one person by himself. That's going right. Rushton everyone going the wrong direction. So that's what you need to take the sandbag out of your rucksack. And ran with jungle boots. I did all this stuff. And it didn't take me very long to realize. I was not doing the right thing. Not making my team stronger. I was isolating myself and stopped it. So this guy he should like start acting just a little bit salty. Or? Lower his morale appearance a little bit like kind of fit in so to speak. Do you want to be part of the team? If you're not part of the team, you don't have any influence if you don't have any influence, you can't move the team in the right direction. If you can't move the team in the right direction that team is less mission capable. That's what you're there for just to make the team more mission capable every moment that you don't do that. You're doing something wrong. So yes, you don't have to show up. I mean, just imagine a new guy it's team on people we show up to run. The course the courses the obstacle courses, really hard. Obstacle course. And I show up with a rucksack on with a forty pound sandbag as a new guy. Of course, people like it's fired up, but people like, okay. Oh, you're you're you're nineteen years old. And you just gotta buds whatever makes we don't like you. So. Steering like a big van, right? You can't district making big turns with the big otherwise things. Tip over little bit seem saying no, you got to like get if you gotta gotta go slow as saying, okay? You understand? Anyway, next question here..

Rushton nineteen years forty pound
"rushton" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"rushton" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"You have to find ballots and you have to focus on the team. And it's better to have the whole team. It's better to have twenty people that move a little bit in the right direction. Then have one person by himself. That's going right. Rushton everyone going the wrong direction. So that's what you need to take the sandbag out of your rucksack. And I ran with jungle boots. I did all this stuff. And it didn't take me very long to realize. I was not doing the right thing. Not making my team stronger. I was isolating myself and stopped it. So this guy he should like start acting just a little bit salty. Or? Lower his morale appearance a little bit like kind of fit in so to speak. Do you want to be part of the team? If you're not part of the team, you don't have any influence if you don't have any influence, you can't move the team in the right direction. If you can't move the team in the right direction that team is less mission capable. That's what you're there for just to make the team more mission capable every moment that you don't do that. You're doing something wrong. So yes, you don't have to show up. I mean, just imagine a new guy it's team on people we show up to run. The course the courses the obstacle courses, really hard. Obstacle course. And I show up with a rucksack on with a forty pound sandbag. As a new guy. Of course, people like it's fired up, but people are like, okay. Oh, you're you're you're nineteen years old. And you just gotta buds whatever makes we don't like you. So. Steering like a big van, right? You can't district making big turns with the big otherwise things. Tip over little bit seem saying no, you got to like get if you gotta gotta go slow as saying, okay? You understand? Anyway, next question here..

Rushton nineteen years forty pound
"rushton" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"rushton" Discussed on KCRW

"Floating bridge would replace the ferry cutting travel time across the fewer from forty minutes to five making it easier to attract investment here where the population has fallen by about half over the past century to twenty eight hundred and making it easier for the region's fishing industry to get it Salmond market. It's the saying that there's no thing in the world that is in bigger Rushton, a dead fish. We need to give us a fresh Lamy's. And I worked for the region public road administration. Minaret he's an Italian engineer. She came from Milan just to work on this project because it was so challenging mineralogy says in parts of Norway's, west coast conventional cable, stayed bridges and tunnels won't work. Because some of these fjords are really really deep. We have secured that right? One kilometre deep that is too much one potential solution build something, no one ever has submerged floating traffic tunnel minaret. He says it could be made of concrete to provide balanced and float one hundred feet or so below the surface. It could be fastened to floating pontoons or tethered to the seabed when I started working with this type of structure, I've felt really excited. Like, wow. This is something that you can be an engineer live your life without hadn't this chance. So it's really unique. Of course, there are dangers Norwegian submarines training the fjords. So there's the risk of collision a terrorist bomb could rip open the tunnel. Ending water pouring in which is why the Norwegian government is working carefully on designs today via Gardena is simulating the effects of a bomb blast using compressed air inside a steel tube Hoon as an associate professor at the Norwegian university of science and technology in the city of Trondheim the pressure regenerate today, a similar to Rico born April device of eight hundred kilos of explosives at the age of thirty meters..

engineer Floating bridge Norwegian university of scienc Norwegian government Rushton Salmond Milan Trondheim Norway associate professor Gardena Rico eight hundred kilos one hundred feet One kilometre forty minutes thirty meters
"rushton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"rushton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We're just about to come into the dark. Call Martin club greets me at the water's edge. He's the mayor of TIs nece a collection of islands, and you can't wait for floating bridge. The ferry is a beautiful, but it's more an obstacle than a good connection a floating bridge would replace the ferry cutting travel time across the few word from forty minutes to five making it easier to attract investment here where the population has fallen by about half over the past century to twenty eight hundred and making it easier for the region's fishing industry to get it to market. It's the saying that there's nothing in the world that is in a bigger Rushton a dead fish. We need to give her fresh. My name is. And I worked for the region public road administration. Minaret he's an Italian engineer came from Milan just to work on this project because it was so challenging minaret. He says in parts of Norway's, west coast conventional cable, stayed bridges and tunnels won't work. Because some of these fjords are really really deep. We have secured that right? One kilometre deep that is too much one potential solution build something, no one ever has submerged floating traffic tunnel minaret. He says it could be made of concrete to provide balanced and flow one hundred feet or so below the surface could be fastened to floating pontoons or tethered to the seabed when have started working with this type of structure, I've felt really excited. Like, wow. This is something that you can be an engineer live your life without having this chance. So it's really unique. Of course, there are dangers Norwegian submarines training, the fjord. So there's the risk of collision a terrorist bomb could rip open the tunnel. Sending water pouring in which is why the Norwegian government is working carefully on designs today via Gardena is simulating the effects of a bomb blast using compressed air inside a steel tube. Hoon is an associate professor at the Norwegian university of science and technology in the city of Toronto. The pressure generate today is similar to our legal born April. Device of eight hundred kilos of explosives at the distance of thirty meters. The purpose of this bold transportation project is to replace the fairies and slash travel time. But many people.

engineer Martin club Norwegian government Norwegian university of scienc Milan Norway Hoon Gardena Toronto associate professor eight hundred kilos one hundred feet One kilometre forty minutes thirty meters
"rushton" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"rushton" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"For for light sport aircraft that are designated experimental. And I don't know that this is going to help out on some of the larger aircraft that our experimental that people might want to be able to rent and get flights Rushton. But certainly it's a start which was good. So let me try to understand this because I was kind of confused. So currently you cannot does this correct. You cannot charge. Someone for flight instruction for what an experimental or a light sport aircraft or. Both. Well, let's see. So they're different kinds of light sport aircraft. The ones that are certificates for sure those can be great a rented. And you can you know by flight instruction in them. And so on I think we're talking here about experimental elyssa, and I have to admit, I don't know the the differences between that and the certificate at once. But for sure for those in the past you haven't been able to, you know, make them visible for rent. And so you would be able to get flight instruction in those and less. It was a personal one the owned, and then I think you can have an instructor. You know, teach you in it. I'm not familiar with all the nuances. I just know that they it's not as clean a picture as it is was for ticket aircraft like Cessna's piper services. So that's interesting. So I it is a way to look at it that, you know, we have this category of of aircraft light sport aircraft, but also experimental. So I mean, I think we're talking about amateur built aircraft. And so by regulation, you can't rent them. And because you can't rent them. You can't get instruction in one unless it's unless it's yours. I think that's correct in. That's been a real problem for people who are building airplanes drink to fly them before. There's you know is finished in the I think that there may be ways that the industry has tried to work around it. But it, but I don't think it's been been real clean. So of course, the EA is very excited about this. In fact, the the government relations director says that quote, the successful publication of this rule in the accompanying policy. Change will create new opportunities in ultralight and sport pilot.

Rushton Cessna director instructor
J Brown - Yoga, Healing and Wholeness

The Flow Artists Podcast

03:23 min | 3 years ago

J Brown - Yoga, Healing and Wholeness

Lorraine Rushton Lorraine Mike JAY Sania Facebook Youtube Sydney DAN
"rushton" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"rushton" Discussed on Freakonomics

"My name is Steven dubner. Our fact checker tonight is berry wasted. My co host is John mcwhirter before we get back to the game, we have some lightning round is questions written, especially for John. You ready? I think I'm ready. Let's just do a quick Visser that round with you, John. Okay. English or friend? Oh. French doesn't like me because it's something I wrote about four years ago where I had said that children in the United States should not be taught French because we think of it as a kind of a middle class class marker. And that really given that we're all surrounded by people who are bilingual in English and Spanish. Wouldn't you rather learn that people actually speak? And I got all this hate mail, so English or French? I'm sorry, I can't say eating up all the world's languages. And so because I don't want to say English, although thank God, I speak it French. Well, all right. Well, as reluctant is that vote was, I can't wait to hear the answer to this one French or Russian, Russian. Oh, God, love wrestling today. Rushton is so hard. I don't believe anybody really speaks it. It's beautiful, and I also enjoy the literature, Russian harder than Hungarian. Russian is infinitely harder than Hungarian Hungarians kind of hard. Russian is just bizarre if infinitely harder, doesn't that mean that you can't learn it? Yes, here's a slightly different this or that bigly or big league. Big-league because he never said bigly. I would kind of like if you would saying bigly. Right? Because it would have popularized this new use of bigly and I like it when language change? Yes, one, these are fun. Is there another one. More for each on. So this is a big one to not split the infinitive or to split with no regrets. Oh, for the bad is just got to go. You can't let the infant if so to boldly go, we're gone before how improperly phrased. It should be to go boldly where that no, somebody just made that up. And that person said, you can't split the infinitive because he can't split an infinitive in Latin because Latin, the infinitive is one effing word. So you can't split it because you can't split a word. It's like trying to cut a cat in half. And so this person. Well, you can't split in in English because English is supposed to be like Latin, he's dead. And here we are just let it go, split your infinitives and enjoy it. Please..

John mcwhirter Rushton Steven dubner wrestling Visser United States four years
"rushton" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

The Wellness Business Podcast

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"rushton" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

"I was listening to a bunch of your podcast one right after the other and happened upon the one that you podcast that you did with Elissa Rushton about getting getting in front of people and how to do that, and she made it so clear in your interview with her was so compelling. Just use the seven step signature top formula. And it really made me feel hopeful that I could overcome my fears and talk to a larger group. I felt I felt there was a lot of promise in that that if I could get in front of people that were coming to actually hear whatever it was, I had to say that they were a lot more. There were a lot farther in their journey wanting to learn something helpful when I was basically cold calling, I guess you would call it. I just felt like people weren't really ripe enough to hear my message in weren't really far enough down that path. But with this. This made it easy may easy made it easy for me to look at this formula. Follow the steps and decide that I could do this. I could get in front of people that were interested and became excited about it because probably had never really been in that situation where I had a group of people that really wanted to hear my message. So I, I thought I'm going to try to give this a shot all my gosh. I love that. I did too, and it's one thing right when you're at a party in health habit comes up, new start handing people card like you were doing before. It's a completely other thing when you actually are leading a workshop, people are coming for whatever topic you've promised them. It is a very specific situation where they know they're coming to hear you. They know they're going to learn from you. You are taking that leadership role and you are embracing it in your business and for those of you that haven't yet listened to that apple sewed that sandy is referring. You that's up thirty six will link it up in the show notes. That was our interview with Elissa Rushton the exact formula to get clients from every talk you give. And obviously that inspired UCLA, which I'm so thrilled. It's definitely one of the things that Kathleen and I love to hear after we do a podcast episode that.

Elissa Rushton UCLA Kathleen apple sandy
Cops: Hartford officer stabbed in neck, critically injured by woman being evicted

World News Tonight with David Muir

01:43 min | 3 years ago

Cops: Hartford officer stabbed in neck, critically injured by woman being evicted

"From connecticut tonight a police officer is fighting for her life at this hour after being stabbed in the neck while answering a call she is alive tonight because to nearby workers fought off the attacker who lunged at her here's abc's gio benitez tonight a twelve year veteran of the hartford police department is fighting for her life after being stabbed in the neck responding to a landlord tenant dispute her colleagues desperately trying to get her help standing in the world all right that emergency room mate that we'll be escorts police say the officer arrived alone this morning at the apartment and tried handcuffing the woman being victim who wouldn't leave that's when police say a fight broke out and that the woman brought out a knife and stabbed the officer in the neck to maintenance workers in the apartment building heard the struggle rushton and pulled the woman off the officer who is now in critical but stable condition the woman has been charged with tempted murder a tough day we'll get through it we'll get roy david police say those two maintenance workers are heroes playing a critical role in disarming the suspect who is now in custody david jude thank you there is news tonight after that package exploding building in california killing a woman when she opened that package the blast also injuring three other people and forcing the evacuation you remember of dozens of children from that nearby daycare tonight a person close to the woman killed is now under arrest but not yet being charged in that bombing here's abc's qena whitworth with discovery.

Officer ABC Gio Benitez Hartford Police Department Rushton Murder David Jude California Connecticut Roy David Twelve Year
"rushton" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"rushton" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Where they we we some as soon as they can start the room in which no car cash too for the open the perfume mccarthy threaten alumi aware of percents to just up to some was once a target for they son had probably been the plume of smoke compound materials from where with cloudy onto the truth of the rushton krugel thought they can stop another ended the party and.

rushton krugel mccarthy
"rushton" Discussed on Katie Couric

Katie Couric

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"rushton" Discussed on Katie Couric

"Yeah so just once like rushton lily is her communications director lily atoms my daughter just priority for no and i mean it's a real real honor to work for kamla look i would say that senator harris i think that the important thing about hillary running was that it's it was hard it was know there was a double standard there probably always will be but it's going to be easier for the next woman who runs so i absolutely think a woman is electable in this country but it's gonna just keep trying and trying and trying as we always say progressives you lose you lose you lose and then you win and when you to it's huge so it just means you have to keep trying i was wondering if how much clinton fatigue also fed into the thing with hillary you know because sometimes i think yes very sexist gender hurt her in many ways but i also feel like people i don't people were tired of the clintons a little bit weren't they well i just think look there's always going to be a reason why you know there's no no one's per no one's a perfect candidate and i've i have worked in tried to help elect many imperfect male candidates so i think somehow we always think women have to i mean this would mother would say you know we're expected to be perfect in every single way and so again i think there are many women in the field now women who are in office women who are business leaders i think there are a lot of women who would make a great president and i think a lot of women are looking around looking at who's an office and saying i do a better job than the guy who's in their cecile richards the name of the book is make trouble standing up speaking out and finding the courage to lead right on system.

rushton lily director senator harris hillary clintons president clinton
"rushton" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"rushton" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"Yeah i imagine is and we'll hear about that so i'm very excited have him on we delivered for you guys i'm going to throw it a correction to episodes ago i mentioned that wild bill who was portrayed in band of brothers william jay near died and run implanted out that yes i i made the rookie mistake of not checking the date of the article so i thought that it was marci of twenty eighteen it was march eighth twenty fourteen i fucked up total rookie mistake rushton piece of course to bill on the anniversary of that but i always liked always planet out if i screw something up your fake news ian yeah i i was was fake so my my fault guys i will not do that in the future and i'm usually not do like that happens it happens but you know we still got to talk about you know our world war two vets so there's there's a silver lining in there that's true for sure not much else to get into i know that the union bomber story happening in texas right now bomber two point oh it's not literally the unibond yes not ted kaczynski us in prison but something's going on for i wouldn't be surprised if they wanna speak to ted kaczynski is like to to get some ideas on what goes into the mind of someone like this and maybe figure out what's happening we're we're up to what is it like the third or fourth parcel bomb now i mean yeah it's creepy all this going on down in texas and i haven't been on top of the story as much as i'd like to be because i've been committed some other areas but got have a writer's paying attention to it and you know we'll follow those developed.

texas ted kaczynski writer william jay rushton
"rushton" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

The Wellness Business Podcast

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"rushton" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

"Okay hold on a minute 'cause i wanna go opt in for that right now i on a happy event freely lightly as a key has new now a building i will be getting my hands on that i can guarantee that well luckily you know me all centreright ever to you personnel tach i love it i love it a note today were going to cover the top five ways to use social media for your business i'll tell you the five strategies i think this is probably the best way to approach it will talk about the five strategies and then we're gonna tackle each one in detail so number one is visibility getting known and connecting with influencers right number two is provide value to drop people in to learn more and see you as a trusted resource so showing up we talked about this in the last episode with alissa rushton right where consistency showing up that is how you build that trust number three as grow your email lest bring people off from social media to become email subscribers number four engage people can act with other people right think of social media as like your neighborhood this is where you're connecting with people having conversations and it's intended to be social right and often we forget about that because we're so focused on it being a marketing to all that we lose this social aspect of social media and lastly number five is promote you are paid programs and services on occasion we're going to give you a really good strategy on thus and you have to remember though that social media as should not be your main focus for promotion because you want to focus more on the first four strategies that i just outlined and then the rest will fall into place versus important to know your nation and tune in to what they want to know about so you can share content they'll appreciate right and share we want wanna make sure that what were sharing with them is also content laid like to share with others.

alissa rushton
"rushton" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

The Wellness Business Podcast

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"rushton" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

"Welcome to the wellness business podcast simple strategies to cut through the online noise to fasttrack the growth of new wellness business with karen paddock and kathleen legris hey everyone welcome to another episode of the wellness business podcast we are excited to be here with each and every one of you hey kathleen pitcairn how are you doing so good i just got back from a trip to mexico which was amazing seven days away with my hobby for our 20th wedding anniversary and we had a great time totally unplugged was amazing i was so happy for you like oh my gosh amazing and now i know now it's like back to reality darnet orderly packed reality i was just telling you i'm still trying to get caught up on email so i think we all know how that goes yes yes yes yes well hey we are excited we have a very special guest with us today she is known as the six and sevenfigure women's voice igniter elissa rushton is a master certified public speaking instructor and high end sales coach who teaches hearts centered entrepreneurs how to craft package and promote their authentic a weekend message and shine there late so they can share their unique message with the world elicits clients and students go on to do great things like quickly make six figures published books speak on ted stages become featured expert on the news and more a list so rushed in a welcome to the podcast.

elissa rushton instructor karen paddock kathleen legris kathleen pitcairn mexico seven days
"rushton" Discussed on The Awkward Human Survival Guide

The Awkward Human Survival Guide

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"rushton" Discussed on The Awkward Human Survival Guide

"So i don't know what the deal is it's like eight it's ed i mean like a i think it's obviously learned just kinda wanna be told explicitly like yes i want to have sex with you in not a nuisance to me because sometimes it as a matter of times where like i don't feel like having sex where you've asked and i'm like i think we should do it the next day because we have zoom but admire something uh and it's him rushton want to rush so like i think i've turned you down more than you've turn me down on but or racial say rescheduled things three scholarships we've rescheduled ex hey when you've been together for a very long time you got to seal the deal on some terms so it's it's like it is what it is it's like is that a is on no you're not offended because you don't care out any of that end and like i don't ever feel like you're trying to deny it i think a couple of times you've said like i don't feel so good may now let's do it another day which is a big deal but it's it's that sort of thing i think it to bring this back to the point i think it it it's what these are all the sorts of things where it's like this makes me feel weird for some reason i just need in or want some assurance that it's not even always an insecurity its i'd like one ideal cared for so it's like if not necessarily that i mean i like if that maybe this girl issia gelt slightly jaws maybe there's us upon but i think if the idea of like if you're like hey you're highlights save person who makes like everything coal you're doing something that's kind of not making me feel that way you want under does not do that no it's like for you if it's just like morning to make sure that like the sexes one hundred percent good you don't wanna feel weird abbada for her is like i don't wanna feel weird because you're looking out of the people i don't really care what you're thinking just.

rushton one hundred percent
"rushton" Discussed on We Can Talk About

We Can Talk About

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"rushton" Discussed on We Can Talk About

"Um episode wrote i say global warming more often heard and i've also said crisis of climate change a couple times and i get a little couple were looks r r us other but i i try to stick with global warming every time instead of climate change carson so it's changed the way that i've changed that frame and it so it's changed it a little bit for me but has early change anything at a macro level i'm only really affecting the people that i'm talking to when i use the words global warming so and then the users who are on no but he is it hopefully sure but but i am learning about how i need to change my framers when i share the words global warming with those two people i'm not also preaching that they should by the way you should also say womb global warming philby was rerun members so with taxes first of all know he wants to talk about taxes because taxes they're boring i mean we're doing a whole podcasts about them words but they're still boring i they're not sexy there's no tax man mud sexy in fact the tax man is a negative connotation so girl he's negative connotations around taxes what would you say is like how do you change the frame by he i understand that you're saying make it attacks investment so how do you do how you change that frame i think the first thing so let's go over would taxes rushton greatness in the future in the public good.

carson rushton
"rushton" Discussed on Counting Countries

Counting Countries

02:06 min | 4 years ago

"rushton" Discussed on Counting Countries

"Bacon the door 1 closed a look quite soak i saw it in was closed because then made sure it is closed and he wasn't so he's charge installed a new room i with you will shorter than me i'm i'm quite tollway yet i was creaming an end way too yeah i don't know into fifth at didn't boxing with a with a fist yet because i think that too bad but i gave him a with lie hadn't slept him as leptin midnight in the wake him but let him and the guy my hand to hurt and i was screaming so much and also open the door and then he went went again over the over the bacon the identity of what he wanted i think he was good drunk last night trump from drinking well that was a memorable granted we still i can't laugh at it while yeah we stick turn don't well do you bring that to management attention after yet and i realized they had the lead to the names of the paper so they didn't know who was next you they knew was next to me but they make sure i wouldn't couldn't find out that couldn't see it in the book did you swick hotels her rooms yes which twitter that was the any way in the wrong hotel i was the or do originally someone recommended to two meal hotel which a hidden found in as though there can stay in this hotel imam waited being this change hotel at didn't didn't look like it to me but the it was kind of strange yeah and i of course statehood me screaming i think they went joe so they came to the door or something and by the problem was the language language problem i i spoke a little bit rushton but not really good enough to take a big boss there so i just a lame they knew what happened and let us left while i hope you give them onestar adviser who.

twitter joe rushton
"rushton" Discussed on The Myth Of The 20th Century

The Myth Of The 20th Century

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"rushton" Discussed on The Myth Of The 20th Century

"Muster muster your way and that's the uh i i think that's the roots of the younger black lives matter thing like trying to find some sort of antiblack racism uh regardless of how desperate attempt ends up being or the the gender stuff that they just need to have as you say a permanent revolution and so what slashed while what's stand up for trannies yes meaning of those are perfect targets because irs problems with no solution by the end up being i think they're they've got to be less satisfying uh than let's say going after uh i don't know who was the um h review researcher out of out of was it one of the canadian universities on not to reach wine which one no this is back in the eighties '90s what's he's got a french surname i can't believe i kept members name a russian yes john philippe rushton believe brochure knew what he was a great he was a great target to go after because he's just dogs so so evil but a now we're we're we're just trying to find the few transsexuals who may or may not be a being abused yeah beat beat d just can't handle it they can't handle being establishment it doesn't build here you're talking you talk about catharsis i mean we're if you're imagine yourself as a leftist where would you go to to get your revolution arches where would this black lives matter even gonna cut afria uh and i think i think and i kind of hope actually in kind of a perverse way that what will happen is that there are about to run up against the chinese at that are about to run up against an asian takeover of many universities loan already well underway i think it soon.

researcher john philippe rushton irs