23 Burst results for "Rumi"

Pilgrimage to Sacred Activism

Hay House Meditations

05:40 min | 3 d ago

Pilgrimage to Sacred Activism

"Hi Andrew and welcome on to the hey house meditations podcast how wonderful to be with you and how wonderful to have the opportunity to speak to whoever's listening from my heart. Out wonderful wonderful. I'd like to talk to you today about the Fifteenth Century Poet Mystic Kabeer. Who you've been doing so much work on and and perhaps have you read a few of his lines. That articulate a meditative experience that is at once transcendent but also completely grounded I really appreciate that in computer But before we get there, there's a pilgrimage that I like to ask you to take us on a pilgrimage to the ark of of your own spiritual journey. An ARC that is has taken pauses with a variety of traditions, teachers, and Gurus and especially that are of the internal pilgrimage of the heart. So I wonder if you'd take us on that pilgrimage and then we'll sort of maybe conclude with Kabira. Does that sound all right with you? That sounds wonderful. Today and your little remission it it's. Never ends. I remember when I was with father bid when he was dying and. The thing that struck me most and move me most about him here. He was the greatest living Christian mystic but even on his deathbed when he was eighty seven, he was still striving for deeper and deeper realize. So he gave me a permanent image of what this really is journey of endless expansion. Shems of Tabriz said to Rumi. The world of God is wealth of endless expansion. We don't ever arrive. We just go Diba and DEEPA and Deepa went blasted where wild enough were brave enough into a mystery that always keeps opening onto wilder and holy vistas. This is my experience. Yes, and you're well I must say your your life has demonstrated that but I'm not exactly certain if you knew that when you were born. In mother India right you are. You're born in south India early in your life. You earlier in life you're surrounded by multiple religious by religious face including your your parents Protestant faith. And among the Hindus and Muslims. So how did that early on your life? How did that shape your outlook on the nature of humans on the nature of people and the nature of the divine? India is too big bomb in a well the distill known that live as cred experience. And that mock me forever I feel that I have an Indian. So a European mind and an American mission. So my deepest deepest ground is always in there especially in south India. When I was born. Nineteen fifty two was the twilight of the Rosh. So this. Was the atmosphere of an. Empire would still. Diffused itself through everything but India itself although it had been dominated by the British in never lost its passionate spirituality and that's what I met in the earliest and most impressionable years of my life. I loved going to temples with my Hindu coke. I loved learning the hail. Mary from my Catholic nanny and I loved it when the driver that we had to as a Muslim stopped the car in the middle of traffic and put his. Prem Don and chunk to Allah. In very early on. I met a saint and this is an extraordinary story because I had white Russian. Godmother. who used to smoke cigarettes out of black along black cigarette holder in Lyon dressed in gold she fall she looked like a Russian Melena dietrich and I was crazy about her she's. and. Every day off to school I would go running up the stairs of her flag. And jumped into bed between her and have great friend who is huge Rowley poterie Indian woman Shanti. Of course as a child I didn't know. Shanti Shanti, later revealed to me it was India's greatest living Quila and she is the child had been. A welcome to previous incarnation and a gunman, a group of journalists to the village that she'd been born in. As, a nine year old recognized absolutely everybody and Meta previous husband and said the money looking for is under a break in the back. So he went and found the money that he'd been looking for. Any. gave. Me a lot of profound simple instruction. She told me two things that have not my whole life. She said God is one. God is the sea and all religions alike rivers that run into the sea. So. Don't get hung up on anyone religion realized that they're all different expressions of the same unity, the different expressions of the same reality

India Shanti Shanti Andrew Tabriz Deepa Kabira Prem Don Melena Dietrich Mary Lyon Quila
"rumi" Discussed on The Alchemical Mind

The Alchemical Mind

04:38 min | 2 months ago

"rumi" Discussed on The Alchemical Mind

"Because it's it's so deeply ingrained in my head. That I can recollect exactly what happened even a year later year plus later. But I remember the next day I talked to my wife. And I think she said to me it was. It was early in the morning. She started telling me about this problem with work. And I was still kind of in this in this days for my experience. and. Said, you know it's fine. Everything is magic. She thought I was the craziest person ever. To say that everything is magic, now remember. We've been married a little over seven years guy. Has Seen me kind of go through some of the transformations that have gone through as a result of some of the experiences. But never had she heard me say something like that and she had no idea how to reply. But this is what it's saying here. All need to do is listen. Right except that, you have both light and dark. And you will be sitting under the tree of all. You realize so many things when you do this about the world that you you thought word possible. But of course they are. If you truly understand. I think that this poem is absolutely fantastic, really powerful for for just a few lines. Now the next two poems are really interesting. They dive a little bit deeper into the fear aspect that will be diving into in a couple of weeks on the PODCAST. So. I definitely want to talk about these. The I was called the uses of fear. Some of these metaphors might be a little antiquated right because. You. We have machines that do things for us right there back the reforming and all that stuff, so keep that in mind whenever you you read some of these ancient texts. That the metaphors might be even a little more off for were at the time, right? The metaphors might have been a little clearer than. But it starts off. A donkey turning millstone is not trying to press oil from sesame seed. He's fleeing the blow that was struck and hoping to avoid the next. We look to pain and keep the civilization moving.

"rumi" Discussed on The Alchemical Mind

The Alchemical Mind

05:08 min | 2 months ago

"rumi" Discussed on The Alchemical Mind

"You can open yourself up into the light. I don't like using some of these terms because they have so much baggage. But you can open yourself to to the night tilt light. If you, don't I witness the darkness right? This is a core aspect of like not dual teachings with the teachings. You can look at the Yang Symbol for example is a perfect example of this. And I picked up. Because I'm sure everyone. Regardless of what faith you're on has at least seen Yin. Yang symbol right? You know what this is. You have these two shapes that kind of looked like tear drops. kind of melting into each other one have is black, symbolizing the darkness when have is white symbolizing the light. And you can have the whole. Without having both the darkness, and the light together. Not, just that, but within the light part of the Yin Yang Symbol. You have the black dot. In aspect of darkness within the light. And within the dark side, you have a white dot. Because you have a little bit of light inside the darkness. And this is really a fascinating topic. That I, want to dive into some day I don't know when but I I will definitely be diving into this aspect of light and darkness. And it won't be during darkness the soul by the way although I'm sure expanded on it then. It's fascinating, because think about the implications of this within the world as a whole right. Think about this within the world as a whole. They remember Rumi says you must have shadow in light source both. A lot of times within. Esoteric circles you hear certain things right like let the light flow in the. Right turn the negative into positive. To new fear into happiness. Your hatred into love, but in why does it have to be this way? Why do we only need to have these positive aspects? This is not what makes us human. If we are to believe that we are divine beings and I believe we are. Then, we cannot be solely goodness. Goodness wouldn't have all the the hatred and war and famine and craziest goes on in the world. If, that were the case. We have to have both..

Rumi
"rumi" Discussed on The Alchemical Mind

The Alchemical Mind

05:13 min | 2 months ago

"rumi" Discussed on The Alchemical Mind

"The course really dealt with some of the major religions, so that was very much on legs, Zoroastrianism or the chain or anything like that, but it was a good introduction for me, and this is when I found out about roomy. We actually had to read the essential Rumi as part of the course. And one of the first things that really struck me. roomies words was. Mean they are poems in general are not very long. There are some longer ones, but in general. They're fairly short. Maybe, a dozen or two dozen lines tops. You nothing find many that are just a couple lines, three or four lines long. But the the quote that really got to me when I was reading this. Was Do, not feel lonely. The Entire Universe is inside gym. And I wanted to start this episode with this quote. Because if you ever follow any of the other mystical traditions from really any other tradition Christianity into his anything. Often hear the same kind of words. I find that very interesting and somewhat exciting. Because for the most part, organized religion is not created to. Actually advance your knowledge of who you are, and what relationship to whatever the by a divine being is in the sky or inside. You are around you. It is Kinda become a method of? Control within society. And I use the word control very loosely right? This is not some David Eick. Reptilians are taking over society or you know. The illuminated guiding US within the shadows. None of that. Mean there is maybe a little bit of an aspect to that right. There are certain things within organized religion that is meant to kind of. Keep people at ease at peace and continuing to contribute to the society around them. And well, that's all well and good. Maybe need some form of moral stance to take in a world where maybe we have no idea how to face it. At least I think until you get to a certain. LEVEL OF CONSCIOUS DEVELOPMENT In which case no.

US Rumi Zoroastrianism David Eick
"rumi" Discussed on CXMH

CXMH

12:35 min | 2 months ago

"rumi" Discussed on CXMH

"Holly Oxygen Learn News a social worker in an associate dean professor associate dean garbage. Well it's Friday Holly. How are you doing today? I must have your title. Can you correct me? You're great I'm doing alright. I'm doing okay robber. It is yes the title is that I am the Associate Dean for research. In Faculty development at the Garland School. Social work at Baylor. University has asked see too many words. I know it's hard not got the I got the court of You. Did you got you've earned as will thank you. How are you doing on this Friday recording? I'm doing well I'm doing well. Today is Kelly and Oliver's last day of the semester. Ooh And so. Yeah and so. We've been finding little ways to celebrate this morning and just try to start finding ways tickets to transition into the summer. But that's what we've been doing today. What about you how are you doing? What have you all been up to? Yeah I'm doing well we Gray doesn't go to form school so there's none of that to celebrate. I know our schools in Georgia finished last week. I know you were talking amount. Do like celebrating that. Do you have traditions? I know people have always done for when school ends. Do you have. Y'All have traditions that you have always done that. You're trying of how to do man. That is a great question so we do we have. I mean first off. We have like a little sign that we do that on the first day school we have you know some details about each of my kiddos and on the last day. There's like some other questions about the both of them and usually we still that out the night before the last day. School an take their picture before they go after school and And so this side by side. Yeah Yeah Yeah so And I love that because I love capturing some of these little things like your favorite song and favorite book and the things they wanted do over the summer and favorite memory of the year and things like that but yet we move slow today and we had a nice big branch Shin. We filled it out together sitting at the kitchen table inbetween. Kelly's like online lessons and things she had if allowed and so usually that's normally what we do and then what we've also been doing like on Kelly's last day school or the day after so we pack up the car and we head out to South Carolina. And you know this year that is not what we're doing so so. I was just telling you before how Kellyanne offensive time yesterday laying out on the HAMMOCK and trying to dream up what you know what we're gonNA WANNA do this summer. And how to fill our time in ways that you know are just good for our family and new rhythms and just kinda living into this next transition this next wave of uncertainty and what this feels like for our family moving into the summer. So yeah what about what about you. I mean I know grace still too little for those traditions. But is there anything that you used to do as a kid growing up at the end? That's what I was trying to think when you text me earlier that you having like a end of the end of the school brunch at the that. That's pretty cool. But we used to always. My parents always took and got us ice cream on the first day of school are fine and then like into into college they would then. Mo didn't exist but they would like no deposit fifteen bucks into our bank accounts for me my bra for and so. We did that with gray when he started daycare back. I guess the fall of last year last fall. Yeah we took him and he didn't he didn't understand right right bunch of pictures of him. You know eating ice cream and stuff like that and so we did that at the beginning which I think is a cool one to kind of carry on a slice cream but also we did every year on the first day of my last Mr of Grad School. My Dad sent Brooke some money and so I think keeping that is something that will probably try and do but nothing on the end. So I don't know maybe that's celing as gray goes into actual grades at some point of. Maybe we'll have to try and think about that's awesome. Yeah it's I mean it's hard in each what I'm realizing to with Kellyanne Oliver. Is that each of them. Wanted to for things to end the year. But you know we're just GONNA be creative. Spent some time this transition a twenty twenty to spend a little time to think through and figure out what we WANNA do this summer so that it feels like summer doesn't just feel like a constant continuation you know like there's still on the yeah. Man is so wild. Wow should we shift into talking a little bit about this week's episode? You tell us a little bit about this week's episode. Yes sure so this week we have melody noisy. On 'em she has just recently published a book called the Rumi Prescription. How in ancient mystic poet Chaim modern manic life and I had actually come across melodies. Work a little while ago. I think I've talked about on the show before I just I love it roomies poetry. I head discovered it in Of Twenty ten from one of my mentors In Grad School who had introduced me to release work and Ramiz poetry is just woven throughout my teaching and some of the writing. I do and I just really love his work so anyway so that is kind of what. Got Me curious about this book and then somehow we just connected. I don't remember I think maybe it was twitter or something but it was just melody is just been such a great voice to get to learn from and listen to and her experience regarding mental health and mental illness particularly with her diagnosed with bipolar disorder and the ways in which room is poetry. He's Kinda spoken to her and she's kind of worked through his poetry translating and writing about it. I don't know I just. I Adore Melody. I Adore her book. I cannot say enough good about it. She speaks so beautifully about her experiences and about roomies work overall. And I can't say enough good about it. She throughout this book she takes these general human conditions that we all tend to struggle with and she pairs roomies poetry with each of them in such beautiful way while weaving in her story. Yeah what about you were there any takeaways or any any thoughts you had about this one? Yeah I think a lot of listeners are probably similar spaces me where you say okay. I've heard of Romy of a couple things that quotes that I could think of but I'm not super familiar. Will I still enjoy listen? You're absolutely right so this is a conversation where I went in thinking like. I don't know a ton about roomy and so will I enjoy this as much as all of our conversations and I absolutely did write them in said she really humanize it talks about her story and things like that and I loved it and so I'll say you know even if you say I'm on I don't really know too much of his poetry. Definitely stick around. Melody does a phenomenal job. It's not all about this that you've you may or may not be familiar about her. Yeah it's really a good conversation. Yeah Alright while without further ado we will get out of the way so that y'all can listen to this episode. Where Melody Moise? Hey this week. We have melody Moisy on. She is an Iranian American Muslim author attorney activists and a visiting professor of creative nonfiction at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. She is a graduate of Wesleyan University and Emory University School of Law School Public Cal. She's written for the New York Times. Washington Post The Guardian and she's appeared on NPR C. N. BBC PBS and more Melody Lists Between Cambridge Massachusetts and Wilmington North Carolina. She's the author of how tall and hyacinths a bipolar life and wore on air real stories of American Muslims and her latest book. Which is what we're GONNA be talking about. Today is called the Rumi Prescription. How in ancient mystic poet changed my modern Manic Life Melody? Thank you so much for joining us today. So good to have you here. Thanks so much for having me holly absolutely. Is there anything that we missed in your bio? I think it's funny. I wouldn't people read my bio. Sometimes I'm like who is that person didn't I mean especially if someone with a mental health issue like their years of my life that are completely empty but I sound really good the way you introduced me but you don't introduce the year the empty years. Those are nothing I got up brushed my teeth and took showers and stuff. You know so that was a success. But there's I think people don't think about that right look. It's not often thought about that all that there's a lot of other stuff there too. Would it be like if we all started writing? Really the most honest by antibodies. Where it's like. I love it. Welcome Robert He made nachos yesterday all our biosphere gonNA become really. I I love it. I love it while we definitely want to dive into the Rumi Prescription today. But I would love for you to tell us about your backstory. That kinda lead up to writing this book touching on the previous books that you've written and what inspired you to write this most recent one well so two things. I grew up in Dayton Ohio as Iranian American Muslim. And that experience like it was a really great place to grow up and I think the division that I saw happening after the two thousand sixteen election especially Was something for you. Know for a lot of people that Activated them and certainly activated me and a lot of ways But none of it would have been possible if I hadn't already had this Intense mystical experience That happened While I was acutely manic so having bipolar disorder it happened to coincide for me and for a lot of people as well with this Mystical side Where I was able to have these beautiful mystical experiences and I had to In my life that have been extraordinary because they've I've felt more connected to every living thing on earth than I ever had before it was very much like people describe psychedelic experiences though. I've never I don't even drink alcohol like don't do drugs But it was a beautiful experience and what happened. Was the medical community. Sort of stole that from me by saying this is not valid. You this is hyper religiosity There's an actual word for it And I wasn't being hyper religious when I was in the hospital as a Muslim. There's a certain way we pray and I think the mental health community in Dayton Ohio was not in Atlanta. Georgia was also hospitalized. I don't think they were particularly familiar with that And they'd only seen it. Maybe on television so to them that seemed threatening right But I don't think it's all people of Faith I. I've talked to people of all different sorts of faiths In the mental health community is not good at helping us through that That was part of the problem. Part of the problem was also the faith community was not so great either. My faith community was like some of them actually told me you know. This is jen which basically means like you're possessed you need an exorcism No not possessed. I need medication..

Rumi Prescription Gray Kelly bipolar disorder Kellyanne Oliver associate dean professor assoc Georgia Garland School Associate Dean for research Dayton Ohio Melody Moise melody Moisy In Grad School Grad School Baylor twitter Emory University School of Law Kellyanne South Carolina New York Times
"rumi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:54 min | 2 months ago

"rumi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"There's a there's a great story that I tell and I wish I had more opportunities on the nose it's one of a lot of beauty in a and I can understand the viewpoint of many in America who see the violence arrogance espoused by reactionaries which Mars would be a slam in their eyes but and that's understandable as the most American I can understand why people would have that reaction and limited understanding but you know it's also religion which inspires the poetry of Rumi you know whose love for the divine has a creative verses that survive eight hundred years and nourish the spirit of lovers around the globe and when it comes to a run on some of the most beautiful moment that exist within the Muslim community and within Islam becomes manifest during this month and I remember one time when I went to America which is you know very then one of the holiest site programs for Muslims and I was American I was doing and home runs essentially like a mini version of hygge it's the easiest way I can explain it and I was in college and was during Ramadan and I just come finished all my which is about to cook took about two and a half hours and I haven't eaten anything and I'm fasting and it's hot and I'm wearing this to white shell and I remember USD praying that you know I wish the sun would set them I'm hungry and I remember and this muzzle Hiram that's the name of the of the mosque with the what you call the black cube the covenant the sunset and the entire world just woke up and everyone went to the mosque and I remember but fifteen or twenty children came up to me and each one taking my hand in right and you know tell you my finger input and smiles on their faces saying come come come come to the mosque and the mosque in Arabic and basically what they had done it is that they had prepared a small bowl with the date and some fruit and some milk thousands of thousands Bolognese mats for all of the Muslims around the city or coming to the mosque and so these children with that I could never met before and it's like you know just one after another one after another just to come come to the border I prepared commutable from live panel please read my abilities in my bowl and I sat there eating his bowl opening my fast next to strangers I've never met before and greeted them with peace in the mosque in the holy month and that was just the a sense of overwhelming beauty and that and I really it's a memory that I cherish that sometimes you know when when you see the the violent extremism arrogance and.

America Mars Rumi
"rumi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:54 min | 2 months ago

"rumi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"There's a there's a great story that I tell and I wish I had more opportunities on the nose it's one of a lot of beauty in a and I can understand the viewpoint of many in America who see the violence arrogance espoused by reactionaries which Mars of the Islamic their eyes but and that's understandable as the most Americans I can understand why people would have that reaction and limited understandings but you know it's also religion which inspires the poetry of Rumi you know whose love for the divine has created verses that survive eight hundred years and nourish the spirit of lovers around the globe and when it comes to a run on some of the most beautiful moment that exist within the Muslim community and within Islam becomes manifest during this month and I remember one time when I went to Mecca which is you know very the ones that the holy site of programming for Muslims and I was American I was doing and home runs essentially like a mini version of hygge if this is the easiest way I can explain it and I was in college and during Ramadan and I just come finished all my which is about two took about two and a half hours and I haven't eaten anything and I'm fasting and it's hot and I'm one of those two white shell and I remember yes do praying that you know I wish the sun would set them I'm hungry and I remember and this muzzle harm that's the name of the of the mosque with the what you call the black cube the covenant the sunset and the entire world just woke up and everyone went to the mosque and I remember but fifteen or twenty children came up to me and you know each one taking my hand and I didn't like it and you know talking my finger input and smiles on their faces saying come come come come to the mosque and the mosque in Arabic and basically what they had done it is that they had prepared a small bowl with a date and some fruit and some milk thousands of thousands vote on these matters for all of the Muslims around the city or coming to the mosque and so these children with that could never met before and it's like you know just one after another one after another just to come come to the ball that I prepared Comey assemble from live panel please read my abilities in my bowl and I sat there eating his bowl opening my fast next to strangers I've never met before and greeted them with peace in the mosque in the holy month and there was just a a sense of overwhelming beauty and that and I really it's a memory that I cherish that sometimes you know when when you see the the violent extremism that arrogance and.

America Rumi Mecca Comey
Loneliness as a Portal to Sacred Presence

Tara Brach

09:35 min | 3 months ago

Loneliness as a Portal to Sacred Presence

"Amnesty and welcome. This is the sixth of a series. And I have no idea how long it'll go on called sheltering in love and last week and this week the focus is on really facing the pain of separation and loneliness the vet Murthy was our recent surgeon general in the United States up until twenty seventeen I also a physician and he did a road trip across the United States. Talking to people. All different types of people now is written a book called together and I mentioned him because he's a key figure and bringing into our societal awareness. The huge huge suffering really. How loneliness is a major public health concern. And he talks about how for so many that he encountered whether it was drug addiction or poverty are arena fiscal diseases that the root suffering was a sense of isolation being stuck in struggle and all by oneself. He shared a number stories but one that struck me. He met with a man several years after this guy had won the lottery and this man told Murthy that the day he won the lottery was the worst day of his life and when Murthy said well explain please. He described how he had been working in a bakery and he had know he was needed there and appreciated for what he did. He had friends in his neighborhood and after winning he stopped working. He moved into a gated community. He got really really lonely. He developed diabetes. He felt pretty continuously angry at what he perceived snobbery of other people. That live there for many of you listening that this isn't hard to understand or imagine and what strikes so much is that loneliness is a disease that hits all classes people in all sorts of life circumstances. There's a really well known teaching story that I love were student asks a spiritual teacher. What's the difference between illness and wellness? The teacher writes those words up on a board any circles the eye of illness and the we of wellness. And we know it that we're not happy when the world is centering around I. Those are not the moments that were happy. The trajectory of the spiritual path is shifting from an identity and a self concern and focus where our fears and our thoughts and all our intentions and motivations really around furthering and defending a self. It's a shift from that. To really recognizing in a cellular way that were connected and then the experience of that is a caring. That's all inclusive. That's one of the definitions. I have of radical compassion. That it's that awake sense that we belong and of course we care for each other. We belong to each other. What's so interesting to me. Is that many evolutionary psychologists and philosophers. Also consider this the trajectory for our species that there's an increasing movement and capacity for collaboration and for compassion with the understanding that we belong to this web of life. What happens in this web affects? All of us sensing were part of Earth. Were part of what's described as guy at this whole system that's synchronized and self organizing on the same boat. So we claverie. 'cause the truth is we belong now of course as I say this you may be instead of thinking of the the long arc. Maybe more focused on a short stretch of time that we've been having recently and it certainly doesn't appear claver to give and embracing and caring of each other which is why this week and last week Really relooking at the suffering of separation and loneliness that many are calling an epidemic and we talked last week about how loneliness surely forgetting our belonging quite literally makes us sick it shortens our our life expectancy and that given where such a social species we have a longing to belong and very real pain of loneliness and it's in our DNA to feel that because for most of human history it was really dangerous to be separate or outside of the group not a member not feeling our membership So it's easy to see how in current days loneliness is exacerbated by this global crisis by the pandemic there's so much anxiety so much fear around health and economy. We see each other. Were afraid of of getting this. Potentially deadly virus from each other. So there's distancing and many are living alone it's a real setup one person Couple of days ago from our DC. Meditation Community who lives alone told me she said. I'm afraid I've had the last hug in my life and I wasn't even aware of it at the time and that really struck me just that sense of really. What if I never feel held again? There's so much suffering the comes with feeling lonely. It often appears as depression. You might not even be in touch with the loneliness. It appears as depression which is a pushing down that rawness. 'cause loneliness is so painful. I'm it appears as anxiety because the more separate we feel the more we feel vulnerable. The more we feel threatened. It's not as appears as anger blame because when we feel lonely really we feel rejected in some way and threatened by others that makes us angry and bottom line core. We feel shame we feel shame because to not belong translates to most of us as something's wrong with me lot of pain. Statistically it's shown that the loneliest age group is eighteen to twenty but it's really all ages now I heard a story that I love It's about this gentleman who knocks on his son's door and he says Jamie he says Jamie. Wake up and Jamie answers. I don't WANNA get up. Papa father shouts get up. You have to go to school and Jamie says I don't want to go to school. Why not ask the father three reasons this Jamie I? It's because it's so dull second. The kids tease me and third. I hate school and the father says well. I'm GonNa tell you three reasons you have to go to school and I because it's your duty second because you're forty five years old and third because you're the headmaster not everyone goes around like on lonely but we all have this existential tendency to feel separate. This is this is deep in us. I find that Rumi says the best on this. He says that everything that comes into being gets lost in being drunkenly forgetting its way home and what he means by lost in being is that we lose the sense of our belonging to the hall and we identified with a separate self this I and all of our thoughts and activities just circle around what I want what I need. I'm afraid of this furthering and protecting ourselves. Now what's kind of important to understand? Is that if in growing up. Our basic needs for safety and love and understanding are Matt. Then that self-focused is there. But it's a wholesome one. It's not exclusive versus sticky. So we can still remember in a very fundamental way are belonging but when our personal lives when in our personal lives. Sir Spin stress and trauma and very little healthy bonding healthy attachment bonding with caretakers by nature. We become more self fixated more self protective more aggressive in kind of defending. And that's where we get really imprisoned in the I That separate lonely feeling with so much suffering

Jamie I Murthy United States Depression Papa Father Rumi Meditation Community DC Matt
Illusion

Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

03:42 min | 6 months ago

Illusion

"What is the cause of suffering? Here it is in one word illusion the cause of oil suffering his illusion or unreality so. Let's discuss this one point. First thing I want to say is that pain. Physical pain is not the same as suffering. Physical pain is actually a very important experience. It tells us that something is wrong. So if you didn't have been in your doors and you had nowhere her seek medical advice. If you didn't have indigestion you'd never corrects the cause of the indigestion if you never experienced heartburn. You'd never know that you have acid reflux and that needs to be corrected. In fact people lose the ability to experience pain as a result of neuropathy for example. Neuropathy on your rightous which happens with diabetes for example or other diseases neurological diseases. People who do not experience physical pain their limbs atrophy. They lose their toys and they get burns and they get all kinds of problems and then they begin to suffer so pain is not the same as suffering. Pain is a useful symptom to remind you that something is wrong. And you need to correct that you need to go back to self-regulation what is suffering suffering is being that we hold onto so a pain like resentment like like anger like hostelry like the desire to get even that causes long-term suffering and then there's another kind of existential suffering the feeling of old age the fear of infirmity the fear of death. This is what spirituality addresses it addresses suffering and the pain that we hold onto the fears that we hold onto. I'm reminded of a BOOM BY RUMI. Way says the way to not suffer from the fire is to go through the fire. The only way out of the fire is going through it. And how do you go through it by getting in touch with your own self and you get in touch with their own? Self that becomes your internal reference point then you realize that it takes force of mind to create. Suffering suffering is a blend of belief and perception that the person thinks he or she has no control over. Well you have control over your suffering because you have control over over writing the illusion of the separate off the secret cause of all suffering is unreality itself the illusion that you are a physical body with the mind and that you are in this theater of space diamond causality which we call the world. None of that is true. It might be a human construct but your soul your spirit having an experience and you can choose the expenses you want

Pain Indigestion Neuropathy Heartburn
The Root of the Addictive Process with Alex Katehakis

The Addicted Mind Podcast

09:40 min | 6 months ago

The Root of the Addictive Process with Alex Katehakis

"All right. Today's guest is Alex. Cata Haughey's somebody who I've wanted to have on the podcast for quite some time and I'm so excited. She decided to come on. She is a clinical sexologist and the clinical director of the Center for healthy sex in Los Angeles California and she's written several awesome books. One of my favorite is sex addiction as affect dysregulation and also erotic intelligence and Mir of intimacy. We have a great conversation about some of the root causes of the addictive process. Really looking at that early developmental trauma and how that affects our ability to regulate our affect. And how we use addictive substances or processes to escape from that feeling. It's great conversation. I really enjoyed having Alex on. I think we could have talked easily for an hour or two or three about these topics. She's so knowledgeable and just really shares a lot of great wisdom and insight about recovery. So with that. Let's go ahead and start this episode. Hello everyone welcome to the addicted. Mind my guest today. Is Alex Kata Hakkas and she is a clinical sexologist and clinical director of the Center for healthy sex in Los Angeles California. And she's GonNa come on and we're GONNA talk about sex addiction. Sex Addiction has affect this regulation. And we'RE GONNA go into a little bit of what that means but Alex introduce yourself. I yeah thank you. Good Morning Dwayne yes as you stated I am clinical sexologist which means I have a doctorate in human sexuality and I've been fascinated with human sexuality for the last twenty five thirty years or longer to save my life and so after practicing as a licensed marriage family therapist for twenty five years. It made sense for me to dive deeper into human sexuality instead of psychology which Swipe chose that particular course of study as you stated I am be clinical director of Center for healthy sex which has been around now for about fifteen years and we treat all manner of sex and love addiction issues of sexual desire dysfunction public pain disorders erectile dysfunction. I mean you name at sexual we treat it. So that's in general. What my the lenses through which I look and just in addition to human sexuality I have been studying with Dr Alan Shore for the past twelve years specifically looking at developmental neuroscience and how the early formation of the infant meaning from the third trimester on Rumi impacts developing brain nervous system and therefore mind. Right definitely and. That's one of the reasons I wanted to have you on is to kind of do a little bit of a deeper dive into some of these issues around addiction specifically sex addiction. And when you say affect dysregulation going into that a little bit and being able to talk about okay when we talk about affect we're really talking about emotions and emotions live deep in the body in fact right now if you're listening to this or you have a policy or having emotions in the body which aren't necessarily registering up high meeting up in your brain until they come forward to what we call feelings and so when a person is regulated meaning. They don't have good heart rate variability. They're not able to rest in digest and play and laugh and be at ease if they are stressed out than their affect is quote this regulated. So when you're regulated you are in a a steady state if you will where you're able to socially engage with people in a way where you don't feel but as soon as threat comes on. The scene with a child has apparent. That's alcoholic or raging or but mother who is cold or shutdown or mean that child's affect is always going to be quote this regulated and here. She is always going to be looking for something to make them feel better. Because the parental connection the parental soothing is not reliable. Or it's just not there so tell me a little bit about how that because that's a lot to digest what you just said. I thought I made it simple. No I mean I get it but like if you're talking to someone who is struggling with addiction. Let's say or Struggling with sex addiction. And you're talking about this affect. What might that look like? In an event that they have in their own life now in the present. Well there may not. There's not even an event in their general waking life you're gonNA feel anxious depressed dead internally dull. There's a general lack of feeling vitality in the body. People say they don't feel joy states or they're super anxious so they have to drink to make the anxiety go away or they use sex to make themselves feel powerful or good about themselves. Anything that we're doing outside of ourselves to make ourselves feel quote right internally speaks to affect regulation so someone who is securely attached. Who's got a good heart rate? Variability in general doesn't have to reach for anything to change their internal state or their mood. Is that clear? Yeah no that makes a Lotta sense and I think what I hear you saying is so someone who if you've had this history of trauma like you said an alcoholic parent that's raging and you're young and you're growing up in that environment. You get your living with this uncomfortable state and you can't get out of that state and so then you'll reach for something that will change it so alcohol sex or for young child that can be something like fantasy. You know what we see. A lot of Labatt annex or some sex addicts too. Is that very early on? They learned that they had to get their needs. Met By themselves and fantasy is a form of mild to moderate dissociation. Where it's you know what your calls an escape when there's no escape where they go into their own little world and they live in their own little world and as adults. It makes it difficult to connect with another person to have intimacy and closeness instead. The person is in fantasy about other people because it's very difficult to be in reality because reality was so painful along time ago and this sets up for very bad relationship sometimes because they're falling in love with an ideal not an actual person right and I think for a lot of people this is can be subtle in some ways so it can be hard to actually see that uncomfortable state. Is it that people are used to it? Like they've lived in this state that is basic discomfort that it's hard to actually see it. And then they don't even know that they're regulating it by using a substance or an addiction or something. Yeah I think people don't now until their lives become unmanageable. They start to have messes in their lives and their primary relationship is with e behavior or the substance and that's typically when addicts get help when they're in pain. They know that their life isn't working anymore and so they're going to stuck. Yeah they're stuck in these tatters because we are nothing but automated and habituated. I mean we have all of these adaptive strategies in the brain and the nervous system. Start working in a particular way to compensate for difficulty that is an adaptation and Rican adapt to just about anything or highly adaptable creatures. So we'll adapt to something that's dysfunctional. Because it's better than the problem we were living in. And then we've got this long standing pattern that can be very challenging to change so for example of somebody stops drinking or using or they stop acting out with their sex addiction. It doesn't mean that they've changed their personality. Which is why the program topics about character issues and you can be a quote dry drunk because you stop the thing. The behavior substance. But you haven't fundamentally changed the way that you relate to other people and that's really the challenge and the beauty. I think the twelve step program is that it really arms and forges new. People that we can change our strategies. And it's hard. It's like if you walked your whole life pigeon toed and your toes were turned in and your hips were adapted to walking that way and somebody came along and said Hey. You don't have to walk that way. You're kind of grinding the bones of your hips in your knees. If you point your host all of a sudden your knees hips are in alignment and you try it. And you're like wow that feels better but the natural tendency of the body is going to be to move towards being pigeon toed unless the person is highly mindful of it and vigilant about it until they can change that adaptive pattern to rocking straight

Alex Kata Hakkas Clinical Director Los Angeles California Cata Haughey Labatt California Dwayne Rumi Swipe Dr Alan Shore Rican
The radical experimenters: a rapper, a poet, and a biological artist

Science Friction

09:21 min | 6 months ago

The radical experimenters: a rapper, a poet, and a biological artist

"The first three minutes of the universe doesn't expansion simultaneously Teini Asli everywhere not zero second but close the first hundred of a second hotter than the hottest star blew hot bruting rooting halt. The nor Smith Says Earth was not found or heaven above but in a yawning gap. That was grasp but no way there were no vikings kings. No Vanilla no lampshades but there was Lego like for life in the first three minutes of the universe everything started added to come together. ferment began to develop lips to form the word poem. one-star dreamed of turning away and now they're just so it could have time. I'm to shape clay. The universe became a rogue gallery of Jigsaw fighting for space and in quiet moments. Mango juice squeezed from the heavens and sparkled like Shaq suits. There was the first spoonful of the CARTWHEEL GALAXY N G C one. Three six five with its. Jim Like bots spiraled wills sentence hyperion Jupiter's moons pulsars born cramping the styles of the middle. I molecules began collecting just so that the wood Po Quaid could be part of this missing in the first three minutes of the universe. Atoms rose dancing and just like the poet. Rumi said they were dancing like madmen. Happy on miserable and they just kept on dancing lover. Melvin poet and performer Alicia. Sometimes there with her pace the first three minutes of the universe and Tesha Mitchell joining you for science friction. We're at this end of the universe you are about to in Canada. I eight poetry cosmos a biological artist who grows organisms as living artworks and a rat performer. Whose lyrics ricks pulse site with? Science Professor Oren Katz is co-founder of the Tissue Culture and art project and director of the University of Western. Australia's influential art. Science lab symbiotic. Baba Brinkman is a new york-based rep performer and playwright whose awesome Rep God's to science audits range from climate change to consciousness and Alicia sometimes is most recent show. Particle wave gathered audiences under planetarium dimes times. These three creative experiment is pushing the elastic boundaries of both at n science and shared a stage at the quantum words festival in Perth. Recently cently he's Aleisha reflecting on those first three minutes. What we want to do when we passion about and scientists connect with an audience? And I I have that problem I'm full of hyperbole and scientists aren't and I love that about them and they care about the mess they care about the facts and I hear all that and I read all that and then I'm just like oh his blitz. He's some poetry so I remember Reading Steven Weinberg's book the first three minutes of the universe and it's full of great fact so this was my interpretation mango juice squeezing from the heavens technically correct Richt by the way the physicists would disagree in that universe buddies taking a obviously a poetic license. But that's what I as a poet what I can never find the right words and the reason the movie dirty dancing connected so well with me. Is that moment. That one of the main characters is carrying a watermelon win and she goes up to Patrick swayze who she likes and says. I carried a watermelon. And that's all she can say and that is what I am like so often. I can't find the exact words and I love that about science that they can find words really matter and in a scientific communication or scientific paper hyper words mean everything but I love as a poet. I can sort of pie around with that and Taika Pot. Isn't it interesting that you draw contrast because as I often think when I'm reading your work that infect poetry and science scherer conciseness and brevity of language precision each word gets placed with intent. And yet your thinking of the relationship is quite contrasted. I totally understand what you're saying. And Brevity is so true and as a poet and I'm sure poets in the audience. They can understand this. Every word matters this and carries it's white but the thing is how do you communicate dark matter. Or how do you communicate Nebula something in biology or does I mean I can never find the right words. I love in contact. A film inspired by. Carl Sagan's book by the same. I'm Nice Cellular pinup boy. I'm so glad it was there. I didn't know you were gonNA talk about him. When demon haunted world is such an important political inspiring because well the Jodi foster character Elliott Airway says when she's thrust into space they should have center poet and finally why Korea I get to go in space so maybe on Amazon or something? I'll get to go just to ago. Mango juice everywhere. Do you feel like you could take sides. Or is that that's not your raisin for you all the Wanda I'm about to wonder in storytelling. I do understand that sometimes the failure of can you just beautifying science and that is somehow not enough and and that's why I love what so many people do is they take it apart in question and what aren was hanging is just so incredible what they do but I yes yeah so just like the storytelling and I really need to communicate it to audiences so they can just take away a little bit of wondering their pocket full of wonder. Hey John Adams Americans said you never learn if you have a poet in your pocket. I just loved that I said what are you trying to do with. I've seen your show particle wave. which takes you inside a planetarium? Describe it for people but also what you're hoping to do with that piece it's musical visual Poetic Extravaganza yes. I loved canvas of the Planetarium Dome and from when I was young and a lot of you would feel feel the Siamese diaby lie back. And you've got this gorgeous. Almost three sixty canvas above you and so I wanted to use that canvas to sell tell held. The story of gravitational waves got to work with a lot of scientists and I recorded a lot of scientists and I want the general public to coming and have a sense of awe four so it mixes poetry music visuals just to tell the story from general relativity some black holes look lookit to kill an and just sort of pint pitcher and I want people to come out and say well I might go read up on that but I had a science instinct come in an eighteen year old. He said that she walked in wanting to do chemistry and came out wanting to do gravitational wave astronomy. And I'm like my works done. That's enough poet delicious. Sometimes there when you think about rap song lyrics what comes to mind politics. Maybe six drugs love last year. American crime and punishment. Absolutely what about science though not really well here as Baba Brinkman canadian-born and and married to a neuroscientist at some point these graduate in comparatively chat court the science bug big time and he's now a renowned science communicate through he's rap gods to things like climate change evolution human nature religion and culture my first rap theater popularisation project CHAUCER's Canterbury Tales and a An evolutionary biologists in England saw that and he said good job. Now do you think you could do for Darwin. What you did for Chaucer and the first time I was introduced to do a performance which was at the Darwin Bicentennial Mark Pailin? The biologist introduced me by saying. Don't worry I checked his lyrics. You're about to witness the first ever rap performance. That's peer reviewed house like peer reviewed rap. That's the best idea ever confession. Spend my whole life perplexed. By Religiousness Front doorstep debating with Jehovah Witnesses I was a teenaged empirical thinker a spiritual seeker obsessed with rap. I considered it liberal research. This was the medium the Daca thinking speaking flipping ridiculous speech over beats like every weekend weekend my CD collection became my personal gospel. I wasn't apostle I think part of it was an unexpected side effect of doing science. This communication rap projects and that side effect was that I became way more gangster rapper

Baba Brinkman Alicia Vikings Teini Asli Shaq Rumi Smith Patrick Swayze Steven Weinberg Po Quaid Planetarium Dome Carl Sagan Canada Australia Tesha Mitchell Taika Pot Perth JIM
Terror leader who claimed responsibility for Florida attack killed

America's First News

00:30 sec | 6 months ago

Terror leader who claimed responsibility for Florida attack killed

"President trump says the US has conducted a counterterrorism strike in Yemen that killed custom al Rumi he was then now Qaeda leader already claiming responsibility for last year's deadly shooting at a Naval Air Station it in Pensacola Florida that's where a Saudi aviation trainee killed three American sailors al Roumi the founder of the al Qaeda in the Arabian peninsula has long been considered the most dangerous branch because of its attempts to carry attacks out on the mainland here in the

Donald Trump United States Yemen Naval Air Station Pensacola Florida Trainee Al Roumi Founder President Trump Qaeda
"rumi" Discussed on Podcasts | Charlotte Center For Mindfulness

Podcasts | Charlotte Center For Mindfulness

03:00 min | 8 months ago

"rumi" Discussed on Podcasts | Charlotte Center For Mindfulness

"You sit. I invite you to see if you can bring up one scenario in your life not the big thing but a small irritation frustration. That is even if minor is unwanted. Take a moment to feel into whatever scenario. You're coming up with and feel into when you're not paying attention and you let the Mig della the survival center. The brain guide the show of how you relate to this thing. What does that feel like? What kind of thoughts go on in the mind emotions associated with it felt senses in the body? What effect does that have on the day? Now imagine welcome. Welcome welcome offering this possibility. Right to the unwanted Rumi says of the guests. Arriving in the guesthouse. Each has been set as a guide on the beyond. If you were to imagine for just a moment a truth in that for you this irritation has been sent to help you find your Rudeness Your Strength. Your knowing how to come back to center. Maybe there's a glimmer of possibility of doing re orienting to your own. North Stars of healing with happens in the mind the heart and the body with that. What effect does this have on your life or maybe even simply your day and that moment?.

Rumi
"rumi" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

06:20 min | 11 months ago

"rumi" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"This episode is brought to you by the Rolling Stone Charts Rolling Stone as the definitive outlet for all things music bringing you the latest news interviews and reviews rolling stone is your go-to source to learn everything about groundbreaking breaking artists and now rolling stone is going even further to show you what it means to be on the rise introducing the rolling. Stone Charts and interactive set music charts that offer an in-depth in the moment view of the biggest songs songs albums and artists in music the rolling stone charts are the definitive guide for trending breaking in popular music in the age of streaming his at rolling stone dot com slash charts or search. Rs Charts the day in history class is a production. I heart radio. Welcome to this day in history class where we bring you a new tidbit from history every day. Today is September thirtieth twenty nineteen. The day was September thirtieth twelve. Oh seven Persian poet installer Jalal Up Dean roomy better known simply as Rumi was born in the Persian empire. Some sources say his birthplace was ball in present day. Afghanistan and others others say it was a small town in modern day tickets. Dan How'd Yo- graphical sources have claimed that Rooney's bother Baha aldean relied was descended offended from the Calif Abu Bakar but those claims have been rejected. Ruiz father was a religious scholar itinerant preacher and Sufi teacher. A Sufi is a Muslim mystic. The early thirteenth century was a time of great conflict in that part of the world. The Crusades were happening and the Mongols also were also a threat when Roomie was young his family moved to Marquette and possibly because of the Mongols or political instability where they lived they soon farther west into Anatolia or present day Turkey. When he was a teenager he married Gow heart cartoon with whom he had two children by twelve twenty nine. The Sultan of the jukes had invited Rooney's father to teach theology in Konia the capital of the Sultanate Khanate of room. The jukes were a branch of the Oak couth Turks and a dynasty that ruled parts of Central Asia and the Middle East from the eleventh to Fourteenth Eighteenth centuries they established the cell juke empire and assaulted of room but a couple of years after the family moved to Konia roomies father died died around twelve forty one when his father's protege or harm Abdeen died to Rumi took over as teacher the assumed leadership of the disciples and he became an Islamic jurist in Islamic jurists or foxy is the illusion with expertise in Islamic jurisprudence in-law roomy soon became friends with religious scholar and mystic. Sham Algebris who arrived in Konia in twelve forty four. Tim's believe in unpretentious spirituality it was under the influence of Shams that Rumi turned away from teaching and toward the path of ecstatic roomy began writing poetry but a few years after the two met Shams disappeared according to Legend Shams left because roomies students were jealous of Shams and resentful of roomies new passion or they may have even had champs killed. Whatever the reason for Sham's is disappearance roomy grooming expressed his feelings of loss and despair in his poetry and Dan Rooney transformed into someone devoted to mystical writing and worship much of his work at this time was expressed through the voice of Shams but it did not take long for him to find his own voice and began writing his most memorable work like like mess Naby or spiritual verses a six volume poem containing fables tails and reflections that illustrate the safety doctrine he was inspired to write the work by another mystic. He was close to who saw aldean's celebi throughout the last several years of his life. roomy dictated the poem to Som- who wrote it in Persian. The poem is widely read in the Muslim world. People have compared to the Koran and recognized is religious and literary a significant Rumi also wrote the works of Shams Tabriz. A collection of mystical poems. Generally roomies poetry focuses on on the idea that God is absolutely ecstatic love and he questioned Orthodoxy many of the poems were composed to be sung at Sufi gathering after his poems were translated people in the West associated him with a tolerant Islamic spirituality and related to his focus on a direct connection with guide as far as his prose goes his sermons letters and lectures have been recorded Rumi in Konya in twelve seventy three his followers compounded the MED levy order a Sufi order years after his death. The order is also known as the whirling dervishes because they practiced whirling as a form the thicker or devotion as a means of attaining ecstatic experience. I'm eavesdrop coat and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. If you feel like correcting my pronunciation or my accent on anything that I've said it in a show bill free to leave a very kind to comment on twitter instagram or facebook at t the I eight thirty podcast. We'll see you tomorrow for more podcasts from my heart radio versus the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows this episode is brought to you by the Rolling Stone Charts Rolling Stone as the definitive outlet for all things music bringing you the latest news interviews and reviews rolling stone is your go-to source to learn everything about groundbreaking artists and now rolling stone is going even further to show you what it means to be on the rise introducing the rolling Stone Charts and Interactive Seta Music Charts that offer an in-depth in the moment view of the biggest songs albums and artists in music the rolling stone charts are the definitive guide for trending breaking in popular music and the age of streaming because it rolling stone dot com slash charts or search R._S. Charts.

Dan Rooney Rumi Legend Shams Konia Baha aldean Shams Tabriz Shams jukes Afghanistan facebook Sham Algebris apple Konya Jalal Ruiz Calif Abu Bakar Gow Sham Sultanate Khanate Roomie
"rumi" Discussed on No Ego

No Ego

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"rumi" Discussed on No Ego

"People at this kind of higher place, my favorite, quote from Rumi sufi, poet is out beyond the ideas of right doing and doing there is a field. A meet you there and what I'm trying to do in the workplace say there's this field out beyond this judgment. And let's learn but not weaponize, let's you know, changes coming, but what's my part in that? So I wanna. I want to tackle a little bit into that weaponization because I see every day on social media. There's a culture of uproar. For this. Someone is someone is offended by something every day. And at what point do you draw the line say, you know, that wasn't that big of a deal? Let's move on together. So how can we move beyond this whole cultures ation of? Being. I mean, some people are victims. But like trying to be the victim and everything and just like calling the cops on someone barbecuing in your backyard who happens to be more Brown than you. So a couple of things I want to talk about because there's micro and I'm not expert in that. So we're doing a podcast on things expert. But my opinion expert if you want size course on microaggressions Wakeman. So on the one hand, we've got a look at the macro versus the micro on the macro. We how some things have really disadvantaged others. And as someone who grew up with a lot of privilege. You know, I just woke up I'm like, I thought I had the hard road. I'm the first college graduate. I'm in my family. I'm the one who likes struggled. I'm the female who got you underpaid and serve my own business. And then on the on the macro I had to wake up and say, well, we'll wait a minute. I have so much privilege, and we've got a look at the systems that are systematically. Limiting access for others really ignore that. We didn't just end up here on the micro. We've gotta grow people's ability to move through the world in what I call higher level of consciousness. So it's like you have the light switch on your forehead when it's tug down. You're an ego. You're suffering comes in your mind from your circumstances and your circumstances..

Wakeman Brown one hand
"rumi" Discussed on Why Sports Matter

Why Sports Matter

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"rumi" Discussed on Why Sports Matter

"And you will accept that. Or you outrightly want to reject it. And and so you're not left with an option to. You know, just apathetically who cares you're faced with the the big questions of of life and purpose. And meaning you know, where was gun. The sort of grief being felt by people most closely connected to the crash can also have profound effects on the body as soon as people experienced for even a memory of the tragedy. The body has a biological physiological response to that feeling if you suppress that feeling it gets aggravated the saying what to resist persists. So the cure pain has the great sufi poet Rumi said is in the pain. The cure for pain is in the pain. To stop hurting, let yourself her key thing is feel it and go through it. There's no other way. And ultimately, the energy of grief dissipates, even the worst tragedies people if they don't suppress it dissipates, and then they turned that into something bigger and much more important that adversity ultimately makes them stronger sway then to feel so drawn to tidy happy ending. First of all, I think this idea of happy ending is pretty much modern postmodern phenomenon and classic theater. There was tragedy and there was comedy, and they complimented each other. Shakespeare, for example, is an expert in these people go and watch it tries it because they feel in the pain of the other feel something themselves. They relate to it empathy is the first day j- of connecting with somebody. So the way you usually defined please. You feel what other fields? Now, interestingly enough when you feel what another feels even if it's painful, it actually connects to you to that other person in a very strong emotional way that can create a long lasting bond in other words. Happy endings feel good. But they're not always honest pressing the grief can cause more pain like Rumi. The poet said the cure for pain is in the pain. I've never felt so empty in my life. I needed to be reminded Jesus I needed to hear from God in this darkness. I didn't have anything to give because I wasn't full of hope myself. Our life is just a vapor. What will you do one breath? Each presi you have left. What are you going to do with it? Will you seek the God who has walked and who has died the show his love and his concern and his his care for you. Or were you get bitter and angry and frustrated? You know, there's really. Really no commodity on earth today that is valuable as time. The time that we've had the time that we have now and the time that we had last. There's a lot of still a lot of days for me that I think I wish I could go back. I wish I could rewind or replay or change things. We can't do that. But on the other hand, the past also has stories rich stories good, stories reminders..

Rumi Shakespeare
"rumi" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

The Healthy Moms Podcast

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"rumi" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

"And I know I know this is this is a priority for you and the focus with you when when you're working with your children, it's I feel like that, you know, and I knew a lot of wellness you talk about is about optimal health and anti-age. Ching, even as I follow your work so much. I have like my Viacom test here on my desk, my my Nanno and everything. I use all these resources, and those are those are so important. And I would say is people think, for example, children the fastest learners on the planet, which they which they are right. They can pick up a musical instrument that could pick up laying which is faster and one of the reasons why they play. But when I say this to audiences, they often say, oh, no, I stopped playing because I grew older, but I don't actually think that's accurate. I don't think you stop playing because you grew older. I think it's the opposite. I think you grew older because you stop playing and I feel like that some at some point in our life, maybe when children was like all I wanna go out and play or I'm gonna hang, or they asked her friends that you go out and play. But later on, it's like, oh, do you wanna go hang out and we start changing that language. But I feel like when we're playing a natural state when we had that sense of wonder and windy, we ever feel though. Those those feelings? I believe all learning, state dependent all learning state dependent that if you wanna know one of the keys to having a long term memory information, it self is very boring. It's forget -able, but information tied to emotion becomes a long term memory because we all know this right from personal experience. There could be a song that could take you back to when you're a kid. There could be a food that takes you back to win your child. There could be a fragrance that could take you back twenty your child because information is forgetful. But information combined with emotion becomes a long term memory. So all learning state dependent, and that's why I love play because in that state of wonder, right on my favorite poets Rumi has this quote that said, sell your cleverness for builder -ment sell your cleverness for bewilderment. I mean, when's the last time you felt bewildered about something or curious about something or fascinating fascinated. It's just like children are so engaged with the process and they not. I'm afraid to fail even children as you watch them learning how to walk they, they don't ever see. They don't try like three times in like, oh, I failed. It is never gonna try this again, right? That would be ludicrous, but adults is all the time in kids. Adults would take a dance class. They'll take a voice clouds. They'll take a programming coding class and they're not good at first, and they'll be like they don't wanna look bad and they're always concerned about everyone else's opinions and their expectations. And here's the thing. If you, you can go broke buying into the opinions and expectations about others. I was working years ago with Jim Carrey. I helped to actors, speed read scripts, had better focused on said, remember their lines in fractional time, and I remember we were in his kitchen more. We're making walk moly and now is this like, Jim, why do you do what you do? What drives you?.

Jim Carrey Viacom Ching Rumi
"rumi" Discussed on From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

07:51 min | 2 years ago

"rumi" Discussed on From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

"Leader to. A religious person. Everyone can find commonality in poetry, the works of Rumi and Hoffa's, and they speak so much to kind of just like the character of Patricia. They speak so much to our daily struggles, our daily strife and also our daily happiness. Every everything. We find beauty and we find beauty in nature. We find beauty in each other. And so I feel like poetry has kind of shaped me and shaped my music in in appreciating the smaller things. The intensely intricate things mean we look at a rug and you're looking at a whole history for instance, you know those, those kinds of things are absolutely palpable to any anyone from any culture you actually traveled to the original capital of the Persian empire. Tell us about that. Yes. Oh, my mother's ancestral hometown of her family is Hamid on Iran, which used to be the capital of the Persian empire. And it was, I mean, kind of incredible to see all of that history and in one place and the people there were so incredibly hospitable. But this this one day comes comes to mind when I think about how Madan it was a early morning and my grandmother brought us to this was a kind of tribute to obvious center. The great scholar, it'd been seen a and it was the slow. Large room with tall ceiling and very intricate mirror work and paintings and assembled. There was a whole array like probably fifty people, but it wasn't. It was something I've never seen. It was fifty people from all different professions from all different classes, and they were all singing, poetry together, and performing one person pulled out his like a Setaro and another person went up and started reading poem. He found and he liked. And these people do this every week to celebrate just kind of is just something they do and it's and they find joy in it. And I've never seen anything like it. And that was really inspiring to me how music and really bring communities together and keep communities together. They're actually so few cultures that openly celebrate in a communal fashion musical. Experience in musical performance. I know you can going for a beer at an Irish pub. You'll get shushed as soon as the musician startup because it's it's really thought of as greatly to be respected, and that's quite an evocative seeing that you paint in the old capital. Thank you. Thank you. So now let's hear Amir's performance. This is shape Patricia from eager stravinsky's three movements from Patricia. <music>. <music>. <music>. <music>. <music>. <music>. <music>. <music>. <music>. <music>. <music>. Seventeen year old from Brookline Massachussetts. They'd shave stress. EVS inskeep.

Patricia Rumi Brookline Iran Madan Hamid Amir Hoffa stravinsky Seventeen year one day
"rumi" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"rumi" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Seven one yoga bag Oh Hello Brenda the timer? Will. Begin after I ask the first question, he ready ready Brenda ready okay here we go Surrey and Rumi are the, twins of which celebrities Wer no story and roomy What food. Does Popeye for super strength Elastic, girls is married to which Pixar superhero because you're last a. Girl is married to which Pixar superhero Where do balloon work Lassie is what kind of animal Sorry you didn't get an. All you can try again tomorrow we do. It every day at twelve thirty it's. The thirty. Second, pop culture challenge let's stuff yeah. There is some. Stuff going on so let's see Yeah, sir and roomy why did I. Say sir sir Earth. Sur survey anyway I must have read that wrong, sir and roomier the twins of which celebrities beyond saying Jay? Z. I would've known that what does Popeye for superstar she got. That elastic. Girl is married to which picks? Are, superhero this incredible and where do balloon is work Lanka chocolate factory and last c- is what. Kind. Of animal she said a. Collie but a dog yes all at the. Same time, she got that right as. The, buzzer went so unfortunately she did not win today however. We do that play that every. Day, at, twelve thirty. And now let's move on, to Solve mysteries in the form. Of, blind items that Holly has brought for us in this. Segment called blinded by the item Mysteries Live from the.

Pixar Brenda Popeye Rumi Lanka Holly Jay
"rumi" Discussed on Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"rumi" Discussed on Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

"Purple out there a lot of lavender openfield what does that mean so the open field as you know is an idea that i so rumi has been a big influence in my life and my daughter was like beyond say knew about room before you have no way i've been talking about room way before beyond set you actually knew when she chose that name because you had heard me talking about room they're like yeah you're right mommy anyway so he has this thing that says out beyond wrongdoing and right doing there's a field meet you there and i kind of took it one step further and it's like out beyond right doing wrongdoing out beyond shame expectation guilt fear whatever that is for you there's an open field meet you there and i remember saying to our other mutual friend martha beck said roomy wrote about the open field and she goes what i said he said there's an open field out beyond fear judgment and she goes maria i went look that up that's not roomy roomy wrote there's a field you made all that other stuff and i was like wow that's actually came right out of here that's what i try to manifest just in my own life that's my vision for where all be standing is in an open field out beyond my executive out beyond my fear out beyond my judgment and expectations all these things that i'll be there and i manifest who i want in that field what i wanted to look like and i project myself forward and that's what i ever kind of stay focused on getting to the open field you're in there with me i'm right there yet they but i think it's a it helps me on my daily life to think like i want to be a place out beyond judgment out beyond guild out beyond fear out beyond shame out beyond expectation out beyond asia reuest highest expression where everybody else's there to everybody it's so wild oprah because i'm meet so many people who want to be in that too and they don't have everybody wants they want and you don't know how to how to name it you donate it yes so it's openfield is yippee moments where people are sometimes when i describe you they're like are you talking about a coop or what unlike i'm like no i'm like i'm really talking about a place that is in my heart and in my mind but i really believe we can live like that i really believe that that's my vision for this country it's how i think people want to live and i meet people who are already living that way i've meet nuns i write about in the book for me like that in community i don't think we're meant to live isolated and behind walls and not trusting her knowing our neighbors or not communicating with people and being so hostile and calling people names and thinking that you belong here and you don't do and you don't i don't think that's how we're meant to live and so i don't believe in that i believe this is how we're meant to live and be an act and connect can't wait to meet you out there going yeah you'd be yippie thank you i love.

openfield rumi
"rumi" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"rumi" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Got it okay but in the end hopefully get a pile of money for that one too and she's got two things going for your whistle blower and what i think is a good case for defamation so tim good luck in the meantime when got it you move out of your okay dumpster but that in you're the living end in right now hopefully get a pile of money for that one too would and you want a big one she's you got know two because things going for your you whistle know they're not blower all that and rumi what so i think is a good case understood for defamation so tim good luck in the meantime when you move out of your dumpster that you're living in right now what you want a big one you know because you know they're not all that rumi so understood effectively calling her a slut that's defamation per se and in those days it was you're not a virgin therefore you are a slut fascinating stuff and the other one is a loathsome disease if you have some effectively kind of an calling s t her d a slut that's or defamation if per you se have leprosy and in those days it and was you're not you're a virgin accused therefore of you are that and it's not true fascinating stuff that is and defamation per the other se one is a loathsome liable disease per se were slander if you per se have depending some kind on whether of an s it's written t d or or uttered verbally if you have leprosy and you're accused of that and hey it's not bill true i that a is defamation cellphone per case se by liable your per go se from one of.

rumi
"rumi" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"rumi" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Got it okay but in the end hopefully get a pile of money for that one too and she's got two things going for your whistle blower and what i think is a good case for defamation so tim good luck in the meantime when got it you move out of your okay dumpster but that in you're the living end in right now hopefully get a pile of money for that one too would and you want a big one she's you got know two because things going for your you whistle know they're not blower all that and rumi what so i think is a good case understood for defamation so tim good luck in the meantime when you move out of your dumpster that you're living in right now what you want a big one you know because you know they're not all that rumi so understood effectively calling her a slut that's defamation per se and in those days it was you're not a virgin therefore you are a slut fascinating stuff and the other one is a loathsome disease if you have some effectively kind of an calling s t her d a slut that's or defamation if per you se have leprosy and in those days it and was you're not you're a virgin accused therefore of you are that and it's not true fascinating stuff that is and defamation per the other se one is a loathsome liable disease per se were slander if you per se have depending some kind on whether of an s it's written t d or or uttered verbally if you have leprosy and you're accused of that and hey it's not bill true i that a is defamation cellphone per case se by liable your per go se from one of.

rumi
"rumi" Discussed on Fit Fierce and Fabulous Podcast

Fit Fierce and Fabulous Podcast

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"rumi" Discussed on Fit Fierce and Fabulous Podcast

"Are going on the robin instead of coffee symptom of drives and shift the vibration which then shifts if i rish within yourself was just the vibration around everyone else you come into contact with love it 'cause then crappy because you don't have the this loan six pack addison addison then you can go home feeling a bit more loving i love that one of my favorite quotes that rumi quote that i'm going to miss reference right now but it's the one that's okay are our greatest desire or whatever it is our mission is to seek for love but to remove all the barriers in we built against it and that's one of seconds just realize that we have always little teeny tiny walls and maybe our goal is to just take down law nick ourselves lovable that's beautiful sewn on these blocks of resistance around them and it's like all just humans and we all just wanna be loved well here's me call myself to see over manson i it's my mission electric rates if i love in the world and i find myself there have been times we're all be sitting next to someone and i'll be like overwhelming sense of love free right now but i will even stop myself and i'll be like how come you shouldn't say that because you know what they think would've don't say back or whatever it's like let's just do without expectation and let's just handed to people like doing with what you want but i just wanna feel extraordinarily for your you must love burning man buddy.

manson rumi